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Monte Villa Center - DEIS Appendices 1988 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I-405/COUNTY LINE NORTH CREEK AREA COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT AND QUADRANT CORPORATION REZONE DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT APPENDICES TABLE OF CONTENTS Appendix Title Paqe A - 1 B - 1 C - 1 D - 1 E - 1 F - 1 G - 1 A Distribution List B Proposed Text Changes for Business Park Comprehensive Plan Amendment C Relationship to Existing Plans and Policies D Geotechnical Engineering Assessment E Plants, Animals, and Wetlands Study F Traffic Study G Water Resources Calculations I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Appendix A I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I APPENDIX A I-405/COUNTY LINE NORTH CREEK AREA COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT AND QUADRANT CORPORATION REZONE DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT DISTRIBUTION LIST Federal Aqencies Environmental Protection Agency, Region X, Director of Environmental Evaluation Federal Emergency Management Agency Department of Agriculture-Soil Conservation Service Muckleshoot Tribes U.S. Fish and wildlife Service U.S. Army Corps of Engineers State of Washinqton Department of Commerce and Economic Development Department of community Development Department of Ecology (3 copies) Department of Fisheries Department of Natural Resources Department of Transportation Department of Social and Health Services Department of wildlife Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation Parks and Recreation Commission Reqional Aqencies Metro Environmental Planning Division, Manager puget Sound Air Pollution Control Agency, Control Officer puget Sound Council of Governments puget Sound Water Quality Authority Seattle-King County Commuter Pool, Program Director Seattle-King County Department of Public Health, Director Snohomish Countv Sheriff Department of Public Works Executive Fire Marshall Historic Preservation Office Parks and Recreation Division Community Development Division A - 1 A - 2 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Ad;acent Cities/Counties Bothell (3 copies) Mill Creek Brier Lynnwood King County Special Districts Fire District No. 10 Northshore School District No. 417 Alderwood Water and Sewer District Snohomish Health District Snohomish Conservation District Utilities/Services Snohomish County PUD General Telephone (GTE) Sno-King Garbage Company Washington Natural Gas Libraries Sno-Isle Regional Library Bothell Lynnwood Everett Mill Creek Government Research Assistance (Seattle) Municipal Research and Services Center of Washington (Assoc. of Washington Cities) University of Washington, Suzzallo Newspapers Mill Creek Tribune Everett Herald Daily Journal-American Daily Journal of Commerce puget Sound Business Journal Seattle Post-Intelligencer Seattle Times Mill Creek Enterprise Northshore citizen I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I other Recipients League of Women Voters Municipal League pilchuck Audubon Society Little Bear Creek Protective Assoc. Committee for Quality Development Brentwood Neighborhood Assoc. South County Homeowner's Association South County Chamber of Commerce Bothell Chamber of Commerce S.A.V.E. A - 3 I I I I I I I I I I I I I !I . I I I I I Appendix B I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I APPENDIX B DRAFT TEXT CHANGES FOR BUSINESS PARK COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan Amendment 1. Introduction The County periodically reviews its comprehensive plans to assure that plan assumptions are still valid in the face of changing conditions and shifts in community attitudes. There were several factors contributing to the decision to study this southern portion of the North Creek Planning Area. First, population in the planning area has grown at a faster rate than anticipated in 1977 when the North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan was adopted. Current projections estimate that more people will reside in the planning area in 1990 than assumed by the current comprehensive plan. Second, the plan assumed that the planning area would not be a primary employment center due to the fact that such centers were already established elsewhere in the county. However, there has been a substantial increase in the development of commercial and business park uses directly south of the site in Bothell and north of the area at Canyon Park. At Canyon Park, 235 acres have been developed or planned for business park uses since 1983 in addition to the 240 acres designated in the 1977 plan. The City of Bothell has revised its comprehensive plan for the North Creek valley to allow substantial business park and mixed use development. There are 380 acres of property south of the site in Bothell that have been developed or are planned for such uses. Third, road improvements are planned in the area that will improve circulation and access. The extension of 39th Avenue SE between 240th Street SE and 228th Street SE, will provide an additional north-south arterial. In addition, improvements at the NE 195th Street/I-405 interchange to the south are scheduled to be constructed as traffic levels increase, resulting in improved access to the regional network. Fourth, the property owner and several developers have applied for consideration of an amendment to the comprehensive plan to allow development similar to adjacent development to the south and north in the "Technology Corridor". The study area encompasses the last large, vacant parcel under one ownership in the lower North Creek Valley. Following the Planning Commission's decision in early 1986 to rank this plan amendment study as a high priority, the Commission held a hearing in May of 1986 to determine the study area boundaries for the amendment study. In July, 1986, the planning B-1 Division conducted a pUblic workshop to inform area residents of the plan amendment study, discuss various plan amendment alternatives, receive comments, and conduct a pUblic scoping meeting for the preparation of the EIS. A range of plan amendment alternatives for the site were discussed at the workshop including Business Park, High Urban Residential, Light Industrial, Community Business and No Change (maintaining the existing comprehensive plan designation). The greatest amount of support was expressed for the No Change and Business Park alternatives. In addition, the High Urban Residential and/or a mix of Business Park and High Urban Residential received some support. Concerns were raised that if Business Park or High Urban Residential densities were considered, traffic, surface water drainage, flooding and North Creek impacts should be adequately considered and investigated. An important consideration for any change to the comprehensive plan was providing adequate transition and buffers to adjoining single-family residential areas. Participants had strong objections to the light industrial and community business plan alternatives. Based on this workshop and further evaluation, the light industrial and community business alternatives were deleted; this EIS analyzes and compares the Business Park, High Urban and No Change plan alternatives. The recommended plan amendment alternative is for Business Park. The Planning commission and County Council may choose to adopt portions or all of these comprehensive plan amendment alternatives. Changes would then be made to the North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan map and text as directed by the adopted plan amendment. Proposed text changes for the preferred plan amendment area are included in this appendix. Changes made to the preferred plan amendment by the Planning Commission or the County Council may require additional or revised changes. 2. List of North Creek Comprehensive Plan Textual Changes Page 39: Amend the three sentences at the end of the second paragraph under Industrial Land Use to read: Eiqht sites have been shown on the plan for Business Park use. These sites comprise approximately 600 acres of the 23,500 acres in the study area. Each site is identified as follows: Page 41: Add the following paragraphs at the end of the Industrial Land Use section to read: o Northeast corner of 1-405 and County line. The 1989/90 plan amendment in this area redesignated the area bounded by 1-405, Fitzgerald Road, 240th street SE, 39th Avenue SE and the County line as Business Park with a Watershed-site sensitive overlay. The overlay B-2 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I designation applies to those areas which consist of either floodplains, peat soils, wetlands, stream corridors or slopes in excess of 15 percent. It is consistent with the identification criteria specified by the Development Areas Model of the plan. Areas outside the Watershed-site Sensitive designation are upland areas which can be developed according to the Upland Plateau criteria of the Environmental Management section. The following discussion contains recommendations and policy direction which are intended to have the weight of plan policies. Rather than listing them as separate plan policies under each element of the comprehensive plan, they have been included here in one place as they relate specifically to the plan amendment area. These policies provide guidance in addition to the policies which have been part of the comprehensive plan for some time. The Business Park designation was provided because of the County-wide demand for high quality Business Park land projected by the year 2000, recent and planned Business Park developments immediately to the south and at Canyon Park Business Center, proximity to freeway interchanges, and projected road improvements in the area. The Business Park zone will implement the comprehen- sive plan in the amendment area. The development design controls of the Business Park (BP) zone will provide, in part, the landscaping and building setbacks necessary for a transition between adjacent single- family residential dwellings and the business park. In addition, the effect of building heights on the view of the valley from adjacent properties should be minimized by increasing the setbacks of buildings fronting 39th Avenue SE and 240th Street SE as much as possible by placing buildings at lower elevations and locating parking areas between the road right-of-way and buildings. Parking areas should be landscaped to minimize light and noise impacts on adjacent residential properties. These construction techniques and BP zone design controls would constitute the appropriate buffer/transition area necessary between the Business Park and adjacent residential uses. site development should avoid any wetland areas except for the filling of less than one acre of wetlands. Any disturbed wetlands should be replaced at a ratio of not less than two to one. An average buffer of 25 feet should be maintained along wetland edges. Wetland mitigation should strive to create wetland classes which are currently absent on the site in order to increase the overall habitat value of the wetlands. B-3 A m1n1mum setback and buffer area of 100 feet on either side of North Creek should be maintained consistent with the requirements of the Shoreline Management Master Program and other policies of the North Creek area Comprehensive Plan. Only pedestrian and bicycle trail and utility construction should be allowed within the creek corridor. Road construction should only be allowed where necessary to cross North Creek. Stormwater runoff from the site should be cleaned in catch basins, grass swales and oil/water separators before discharge into the Creek and/or wetlands. The wetlands should be maintained and, where feasible, enhanced in their current configuration, except for filling of less than one acre of wetlands. The existing farm buildings on the site should be retained. Site development should be limited to not more than approximately 950,000 gross square feet of floor area on the entire site. This was the maximum build-out assumed for the traffic impact analysis which was performed as part of the comprehensive plan amendment study. Any development exceeding this limit would have unknown traffic impacts which would require additional analysis and further amendment of the comprehensive plan. Larger floor areas would also most likely have additional aesthetic impacts and impacts on the creek, soils and wetlands which have not been analyzed. Access to the site should be limited to 39th Avenue SE to minimize traffic impacts on the residential area north of 240th Street SE. No access should be allowed from 240th Street SE except for emergency access. 3lst Avenue SE should be vacated prior to the site development west of North Creek. Internal circulation should minimize roads on peat soils and avoid infringing on wetlands to the greatest extent possible. North Creek crossings should be limited to one. As part of the internal circulation plan and consistent with the County's Park and Recreation Plan, the developer of this site should be required to extend the public pedestrian/bicycle trail abutting the south property line along North Creek to the northwest corner of the plan amendment area. The rezone contract should include provisions for ride- sharing and van pool programs which would reduce traffic and air quality impacts. The site could be developed in phases and mitigation of impacts could be required to occur as each phase is developed. The traffic analysis for the comprehensive B - 4 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I plan alternatives indicated that prior to the year 1996, there may be traffic impacts which cannot be mitigated as required under the current version of Title 26B SCC. However, other mitigation such as aggressive car or vanpooling programs, better access to public transit, additional road capacity or changes in Title 26B may result in lesser road impacts or different standards and make the mitigation of impacts possible. Concurrently with a rezone to Business Park on this site, a rezone contract could be required which defines the responsibilities of a future developer for phased mitigation and further analysis and the County's right to withhold final site plan approval if impacts cannot be mitigated under currently applicable standards and codes. (This language will be refined as part of the comprehensive plan amendment process.) B - 5 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Appendix C I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I APPENDIX C RELATIONSHIP TO EXISTING PLANS AND POLICIES This section reviews existing comprehensive land use plans and other policy documents relevant to the proposed actions. The discussions presented here are excerpts from the documents that are specifically relevant to the proposed actions. The following elements are analyzed in this Appendix: Element Paqe Snohomish County: o North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan C-2 o Snohomish county Code (Title 18) C-23 o Snohomish County Shoreline Management Master Program, 1984 C-25 o Snohomish County Council Motion 87-039 - Aquatic Resource Protection in snohomish County C-36 o Snohomish County Business and Industrial Land Survey C-37 o Snohomish County Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan C-40 o Alderwood Area comprehensive Plan - Amendment for SR-527/228th street SE Intersection C-43 City of Bothell: 0 Plan for the North Creek Valley 0 Development Guidelines King County: 0 Northshore Community Plan C-45 C-45 C-48 C - 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I SNOHOMISH COUNTY NORTH CREEK AREA COMPREHENSIVE PLAN The North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan was adopted in 1977 to govern land use and capital improvement decisions in the southern portion of Snohomish County. The North Creek Planning Area encompasses approximately 74 square miles and is bordered by the city of Everett on the north, Interstate 405 and Interstate 5 on the west, King County on the south, and the snohomish-snoqualmie River valleys on the east. The plan is comprised of development goals and objectives for the North Creek planning area. These policies are then divided into six general policy categories or elements--growth management, balanced land use mixture, environmental management, natural resources, transportation and community facilities. Assumptions, policies and goals that are pertinent to the proposed comprehen- sive plan amendment and rezone are addressed below. Development Goals and Obiectives A. Assumptions-Economic 1. The planning area will not be a primary employment center due to the fact that such centers have already been established elsewhere in the County, i.e. southwest Everett in the vicinity of the Paine Field Airport, the Everett waterfront, and in the north Marysville area at or near the Arlington Airport. Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives BUSINESS PARK - The North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan was adopted prior to the formation of the Technology Corridor. This marketing effort is geared toward attracting technology related companies to the North Creek-I-405-Paine Field area. With the establishment of the Koll and Quadrant business parks in Bothell, and the Canyon Park Business Park, ATL, and Eldec sites in the southern portion of the Planning Area, the North Creek Valley is becoming a primary employment center in southwest Snohomish County. The plan amendment would reflect this trend. HIGH URBAN - This alternative is consistent with this policy. NO CHANGE - This alternative is consistent with this policy. C. North Creek Planninq Area Goals 1. Maintain a moderate rate of population growth which will as much as possible preserve the rural areas and suburban neighborhoods found in the planning area. C - 2 2.b. Promote and maintain high quality residential develop- ment which is appropriate to the rural character of the North Creek Planning Area. 2.d. Industrial areas should be located and developed in a reasonably attractive manner, and contribute to the economic growth and stability of the North Creek Planning Area, as well as the whole County without degrading its natural or residential living environments. 4. The natural environment should be recognized as an integrated unit composed of interacting land, water, and air resources and every effort should be made to ensure that the health and stability of this resource system is maintained. 6. The North Creek Planning Area's abundant resources of water, minerals, forests, agricultural lands, wildlife and scenic areas should be appropriately utilized, enhanced and preserved. A proper balance between the development and preservation of these natural resources should be established and maintained. This delicate balance should serve the best long-term economic and environmental interests of the area's and the County's citizens. 7. A transportation system should be developed that: a) Is safe, efficient and economical; b) Is designed to meet the travel demands created by the forecasted population growth and planned land development for the planning area; and c) Recognizes environmental, social and aesthetic values. l2. North Creek area residents should be provided with an amount and variety of park and recreation facilities, trails and open space areas at easily accessible points which are adequate to satisfy their needs. Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives BUSINESS PARK - Except for Policy 2.d., these policies do not apply to this alternative. The proposed alternative would only indirectly contribute to population growth in the planning area. Population growth resulting from full development of the site and the subsequent employment opportunities would be noticeable, but are not expected to be significant over the next 10 years. This growth would be distributed throughout much of the Seattle metropolitan region (see POPULATION). Policy 2.d would be upheld by this alternative. Development of the site would provide up to 2,500 jobs for the South County in an area in which high technology firms are currently locating. C - 3 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Approval of the proposed amendment would result in the removal of vacant land from the planning area and its replacement with a business park. This development would occur on a site which contains some Class II and III soils but is in an area that is adjacent to existing business parks not in an agricultural district. Development would occur outside wetland areas, with the exception of filling about one acre. Human intrusion into the creek corridor would be discouraged in order to protect the riparian vegetation. Building setbacks from the creek would maintain the scenic qualities of this corridor. The site has relatively direct access to 1-405 through use of the NE 195th street interchange to the south. This would minimize use of residential roads during most phases of the proposal. 39th Avenue SE between 228th street SE and 240th Street SE is scheduled by Snohomish County to be built between 1991 and 1993. This would provide a second direct access to 1-405 at the SR 527 interchange. The North Creek corridor and pedestrian/bicycle trail would be readily accessible to both site employees and vicinity residents. The trail would provide a direct link to the North Creek Valley Trail network. HIGH URBAN - This alternative would accommodate a large popula- tion increase in the planning area. It would not contribute to the location of industrial areas in the planning area. The natural environment would be recognized since at least a 100-foot buffer along each side of North Creek, as called for in the North Creek Plan, would be maintained and the location of buildings would probably be outside the wetlands and floodplain areas. The transportation network would be predominantly the same as that developed for the business park alternative. Also, the North Creek trail would be extended across the site. NO CHANGE - This alternative would have the same impacts as the High Urban Alternative but to a lesser degree due to the reduced number of housing units and on-site population. Plan Elements 5.2 Growth Manaqement Goal: Maintain a moderate rate of population growth which will as much as possible preserve the rural areas and suburban neighborhoods found in the planning area. Policies: 1. A moderate population growth occurring at a steady, predictable rate should be encouraged for the North Creek Planning Area. C - 4 2. Population growth and distribution should occur in such a way that the demand for urban services does not exceed the ability of service providers to accommodate demand. 3. Population distribution should occur in a manner which will not adversely affect the life styles of the existing residents of the planning area. Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives BUSINESS PARK - The proposed Comprehensive Plan Amendment would indirectly contribute to population growth in the planning area. Population growth resulting from full development of the site and the other indirect employment opportunities would be noticeable but not significant. The anticipated growth would occur over a 10-year period and would be distributed throughout much of the metropolitan region, not only in the planning area. For these reasons, demands for urban services in anyone area should not exceed the ability of service providers to accommodate new demand as a result of the proposed actions. The potential population increase in the 15-minute commute distance zone (an area larger than, and encompassing, the planning area) would comprise 1.0 percent of the projected year 2000 population projected to occur without the comprehensive plan amendment. This relatively minor increase should not adversely affect the lifestyles of existing residents. The proposed amendment is consistent with these policies. HIGH URBAN - This alternative would accommodate a large (2,402 persons) population growth in the planning area. New urban services to the site could accommodate the possible 880 housing units. A large multi-family complex would create a different lifestyle in the area than currently exists. NO CHANGE - This alternative would be generally compatible with these policies. 5.3 Balanced Land Use Mixture Goal: Create a land use pattern which preserves the quality of existing development while providing suitable areas for residential, commercial and industrial growth. policies: 3. New development which will create undue demand for public facilities and services or which is not compatible with adjacent land uses or not served by any adequate transportation linkages should be discouraged. 5. New urban development should be compatible with environmental goals and policies. C - 5 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 7. In order to prevent problems resulting from excessive traffic volumes, inadequate sanitary facilities, over- crowded schools, or inadequate public safety protection, all urban land uses which are to be located within planning areas should occur in a manner consistent with the willingness and ability of the County, the state and special use districts to provide services including streets, public utilities, schools, police and fire protection. Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives BUSINESS PARK - Under full development, the business park comprehensive plan amendment would not create undue demand for public services, be incompatible with adjacent land uses, or have poor transportation linkages. Existing business parks north and immediately south of the site would ensure the compatibility of land uses and the availability of utilities. The installation of a new 12-inch water main and the extension of the existing 42- inch sewer trunk line from the County line to the north boundary of the site would provide more than adequate service to support a business park development. with 1-405 forming the site's west boundary, there is excellent accessibility to the region's transportation system. The proposed development would be located outside the wetlands and Watershed-Site sensitive areas. Buildings and parking areas would be set back at least 100 feet from the ordinary high water mark of North Creek. The riparian habitat along North Creek would be preserved and maintained. All public services and utilities are available to serve business park development of the site as allowed under the proposed comprehensive plan amendment. (Refer to UTILITIES sections of the DEIS for information regarding capacity and service availability). The proposal is consistent with these policies. HIGH URBAN - This alternative would add a population of 2,402 people in the planning area which may require the provision of new public services in the area. The natural environment would probably be maintained under this alternative as under the Business Park Alternative. Transportation impacts would be greater, however, in the County, but less within the city of Bothell. NO CHANGE - This alternative would be generally consistent with these policies. Aqriculture Goal: Prime agricultural land should be preserved as a renewable resource for the use and benefit of current and future generations. Policies: 1. Promote the retention in agricultural use of upland farming areas occurring on Class II and III rated soils C - 6 which remain in acreage large enough to be farmed economically. (Soil Conservation service classification.) 2. Encourage the continuance of agricultural pursuits in areas where each activity has traditionally taken place. 3. Urban and other types of preemptive development should be directed away from prime or other highly productive agricultural lands. 4. No pUblic or private action should be taken which would substantially impair or diminish the present uses, values, or enjoyment of agricultural land in the North Creek Planning Area. Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives BUSINESS PARK - The 86-acre site is comprised of Class II, III and IV rated soils. The site is not included 1n a County agricultural district and the Class IV rated soils are less suitable for farming than Class II and III soils. Development of a business park would eliminate the potential for grazing uses on the site. Agricultural activities have traditionally been practiced in the North Creek Valley. This land use has been steadily replaced, however, by business parks and other more intensive uses over the last eight years. Agricultural production may no longer be viable in the North Creek Valley. The project proponent intends to retain the existing farmhouse and two large white barns. Retention of these buildings will provide a visual amenity to the public and a sense of the history of the site. The amendment is consistent with Policies 1 through 3 because the site is not in a County agricultural district, is not considered large enough to farm economically, has never been farmed and is not currently in an agricultural use. The amendment would maintain the farm buildings from the previous dairy as a link to the past use of the site. HIGH URBAN - This alternative would be generally consistent with these policies in the same manner as described for the Business Park Alternative. NO CHANGE - This alternative would be consistent with these policies. Residential Goal: Promote and maintain high quality residential development which is appropriate to the rural character of the North Creek Planning Area. C - 7 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I policies: 1. A broad range of housing types and densities should be encouraged in order that a choice of housing will be available to all North Creek area residents. 3. Residential development should be related to existing and planned employment centers, public facilities and transportation systems. 6. Residential development should be compatible with the natural resources of the North Creek area. 9. Multiple family housing sites should be selected on the basis of their potential for providing a safe, attractive and convenient living environment for apartment dwellers. 10. Multiple family housing should be required to locate in close proximity to: a) intensive development areas that afford immediate access to shopping, employment and entertainment facilities; b) open space and recreational resources; and c) existing or planned public transportation corridors. 11. Residential areas should be protected from incompatible land uses through the careful control of other types of development and expansion in adjacent areas. 12. Future residential development should generally reflect the density and pattern of housing already existing in the North Creek Planning Area. Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives BUSINESS PARK - These policies do not apply to the proposed designation as it does not include any residential components. HIGH URBAN - This alternative would allow up to 880 multi-family residential dwellings on the site. These units would be compatible with the mUlti-family housing currently available and under construction to the south in Bothell. They would add to the variety of housing found in the area and promote a range of densities for area residents. The site and its location would allow the units to be safe, convenient and attractive for future residents. The site is located adjacent to the Koll Center-North Creek and Quadrant Corporate Center-Bothell business parks. It is south of the Canyon Park Business Center and within the Technology Corridor. It is adjacent to employment centers as well as the major transportation corridor in the area, Interstate 405. Convenient access to 1-405 is provided for shopping, entertainment and employment needs of the residents. C - 8 Additionally, the site is bisected by North Creek, which provides an open space and recreational amenities. A public pedestrian/bicycle trail would be located along North Creek and buildings would be set back at least 100 feet as required by the North Creek Area Plan. This trail would connect to the existing trail in the Koll and Quadrant business parks and cover part of the distance toward a link with the existing trail at Canyon Park Business Center. Overall, these policies would be met because this alternative would increase the range of housing types and densities in the area, provide on-site recreational facilities, include immediate access to the region's transportation network, and utilize a site which is within a major employment area. Industrial Land Uses Goal: Industrial areas should be located and developed in a reasonably attractive manner and contribute to the economic growth and stability of the North Creek Planning Area, as well as the whole County, without degrading its natural or residential living environments. Policies: 1. An ample number of industrial uses suited for diversity of industrial uses should be identified and reserved in the North Creek Planning Area. 2. The clustering of industrial uses in planned industrial parks in areas adjacent to existing centers of development should be strongly encouraged. 3. Future industrial development should be located where it can take maximum advantage of existing and planned utility systems in order to optimize the cost of providing essential public services. 4. Industries should be located in areas where they will have adequate expansion space to meet anticipated future needs. 5. Industrial development should be required to locate on soils which are suitable for such development. 6. Industrial development, in general, should be served by public utilities and urban services with possible exceptions to be made for industrial uses of a rural or non-intensive nature that: a) must be located near raw materials or markets; and b) are not highly labor-intensive. 7. Industrial areas should be located where direct access can be provided to regional ground transportation systems C - 9 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I including highways and railroads. Location of these areas near airports is also desirable, but not essential. 8. Industrial areas should be located so that they are readily accessible from residential areas, but are functionally separate and compatible. 9. Industrial development should occur in a manner which provides the public and government adequate notice to review the design of the development to insure its impacts are internalized to the greatest extent possible. 10. Adequate buffers of landscaping, compatible- transitional land use and open space should be utilized to protect surrounding land areas from the adverse effects of industrial development. Particular attention should be given to protecting residential areas, parks and other public-institutional land uses. Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives BUSINESS PARK - significant employment growth has occurred in the planning area since the adoption of the North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan, due in part to the marketing efforts and success of the Technology Corridor. with the development of the Technology Corridor, demand for suitable business park sites has increased. Only six sites were shown on the 1977 land use map for Business Park use in the entire Planning Area. Since then, all of these have been developed. Some areas, such as the Canyon Park area, have expanded faster than anticipated. The project is located between the Canyon Park area (Canyon Park Business Center, ATL and Eldec) and the business park development in the City of Bothell, and should be considered suitable for designation as a business park site. Proposed water and sewer improvements for the immediate site vicinity are identified in the Alderwood Water District Comprehensive Plan. Also, this site allows a total of 950,000 gsf which could be phased over four to seven years and accommodate substantial expansion over time. Appendix B contains draft language for the proposed Comprehensive Plan Amendment. The proposed amendment would be consistent with the draft language~ site conditions are generally compatible with development that would be allowed under the proposed actions (see EARTH). The peat or silt/clay materials throughout the lowland area are generally too wet in their present condition to be considered for use as structural fill. However, soils which underlie the sideslope areas are typically free-draining and should be suitable as structural fill. There are generally favorable conditions for shallow foundation support over the entire site with the exception of the localized areas of highly compressible peat and silt soils. The proposed plan amendment is consistent with the identified policies. C - lO The site is adjacent to residential development on the north and east. However, it is functionally separate topographically due to its location at the north end of the valley. It is also separated by existing County roads (240th street SE and 39th Avenue SE). The major freeway accesses will be at NE 195th Street in Bothe11 and the 39th Avenue SE extension/228th street SE link. These streets are designed as collector arterials; traffic would not move through residential neighborhood streets. HIGH URBAN - This alternative would not be consistent with industrial development policies because it would foreclose the opportunity for such development. NO CHANGE - This alternative would also not be consistent with these industrial location policies. Rezone Alternatives PREFERRED AND ALTERNATIVE REZONE SITE PLANS - The proposed site plans are consistent with these policies. Development of the site would be similar to the development in the canyon Park area and would be a northward extension of existing business parks to the south. The site would be directly accessible to residential areas adjacent to the north and east. Compatibility with residential areas would be promoted by the provisions of the zoning code and performance standards would be met. For example, under the provisions of SCC 18.55.120, buildings would be designed to be compatible with their surroundings, both within and adjacent to the BP zone. Buildings would appear to be 2 stories in height from north and east of the site. Building materials have not yet been determined but are likely to be matte-finished and non-reflective. Areas zoned BP must also be designed with sufficient landscaped or natural open space area. Landscaping would be provided in combination with berms for additional visual screening. Furthermore, building setbacks from all road rights-of-way would provide a park-like atmosphere along site perimeters. The site is directly adjacent to 1-405, and, therefore, has excellent access to the region's highway system. The site is not served by rail lines: however, the development is not expected to utilize this type of transportation. The site is located approximately 50 minutes north of the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport and seven miles southeast of Paine Field in Everett. The project is expected to be phased over a four to seven year period. Overall development would follow the master plan approved with the rezone. Individual phases would be reviewed by the County staff through the Final site Plan Approval process. Development of the site would be by one developer which would contribute to a unified, integrated site plan. C - II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ~ Landscaped areas, natural open space areas, and berms would provide visual buffers between the business park and adjacent residential areas to the north and east. A 30-foot landscaped buffer area would be provided along the site perimeter. Additionally, the parking areas and buildings could be stepped into the hillside in order to minimize their impacts. Buffers of at least 100 feet would be provided on both sides of North Creek. Appendix B contains draft language for the Business Park Comprehensive Plan Amendment. The Preferred and Alternative Rezone Site Plans would be consistent with the proposed language. The rezone alternatives would generally avoid use of wetlands or floodplain areas for development, have private covenants, include 100-foot setbacks from North Creek, and limit development to approximately 950,000 gross square feet. These are provisions included in the draft language in Appendix B. NO REZONE - This alternative would not be consistent with these policies. 5.4 Environmental Manaqement Goals: Regulate new development through zoning, the Comprehensive Plan, and other legal means to preserve and improve the environmental quality of the planning area. The natural environment should be recognized as an integrated unit composed of interacting land, water, and air resources and every effort should be made to ensure that the health and stability of this resource system is maintained. Policies: 1. The location and design of urban development should be carefully guided in order to minimize potential adverse impacts of the quality of ground and surface waters. 2. Land use patterns and practices which preserve the natural hydrologic system, including the balance between ground and surface waters, should be encouraged. Aquifers and aquifer recharge areas should be given special protection. 3. The design of urban development should utilize natural drainage patterns and measures to minimize or entrap pollutants before they enter surface waters. 5. Industrial and commercial development should be prevented in those areas identified by this plan as having: sloped conditions in excess of 15 percent, soils with high water tables, slow infiltration rates, severe erosion or slippage potential, or no bearing strength; or areas that lie within 100 feet of major stream courses such as North, Penny and Bear Creeks. C - 12 6. The role of wetlands and woodlands as essential components of the hydrologic system as well as valuable wildlife habitat should be preserved. Degraded wetland resources should be restored wherever possible. 7. Shoreline and floodplain areas throughout the planning area should be conserved and utilized in accordance with the provisions of the Snohomish County Shoreline Management Master Program. 8. Future development should be compatible with the inherent characteristics of percolation rate, water holding capacity, structural strength, and composition of the predominant soil types in the area on which it will be located. 12. The protection of important natural wildlife habitats which assist in maintaining the natural environment should be encouraged. 15. Planned residential, commercial and industrial development solutions for projects in areas containing unique natural features should be strongly encouraged. 16. Urban development in areas subject to periodic flooding such as may occur in the Penny, North and Bear Creek corridors should be extremely limited. 18. Air quality throughout the planning area should be preserved or enhanced by minimizing the barriers to the flow of traffic along major arterials and enforcement of adopted pollution control standards for stationary source emitters. Development Areas Model The North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan makes provisions for two types of environment: Watershed-Site Sensitive and Upland Plateau. Watershed-Site Sensitive areas have been distinguished because these lands have drainage characteristics which carry surface and subsurface water originating in Upland Plateaus and in the steep slope and lowland portions of Watershed-Site Sensitive areas and drain directly into streams or creeks. Watershed-Site Sensitive areas may contain three types of environment: Side slopes - areas with slopes in excess of 15 percent gradient, areas that are substantially forested, and areas with soils that have high erosion potential. Lowland drainage - areas with flat to moderate sloping topography, seasonally wet or prime agriculture soils, grass C - 13 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I . I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ground cover, and areas that are subject to periodic flooding. Creek corridors - land within 100-200 feet on either side of a drainage way or major creek that is subject to seasonal flooding, and that has both grass and forest cover vegetation types. In order to provide for compatible environmental-land utiliza- tion, the Plan envisions two levels of development: "basic" and "greater than basic". Basic development is where site conditions would generally limit the intensity of uses which might ordinarily be placed on a particular piece of land in a particular area. Greater than basic development permits more intensive uses where it can be shown that a specific site is capable of supporting them. Basic development of an area designated Upland Plateau is 25 percent site utilization for industrial development; for residential development it is .4 to 1 dwelling unit per acre. Greater than basic development allows a maximum of 4 residential dwellings per acre in a Suburban designation and 1 dwelling per acre in a Rural designation. It allows a maximum of lOO percent site utilization for industrial development when the following criteria are met: a. At least 75 percent of the site contains well-drained soil; b. Buildings do not cover more than 35 percent of areas where slopes in excess of 15 percent cover more than 25 percent of the site; c. Public utilities and County-approved storm drainage facili- ties are available; d. Transportation access is to a major highway or arterial; e. At least 10 percent of the overstory is left if forest clearing is necessary; and f. The plan map provides designations supporting industrial uses. Basic development of an area designated Watershed-Site sensitive areas is 1 dwelling unit per 2.2 acres of land for residential and agricultural land uses. Commercial and industrial development may be located in a Watershed-site Sensitive area, but only 10 percent of the site can be utilized under the basic development criteria. Greater than basic development allows residential development in Watershed-site Sensitive areas at 4 dwelling units per acre if certain development criteria are met. Commercial and industrial C - 14 development may utilize up to 55 percent of the site if the following conditions can be met: a. Proposed developments are controlled by an approved site plan; b. Greater than basic development does not occur in slope areas that have gradients in excess of 15 percent wherein more than 70 percent of the total site area has this percentage of slope, creek corridors, or areas subject to periodic floods; c. Soil conditions are such that not more than 50 percent of the site contains imperfectly drained, poorly drained mineral, or organic soils; d. utilities of both pUblic water and sewer must be provided for maximum site utilization; and e. Transportation access is on a major arterial or major highway. Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives BUSINESS PARK - The proposal is consistent with these policies. Provisions would be made to protect North Creek and other off- site water bodies from silt-laden water and erosion during construction through the use of siltation ponds, temporary silt fences and other accepted erosion and pollution control practices. There are no aquifers on-site. The wetlands would be maintained. Sufficient runoff from the parking areas would flow into them and act as a groundwater recharging mechanism. Additional runoff resulting from development could be directed to either the wetlands or North Creek. Up to one acre of wetlands may be filled. The current Comprehensive Plan map shows the Watershed-site Sensitive (WSS) designation on approximately 70 percent of the 86-acre site. The rest of the site is considered Upland Plateau. This alternative would change with the Comprehensive Plan designation to Business Park with a WSS overlay, based on a site- specific analysis of conformance with the development criteria. This new WSS area would be approximately 27 acres, or 32 percent of the site. The site-specific analyses were completed by Hewitt Daly Isley and Hart Crowser, Inc., for the 1-405/County Line North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan Amendment-Digital Equipment Corporation Rezone Draft EIS in August, 1988; the analysis is valid for the current proposal. The revised WSS area includes loa feet on either side of North creek, wetlands areas, areas of peat soils, the lOO-year floodplain, and areas with slopes over 15 percent. C - 15 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I In the Upland Plateau areas, "basic development" for industrial uses includes 25 percent site utilization. "Greater than basic development" allows up to 100 percent site utilization when some or all of the six criteria are met. In this case, it would appear that all six could be met and, therefore, that a develop- ment could utilize up to lOO percent of the Upland Plateau areas (67 percent of the total site). The soils outside the WSS area are well-drained, slope conditions do not exceed l5 percent on more than 25 percent of the site, both public sewer and water are available, transportation access is to 1-405, no forest clearing is needed, and the BP designation would support industrial uses on the site. Because the Upland Plateau covers the majority of the site, development would not necessarily need to use the WSS area. Basic development on WSS areas is lO percent. Greater than basic development allows a maximum of 55 percent site utilization. The additional site utilization would be allowable if the development utilized an approved site plan, remained outside the creek corridors, 100-year floodplain and steep slope areas, had relatively good soil conditions, had public utilities available, and had access to a major arterial or highway. It is estimated that a proposed development could meet at least three or four of the five criteria and earn additional site coverage utilization. This alternative would meet the Comprehensive Plan policies as well as the Development Areas Model policies and criteria. HIGH URBAN - This alternative would generally comply with these policies. The impacts would be similar to those discussed in the Business Park Alternative. NO CHANGE - This alternative would generally comply with these policies. Rezone Alternatives PREFERRED AND ALTERNATIVE REZONE SITE PLANS - The final design of the drainage plan for business park development of the site would retain existing drainage patterns to the greatest extent possible. Most sediment and other pollutants would be trapped prior to stormwater discharge with overflow into North Creek by grasslined swales, oil traps and/or other measures. As mentioned above, the wetlands would be retained and recharged. The location of structures on the site would generally avoid the wetlands and areas with peat soils and would be set back a minimum of lOO feet from North Creek. The surface slopes range generally from zero to lO percent and do not represent a develop- ment constraint. The majority of the side slope soils and the lowland soils in the northerly portion are subject to moderate erosion, but these areas would be protected, particularly during construction. C - 16 The North Creek stream course would be maintained, the riparian habitat would be enhanced with additional landscaping; public visual access to the Creek would be encouraged through the construction of a pedestrian/bicycle trail. The wetlands would generally be retained as open space. Development would be clustered outside of the shoreline areas. Air quality in the vicinity is considered good. Particulate matter is the only pollutant of concern. The project proponent would not be utilizing any processes which release particulate matter into the air. The generally direct access to 1-405 afforded by the site location would minimize any barriers to the flow of traffic. Carbon monoxide (CO) levels may increase in response to the decrease in LOS at the NE 195th Street/120th Avenue NE and NE 195th Street/I-405 intersections as a result of the project. However, CO levels would not be expected to exceed the regulatory standards with the proposal. Thus, the proposal meets these pOlicies and guidelines. This alternative would comply with the Development Areas Model. The revised Watershed-site Sensitive area would comprise 27 acres, or 32 percent of the site. Both the Preferred and Alternative Rezone site Plans would locate fill, and a dike within in the 100-year floodplain. Less than one acre of wetlands and peat soils would be filled and covered with development. Areas of 15 percent slope outside the 100-year floodplain would be included in the development areas. The basic development allowed in WSS areas is 10 percent or approximately 2.7 acres. If the development criteria are met and greater than basic development density is allowed, a maximum of 55 percent site utilization, or approximately 15 acres of the WSS area could be developed. As this alternative is presented, it meets the greater than basic development criteria. The preferred rezone site plan would utilize 5.98 acres of WSS lands. The Upland Plateau portions of the 86-acre site cover 67 percent or approximately 58 acres. Basic development allows 25 percent site utilization for industrial uses and greater than basic development allows up to 100 percent site utilization. This alternative proposes development on about 64 percent of the Upland Plateau area (43 percent of the total 86.4 acres). As shown below, this alternative meets the development criteria and would be allowed a greater than basic development level. Specifically, the soils in the Upland Plateau area are well- drained. Slope conditions do not exceed 15 percent on more than 25 percent of the site. Public water currently serves the site and there is a public sewer stub just across the south property line. Both utilities either have enough capacity for the pro- posal or could be upgraded. There is immediate access to 1-405, the major transportation corridor, from the site. Forest clearing is not needed on the site. The requested Business Park Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternative would support business park and industrial uses on the site. This alternative meets the C - 17 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I six development criteria for greater than basic development densities. NO REZONE - This alternative would not be generally compatible with these policies. 5.5 Natural Resource Goal: The North Creek Planning Area's abundant resources of wate:, minerals, forest, agricultural lands, wildlife and scen1C areas should be appropriately utilized, enhanced and preserved. A proper balance between the development and preservation of these natural resources should be established and maintained. This delicate balance should serve the best long-term economic and environmental interests of the area's and County's citizens. policies: 4. The planning area's important scenic and historic sites should be protected and preserved to the maximum extent feasible. 5. The integrity of all water resources should be protected and maintained. 7. Land clearing, site preparation and building construc- tion occurring within the planning area should be in accordance with a construction management plan which will prevent or at the vest least minimize soil erosion. Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives BUSINESS PARK - A 100-foot setback area would be located on both sides of North Creek. Human interference with North Creek and adjacent habitat would be minimized by the pedestrian/bicycle trail location approximately 100 feet away from the creek. Stormwater runoff from the site could be cleansed by oil/water separators and/or grasslined swales before entering the wetlands. The wetlands would further clean the water before it enters North Creek. HIGH URBAN - This alternative could also be consistent with these policies in the same manner as the business park discussed above. NO CHANGE - This alternative would also be generally consistent with these policies. Rezone Alternatives PREFERRED AND ALTERNATIVE REZONE SITE PLANS - A Temporary Erosion and Sedimentation Control Plan (TESCP) would be submitted by the project proponent to the County for approval prior to commencing construction. The TESCP would be used during construction to C - 18 m1n1m1ze erosion as well as address stormwater runoff. After construction, disturbed portions of the site would be landscaped or seeded. These alternatives would be consistent with the Natural Resources goal in a manner similar to the Business Park Comprehensive Plan Amendment. The major farm buildings would remain on the site after develop- ment under the preferred site plan. They would be maintained although no use for them has been specifically identified. While they are not historic buildings, the farm buildings would provide a visual link with the North Creek valley's previous agricultural activities. The buildings would not be retained under the alternative site plan. NO REZONE - A TESCP would be required of development under the existing zoning as well. It would achieve the intent of this policy. The farm buildings would not necessarily remain after development. 5.6 Transportation Goal: A transportation system should be developed that: 1) Is safe, efficient and economical; 2) Is designed to meet the travel demands created by the forecasted population growth and planned development for the planning area; and 3) Recognizes environmental, social and aesthetic values. Policies: 1. Routes and facilities of the transportation system should be located and designed to meet the demands of both existing and projected land uses as provided for in this comprehensive plan. 9. Safe and efficient movement of pedestrian traffic throughout the planning area with special emphasis on school areas, points of congestion and areas of limited access, should be provided. The concurrent development of a pedestrian, bicycle and horseback-riding circulation system (primarily trail systems) should be promoted and encouraged. 10. The impact of transportation facilities on natural drainage patterns and soil profiles should be minimized. 12. Encourage, whenever feasible, the provision of pedestrian and bicycle facilities in street rights-of-way. 13. Encourage whenever feasible the provision of exclusive bicycle and circulation routes within the planning areas as an alternative to automotive forms of transportation. C - 19 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives BUSINESS PARK - Although business park development of the site was not anticipated by the comprehensive plan, planned and programmed improvements proposed by Snohomish County, WSDOT, and the City of Bothell are being designed to meet the demands of 'growth in the North Creek area, including the proposal. In addition, business park developers are contributing to transpor- tation improvements in order to offset the impacts of business 'park development. HIGH URBAN - The improvements discussed above would generally accommodate the transportation demands of this alternative. . NO CHANGE - This alternative would not contribute significantly to the need for additional transportation facilities. Rezone Alternatives PREFERRED AND ALTERNATIVE REZONE SITE PLANS - Those improvements specifically included in the proposed rezone include frontage improvements on 39th Avenue SE and 240th Street SE. 39th Avenue SE would be widened to three lanes with curb, gutter, sidewalk and street lights. 240th Avenue SE would be developed to either rural or urban street standards, as determined by county staff. The preferred rezone alternative would not include access, other than emergency access, to or from 240th Street SE. Internal access to the east and west portions of the site would be provided by a bridge and road over North Creek. (See TRANSPORTATION for additional discussion of the improvements included in the proposal). The project proponent would contribute a fair share of the costs of improvements which would benefit its employees. The size of required transportation improvements would generally be determined by the appropriate jurisdiction: Snohomish County, WSDOT or city of Bothell. They would be designed to conform with the land use plans and expected development which would use the system. The project would meet the policies identified above. These alternatives propose a bicycle/pedestrian trail along the east side of North Creek which would link immediately to the regional trail in the Koll Center-North Creek and Quadrant Corporate Park - Bothell and in the future to the regional trail at Canyon Park Business Center. The trail would be located along the creek because it is safer than facilities in nearby street rights-of-way. Sidewalks for pedestrians would be provided along 39th Avenue SE and a shoulder for walking would be provided along 240th street SE. NO REZONE - This alternative would require transportation improvements similar to the preferred alternative. C - 20 5.7 Communitv Facilities Public Utilities and services Goals: High quality public services should be provided to all residents of the North Creek Planning Area in accordance with their needs. Provide adequate public services while keeping taxes as low as possible. Urban utilities and services would be extended in a manner which will shape future growth and facilitate the achievement of the other goals of the plan. Policies: 3. The extension of urban services and utilities should be confined to lands that are designated for urban development by the comprehensive plan, and which are planned for development at urban densities. 5. The existing capacity in public systems should be utilized before making substantial extensions except where full utilization of existing capacity would defeat other development and environmental protection objections. 6. The extension of public utilities over large acreages of undeveloped land for the purpose of serving scattered parcels of existing development should not be allowed. 9. Developers should, in subdivisions as well as other types of land development, provide facilities which utilize natural site features to hold, absorb or store stormwater runoff. 10. Surface runoff and storm drainage facilities should be designed and utilized in a manner which protects against the destruction of private property, the disruption of natural drainage-ways and the degradation of water sources and water quality. Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives BUSINESS PARK - Much of the site is presently designated Watershed-site sensitive. The extension of sewer, water and other utilities and urban services to the 86-acre site would be consistent with the above policy upon redesignation of the site to Business Park. utilities and public services are available in the immediate site vicinity. Necessary expansions to existing water and sewer systems have been identified in the Alderwood Water District's Comprehensive Plan. These improvements would be capable of serving full development allowed under the proposed comprehensive plan amendment and rezone and other growth that is C - 21 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I anticipated in the planning area. The 86-acre rezone area would be developed in its entirety as a planned business park. Small, scattered parcels would not be developed within the rezone area, and public utilities would not be extended over large acreages of undeveloped land. HIGH URBAN - Development of a large multifamily complex on the site would generally be consistent with these policies. Development would not be piecemeal and on scattered sites. Utilities would not be extended in small increments. NO CHANGE - Development under this alternative may be done in small segments and thus may not be consistent with the intent of these policies. Full development under this alternative probably would not necessitate the utilities extensions required for business park development. . Rezone Alternatives PREFERRED AND ALTERNATIVE REZONE SITE PLANS - The project would be designed to utilize the on-site wetlands as part of the stormwater runoff system. Catch basins in the parking lots could cleanse the runoff by use of oil/water separators and/or grease traps. Runoff could then flow through grasslined swales (minimum 200 feet) before being released into North Creek. NO REZONE - The same kinds of systems described for the Preferred site Plan could be utilized for this alternative although they would be used on a much smaller scale. Parks. Trails. and Open Space Goal: North Creek Area residents should be provided with an amount and variety of park and recreation facilities, trails and open space areas at easily accessible points which are adequate to satisfy their needs. policies: 4. Park and recreation facilities should include, but not be limited to: playlots, playgrounds, playfields, special purpose parks, systems of linear parks with walks, trails and riding paths, and regional parks including many of these individual facilities. 7. The most unique and outstanding natural features of the North Creek planning area should be considered for possible acquisition for public use and enjoyment. 8. Public park and recreation facilities should generally be located to provide the most convenient possible access to the greatest number of citizens. C - 22 10. sites designated on the Comprehensive Plan map as having park or trails potential should be given open space current use tax assessment status if landowners so desire. Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives BUSINESS PARK - Recreational facilities would be developed as part of the business park's open space area in a manner compatible with the provisions of the North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan. Under the proposed amendment, the North Creek corridor on the site would be available for public use but acquisition by Snohomish county would not be necessary. The trail along North Creek would be accessible to residents who live near the site and to on-site employees. HIGH URBAN - Recreational facilities could be developed as part of a large multifamily development on the site. These facilities would be similar to those discussed above for the Business Park amendment. NO CHANGE - Development under this alternative could be done in small segments rather than a comprehensive manner, so recreational facilities might be more limited in nature. The North Creek Trail could still be extended across the site, however, as a condition of subdivision approval if subdivision were the method of site development. Rezone Alternatives PREFERRED AND ALTERNATIVE REZONE SITE PLANS - North Creek is the most unique feature on the site. A north/south trail would be developed along the east side of North Creek for pedestrians and bicyclists. This trail would become part of the North Creek Valley trail system. NO REZONE - This alternative could include prov1s10n of on-site recreational facilities or other measures to mitigate impacts on recreational facilities in the area. SNOHOHISH COUNTY ZONING CODE (TITLE 18) The purpose of the Snohomish county Zoning Code is to provide the authority for, and the procedures to be followed in, guiding and regulating the physical development of Snohomish County by coordinating public and private projects. The 86-acre site is presently zoned Residential 9600 (R 9600) and Rural Conservation (RC). A large majority of the site, 80 acres, is designed RC. The remaining 6 acres is zoned R 9600. This zone is located adjacent to 1-405. The purpose of the R 9600 zone is to implement the Suburban designation of the North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan (NCACP). This zone allows approximately 4 dwelling units per acre; the lot area for each single family dwelling must be a minimum of 9,600 square feet. C - 23 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I The RC zone is applied to those lands in the NCACP which are designed Rural or WSS. The area immediately surrounding the site is zoned RC and Suburban Agriculture (one acre) to the north, RC to the east and R 9600 to the northwest and west across 1-405. The area directly south has been rezoned to Mixed Use (MU) in the last five years by the city of Bothell to allow substantial business park development. The County allows industrial and development on land zoned Business Park (BP). The purpose of the BP zone is to provide for those business/industrial uses of a professional office, wholesale, and manufacturing nature which are compatible with adjoining residential retail commercial or other less intensive land uses. Properties of a minimum size of 4 acres may be rezoned to BP. In order to rezone land to the BP zone, a two-step approval process must be followed. A rezone application, including a preliminary development plan, must be submitted to the County. The County reviews the rezone and preliminary plan simultaneously through steps in the process from staff to Hearing Examiner, who decides whether to deny/ approve the rezone. At all of these stages in the preliminary phase, the proposal is reviewed for its relationship to pUblic health, safety, and welfare, as well as Comprehensive Plan policies and specific zoning criteria, including ability of the proposal to be compatible with and blend with the surrounding area. Once preliminary rezone approval is granted, the final phase of the BP rezone process is initiated. The proponent is required to submit the following final plans: final grading plan showing finished site contours, landscaping plans, street layout, sign plan, lighting plans, and building plans. The building plans may be postponed until applications are filed for each lot or site if the complete development project is to be constructed in phases. The final plans are submitted to the Planning Director for administrative approval or disapproval, based on conformance with the approved preliminary plan and criteria of the BP zone relating to performance standards. Business Park performance standards are contained in the zoning code (ref. SCC 18.60.100) and address processes and equipment, phasing of development (if proposed), compatibility of building design with surroundings, long-term adherence to maintenance and upkeep of landscaping and storm drainage facilities (via restrictive covenants and a . binding site plan), off-street parking, signs, and noise; these standards are discussed below in more detail. Upon approval, the final plan controls all development of the property. C - 24 The BP zone performance standards require that buildings be compatible with their surroundings, and that exterior building materials be in harmony with the surrounding natural and man-made environment. All utilities must be located underground. All areas zoned BP must be designed to include sufficient landscaped or natural open space areas to create a park-like setting. Open spaces cannot include areas devoted to buildings, parking, or vehicular access. A landscaping strip, consisting of a mix of evergreen and deciduous trees, shrubs, and groundcovers, with a minimum width of 30 feet, must be provided as a visual buffer between rights-of-way or private access roads and building or parking areas. All outdoor lighting must conform to the unified architectural lighting scheme for the BP development and must not shine on adjacent properties. No on-street parking is permitted within a BP zone. Maximum lot coverage for all structures cannot exceed 35 percent, and the maximum building height is 50 feet. Rezone Alternatives PREFERRED AND ALTERNATIVE REZONE SITE PLANS - The rezone proposal includes a request to reclassify the zoning designation to BP for the entire 86-acre site. The BP zoning would allow the proposed business park. These alternatives would be compatible with adjacent residential uses because they guide all or most of the traffic away from the residential areas, and preserve nearly half of the site as open space; in addition, the buildings and parking areas could be screened from the view from the residential areas by landscaping. The site would be developed by a single developer who would maintain consistent development standards. The buildings would not be higher in elevation than adjacent residences because of the slopes of the site. Building materials and colors are not yet known. All utilities except 115 KV lines would likely be located underground. The open space reserved on the site would create a park-like setting. A 3D-foot landscaping buffer would be located along 240th street N.E., 39th Avenue N.E., 38st Avenue N.E., and the Snohomish/King County line. Landscaping would also separate the building and parking areas. Outdoor lighting would conform to the overall architectural scheme and not shine directly on adjacent properties. On-street parking is not proposed. The development alternatives would meet all BP zone development standards. SNOHOHISH COUNTY SHORELINE MANAGEMENT MASTER PROGRAM, 1984 (AMENDED) The Shoreline Management Master Program was developed to reflect the intent of the Shoreline Management Act of 1971. The plan provides the goals, policies and regulations which guide the long-range development of the County's shorelines. The Shoreline Management Master Program addresses nine basic land use and water use elements: shoreline use, economic development, public access recreation, circulation, historical/cultural/scientific/ educational, conservation, agriculture and implementation. C - 25 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I The County's shorelines are classified into five distinct environments which provide the framework for implement- ing shoreline policies and regulatory measures. These five environments are Natural, Conservancy, Rural, Suburban and Urban. The site contains a portion of North Creek which is classified as Urban in the County's Shoreline Management Program. The Urban Environment is an area of high-intensity land use. It is particularly suitable to those areas presently subjected to extremely intensive use pressure, as well as to areas planned to accommodate urban expansion. Most activities and uses are permitted in the Urban Environment subject to regulatory controls. Commercial development is allowed within the Urban Environment, including uses involved in wholesale and retail trade or business activities. Business parks are also included in this classifica- tion. Normally, the setback of a commercial use from the ordinary high water mark is 10 feet in the Urban Environment. However, the Shoreline Master Program recognizes that North Creek must continue to function as a valued natural system, and, accordingly, a setback of approximately 100 feet must be maintained for commercial and industrial uses, except where creek crossings are necessary. The Master Program contains several layers of policies which must be reviewed for compliance when an application is submitted. The Environment Management policies for the particular environment in which the project is located as well as the Shoreline Use Element of the Goals and General Development policies are considered. Applicable policies are listed below. Urban Environment 1. Because shorelines suitable for urban uses are a limited resource, emphasis should be given to directing new development into already developed, but underutilized areas. 2. Give priority in Urban Environments to water dependent, industrial and commercial uses requiring frontage on navigable waters. 3. Give priority to planning for and developing public visual and physical access to the shoreline in the Urban Environment. 5. Design industrial and commercial facilities to permit pedestrian waterfront activities where appropriate. 6. Link, where practical, public access points with non- motorized transportation routes such as bicycle and hiking paths. C - 26 9. Actively promote aesthetics when considering urban shoreline development by means of sign control regulations, architectural design standards, planned unit development standards, landscaping requirements and other such means. 10. Regulate all urban shoreline development in order to minimize adverse impact upon adjacent land areas and shoreline environments. Shoreline Use Element 2. Assure that all uses and developments are as compatible as possible with the site, the surrounding area and the environment. 3. Provide site development performance standards and other appropriate criteria to developers indicating minimum acceptable standards to be achieved. 5. Foster uses which protect the potential long-term benefits to the public from compromise by short-term economic gain or convenience. 7. Shoreline land and water areas which are particularly suited for specific and appropriate uses should be reserved for such uses whether they are existing or potential. 8. Prohibit uses not water-surface nor shoreline dependent, which permanently alter the shoreline, conflict with, or preempt other shoreline dependent uses. 12. Require all developments to plan for and control runoff and where necessary treat it before discharging from the site. Various applicable use activity policies and regulations in the Commercial Development, Shoreline stabilization and Flood Protection, Landfill, Recreation, Residential Development, Roads and Railroads, and Utilities sections of the Master Program are identified below. Commercial Development Policies: 1. Commercial development [in the shoreline jurisdiction] should have waterfront dependency as previously stated in the Goals for Economic Development. 2. Strongly encourage new commercial developments on shorelines to locate in those areas where current commercial uses exist. C - 27 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 3. In order to minimize adverse impact, ensure that adequate assessment be made of and consideration given to, the effect a commercial structure will have on a scenic view significant to a given area or enjoyed by a significant number of people. 4. Require that parking facilities m1n1m1ze their visual impact on the shorelines, and where possible be placed inland away from the immediate water's edge and recreational beaches. 5. Encourage commercial developments that abut the water's edge to provide physical and/or visual access to the shoreline where appropriate. 6. Ensure that all commercial development respects natural systems. General Regulations: 1. Applications for commercial development detailed statement explaining the nature and water orientation of the proposed activity. shall include the following: shall include a intensity of Such statement a. Nature of the commercial activity b. Need for shoreline frontage (where applicable) c. Special considerations being planned to enhance the relationship of the activity to the shoreline d. Provisions for public visual and/or physical access to the shoreline. 2. Signs associated with commercial developments shall meet the regulations specified under "Signs". 3. Parking associated with commercial developments shall meet the regulations specified under "Roads and Railroads". 4. Overwater construction and landfill shall be prohibited except as provided for herein. Urban Regulations: 2. Commercial development may be located on landfill or over water PROVIDED that such development must require or be dependent on direct, contiguous access to the water or must provide substantial numbers of the public the opportunity to physically or visually enjoy the shoreline. C - 28 Shoreline Stabilization and Flood Protection policies: 1. Locate, design, and construct riprapping and other bank stabilization or flood protection measures so as to avoid channelization, protect adjacent property from adverse effects, and to protect the natural character of the streamway. 2. Place all flood protection measures such as dikes and levees landward of the principal streamway, including associated swamps and marshes directly interrelated and interdependent with the stream property. 3. Recognize and protect the integrity of a water body's hydraulic system when planning for and designing shoreline stabilization and flood protection measures. Regulations: 1. All shoreline stabilization and flood protection measures shall be designed and constructed so that downstream banks will not be adversely affected. Shoreline stabilization measures, including riprap, shall be designed and constructed in a manner consistent with Soil Conservation Service, Corps of Engineers and/or other engineering and design specifications deemed appropriate by the county Engineer, and said designs shall be reviewed and confirmed by the County Engineer as being consistent therewith. 2. Shoreline stabilization and flood protection measures shall not be designed and constructed in such a manner as to result in channelization of normal stream flows. 3. Within the discretion of the permit granting authority, and considering the reasonableness of the conditions and the technological state of the art, applications for shoreline stabilization and flood protection measures shall include the following (at a minimum): a. Purpose of project: b. Hydraulic characteristics of river within one-half mile on each side of proposed project: c. Existing shoreline stabilization and flood protection devices within one-half mile on each side of proposed project: d. construction material and methods: e. resultant hydraulic characteristics of river. C - 29 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II 4. Flood control diking shall be landward of the floodway of the base (100-year frequency) flood and any marshes or swamps directly interrelated and interdependent with the river. 5. Shoreline stabilization measures are allowed in floodways and density fringe areas of the base (100-year frequency) flood only when their purpose is to protect existing development or prime agricultural land or to prevent serious impairment of channel function. Provided, that where the detailed information referenced in regulation #3 above is not required due to waiver or exemption from a permit, stabilization measures shall be reviewed and approved by the County Engineer, with said approval to confirm that measures mitigate or avoid the potential for adverse impacts to adjacent shoreline consistent with regulation #1 above. Provided further, that vegetative and/or other non-structural shoreline stabilization measures may be used in hydraulic floodways for any purpose otherwise consistent with the Master Program, the Shoreline Management Act and its administrative guidelines. 6. Streambank vegetation shall be preserved to the maximum extent feasible consistent with safe construction requirements. 7. Cut-and-fill slopes and backfill areas shall be revegetated with natural grasses, shrubs, and/or trees in keeping with existing river bank vegetation. Shoreline stabilization and flood protection measures are permitted in the Urban Environment subject to the General Regulations listed above. Landfill Policies: I. Allow landfills only in those areas designated for such purposes in the Environment section of the Master Program. Regulations: 2. Landfills shall be permitted only when used as preparation for an activity otherwise permitted by this program for the Environment in which it is located. Such landfills shall also be subject to the regulations for the proposed use. C - 30 3. Applications which include landfilling shall include the fOllowing information: a. landfill b. Physical, chemical, and biological character of material; Source of landfill material; Method of placement and compaction; Type of proposed surfacing; Method of perimeter erosion control; Proposed use of filled area. c. d. e. f. 4. The perimeter of all landfills shall be provided with some means to control erosion, such as vegetation, retaining walls, or other mechanisms. Landfills are permitted in the Urban Environment subject to the General Regulations listed above. Recreation 1. Give priority to developments which provide recreational uses and other improvements facilitating public access to shorelines. 3. Strongly encourage the linkage of shoreline parks public access points through the use of linear access. types of connections can be used such as hiking paths, bicycle trails and/or scenic drives. and Many 4. Carefully consider the total effect the development of a recreational site will have on the environmental quality and natural resources of an area. 6. Avoid wasteful use of the limited supply of recreational shoreline areas by locating parking areas inland away from the immediate edge of the water and recreational beaches. Safe access should be provided by walkways or other methods. Residential Development Policies: 1. Encourage the use of the planned residential development concept in all shoreline subdivisions. 2. Require that subdivisions be designed at a level of density, site coverage, and occupancy compatible with the physical capabilities and aesthetic characteristics of the shoreline and water body. 3. Encourage subdividers to provide public pedestrian access to the shorelines within the subdivision. C - 31 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 4. Encourage subdividers to provide all residents within the sub-division with adequate easily accessible and usable access to the water when topogrpahically feasible. 5. Prohibit residential development over water. 6. Do not allow residential development on shorelines which would be dependent on future bulkheading or other shoreline fortification for protection. Roads and Railroads 1. Locate major highways, freeways and railways away from shorelines wherever feasible. 2. Design and maintain roads to m1n1m1ze erosion and permit a natural movement of surface runoff. 3. Insure to the maximum extent practical, that all construction debris, overburden and other waste materials shall not enter into any water body by disposal or erosion from drainage, high water or other means. 4. Locate and design all roads and railroads so that minimum alterations of natural conditions will be necessary. 5. Provide safe pedestrian and other non-motorized travel facilities in public shoreline areas. 10. Locate and design road and railroad bridges to accommodate the existing floodways of streams and rivers. 11. Encourage creation of trail systems adjacent to new roads and railroads where feasible and safe. utilities 1. Insure that upon completion of utility installation or maintenance projects on shorelines, all areas be restored to pre-project configuration, replanted with native species and provided with maintenance care until the newly planted vegetation is established. 2. Locate utility trunk lines and facilities outside shoreline areas, to the maximum extent feasible. 3. Locate utility lines and facilities, when they must be placed in a shoreline area, so as not to obstruct or destroy scenic views. Whenever feasible, these facilities should be placed underground, or designed to do minimal damage to the aesthetic qualities of the shoreline area. 4. To the maximum extent feasible, local governments should incorporate major transmission line rights-of-way on C - 32 shorelines into their programs for public access to and along water bodies. 5. Locate utilities to meet the needs of future popula- tions in areas planned to accommodate this growth. 6. Combine utility rights-of-way in shoreline areas to the maximum extent possible. 7. Require that major utility developments be consistent with adopted County comprehensive plans for utilities, where they exist, for provision of the respective utility service to the County's residents. Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives BUSINESS PARK, HIGH URBAN and NO CHANGE - All three Comprehensive Plan Amendment alternatives would be consistent with provisions of the Master Program. Any development proposed would be evaluated for compliance with Master Program policies. Commercial and both high and low-density residential uses are permitted uses in the Urban Environment. Rezone Alternatives PREFERRED AND ALTERNATIVE REZONE SITE PLANS - Shoreline jurisdiction extends to 200 feet landward from the ordinary high water mark on both sides of North Creek and covers associated wetlands located east and west of the creek. Building and parking construction might occur within this 200-foot shoreline area, but not within the 100-foot shoreline setback area. Fill and minor grading may occur in the shorelines jurisdiction in conjunction with elevating site grade of Lots 7 and 8. within the shorelines jurisdiction, these improvements would be constructed: I) 42" sanitary sewer extension located approximately 120 feet east of North Creek; 2) the bicycle/pedestrian trail located on top of the sanitary sewer line; 3) a vehicular bridge and internal road for access between the east and west portions of the site; and 4) a dike and fill. A review of the Urban Environment and Shoreline Use Element policies listed above would be used to evaluate the proposal as part of Shoreline permit issuance. For the Urban Environment policies, the proposal would include a public pedestrian and bicycle trail along North Creek for visual and physical access to the shorelines. The business park development would be located in an area which already contains three large business parks. The business park would not be considered a water-dependent use, but would provide public access to the shorelines, buildings and parking facilities which are set back at least 100 feet from either side of North Creek for visual access and retention of existing farm buildings for a link to the site's past agricul- tural uses. Private covenants regulating on-site development would be approved as part of the proposed change in zoning C - 33 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I classification and Final Plan approvals. The covenants would cover architectural standards, landscaping, signs, and on-site uses. All of these features would also comply with the Shoreline Use Element policies. The buildings and parking areas would be terraced into the hillside to reduce their impact on both the shoreline and adjacent residential areas. with the exception of the bridge for the internal road, the proposed development would not alter the shoreline. For the Shoreline stabilization and Flood Protection section, the primary activity would be to install a dike on the eastern side of North Creek to limit flooding of that portion of the site. The downstream flood analysis (see WATER section) indicates that there would be no adverse effect on downstream banks and that no channelization of normal stream flows would result. Existing vegetation along the streambank would be left intact. For the Landfill section, the proposed business park would be in preparation for the proposed roadway and building footprints on proposed Lot 7. This activity would be for a business park which is a use permitted in the urban environment. Applications submitted for the fill will include the appropriate information. A review of the applicable Recreation, Roads and Railroads, and utilities policies listed above would be required prior to any permit issuance. For the Commercial Development section, the proposed business park would be locating in an area which already has numerous business parks. The Koll and Quadrant developments are to the south and the Canyon Park development is to the north. North Creek runs through all of these projects. The commercial structures and all parking facilities would be set back at least 100 feet from either side of North Creek in order to minimize intrusion into the North Creek view corridor. Also, development would be located outside the wetlands and 100-year floodplain areas which would provide a large open space in the center of the site adjacent to North Creek. Physical and visual access to the Creek would be provided through the installation of the public trail on the east side of the creek. The proponent would utilize the wetlands on-site as a natural filtering system for part of the stormwater runoff. For the Recreation section, the trail would provide a recreational use which facilitates public access to the shorelines. The trail would be located approximately 120 feet east of North Creek in order to provide linear access, provide connections to existing trails, and maintain the existing wildlife habitat along the Creek without excessive human contact and interference. The parking areas are all located away from the creek and 'outside the 200-foot jurisdictional area. The rezone alternatives would meet these policies. For the Roads would provide development. and Railroads section, the internal road and bridge access between the east and west sides of the The road would be perpendicular to North Creek to C - 34 m1n1m1ze the impacts on and the disturbance to the shorelines area. This road would not be considered a major highway, would be private and would be intended for the sponsor's use only. The potential for erosion would be minimized by the location of the road and the grasslined swale system would handle the stormwater runoff generated by the road. A safety situation between the proposed pedestrian/bicycle trail system and the new road may be created as they cross, but volumes on the road should be low enough, and visibility high enough, to reduce the potential for conflict. Also, the majority of the trail use would be anticipated on weekends and in evenings, whereas the road would be used predominantly on weekdays. The bridge would include pedestrian facilities and will be designed to accommodate and remain outside of the 100-year floodplain. For the utilities section, the 42" sanitary sewer trunk line would be an extension of an existing line south of the site. The stub is currently located 120 feet from the east side of North Creek and this alignment would be continued up to the north property line. The extension has been approved as part of the Alderwood Sewer and Water District Comprehensive Plan in order to serve future development in the district. In order to incor- porate public access along a currently private shoreline area, the bicycle/pedestrian trail would be located above the sewer line within the same easement. New plantings would be installed with the trail in areas which would not interfere with the sewer line. At the associated wetlands, the sanitary sewer line would be located under the wetlands and the bicycle-pedestrian trail would bridge over them. This would minimize the potential for any damage to the area. The proposed plan amendment and rezone and the uses thereby allowed would be compatible with the Urban Environment designa- tion. A Shoreline Substantial Development Permit would be required prior to any development within 200 feet of North Creek. NO REZONE - single-family residential development would be generally compatible with the Urban Environment designation. It could comply with the Residential Development policies by providing a trail along North Creek, but may not use a PRO-type of development. C - 35 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I SNOHOMISH COUNTY COUNCIL MOTION NO. 87-039 CONCERNING AQUATIC RESOURCE PROTECTION IN SNOHOMISH COUNTY This motion was adopted in May, 1987, as a permanent measure to ensure thorough review of development in wetland areas. The motion states that it is County policy to "utilize existing land use regulations to the maximum extent possible to protect wetlands and to review all development proposals carefully when activities are likely to affect wetlands". The motion calls for cooperation between County departments, establishment of clear County policy on protection of aquatic resources and associated fish and wildlife habitat. Compliance with regional and state standards and greater civic awareness of aquatic resources is also called for in the motion. The County will review all development proposals carefully using its authority under the state Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) to determine whether activities are likely to affect important wetlands. Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives BUSINESS PARK - There are four wetlands on the site. Development under this alternative would be more likely to be located outside the wetlands areas due to the costs and regulations associated with locating development within the wetlands. However, the proposed plan amendment would not guarantee that development would be located outside of the wetlands unless additional policy guidance was incorporated into the Comprehensive Plan. A thorough review of proposed site plan would occur at the rezone and/or Final site Plan stages. HIGH URBAN - This alternative would also not necessarily result in development located totally outside the wetlands. site- specific reviews would occur at the rezone and/or Final site Plan stages. NO CHANGE - This alternative may result in development outside the wetlands areas but, again, such a result cannot be guaranteed. Rezone Alternatives PREFERRED AND ALTERNATIVE REZONE SITE PLANS - These two rezone alternatives include site plans which would locate development generally outside of wetland areas. Development would generally remain outside the Watershed-site Sensitive areas. The Preferred and Alternative Rezone site Plans would comply with the Council motion. C - 36 NO REZONE - This alternative would probably locate development outside wetlands areas. In any case, a thorough review of the wetlands issues would take place at the site plan review stage. SNOHOMISH COUNTY BUSINESS AND INDUSTRIAL LAND SURVEY The survey was completed in December, 1985 and reprinted in August, 1986. The survey essentially analyzed the existing supply and future demand of business and industrial land in snohomish County including all municipalities. The inventory of parcels indicated a total of 3,760 parcels which are designated or zoned for business or industrial development. These parcels cover 17,844 acres of land in Snohomish County including incorporated areas. This acreage includes 16,540 acres of land designated on comprehensive plans or zoned for industries (Heavy/ Light Industry, Industrial Park, or Business Park) by the County or the cities. The balance of 1,304 acres comprises land which is designated for heavy commercial uses. "Quality" criteria were applied to all vacant parcels to identify the most desirable parcels for new industrial land uses. The supply was then compared to the demand for business and industrial land in two target years: 1990 and 2000. The land demand was derived from regional and local employment projections for 27 industrial employment sectors. These were divided into the three industrial categories mentioned above. The projected employment figures were then translated into square feet of floor space for each of the 27 sections, with the floor space then converted to acres of land needed to accommodate the forecasted employment. In the Business Park category, there were 584 acres of quality undeveloped land. Eighty (80) percent of this land was divided almost equally between the North Creek and Paine Field areas. Fifty-seven (57) percent of this vacant acreage was in parcels of 5 acres or less. There was one parcel of 30 acres or more in the North Creek area. Almost all Business Park land was located in unincorporated county areas. C - 37 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I SUMMARY OF VACANT INDUSTRIAL LAND SUPPLY AND YEAR 2000 LAND DEMAND (Acres) All All Developed* Vacant Vacant w/Quality criteria Projected Year 2000 Demand Heavy/Light Industry (HI/LI) 4,065 5,180 1,363 197 Industrial Park (IP) 2,918 2,920 1,077 319 Business Park (BP) 210 1.247 584 485 All Industrial categories 7,193 9,347 3,024 1,001 * includes partially developed parcels Source: Snohomish County Business and Industrial Land survey, 1986 The survey found the greatest land demand would be in the Business Park category. This was also the category which showed the least land available although it still exceeded the demand for the year 2000. However, the surplus would be much smaller than in the two other industrial land categories. The study recommended that the absorption of Business Park land should be carefully monitored. If needed, the supply of Business Park land could be increased by either upgrading and redesignating lower quality industrial land primarily in the Light/Heavy Industrial category or by identifying new Business Park land in comprehen- sive land use plans. The survey recommended that new Business Park land should be designated in comprehensive plans only if the following criteria could be met: o Location in areas which are already designated for suburban/ urban growth and are planned to receive an urban infrastructure; o Redesignation would not induce unplanned growth; o New areas meet the quality criteria established in this Business and Industrial Land Survey; o ownership and parcel sizes are predominantly large to increase the choice of available lot sizes; and o Already existing Light/Heavy Industry designations are not suitable for Business Park uses. C - 38 The selection of these criteria resulted from the study's Technical Advisory Committee's conviction that planned growth and the attraction of high technology companies were highly correlated. They survey also said to: o Establish new Business Park designations only if equally careful attention is given to the residential, commercial, environmental, parks and infrastructural elements of an area comprehensive plan. Only quality residential and commercial development in adjacent areas will contribute to the long- term success of Business Park areas; o Carefully monitor the absorption rate and ownership size pattern of Business Park land to ensure adequate supply and choice during the time period 1990 to 2000; and o Consider the economic development and the adequacy of designated Business Park land in unincorporated Snohomish County during the update of comprehensive plans which have a plan target year beyond 1990. The North Creek area is one of the sectors in which Business Park and other industrial land was analyzed. The study described the area as "urbanizing but it still retains a rural character in some sectors. The topography of these parcels is relatively flat. Natural amenities such as streams and wooded areas occur on some parcels. Part of the area is known as the 'Technology Corridor' and is marketed through a marketing cooperative of four corporations. Existing uses are high technology firms, i.e., electronics and biomedical corporations. Further north, uses include business park, commercial enterprises, and small manufacturing firms. Highway access and visibility is excellent. Paine Field, the County's general aviation airport, is located seven miles west of the area" (BILS). Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives BUSINESS PARK - This proposed alternative is consistent with the Business and Industrial Land Survey (BILS). It seeks to redesignate as "Business Park" land that is within the Technology Corridor, of a large size (86 acres), and scheduled for urban infrastructure (39th Avenue SE extension and new Alderwood District water and sewer lines). The site is suitable because it provides high visibility and good regional access, is generally flat and could be marketed as part of the planned growth of the Technology Corridor. The site also meets the quality criteria for the Business Park category. The site has an overall flat topography (less than 10 percent slope), 90 percent of development would not be located on the floodplain or in wetlands areas, and public water and sani- tary sewer service serve the property now. The property also has C - 39 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I , I II I , I such amenities as a creek flowing through the site, views to the interior of the site (wetlands and North Creek), trees within the riparian habitat along the creek, and a location adjacent to 1- 405 on the west with immediate access to the freeway from 39th Avenue SE/120th Avenue NE/NE 195th street. "It has always been the county's policy to overallocate the supply of land in its long-range comprehensive plans" (BILS). This proposed plan amendment would be consistent with this policy and would add to the supply of properly designated land in an area increasingly in demand by firms wishing to locate in snohomish County. HIGH URBAN - This alternative would not be consistent with the recommendations of the survey. NO CHANGE - This alternative would also not be consistent with the recommendations of the survey. Rezone Alternatives PREFERRED AND ALTERNATIVE REZONE SITE PLANS - These rezone alternatives would allow for a single entity to develop the site over a four to ten year period. This developer would have a long-term commitment to the County, and would contribute to high quality development in the Technology Corridor. The BILS stated that this was the type of business park development the County was trying to attract and that it "prefers this type of develop- ment over heavy industries which generate industrial pollution". The survey also stated the Business Park (BP) land use category would have the largest acreage demand and would host the most preferred industries, but had the lowest supply of land. "There will be a reasonable supply of BP land until 1990 or 1995, the current supply of vacant BP land which meets certain quality criteria will most likely not be sufficient some time before the year 2000" (BILS). These rezone alternatives would increase the supply of land, would meet the needs of an immediate user and would be consistent with the findings and recommendations of the Business and Industrial Land Survey. NO REZONE - This alternative would not be consistent with the Business and Industrial Land Survey because it would not provide additional business park land in an area which has been designated and marketed as the Technology Corridor, a desired location for high technology firms. SNOHOMISH COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PARK AND RECREATION PLAN 'This plan was written in 1986. Its purpose was to make a detailed investigation of the problems and potentials confronting the county's park and recreation program. It includes pragmatic suggestions for implementing the plan. Public workshops and user C - 40 surveys were used extensively. The results of workshops with the public and representatives of the cities and school districts generally validated the plan's demand estimates. Park activities, particularly waterfront, boating, trails and outdoor pool swimming, were identified as priority issues. One of the goals identified in the plan was to "develop a system of trails to provide a high quality and diverse sampling of the County's environmental areas and features, accessible to all physical skills and interest groups, including hikers, bikers, horseback riders, boaters and off-road vehicle enthusiasts". This was based on the activity preferences determined through the survey process. "Bike riding for pleasure" ranked as a high preference based on both number of users and number of times the activity was performed. For future activity preferences, bicycling was listed as the second preference while walking for pleasure was ranked seventh. The County examined the supply of facilities to meet these needs and found the walking trail deficit would be significant, considering this was one of the most popular activities for all age groups in the population. The 1990 and 2000 deficits would be 35.2 and 45.0 miles of urban trails within and between the County's most populated areas. The deficits would be critical considering there were virtually no existing urban trail facilities. The 1990 and 2000 deficits of 87.8 and 113.6 miles would be critical in numbers and distribution of "bike riding for pleasure" facilities considering this was one of the most popular activities for all age groups. The requirement would be for bike lanes or trails separated from vehicle traffic, and not for on- street or sidewalk facilities of low capacity or high conflict with pedestrians or automobiles. The plan describes urban trails as follows: An urban trail will be a primary, high volume, bike and hike path which provides an important trail connection between major environmental park sites. The trail will be located within a separate corridor when possible, but normally will consist of a specially designated 8-foot shoulder along major County roads. In some instances, the route may accommodate local bike or walking commuter routes to schools, shopping centers or downtown areas. The trail's principal purpose, however, should be recreational use by bikers and hikers of all ages and skills. The proposed urban trail system "would provide recreational corridors from King county to Skagit county from Puget Sound to the mountain edges at Index in corridors adjacent to local roads, within abandoned railroad beds and on flood control levies". The following language describes the proposed trail from Bothell to Paine Field: C - 41 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I The trail would begin at the Burke Gilman Trail's Bothell Landing in King County and extend north through the Koll/ Quadrant Business Parks to Canyon Park, on Canyon Park to 35th Avenue and Maltby Road, on 35th Avenue past Thomas Lake, on Green Lantern Road to Silver Lake and on to Paine Field. The route would provide a river valley/plateau environmental sequence through the center of the County's developing suburban areas. The trail is shown on Graphic 20 - Proposed Countywide Park Concept and Graphic 21 - Proposed Urban Trails System (pages 141 and 142 of the Plan). In the Plan, the County recognized limitations on its resources and ability to provide facilities. One policy was to develop present county park and recreational facilities to maximum effectiveness before initiating new acquisitions and development projects. Three constraints were listed: diverse County-wide needs and desires, limited financial capabilities, and continued urban growth (additional users, no new facilities, and decreased maintenance and operation). For residential development, the Plan includes a discussion of "Growth Impact Tools". These include possible ways of requiring developers to provide suitably designed and located open space and/or recreational facilities to mitigate the impacts of new urban development. This section of the plan also calls for the developer to provide an acceptable long-term method of managing and financing maintenance requirements. The discussion addresses revisions to Ordinance 26-A, the recreational growth impact ordinance, and recommends it should apply to all residential development and possibly some industrial or office development. A revised ordinance would estimate the impact a development would have on park and recreational facilities in the particular park and regional and community recreation service zone so that resources (land, monies and/or improvements) could be set aside to offset the impacts. An impact analysis formula is described and a developer would be allowed to choose any combination of land or cash mitigation. Policies are identified regarding use of the contributions. The growth impact tools would be a way to determine park and recreational needs so that service levels are not reduced as a result of new development. Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives BUSINESS PARK - This alternative would allow implementation of the Park Plan and the location of a pedestrian/bicycle trail through the 86-acre site. An existing trail abuts the south property line and was constructed as part of the Koll Center - North Creek development. Location of the trail adjacent to the east side of North Creek would be logical. Construction of the trail on this site would further the county's goals to increase urban trail facilities and meet the identified needs. Ownership of the land on which the trail is located could remain with the C - 42 property owner or developer and easements would be granted for public access. HIGH URBAN - This alternative would also be able to implement the Park Plan through location of a trail along North Creek. Development would be through the PRD process which would call for compliance with the Park Plan. The impacts would be the same as described under the Business Park Alternative. NO CHANGE - Development of the single-family homes under this alternative would probably occur through the residential plat process. Inclusion of a trail along North Creek could be included in the plat design although it would not be anticipated that the plat would include any common areas. The County may have to obtain ownership of the trail land through deed, dedica- tion or eminent domain. Rezone Alternatives PREFERRED AND ALTERNATIVE REZONE SITE PLANS - Both alternatives include a trail on the east side of North Creek. The trail would be open for public uses as well as use by employees of businesses located in the new development. It would connect to the existing trail in Koll Center - North Creek project located to the south and would be another link between the county line and the existing trail at the Canyon Park Business Center. Even though these alternatives were for business park use, they would contribute to the County's park and recreational needs. The trail would comply with the Park Plan. Additional recreational opportunities could be provided on the site under the Preferred Plan in the retained farm structures; under the Alternative site Plan, these structures would not be retained. NO REZONE - The 52 single-family residences which could be built under this alternative might not include common open space. Development could be through the plat process and a contribution to offset impacts on park and recreational services might be required. A trail system connection along North Creek could be included in the development. If required, the County might have to acquire title to the trail land through purchase, dedication or eminent domain. These could be costly and time consuming. Overall, this alternative would probably comply with the Park Plan. AMENDMENT TO ALDERWOOD AREA COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR SR-527/228TH STREET SE INTERSECTION Amended Ordinance No. 86-072 was adopted by the Snohomish County Council to supplement Amended Ordinance No. 85-123 which approved the Alderwood Area Comprehensive Plan Amendment in the SR-527/ Canyon Park area. The purpose of Amended Ordinance No. 86-072 was to require appropriate mitigation measures for the intersection of SR-527 and 228th street SE and to allocate the C - 43 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I capacity of that intersection in an effective and fair manner so that all of the capacity of the intersection at peak hour was not used by commercial development on parcels adjacent to the inter- section. Amended Ordinance No. 86-072 provided for the ultimate design of the SR-527/228th street SE intersection to consist of 22 lanes plus a right-turn pocket for west to northbound traffic. Amended Ordinance No. 86-072 provided that developers located outside the plan amendment area and requesting Comprehensive Plan amendments should be subject to the same long-range (year 2000) projections and analysis that were contained in the traffic study of the SR-527/228th street SE intersection. Developments outside of the plan area were to be reviewed for compliance with Amended Ordinance No. 86-072 only if 1) the Comprehensive Plan designa- tion for the property being developed was different than what was assumed in the traffic study and the development generated more trips than would have occurred under the prior comprehensive plan designation, and 2) the development contributed 10 percent or more of the site-generated traffic to the SR-527/228th street SE intersection. Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives BUSINESS PARK - The site is located in the North Creek Planning Area, east of the Alderwood Planning Area. The existing Comprehensive Plan designation is Watershed-site Sensitive (WSS) and Suburban (S); the proposed designation is Business Park (BP). Even though the Comprehensive Plan designation for the site would be different than that assumed in the traffic study on which Amended Ordinance No. 86-072 was based, the traffic from the site which would utilize the SR-527/228th Street SE intersection under the proposed BP designation would be equivalent to what would occur with development under the present Comprehensive Plan designation. Under the proposed BP designation, 32,547 daily trips would be generated through the SR-527/228th Street intersection while 22,850 daily trips at full development (2000) would be generated under the current plan designations. There is no significant difference between the two numbers of trips generated (see TRANSPORTATION for additional discussion). The total daily trips estimated to be generated under the BP designation is 6,875. The amount which would go through the SR- 527/228th Street SE intersection is 617 or 9 percent. As discussed in the TRANSPORTATION section, 79 percent of the future employees are assumed to live south of the site, and it is anticipated that they will not use the SR-527/228th street SE intersection. Overall, development under the proposed BP designation would be in compliance with Amended Ordinance No. 86- 072. HIGH URBAN - This alternative would be different from the Comprehensive Plan designation evaluated at the time of the SR- 527/228th street SE traffic study. It would produce 1,315 trips C - 44 which would use this~intersection. This would be more than the amount anticipated in the intersection study. Also, it would be 32 percent of the 5,261 total daily trips generated from the site. Therefore, development under this alternative would be subject to this amended ordinance. NO CHANGE - This alternative would be the same as the Comprehen- sive Plan designations evaluated for the SR-527/22th street SE study. Development under this alternative would not be subject to Amended Ordinance No. 86-072. CITY OF BOTHELL PLAN FOR THE NORTH CREEK VALLEY AND DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES This Plan, a supplement to the existing Bothell Comprehensive Plan, details community goals and objectives for development in the North Creek area. The plan addresses the community concern of maintaining the residential and semi-rural atmosphere while improving the local tax base. It delineates community goals by expressing in greater detail policies and standards for the North Creek Valley planning area. The Plan recommends designating the portion of the planning area within the city of Bothell as a special District. Development in the District is to be governed by the Plan's policies and development standards; zoning designations as previously identi- fied on the City's zoning map are to be removed. The Plan further recommends that future development in the planning area be subject to the Planned Unit Development (PUD) process in order to limit the extent of impervious surface coverage. The types of uses that are encouraged on the valley floor, (also known as Subarea A), subject to adequate controls to preserve and improve the quality of life, include: o non-polluting manufacturing o business-professional uses o educational facilities o recreational facilities o non-freeway oriented public accommodations o retail outlets o hospitals, Clinics, medical-professional buildings o multi-family residential uses The types of uses that are to be restricted from the valley floor include: o single-family and mobile home residential uses o open storage except for certain agricultural purposes Each PUD proposed on the valley floor should have a minimum of 40 acres to encourage clustering within a development, discourage C - 45 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I' I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I strip development along streets, and promote compatibility among larger, organized developments. A base of 27 percent of the site may be covered by impervious surfaces. Additional area may be covered if bonus points (I point = I percent of the site) are earned by improvements included in the development. The total area of impervious surfaces in a development cannot exceed 50 percent of the area of the total site, unless bonuses are approved by the Planning Commission. The absolute maximum impervious surface coverage for a development is 63 percent of the site area. The City of Bothell encourages the use of berms, walls, and fences between developments and the freeway to soften the visual impact of the freeway and to help lower the freeway noise level. Noise and air pollution should be minimized through land use control and site design techniques such as buffers, landscaping, building locations and ingress/egress locations. Lighting use must be designed for safety and convenience and must be screened to eliminate glare on residences in adjacent areas. Major areas of open space should be allowed between adjacent developments. The Plan contains an inconsistency: one section says there is no height limit on development on the valley floor while a second section says the basic height limitation for all uses on the valley floor is 35 feet, although the Planning Commission may approve exceptions as part of the PUD process. Landscaping standards encourage public access to the North Creek shoreline, and the planting of indigenous shade trees in the corridor. Both the interior and perimeter of parking areas must be landscaped, and the use of berms is encouraged between parking areas and adjacent development. Landscaping is similarly required along public access routes, and around service, loading, storage and other areas which tend to be unsightly. utilities must be located underground with the exception of major transmission lines. The basic requirements for a collector street are a 60-foot right-of-way and one travel lane in each direction. All development in the North Creek Valley Planning Area must be connected to sanitary sewers due to the poor soil suitability for septic tanks. This requirement can be waived if residential development is proposed on lots at least one-half acre in size where sewer lines will not be available and where the developer provides proof of soil capacity to accommodate septic tanks. Koll Center North Creek and the Quadrant Business Park - Bothell are two major business parks in various stages of development in this portion of the City of Bothell. They are being developed as planned business parks with offices, light industrial structures, recreational amenities, and extensive natural and landscaped open space. Koll Center North Creek encompasses 140 acres, and the Quadrant Business Park - Bothell is located on 178 acres. C - 46 Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives BUSINESS PARK - The City of Bothell's North Creek Planning Area extends northward into Snohomish County to include the 86-acre site although the City does not have jurisdiction in this area. The Plan for the North Creek Valley shows all of the site located in Subarea A, which is the valley floor. Development in this area would require compliance with the performance standards and development criteria for the valley floor if the City of Bothell had jurisdiction over the 86-acre site. The site's existing comprehensive plan designation and zone classification are not fully consistent with the intent of the Bothell plan. The existing land use and zoning would permit single-family residential housing, whereas the Bothell plan promotes light industrial, commercial, institutional and multi- family residential uses that would improve the local tax base while preserving the quality of life in the North Creek Valley. The proposed plan amendment, however, would be fully compatible with the policies and regulations of the Bothell plan. Business park development would comply with standards regulating uses, noise control, utilities, building design and materials, land- scaping, buffering, open space, lighting, signage, parking, lot coverage, height and setbacks. HIGH URBAN - This alternative would be consistent with the Bothell plan. NO CHANGE - This alternative would not be consistent with the Bothell plan, as discussed under the Business Park alternative. Rezone Alternatives PREFERRED AND ALTERNATIVE REZONE SITE PLANS - Upon full development, business park development of the 86-acre site would be similar to the existing Quadrant and Koll business parks in that many structures would be clustered and extensive open space would give the site a park-like setting. The North Creek corridor would be preserved and landscaped, and a pedestrian/bicycle trail would be built adjacent to the creek. Parking areas and access roads would be buffered with landscaping and berms. Public pedestrian walking areas would be provided along perimeter roads and private walkways would be provided in the interior of the site. All utilities would be located underground. Structures proposed on the site would be of comparable bulk, density, and height of those located at the existing Koll and Quadrant parks. These alternatives propose development which would include 40 percent impervious surfaces and 60 percent open space (pervious surfaces). Under the city's plan for the North Creek Valley, bonus points would have to be awarded in addition to the base of 27 percent coverage in order to permit this development. This C - 47 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I would mean a total of 16 bonus points would need to be earned in a combination of at least four of the six categories: Open space, North creek, Energy Conservation/Transportation, Community Benefit, Aesthetics and Planning/Development. A maximum of 10 points can be earned in each category but no category can earn more points than those allocated in the Open Space category. Bonus points could be allocated as follows: Cateqorv Minimum Points Open Space North Creek Energy conservation/Transportation Community Benefit Aesthetics Planning/Development 4 3 3 3 1 -2 Total Bonus Points Earned Plus Basic Percentage 16 27 Total Impervious Surface Coverage Percent 43 Overall, these alternatives would be consistent with the city's plan and would earn enough bonus points in addition to the basic impervious surface coverage allotment to complete the development as proposed. NO REZONE - This alternative would not be consistent with the Bothell plan as discussed in the Business Park Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternative section. KING COUNTY NORTHSHORE COMMUNITY PLAN This plan, adopted in 1977 and revised in 1981, addresses the growth and development of the communities in the portion of King county north and east of Lake Washington. The community located closest to the Snohomish County site is "Holly Hills". The portion southeast of the site is bounded by 120th Avenue NE on the west, the Snohomish/King County line on the north, and the imaginary extensions of NE 200th Street on the south and approximately 14th Avenue NE on the east. The Northshore Plan calls for single-family residential uses in this area. Density ranges from 3-4 units per acre to 4-6 units per acre. The area immediately adjacent to 120th Avenue NE is designated as a "Sensitive Area". The area has several scattered, existing single-family homes and vacant acreage. The Northshore Plan includes policies identified in the following plan elements: C - 48 o Residential Land Use and Housing; o Circulation and Transportation; o Business Districts; o Industrial and Office site Development; o Parks and Recreation; o utilities; o Public Health and Social services; o Aesthetics; and o Development Sensitive Areas. The goal of the Industrial and Office site Development element is to "encourage the development of industrial area and office parks which are functional, serve a wide variety of industries and activities, and are consistent with good environmental planning." Plan Guidelines include the following examples: 1. Provide employment opportunities in the Northshore area to bring jobs closer to living areas; 3. Develop industrial districts which fit harmoniously into their surroundings; 5. Provide adequate facilities for pedestrian and bicycle ways such as bike racks and benches in the development of industrial and office park sites; 6. Retain and enhance to their fullest the natural attributes of the community which exist on industrial and office park sites; 7. Assure development has minimal impact on the lakes, streams and drainage ways, air quality or noise levels of the community's environment; 8. Apply landscape and architectural design standards to all sites which are visible from 1-405 and SR 522; 9. Prohibit industrial development of land in current and potential agricultural use and in flood plains; 10. Discourage industrial land use and traffic in valley areas with potential smog inversion problems; and 16. Locate industrial development in those areas most suitable for development on the basis of proximity to existing facilities, accessibility, cost for extension of services, terrain, and other natural and man-made conditions. The plan for the Holly Hills neighborhood seeks to protect and complement the existing natural features and character which add to the beauty and enjoyment of the area. It identifies Holly Hills as a prime residential area which should provide a variety of densities and values. Development should be controlled in a C - 49 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I way which will add to the convenience and full use now enjoyed by residents of the Holly Hills area. policies for the community include the following examples: 1. Encourage development of vacant land lying east of Bothell corporate limits for single-family residential development at a density of 2 to 3 dwelling units per acre. If sanitary sewers are available to the area the residential density may be increased to 4-6 dwelling units per acre. 8. Prohibit business and commercial zoning in the area east of Bothell City limits. 9. Development proposals for the North Creek Valley should be coordinated between King County, Snohomish County and the City of Bothell to ensure orderly development and minimize adverse impacts throughout the valley. A formal procedure should be established for joint review of plans, policies and development actions. 10. Development of unincorporated property abutting munici- palities shall not be incompatible with the existing densities of those municipalities at the time of Plan adoption. Densities in King county shall be consistent for the first 90 feet or the first tax lot, whichever is least. Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives BUSINESS PARK - The Northshore Plan calls for residential uses in the areas under its jurisdiction closest to the site. This is consistent with Snohomish County's existing North Creek Area Plan designations for the areas east of the site in question and directly north of the area covered by the Northshore Plan as well as the designations on the site itself. The site's existing zoning classification is also compatible with the zoning of this portion of the Holly Hills community. The proposed plan amendment would be consistent with the Northshore Plan policies identified for industrial and office development as well as for the Holly Hills area. The Business Park designation would bring jobs closer to living areas, would provide a development which would fit within its surroundings, would apply landscape design standards to a site which is visible from 1-405 and would locate development in an area which has existing facilities, accessibility, and public services. It will also provide the ability to increase the sanitary sewer capacity of the area as well as retain business zoning west of the Bothell City limits (120th Avenue NE/39th Avenue SE). Business park development would comply with standards regulating noise, utilities, open space, buffering, lighting, signage, parking and lot coverage. C - 50 HIGH URBAN - This alternative would be consistent with the Northshore Plan in that it provided for residential uses but the allowed density (maximum 12.8 dujacre) exceeds the densities called for in the Plan. High and medium density developments could be very compatible. NO CHANGE - This alternative would be consistent with the Northshore Plan, as discussed under the Business Park Alternative. Rezone Alternatives PREFERRED AND ALTERNATIVE REZONE SITE PLANS - Upon full development, business park development of the 86-acre site would be similar to the existing business parks located to the south of the site within the City of Bothell. A pedestrian and bicycle trail along North Creek would be provided. Several of the existing farm buildings would be retained as a means of using the natural attributes of the site. A 100-foot development buffer would be located along each side of North Creek and development would be kept out of the wetlands. The storm drainage would be cleansed on-site, with minimal impact on North Creek. Development would provide minimal additional noise and air pollution impacts beyond the background levels calculated for the year 2000 (see NOISE and AIR QUALITY sections). Overall development would be compatible with the policies in the Northshore Plan. There is no existing interlocal agreement between Snohomish County, King County and the City of Bothell to review development proposals. Any review of development in another jurisdiction is done through the SEPA process (wozniak, 1988). NO REZONE - This alternative would be consistent with the Northshore Plan as discussed in the Business Park Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternative. C - 51 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II Appendix 0 I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I .. .. HLlRTCnOwSER Ea,-;r-. a"a Envlronmenta: Terhnc::J9'f'S Geotechnical Engineering Assessment and Impacts Analysis for Draft Environmental Impact Statement Monte Villa Center Snohomish County, Washington Prepared for The Ferris Company and The Quadrant Corporation J-2559 1910 Fairvi~w AvenuE' East Searrfe, Washington 98102-3699 206.324.9530 1 Summary of Soil Types, Characteristics and Development Limitations I I I Page No. I 1 1 I 2 3 4 4 I 5 5 I 5 6 I 6 7 7 I 8 8 I 8 8 9 I 9 I 10 13 18 I 19 19 I 20 21 I 22 23 I I I I J.2559 CONTENTS EXISTING CONDITIONS General Site Geology Discussion of Soil Conditions Geologic Hazards Topoghraphy Erosion ENVIRONMENTAL IMPAGTS ~ Ground.....ater Topography Erosion KITIGATING MEASURES Soils Groundwater Topography Erosion REFERENCES SCOPE OF GEOTECHNICAL STUDIES GEOTECHNICAL DEVElDPKENT ALTERNATIVES Techniques for Providing Facilities Support Development Conditions in General Areas and Specific Lots Other Geotechnical Considerations REQUIREMENTS FOR DESIGN LEVEL GEOTECHNICAL STUDIES SOIL AND GROUNDYATER CONDITIONS Site Geology Discussion of Soil Conditions Groundwater LIMITATIONS TABLE I I I I I I I I I I J-2559 page ii FIGURES Page No. 1 2 3 4 5 Vicinity Map Existing Topography . Site and Exploration Plan Surficial Soils Map Master Development Plan with Exploration Locations Slope Analysis . APPENDIX A FIELD EXPlDRATIONS A-I Auger Borings Cone Penetrometer Probes A-I A-3 FIGURES I I I I I I I I I A-l A-2 through A-7 A-8 A-9 through A-19 A-20 A-21 through A-24 Key to Exploration Logs Boring Log B-1 through B-G Principle of Dutch Cone Penetrometer Probe Log pol through polO Probe Log P-IOA Probe Log poll through P.14 APPENDIX II lABORATORY TESTING PROGRAM B-1 Soil Classification Yater Content Determinations Atterberg Limits (AL) Grain Size Analysis (GS) B-1 B-1 B-2 B-2 FIGURES B-1 B-2 B.3 Unified Soil Classification (USC) System Plasticity Chart Grain Size Classification J-2559 GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING ASSESSKENT AND IMPAGTS ANALYSIS FOR DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPAGT STATEMENT MONTE VILLA CENTER SNOHOKISH COUNTY. YASHINGTON THE QUADRANT CORPORATION This report is intended to serve two functions. Geotechnical input to the draft environmental impact statement (dEIS) is given in the first section. The format is as requested by The Ferris Company. In the second section is an expansion of the information presented for the dEIS to discuss the various developmental considerations and constraints for the property. This second section is for use primarily by the owner and their design consultants. The following section is a presentation of the information to be included in the dEIS. EXISTING CONDITIONS Site-specific explorations completed as part of this study and for previous studies have been compiled to develop the information presented on the exist~ng conditions. Figure 2 shows the locations of explorations at the site. General Site Geol02v The geology, soils, and topography of the Puget Sound region are the result of glacial deposition and erosion during the last continental glaciation. These glacial processes have produced the present north-south trending ridge and valley topography. The valleys that remained after the glacial ice melted became lakes and flood plains in which sediments and peat accumulated. After the lowering of Lake Ilashington, the Sammamish River and North Creek became entrenched in their valleys. Further, recent I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I J-2559 Page 2 I channelization of North Creek has significantly reduced the likelihood of seasonal flooding and further sediment deposition. I Soils in the lowland portion of the Monte Villa property are characterized by organic deposits in the topographic lows. These organic soils are interbedded with silt, clay, and fine sand. Dense glacial soils underlie these alluvial deposits. The uppermost glacial soils in the lowland area and across much of the highland or sloping areas are comprised of recessional sands and gravels. Underlying the glacial recessional material is glacial till. These glacial soils are predominantly granular with a variable content of fine-grained soil. I I I I I I I I On the west side of North Creek, low strength cohesive soils were encountered in cul-de-sacs located north and south of the existing farm buildings. The formation of these cul-de-sacs could be surface expressions of old groundwater seepage erosion at depth, or erosion from an old creek channe 1 . Discussion of Soil Conditions The site soils may be subdivided into four distinct general categories: I I I I 0 Topsoil 0 Compressible Soils 0 Near - Surface Glacial Soils 0 Deep Glacial Soils The topsoil is defined as the surface layer of vegetation, roots, and other organics. Such material covers the entire site and ranges in thickness from less than 1 foot to about 3 feet. I I The elevation 40- to 50-foot contours are rough boundaries of the areas where compressible soils are located across the proj ect site. These compressible soils consist of peat or organic silt, and silty clay. The thickness of the compressible soils at the exploration locations ranged to I J-2559 Page 3 more than 20 feet. The general limits of significant deposits of the compressible soils are indicated on Figure 2. The near-surface glacial soils are located primarily along the north and east portions of the property, and on the upland portions west of North Creek. These soils are silty sand and gravel and directly underlie the surficial topsoil layer. They increase in density with increasing depth. The deep glacial soils were encountered intermittently in explorations on the east side of the site. These materials are overconsolidated and very dense. The soil, termed glacial till, is an unsorted mixture of sil t, sand, and gravel cemented into a compact, low permeability material. Groundwater underlies the site at depths ranging from essentially the ground surface to about 8 feet below the ground surface. Standing water in low areas is evident seasonally. In addition to the site-specific data developed from explorations, the Soil Survey of Snohomish County Area, IJashington prepared by the Soil Conservation Service (SCS, 1983) was consulted for additional information on the project site. The SCS map showing soil classification of the site has been reproduced as Figure 3. Table l, included in this report after Figure 3, is a compilation of some data from the SCS report. The data from this report as well as the information included in Table 1 should be considered generalizations only. The presence of site-specific explorations is a far more useful source of information on the site soils and the quality of the site from an engineering standpoint. Geol02ic Hazards The Puget Sound region is a seismically active area which has experienced frequent earthquakes of low to moderate intensity. Damage as a result of a seismic event could be caused by several occurrences, such as direct ground shaking, liquefaction, induced slope instability, or settlement. The greatest hazard is a result of movement of the ground beneath structures. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I J-2559 Page 4 I The intensity of shaking is related to the location of the site relative to ~he epicenter, the energy of the earthquake, and the response of the site soils. Soils of higher density, such as those in the area planned for most of the buildings, have a lower seismic hazard potential than less dense flood plain soils. I I I Liquefaction, the loss of soil strength due to ground shaking, can cause settlement of overlying structures. However, the soils of this site are generally not considered susceptible to liquefaction, except through isolated less silty seams in the soil profile. I I I In addition, landslide hazards are low due to the relatively flat nature of the site topography. TODo~raDhv I I The site topography is illustrated on the topographic contour map reprinted on Figure 2. East of North Creek the site slopes from 39th Avenue S.E. toward North Creek, and from 27th Place S.E. toward North Creek. The central portion of the site is relatively flat. Smaller local slopes exist variously around the site. North Creek cuts the site from north to south at approximately the western one-third point of the site. Surface elevations range from about 30 feet in the central lowland area to about 90 feet in the extreme northeast corner. The hillside slopes (Figure 5) are generally 8 percent or less, and in most cases less than 5 percent. Isolated slopes are as steep as 20 percent, but these are typically small in area with only about a lO-foot difference in grade. I I I I I Erosion I Each of the soils mapped by the Soil Conservation Service (Figure 3) and identified in Table 1 have been characterized by SCS to have a slight hazard of water erosion. I I I J-2559 Page 5 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPAGTS ,S,Qlli The impacts to the geology and soils from the development of this site would be primarily from removal of the topsoil across much of the developed area, consolidation of the compressible soils which will be overlain by new buildings or fills, and a change in the surface drainage pattern of the site. Ilithout proper engineering of the building design, post-construction damage to the facilities resulting from poor support conditions or from long-term settlements could occur. Buildings will not likely overlie areas of known peat deposits. Prealods for the building site, if u.sed, may encroach slightly on the peat areas. Roadways may overlie peat. Preload fills will probably be required in these areas. Compressing the soil increases its unit weight and strength. Filling and paving of those areas underlain by organic soils could prevent natural emission of methane gas generated from the decomposition of the organic material. Compression of organic soils does affect the decomposition rate of the material or other chemical properties so generation of methane gas would continue Consideration of the methane generation conditions should be undertaken during design level studies. Croundwater Three aspects of the development plans may be related to the groundwater below the site. These are the installation of piles into soil below the groundwater level, excavations in saturated soils, and surface paving across a broad area. Installation of piles would theoretically cause a short-term rise in the water level a height commensurate with the volume of water displaced. Realistically any such rise would be small, and diss ipate quickly. A I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I J-2559 Page 6 I I small, long-term increase in the water level as a result of reduced hydraulic conductivity in the pile areas may also result. This increase should dissipate at a short distance away from the buildings, and may not extend beyond the site boundary. I I Construction of asphalt pavement over a broad area will reduce the surface infiltration of precipitation into the groundwater system. The impact of the reduced infiltration should be minimal, as the surface water runoff from the pavement will likely be collected and outletted either into North Creek, thereby maintaining a direct communication with the area groundwater. or into the groundwater directly through retention basins. I I I TOD02raDhv I Development activities would result in modification of existing topography. Some grading will occur to enable development of buildings, parking, and roadways. Cuts would be likely in some of the higher portions of the site with balanced fills occurring in the lower areas. Different development alternatives will result in different levels of cuts and fills. I I Erosion I I Erosion of exposed soils in areas of steep construction slopes could result, even though the soils in their natural condition are considered to have a low susceptibility to erosion. Ilithout proper protection from erosion, soil materials could be transported to downslope areas and possibly into North Creek. In addition, local sloughing and sliding of oversteepened slopes could occur. I I I I I J-2559 Page 7 MITIGATING KEASURES ,S"Q,lli Various foundation support alternatives can be used for buildings located across this site. Those alternatives include deep foundations, which would likely have the least impact on the existing soils and subsurface conditions, or shallow foundations with suitable site pretreatment. Appropriate methods of pretreatment include construction of pre loads across building areas, overexcavation of softer compressible soils and replacement with compacted fill, or relocation of buildings to areas with more favorable soil support conditions. Pre loads are a way of inducing consolidation of the underlying soils by placement of an earth fill approximating the weight of the building to be constructed in the future. The soils therefore consolidate under the weight of the fill rather than the weight of the building. Overexcavation of unsuitable soil and provides a more uniform bearing surface and differential settlements result. replacement with for the structure. compacted fill Reduced total I I I I I I I I I I II I Location of the buildings in the areas of firmer support soil would require II placement of buildings essentially around the perimeter of the site. Significant thicknesses of peat will not likely be removed from the site. Additional mitigating measures associated with consolidation of peat under preloads or fills are not planned. Mitigation of risk due to earthquakes is not likely to be cost-effective. Large scale densification of the soils to make them more resistant to ground shaking and resulting settlement would be very expensive and only marginally effective. The upland areas have a relatively low seismic damage risk as it is. I I II I I I I I J-2559 Page 8 I I Methane can be controlled by several methods, if it is considered a building area hazard. The underslab of the buildings can be completely sealed to reduce the potential for gas inflow into the building. Alternatively, cutoff trenches can be constructed around the building to prevent migration of the methane to the underslab areas. I I Groundwater I I I Noticeable adverse impacts are not expected. To maintain the quality of the storm water or runoff discharge into North Creek or through retention basins, erosion control measures on slopes and components such as oil/water separators in the pavement and building drainage system are planned. To'Ool!rsnhv I Modifications to the topography of the site cannot be mitigated. The site will be altered by grading efforts necessary for development. I Erosion I Erosion and siltation could be controlled using appropriate and common construction techniques. These techniques would include use of silt curtains, temporary ditching, retention ponds, and phasing of earthwork activities. Cut and fill slopes and retaining structures can be properly designed and maintained to control local sloughing, sliding, and bank erosion. I I I I REFERENCE I I U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service, "Soil Survey of Snohomish County Area, Yashington", July 1983. I J-2559 Page 9 The following sec~ions of the report expand on the information to be included in the dEIS. These sections include a discussion of the scope of the geotechnical studies completed for the project, a review of the existing soil and groundwater conditions, and a discussion of those conditions in engineering terms, an outline of the geotechnical development alternatives addressing methods of foundation support and site pretreatment, relating those various support methods to the potential buildings sites or lots on the property. In addition, we have included general comments on various other geotechnical considerations and have developed recommendations for design level studies prior to final building design. SCOPE OF GEOTECHNICAL STUDIES The scope of our work at this site has included a review of the previous studies completed at this site in 1984 and 1986, and completion of deep explorations in the form of 15 cone penetrometer probes and six hollow-stem auger borings around the site. Limited laboratory testing has been performed, generally to identify the engineering properties of the sampled soils and to aid in the overall site assessment. Engineering studies focused on the development of input for the dEIS and on preparation of an outline of developmental alternatives for the preferred project alternatives. The reader is again referred to the various site plans included on Figures 1 through 5 of this document, with particular attention paid to Figure 4. On Figure 4 is shown the current lot designations and the locations of explorations for this and previous studies. GEOTECHNICAL DEVElDPKENT ALTERNATIVES I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I The information in this section is of interest to ~he owner and the designers. Ye discuss the various advantages and disadvantages to II development of each distinct area and lot of the site, and identify the requirements for a successful development in each area from a geotechnical I s~andpoint. I I I I J-2559 Page 10 I Technioues for Providin2 Facilities Support I The geotechnical considerations associated with building support are providing a proper sub grade to physically support the weight of the building, dealing with the deeper soil condition so that post-construction settlements are not excessive, or using deep foundation support. I I In areas where the competence of the deeper soils is not an issue, providing a proper sub grade can usually be accomplished through minor overexcavation and replacement of unsuitable near-surface soils. If unsui table soils extent to significant depth below the building area, the alternatives for limiting settlements include: I I I o Overexcavation of soft or unsuitable soil and replacement with compacted fill; I o Preloading of the affected area. I Following the establishment of a stable sub grade , and appropriate site pretreatment, shallow foundations consisting of spread footings, continuous footings, and slabs-on-grade can be used. The specific design requirements vary across the site, with low allowable bearing pressures over softer soils or new fill, and higher allowable bearing pressures on the upland glacial soils. I I I I If the problems with subgrade conditions or settlement cannot be economically overcome by the above alternatives, deep foundations may be required. Overexcavation and Replacement I I I It has been our experience that overexcavation of unsuitable soils and replacement with compacted structural fill is not economically viable if the depth of overexcavation is more than about 5 to 7 feet over a broad area. The theory behind this site preparation approach is to provide a I J-2559 Page 11 uniform bearing surface for the facility and a means of transferring and spreading the applied building loads to the deeper soils. This approach requires field decisions to be made by the geotechnical engineer or owner's representative regarding depths of overexcavation. In addition, all fill placed into the overexcavation must be carefully compacted. Completion of the overexcavation and placement of the fill becomes more difficult during the wet winter months. The situation is further complicated by the groundwater table, which may be within a few feet of the ground surface during the wetter months of the year. These factors may actually create more problems than the overexcavation solves. Design decisions on overexcavation must be made on a site by site basis, taking these factors into account. Recommendation: Avoid overexcavation and replacement: broad scale to depths of more unless construction can occur of mat.erials on a than about 4 during the feet summer. Pre loading or Surcharging Preloading of those areas underlain by soft compressible soils is used successfully throughout the Puge t Sound area. Pre loads have been constructed over building sites in the properties adj acent to this. and have been used extensively for structures in the deep soft soils of the Kent Valley. Pre loads are constructed with dumped fill "tracked" into place. Typically settlement plates or some other form of geotechnical instrumentation are included with the preload so that the progress of the consolidation can be monitored. The design height, extent, and time frame for pre loading is dependent on the specific subsurface conditions at the building site and on the design plans for the facility. Even with preloading, minor overexcavation of unsuitable soil and replacement with compacted fill at I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I J-2559 Page l2 I footing locations would probably be necessary to provide a uniform bearing surface. I I I Recommendation: Consider pre loads early in the design process. The pre loading time requires that the cons true ted embankment be in place for a designated period before building construction can begin. Deep Foundations I I I Deep foundation support can be provided without significant site pretreatment. Deep foundations are usually more expensive than shallow foundations and often require the hiring of specialty contractors or subcontractors. Appropriate types of deep foundation support include augercast piling, steel pipe, and H sections, and in some areas precast concrete and timber piles. Piles would be installed into the underlying glacial soil. Post-construction settlement of facilities supported on piles is expected to be very low. I I Roadways and Parking I As with the buildings, roads or parking areas are likely to be constructed in both cuts and fills. Filling will induce consolidation and settlement over soft soils. A proper subgrade will be required also for these aspects of the development plan. Pre loading of parking areas or roads is possible and would be very effective. But preload costs are likely to be high for this sort of land use. An alternative is raising site grades in soft areas. This provides a proper sub grade . The cost of maintenance from settlement would be weighed against the cost of pre loading. If grades are raised, the filling should be done early in the project so that settlement occurs before pavement construction. I I I I I i I I II J-2559 Page 13 Develoument Conditions in General Areas and Soecific Lots Northwest Corner - Lots 12, 13, 14, l5, 16 The northwest corner of the site, defined as that area north of the existing farm buildings and west of North Creek, is characterized by a significant deposit of compressible silt and clay. Explorations (three test pits and two probes) in this area disclosed compressible soil depths of more than 20 feet in some areas. The depth to soils considered suitable for direct support of spread foundations ranged from 7 to 25 feet below the existing ground surface in portions of lots 14 and 15. In other areas, the soils are expected to be firm within a few feet of the ground surface. No explorations have been done west of 31st Avenue Southeast. Buildin2 Suuuort: Recommended support alternatives for the west half of lot 14 and the east portion of lot 15 include a preload, or piles. The preload would likely be at least 8 to 10 feet high (depending on the structure) and would require a consolidation time of four to six months, as a minimum. Footing loads of about 2,000 pounds per square foot (pst) may then be supported. Piles on the other hand would be 20 to 40 feet long, and could be susceptible to downdrag loads resulting from continuing consolidation of the compressible soils over the deeper support soils. In other. areas, it appears that only surface stripping of vegetation and shallow organics will be needed to expose competent bearing soils. Paved Areas: Construction of pavement for parking or roadways would also require some treatment within lots 14 and l5. If possible, these areas could also be preloaded, or as a minimum, overexcavation of 2 to 3 feet of soil and replacement with compacted structural fill should be done. Raising grades with fill would be an option also. In other areas, typical pavement sections can be constructed after removal of surface vegetation and organics. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I J-2559 Page l4 I For any building supported on spread foundations or for any paved parking or roadways in this area of compressible soil, post-construction settlements should be expected. Flexible building design (tolerant to post construction settlement) would be required, and periodic resurfacing or repair of the paved areas would likely be necessary. I I I - Southwest Corner - Lots 17, 18, 19, 20 I I I The southwest portion of the site, south of the existing farm buildings and west of North Creek, includes two very different areas. In the southeast portion of this area, significant deposits of soft, compressible or organic soils were encountered. Organic soils to depths of more than 20 feet were noted at the extreme southern portion of this area. It is estimated that the dividing point of the soft soils and the more suitable support soils is represented by approximately the elevation 42- to 46-foot contours, but more explorations are needed to define this more accurately. Soils on the western half of this area are firm within 2 to 3 feet of the ground surface. Explorations done in this area include seven test pits, four probes, and one boring. I I I Buildin2 Suuuort and Paved Areas: Structures or pavement sections constructed on the western portion of this area (most of lot l8 and all of lot l7) would require only stripping of the organic topsoil layer. Support can be provided directly by the stripped surface. Foundation bearing pressures of 3,000 to 5,000 psf may be available. Away from the areas of organic soils, the development alternatives above the soft and compressible soil (most of lot 19 and some of lot 20) are similar to those in the northwest corner. Pre loads or deep foundation support would be appropriate. The thickness of compressible soil in this area of the site 1s slightly less than the northwest corner, and therefore post-construction settlements and preload heights and times would be smaller as well. I I I I I I I We discourage development over the peat soils unless absolutely necessary. Preloading of peat is possible, but it is more difficult to achieve the desired result as peat will undergo consolidation over a period of many J-2559 Page 15 years _ Pile support of structures located over peat is almost always a more positive design approach. In addition, consideration of the production of methane gas from the decomposition of the organic soils is a concern for development over peat. These concerns would apply to both structures and pavements. North-Central - Lot 4, 5, 6 The north-central area of the site is characterized by gentle slopes from north to south. It can be loosely defined as the area north of the elevation 40 contour, east of North Creek, and in the central third of the property. The depth of surficial organic topsoil in this area is typically 1 to 2 feet. Six test pits and two borings have been done in this area. Buildin2 Suooort: Generally granular soils which will provide moderate bearing for foundations are located within 2 to 3 feet of the existing ground surface. Only minor overexcavation or compaction in-place of soils directly below footings and slabs would be required. The area should be suitable for support of compacted fills. Moderate bearing pressures for footings, on the order of 3,000 to 5,000 psf are expected. Paved Areas: Roads or parking lots can be supported directly on a stripped surface, on cuts, or on fills in this area. Significant post-construction settlement is not likely. As shown on the plan dated 5/5/89 (revised 7/18/89) and reproduced as Figure 4, the main access road adjacent to the south side of lots 4 and 5 will cross the elevation 40-foot contour. The road will pass over peat and other compressible soil. Explorations in this area show soft and compressible soils to depths of 4 to 8 feet below the existing ground surface. As noted previously, support options for the road include overexacavation and replacement, preloading, or a structural deck/bridge. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I J-2559 Page 16 I I Northeast Corner - Lots l, 2, 3 I Based on the results of three test pits and one boring, we conclude that the northeast corner of the site in general has the most desirable bearing conditions. Outcrops of glacial till were encountered in several of the explorations in this area. Surficial topsoil thicknesses of less than 2 feet were prevalent across the area, although in small swales the thickness could be greater. I I I I Buildin2 SUDDort and Paved Areas: Moderate to good bearing conditions are present within about 2 feet of the ground surface, with excellent bearing located several feet deeper. Only limited replacement of disturbed soils will be required before constructing building and pavements. Bearing pressures of 4,000 to 7,000 psf are expected. I This is also the highest area of the site and the area in which most cuts are expected to occur. Cut slopes in this area should be relatively stable, although erosion protection is recommended if the slopes are to be open for an extended period of time. I I I I I, I Southeast Corner - Lots 9, lO, II I The southeast corner is defined as that area east of the elevation 40-foot contour in the south half of the site. In general, this area of the site is well suited for development of pavements and structures. An exception to this is apparently in the vicinity of explorations P-4 and B-6 (southwest corner of lot 9). Less competent soils were encountered in each of these explorations. Also, the southwest corner of lot II extends below the elevation 40-foot contour. Peat or other soft soil is possibly in this area, but in limited thicknesses. These are areas which will require further study during a design phase. In the other explorations in this corner, the depth of surficial topsoil was less than 2 feet. Soils within 2 to 3 feet of the existing ground surface will provide moderate foundation support. I I J-2559 Page 17 South-Central - Lots 7, 8 This area is defined as that portion of the property south and west of the elevation 40-foot contour and east of North Creek. Two significant deposits of peat or organic soil were encountered in this area. They are denoted on Figure 2. The remaining portion of this area is characterized by soft or loose soils varying in depth from about 3 feet to about lO feet. Buildin2 SUDDort and Paved Areas: Except for the northeast corner of lot 8, this portion of the site is generally not suited to development of either structures or paved areas. Deep foundation support or significant pretreatment of the area would be required in order to provide building support:. Pretreatment or tolerance of continuing settlement and maintenance work would be needed for construction of pavements or roadways. The north half of lot 7 appears to have a manageable thickness of soft soil, but it is within the 100 year flood plain. Much of this area had standing water when our deep explorations were done in April. 1988. Summary of Development Conditions Most of the lots can be developed with building locations on the upper portions of the property, above the elevation 40-foot contour. Those facilities above this contour can be constructed and supported on shallow foundations with limited special construction requirements. A few exceptions to the 40-foot contour guideline exist, most notably in lots west of North Creek, where soft soils were encountered on some higher ground. The portions of the buildings which infringe upon the elevation 40-foot contour are likely to require some special construction techniques. Roadways into and around the soft areas will also require special construction techniques in the form of overexcavation, fills, or preloading. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I J-2559 Page l8 I I Other Geotechnical Considerations Fill Soil Characterization and Quantities I I The near-surface materials are in a loose to medium dense condition. Compaction of fill usually results in a medium dense condition as well. As a result, in the upper 3 to 4 feet, the relative quantities of cut and fill are estimated to be about the same. As the in situ soil becomes more dense, the volume excavated creates a larger volume when filled. The different in these quantities may be on the order of 10 to 15 percent. I I I Soil excavated on-site will not be able to be used as backfill in building areas except under extended good weather conditions (July-September). Grain size classification tests performed on selected samples of the near-surface materials in the northeast corner indicate fines content ranging from 12 to 30 percent. If a soil has a fines content of more than about 5 percent it cannot be consistently compacted to a fim condition except during dry weather. The site materials are moisture sensitive and do not generally drain well. I I I I I I I Recommendation: If significant fills are to be placed during wet weather, use imported clean sand and gravel. Erosion Protection and Drainage During excavation and following construction, erosion protection of cut and filled slopes will be required. Such protection is likely to take the form of silt fences, retention ponds, and plastic covering of exposed slopes during construction. Permanent erosion protection can probably be provided using appropriate drainage around the slopes and buildings, landscaping, and vegetation protection of permanent slopes. I I Permanent drains around and below buildings and behind retaining walls may be required depending on the final site grading plans. The designers I J-2559 Page 19 should slope the site to drain surface runoff to desirable collection points and away from buildings. Some special drainage plans in the non-developed areas of the site may be incorporated to create detention ponds or wetland areas, and to provide drainage of other portions of the site. REQUIREMENTS FOR DESIGN LEVEL GEOTECHNICAL STUDIES Yhen a site plan has been developed which presents assumed final grades and building locations, it will be necessary to complete additional deep and shallow excavations. These explorations will allow us to tailor the recommendations to a specific lots and specific building requirements. If the design plan for Quadrant is to provide fully builable lots or pads the geotechnical approach could be similar, or could simply be a preparation of appropriate work scopes for each property. On the basis of the building-specific explorations and testing, analyses should be undertaken to identify such design requirements as foundation bearing pressures and recommended levels, estimated post-construction settlements, specific preconstruction treatment of the site including preload sizes and times, and required depth of overexcavation. Finally, clear recommendations for construction observation and testing should be included in the design level work. SOIL AND GROUNDYATER CONDITIONS This section is a compilation of the subsurface data from the Hart Crowser explorations and those completed by others. It formed the basis for our engineering discussion. It is useful to a designer only in that it presents the rationale for various statements made in previous portions of this report regarding development alternatives and recommendations. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I J-2559 Page 20 I Site Geol02v I The depositional environment of the soil at the Monte Villa site is dominated by the most recent glaciation of the Puget Sound area and the movement of North Creek through the site. Soils in the lowland portion of the property are characterized by organic deposits in topographic lows. These organic soils are interbedded with silt, clay, and fine sand associated with overbank deposits from North Creek or its predecessor. I I I I I I I I I I I I Dense glacial soils underlie these alluvial deposits. The uppermost glacial soils in the lowland area and across much of the highland or sloping areas are comprised of recessional sands and gravels. These materials have not been overridden, as they were deposited behind a receding glacier. The materials increase in density with increasing depth below the ground surface. Underlying the glacial recessional material is glacial till. Glacial till was encountered in several of the explorations, predominantly on the east side of the property, but it is assumed to underlie the entire site at some depth. Both the recessional sand and gravel, and the till, are predominantly granular soils with a variable content of fine-grained soil. I I On the west side of North Creek low strength cohesive soils were encountered in cul-de-sacs located north and south of the existing farm buildings. Medium stiff silt and clay extending to depths of 15 to 20 feet were noted in explorations in each location. The topography of the area suggests that these soils are overbank materials from North Creek deposited in depressions carved either by the creek itself or by erosion from groundwater seepage from high ground to the west. The extent of these soft deposits has been well defined south of the existing farm buildings. To the north of the buildings, however, insufficient explorations have been done to identify the limits of the soft soils. I J-2559 Page 21 Discussion of Soil Conditions The site soils may be subdivided into four distinct categories: 0 Topsoil 0 Compressible Soils 0 Near-Surface Glacial Soils 0 Deep Glacial Soils - Topsoil The Topsoil is defined as the surface organic layer consisting of vegetation, roots, and other organics. Such material covers the entire site and ranges in thickness from less than one foot to about 3 feet. The surficial vegetation provides some strength for the support of foot traffic including animals and light machinery. Yhen this surficial organic layer is broken through, the underlying soils are very soft and, except in summer, very wet. This material is not suitable for engineering purposes and will require removal in development areas. - Compressible Soils The elevation 40-foot contour (50-foot contour in northwest corner) is a rough boundary of the areas where compressible soils are located across the project site. These compressible soils consist of peat or organic silt, and silty clay. The thickness of the compressible soils at the exploration locations ranged to more than 20 feet. The general limits of significant deposits of the compressible soils are indicated on Figure 2. Three distinct areas of peat soils have been encountered in the explorations. It appears the thickness and extent of peat is increasing to the south, beyond the property limits. If loads are applied placement of fill, to the compressible soils either the soils will consolidate. by development, or by The time rate for I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I J-2559 Page 22 I completion of the consolidation depends on the nature of the soil and the thickness of the soil. Organic soils may continue to compress for many years. Non-organic soils will consolidate much more quickly. In general, development of any area underlain by compressible soil requires special measures such as pre loading of the area, support on deep foundations, or a structural design which can tolerate significant settlements. I I I - Near-Surface Glacial Soils I I I The near-surface glacial soils are located primarily along the north and east portions of the property, and on the upland portions west of creek. These soils are silty sand and gravel and directly underlie the surficial topsoil layer. They increase in density with increasing depth, and are capable of providing support for fills, buildings, and pavements. These soils are also a potential source of material for use as fill in other areas of the site, but the variable silt content within the sand and gravel matrix can complicate fill placement during periods of wet weather. In the south-central, or lower areas of the site, these soils underlie the compressible soils. I I I I I I I I I I - Deep Glacial Soils The deep glacial soils were encountered in three of the borings on the east side of the site and in two test pits. These materials are overconsolidated by glacial ice and are very dense. The soil, termed Glacial Till, is an unsorted mixture of silt, sand, and gravel cemented into a compact, low permeability material. This soil provides excellent support for all kinds of development. Groundwater Groundwater was encountered in each of the explorations at depths ranging from at the ground surface to about 8 feet below the ground surface. At the time of our explorations, standing water was evident in the southern low portions of the site. Groundwater is present at the site in two J-2559 Page 23 forms. The common source is related to North Creek and its drainage basin. This more represents a true regional groundwater table because it is present year round. The second source is groundwater "perched" above isolated or low permeability soils. If encountered, these zones may quickly drain, since they have no continuous recharge. This groundwater is common in glacial soils. The groundwater flow direction is generally toward the south, or the North Creek valley from the highland areas east, west, and north of the site. In the upland portions of the property, the groundwater is likely associated with surface runoff and other shallow flows in the moderately permeable near-surface glacial soil. Cuts for regrading of the site on the north and east side are likely to encounter groundwater seepage within about 5 to 7 feet of the existing ground surface. LIMITATIONS This study was first performed in general accordance with our scope of work dated February 16, 1988, and with the provisions of the executed contract agreement dated March 29, 1988. The report was modified according to our proposal dated June 13, 1989. This report has been prepared for the exclusive use of The Quadrant Corporation and The Ferris Company and their design consultants for specific application to the subject project and site. This study has been performed in accordance with generally accepted geotechnical practices. No other warranty, express or implied, is made. The subsurface conditions including the soil and groundwater conditions have been evaluated on the basis of the exploration completed for this study and those explorations completed for previous studies. It should be noted that the nature and extent of subsurface variations between the explorations may not become evident until construction. Should significant variations appear evident, it will be necessary to reevaluate the recommendations of this and subsequent reports. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I J-2559 Page 24 The discussions and recommendations given herein are sensitive to the the project. The recommendations are general and not However, should the nature of the buildings change I development plans for building specific. significantly from the size and loads anticipated, some recommendations may I require revision. I Ye appreciate the opportunity to work with you on this project. If you have any questions or require clarification or additional discussion of any items, please call. I I I I I I I I HART CROYSER, INC. ~G~~- .,....,......-........" . - I \" .-- ,t) ",. w/I\., ,.'\\ '.....J.. ...~..~:~.... '~.~ \ ' -" .."~,, '."'"" ".'. , ..... 0"_ U -'_:-;..-_ : .'~"'-"" '';:\ ,-< i ;";;:.' ''lo'~ '\ "~'~ . .~ ,~: -'l..~," ~p' < : "';:: :! Il""';.{ ..._l.. ... ......' f ~ '. .'" L;../ ,'4;;; .~..... . . ,... ~'J ;- c:?r: ...~(GiSil~\~.. ,".~ ~ ~J'sii:iNA\'t.;.~-..... "_'::a,,...._~.a."" DAVID G. YINTER, P.E. Associate DGY:sek/kcp FR2559/JOBS I I I I I Table 1 S\mma!y of Soil Types, Olaracteristics, and DevelOlJlleDt Limitatioos Buildin;1 Site DevelCipllellt Shall"" SlDall !:XC. Buildinqs Roadways Cap. Soil Type and Slope Cass , I I . Ind. gravelly sandy loam I lYe 1- llDierately well drained 2 - 8\ : 1- hardpan bel"" 35" I :- seasaW. water table at 2' I 1- l"" pel'\""'.hi1ity in hardpan General Olaracteristics :Ald. gravelly sandy loam : lYe 1- same as above 8 - 15% I I : Ever . gravelly sandy loam I Vls 1- high Jlel""'-M 1 i ty o - 8\ : 1- SCIlIeIdlat excessively drained -"" silt loam 0-2\ I 1111 : - slow permeabi.1i ty I : - Be'l.....,.1 high water table I :- UDderlain bof organics : I Terrie """,...prtsts : 1111 1- very pcorly drained. organic o - 3\ 1- III:lderate permeability 1- p:n:Iinq : - .....,..,.1 high water table Soil Calservatioo Service. 1983 lb1erate: cemented pan, wetness I It:derate: I As above. slope : Severe: cuthanks I :cave, small stales: Severe: excess hI.m.1s. wetness IiJt rated Iloderate: slope Severe : slope It:derate: slope Severe : flcx:dinq , I loll strenqth : IiJt rated Slight , I , I !I , , , :1 , , :, . Iloderate: slope Slight Iloderate: :, I wetness, : : flcx:dinq, : : frost actioo : I nJt rated :1 , , :, I I I J-2559 I I APPENDIX A FIELD EXPLORATIONS I I I I I The program of subsurface explorations for this project included completion of fifteen cone penetrometer probes and six hollow-stem auger borings. The results of our exploration program are presented on the explorations logs within this Appendix. The exploration logs are a representation of our interpretation of the drilling or excavation, sampling, and testing information. The depth where the soils or characteristics of the soils changed is noted. The change may be gradual. Soil samples recovered in the explorations were visually classified in the field in general accordance with the method presented on Figure A-I. A legend for the field exploration logs defining symbols and abbreviations utilized is also presented on Figure A-I. I I I The exploration locations are presented on Figures 2 and 4. The explorations were located in the field by hand taping or pacing from existing physical features. The approximate ground surface elevation at the exploration locations, as presented on the exploration logs, are interpreted from elevations presented on a topographic map provided by Hewitt/Daly/Isley. The location and elevation of the explorations should be considered accurate to the degree implied by the method used. I I I I I Au"er Borin"s I A total of six hollow-stem auger borings, designated B-1 through B-6, were drilled in April 6, and 7, 1988. The borings were completed to depths ranging from 24 to 33 feet below the ground surface. The borings were advanced with a truck-mounted drill rig under subcontract to Hart Crowser, Inc. using a 3-3/8-inch inside diameter hollow-stem auger. The drilling was accomplished under the continuous observation of an engineering geologist from our firm. Detailed field logs were prepared of each I J-2559 Page A-2 boring. Standard Samples were obtained on 2.1/2 to 5-foot depth intervals using the Penetration Test (SPT) procedure and thin-walled Shelby tubes. The Standard Penetration Test procedure as described in ASTM D 1587, was used to obtain disturbed samples. A standard 2-inch outside diameter, split-spoon sampler is driven into the soil a distance of 18 inches using a 140-pound hammer, free-falling 30 inches. The number of blows required to drive the sampler the last 12 inches is the Standard Penetration Resistance. This resistance t or blow count, provides a measure of the relative density of granular soils and consistency of cohesive soils. The blow counts are plotted on the boring logs at the respective sample depths. Samples were recovered from the split-barrel sampler, field classified and placed in water-tight jars and taken to our laboratory for further testing. The Standard Penetration Test is a useful quantitative tool from which density/consistency is determined. The results must be used in conjunction with other tests and engineering judgement. If the high penetration resistance encountered in very dense material precluded driving the total l8-inch sample interval, the penetration resistance for the partial penetration is entered on logs as follows: if the total penetration is greater than 6 inches and less than 18 inches, then the noted blow count is the sum of the number of blows completed after the first 6 inches of penetration, over the number of inches driven in excess of the first 6 inches. For example, a blow count series of 12 for 6 inches, 30 for 6 inches, and 50 for 3 inches, would be recorded as 80/9 inches. A blow count series of 32 for 6 inches and 50 for 4 inches would be reported as 50/4 inches. In the case where total penetration is less than 6 inches, the total number of blows and penetration are indicated. In fine-grained soils, a 3-inch-diameter thin-walled steel (Shelby) tube sampler was pushed hydraulically below the auger to obtain a relatively undisturbed sample for classification and testing. The tubes were sealed in the field and taken to our laboratory for extrusion and classification. The boring logs are presented on Figures A-2 through A-7. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I J-2559 Page A-3 Cone Penetrometer Probes I I I The quasi-static cone penetrometer was used to complete 15 probes for this study. The probes, designated pol through P14 (and P-lOA), were advanced to depths ranging from 7 to 33 feet below the ground surface. The probes were completed by Subterranean, Inc. of Gig Harbor, Washington. The cone penetrometer used was the Begemann type, the principles of which are shown on Figure A-8. The system is mounted on a truck which provides the necessary reaction for the applied loads. I I I From the results of the penetrometer probes, a direct correlation is obtained between the point resistance of the cone an bearing capacity of the soil and between the sleeve friction and frictional characteristics of the soil. The relative density/consistency of the soil being probed is empirically related to the cone penetration resistance (qc). Further, comparing the values of qc, sleeve friction (fs), and the friction ratio (fs/qc in percent) leads to an interpretive soil classification. The soil . classification chart developed by Schmertmann (1978) for use with the cone penetrometer results is also presented on Figure A-8. I I I I Generally, a friction ratio value less than 2 indicates sand; a value between 2 and 4 indicates a silt-sand mixture, clayey sand, or silt; and values greater than 4 indicate a clayey silt or clay. The soil interpretations presented on the probe logs have been developed using Figure A-8 as a guideline with modifications according to correlations of soil types disclosed in borings performed at the site and interpretation of the probe results. The probe logs are presented on Figure A-9 through A-24. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I lIIo... Key to Exploration Logs Sample Descriptions ClaSSlflcatlon of soils 1" tnis reco~t is based on visual field and leco~BtQ~Y oDse~v.tions wnicl"l include densIty/consistency, moisture condition. grain 51%e, ana elastiCity estlml!!ltes and sMould not be construed to imply field nor laboratory testing unless presented Mereln. Visual-manual claSSIfication methods af ASTM 0 2488 ~e,..e used as an identification guide. SOil descriPtions consist of t~e following: Oensity/conslstency. moisture. color. mlnor constituents. MA..JOR CONSTITUENT. additional I""emal""ks. DenSity/ConSistency Soil denslty/consistency 1n borings is related primarily to tne Standal""d ~enetration Resistance. Soil denslty/conslstenCy in test tilts is estimated based on visual observation and is pl""esented p.rentne~ic.lly on tne test Pit logs. SAND or- GRAVEL Oensity Very loose L.oose Medium dense Oense Ver-y dense Standar-d Penetretion Resistance in Blows/Foot 0-" .. - 10 10 - 30 30 - 50 >50 Moisture Cry L.ittle perceptible moisture Camp Some perceptible moisture. pr-obably below OPtimum Moist PrObably nea,.. optimum moisture content Wet Much perceotible moisture. problbly above optimum Legends Sampling BORING SAMPLES I2?l So 11 t Sooon [SJ SI1e ICv TuCe lIID Cuttings OJ COr"e Run * NO Samele Recover"Y P Tube PUShed. Not Or"iven TEST PIT SAMPLES [8] Gr".b (~a~) lZ! Bag lSl SI1elCy Tube Ground Water Observations i SUr"face S.al Ground Water" L.evel on Date (ATOI At Hme at 0~1111ng Obser"vation well Tip Or" Slotted Section ? Ground Water- Se.oage (Tilt Pitsl SILT o~ CLAY ConSistenCY Very soft Sott Medium stiff Stitt Ve,..y stiff Hard Standar-d Penetration Resistance in Blows/Foot 0-2 2 - .. .. - B B - 15 15 - 30 >30 - 1.0 - 2.0 >2.0 Aoproximate snear Str"ength In TSF <0.125 0.125 - 0.25 0.25 - 0.5 0.5 1.0 Minor Constituents Estimated Per"centage 0-5 5 - 12 12 - 30 30 - 50 Not identified in descriPtion Sl1ghtly (clavev. Siltv, etc.) Clayey. silty. s.ney. gr".vellY V.~y (clavey, Siltv. etc.) Test Symbols GS Gr-ein Size ClasSiflcation CN Con.ol1dat1on TUU Trlaxlal Unconsol1dated Und~a1ned TCU Tri.xial Consolldated Undrained TCO Tr1axlal Consolid.ted O,...ined au Unconfined Comgr"ess1an OS D1rect sneer" K PP TV CBR MO AL Pe~me.bility Pocket Penetr"ometer" AODroximate Compr-essive Strengtn in TSF Tcrv.ne AOOr"oximlte Snear Strength in TSF Cal1to~nl. B.a~1ng Ret10 MOisture Density Reletlon.nip Att.~c.~g L1m1t. I . I Water- Content in Percent I I L.. LiQuid L1l11t L-N.tu....l Plastic L.1e1t ';-2051-02 HART-CROW5ER J-2559 August 1989 & associates, inc. Figure A-1 I I J-2559 I I APPENDIX B LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAM I I I I A laboratory testing program was performed for this study to evaluate the basic index and geotechnical engineering properties of the site soils. Laboratory test were performed on both disturbed and relatively undisturbed samples. The laboratory tests performed and the procedures followed are outlined be low. Soil Classification I Soil samples recovered in the explorations were visually classified in the field and then taken to our laboratory where the classifications were verified in a relatively controlled environment. Visual-manual field and laboratory observations include density/consistency, moisture condition, grain size and plasticity estimates. I I I The classifications of selected samples were checked by performing laboratory tests such as Atterberg limits determinations and grain size analyses. Classifications were made in general accordance with the Unified Soil Classification (USe) system, ASTM D 2487, as presented on Figure B-1. I I I I I Yater Content Determinations Water contents were determined for most samples recovered in the explorations in general accordance with ASTM D 2216 as soon as possible following their arrival in our laboratory Water contents were not determined for very small samples nor samples where large gravel contents would result in values considered unrepresentative. The results of these tests are plotted at the respective sample depth on the exploration logs. In addition, the water contents of samples subjected to other testing have I I J-2559 Page B-2 I I been determined and are presented on the exploration logs as well as with I the various test: results which follow in this appendix. Atterber2 Limits (ALl Atterberg limits determinations were accomplished for selected fine-grained soil samples. The liquid limit and plastic limit were determined in general accordance with ASTM D 423 and ASTM D 424, respectively. The results of the Atterberg limits analyses and the plasticity characteristics are summarized on the Plasticity ehart, Figures B-2, which relates the plasticity index (liquid minus the plastic limit) to the liquid limit. The results of the Atterberg limits test are shown graphically on the boring logs as well as where applicable on figures presenting various other tests results. Grain Size Analvsis (GSl Grain size analyses were performed on representative samples in general accordance with ASTM D 422. The wet sieve analysis method was used for most samples and determines the size distribution greater than the U.S. No. 200 mesh sieve. The size distribution for particles smaller than the No. 200 mesh sieve was determined by the hydrometer method for a selected number of samples. The results of the tests are presented as curves on Figure B-3 plotting percent finer by weight versus grain size. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Unified Soil Classification (USC) System Soil Grain Size Size of 00en1ng 1n InChes Number 0 US . . . " ~ 0 0 0 0 0 o. 0 0 0 0 0 IiI I I , 'It , I , . . . " ~ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Gra1n S1ze 1n M1111metre. ~ :~ ~ . ~ . e 0 ~ 0 0 0 . . " ~ ~ " . e 0 0 0 0 0 . - "~ ~ , , , , , I , I , I , ., , 'I , , ttl , , I , , lIt I I , I 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ~ : . . . " ~ - . . . " " - . . . " " 0 0 : . . . " 0 0 0 0 0 " ~ o o o o Grain Size 1n Ml111metres COBBLES i I SANO SILT and CLAY Flne-GrBlned SolIs i i GRAVEL Coarse-Grained 50115 I Coarse-Grained Soils I I I I I I I I I I I I I I G W I G P ,l G M I G C S w ! S p .~ S M I S C . . Clean GRAVEL <5% ~lnes Y GRAVE,- witn >12% fines Clean SANO <5X fines y SA NO w1tn >t2X fines G~AVEL. >50% COBr'S! fr"lction lar"ger than No. 4 SANO >50X toar'sl! fraction sma lIef'" than No. .4 COlr"se-GrlineQ Salls >50% larger than No. 200 sieve G Wand 5 W [0'0]>4 tor G W 010 >6 for" S W G P and S P Clean GRAVEL Or" SAND not meeting re~ulrements for" G Wind 5 W [ (030) 2 ] & 1:!: :=:3 010 x 060 G M anCl S M Atterber"g limits belew A Line lii'lth PI <4 G C and S C Atterberg limits above A Line with PI >7 * Coar"se.gr"ained soils with ~er"tentage of fines between 5 and 12 Ir"e considered bOr"der"llne cases requir"ing use of dual symbols. 0'0. 030. and 060 Ire the particle Clamete'" of which 10. 30. and EO percent, respectively. of the 5011 weight are finer'. Fine-Grained Soils I M L C L 0 L M H C H 0 H pt I SILT CLAY Or-ganic SILT CLAY Organic H1gnly Organic Salls with L1qu1d LlmH <50X 5011. Nith L1qu1d L1m1t >50X Soils Flne-Grl!lined So11s >501 smaller'" than No. 200 sieve 60 50 " co 40 'C C ~ .. .. 30 - u - .. " co 20 - "" 10 0 0 C H C L M H or 0 H CL-ML J ,-.,,',"'.'.'. or I I 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 eo 90 100 L1Qu1d L1m1t .J - 2559 May 1988 HART-CROW5ER & assoc iates, inc. Figure B-1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Appendix E I I I I I I I I I . I I I I I I I I I fAA Ji'.;/ : 4 ~~aJ Report to: The Quadrant Corporation Attn: Ms. Susan Heikkala P.O. Box 130 Bellevue, Washington 98009 Title: Assessment of the Plant and Animal Communities within the Monte Villa Property, Snohomish county, Washington. Project: 89-79 Prepared by: RAEDEKE ASSOCIATES SCIENTIFIC CONSULTING 4106 Stone Way North Seattle, Washington 98103 Date: November 11, 1989 RtlEDEKE ASS004TES SCIENTIFIC CONSULllNG 4106 Stone Way North Seattle, VV4 98103. US4 (206) 547-8086 project Manager & Primary Author: Personnel: Kenneth J. Raedeke, PhD certified Senior Ecologist, ESA I I I I I I I I I . I I I I I I I I I william Nuhn, Msc soil scientist Laura Potash, MSc Plant Ecologist Richard w. Lundquist, MSc wildlife Biologist Nancy Strayer, BSc Natural Resources Planner I I I I I I I I I , I II I I , I I I I TABLE OF CONTENTS List of Tables............................................ ii List of Figures........................................... ii 1.0 INTRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 1 2.0 METHODS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3 2.1 Wetland definition and delineation.............. 3 2.2 Soils inventory................................. 4 2.3 Plant community inventories..................... 5 2.4 Animal community inventories.................... 6 2.5 Threatened and endangered species............... 6 3.0 AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT................................. 8 3.1 Topography, drainage, and soils................. 8 3.2 Plant communities...............................11 J . 3 Animal communities.............................. 21 3.4 Threatened and endangered species...............31 3.5 Wetland functional analysis.....................31 4.0 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS................................38 4.1 Comprehensive plan amendment alternatives.......38 4.2 Rezone alternatives.............................44 5.0 MITIGATING MEASURES..................................45 6.0 SIGNIFICANT UNAVOIDABLE ADVERSE IMPACTS..............48 7.0 LIMITATIONS OF THIS REPORT...........................49 8.0 LITERATURE CITED..................................... 50 Appendix A. Appendix B. Appendix C. Appendix D. Appendix E. Appendix F. Wetland delineation methodology Scientific and common names of plants Vegetation plot data Scientific and common Scientific and common Scientific and common names names names of of of birds mammals herpetofauna i ii I I I I .1 I I I I e I I I I , I I I , List of Figures Number Page 1. site location map..................................... 2 2. USDA Soil Conservation Service soil map............... 9 3. Plant community cover type map.......................11A 4. US FWS 1979 wetland mapping...........................17 5. US FWS 1987 wetland mapping...........................18 List of Tables 1. List of aerial photographs used in study.............. 5 2. Acreage of habitat types present......................l2 3. Bird species by habitat type..........................22 4. Mammal species by habitat type........................27 5. Reptile and amphibian species by habitat type.........30 6. Threatened and endangered plants of Snohomish Co......32 7. Threatened and endangered plants of King Co...........34 I I I I I I I t I' I I I t I I S I I I 1.0 INTRODUCTION The report presents the results of our study of the plant and animal communities of Quadrant Corporation's proposed development on the Monte Villa property. The property, containing 86 acres, is located immediately east of Interstate 405, generally south of 240th street Southeast, west of 39th Avenue Southeast, and immediately north of the Snohomish County-King County line in sections 32 and 33 of Township 27 North, Range 5 East, W.M. (Figure 1). The proposal is for a Comprehensive Plan Amendment and Rezone to allow construction of an office park on 86 acres in Snohomish County, Washington. The purpose of our study was to provide the general and technical baseline information needed for the preparation of the Environmental Impact Statement. Specifically, the study was conducted to: * describe the plant and animal communities currently found on the site; * verify current boundaries of wetlands previously identified on site based on the new federal inter- agency wetlands delineation methodology; * evaluate impacts of the different alternatives proposed for the site on plants and animals; and, * propose measures to mitigate probable impacts of the preferred alternative. The general approach to the 1989 study has been to consolidate and up-date existing information collected over the past three years of environmental analysis on the site, and initiate new field studies in areas where information gaps existed, or where questions were raised in review of the previous DEIS for the site. I I I I I I , . I I I I I I t I I I I 3 2.0 METHODS The existing plant and animal communities on the site were inventoried, classified, and described through field surveys, interpretation of aerial photography, and a review of existing mappings. Field surveys were conducted on May 24, August 20 and 28, September 2 and 3, 1986, April 12, 1988, and July 19, 1989. 2.1 Wetland definition and delineation The wetlands on the site have been delineated in the field with COE and Snohomish County staff, surveyed and mapped, and verified by COE in 1988. Field surveys in this 1989 study were conducted to verify the boundaries delineated in 1988, and provide descriptions of any changes in conditions in the wetlands that may have occurred since previous delineations were conducted. The u.S. Army Corps of Engineers' (COE) wetland definition was used to determine whether any portions of this property would be classified as wetlands. For the purpose of Section 404 of the Clean Water Act, a wetland is defined as an area "inundated or saturated by surface or groundwater at a frequency and duration sufficient to support, and that under normal circumstances does support, a prevalence of vegetation typically adapted for life in saturated soil conditions" (Federal Register 1986:41251). The technical guidelines of the Federal Interagency Committee for Wetland Delineation (1989) were used during our 1989 field work. These guidelines are the result of a joint effort by the COE, u.S. Fish and wildlife Service (USFWS), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) to provide uniform methods of wetland delineation. As the Federal Manual for Identifying and Delineating Jurisdictional Wetlands (1989) indicates, the technical guideline to identify and delineate wetlands is based on three parameters: vegetation, soils, and hydrology. In general, a minimum of one positive wetland indicator for each parameter must be found in order to make a positive wetland determination (Federal Interagency Committee for Wetland Delineation 1989). The interaction of vegetation, soils, and hydrology results in the development of characteristics unique to wetlands. A positive indicator of wetland hydrology is needed for classifying an area as wetland. The USFWS considers hydrology to be the most important attribute of wetlands (Tiner 1989). positive indicators of wetland hydrology include direct observation of inundation or soil saturation, as well as indirect evidence such as driftlines, water marks, surface encrustations, and drainage patterns. Hydrology was further investigated by noting drainage patterns and surface water connections. Hydrophytic vegetation "...is defined as macrophytic plant life growing in water, soil or substrate that is at least periodically deficient in oxygen as a result of excessive water content" and is a positive indicator of wetland (Federal Interagency Committee for Wetland Delineation 1989). Therefore, the plant communities on the property were assessed to determine whether any of them could be classified as hydrophytic. The United states Fish and wildlife Service Wetland Indicator Status (WIS) ratings were used to make this determination (Reed 1988). The WIS ratings segregate plant species into ecological groups with similar abilities to withstand saturated soil conditions. Going from high probability to low probability of being in wetland, these ratings are: Obligate wetland (OBL), facultative wetland (FACW), facultative (FAC) , facultative upland (FACU), and upland (UPL). Further discussion of the vegetation analysis is included in Appendix A. Hydric soil is a positive indicator of wetland. "A hydric soil is a soil that in its undrained condition is saturated, flooded, or ponded long enough during the growing season to develop anaerobic conditions that favor the growth and regeneration of hydrophytic vegetation" (Soil Conservation service 1985). The morphological characteristics of the soils on the property were examined to determine whether any could be classified as hydric according to the definition of the U.S. Soil Conservation Service (1985). A discussion of the morphological characteristics used to identify hydric soil is included in Appendix A. 2.2 Soils inventory The soils in the Monte Villa site were mapped by the U.S. Soil Conservation Service (SCS) and described by Debose and Klungland (1985). Site specific soils-engineering studies were conducted by GeoEngineers, Inc. (1986) and Hart Crowser (1988). These studies together with our field verification, form the basis of the soils information used in the analysis of plant communities and in wetland determination. 2.3 Plant community inventories Historical and present landuse patterns of the site and surrounding lands were determined from available aerial photographs. The initial identification and mapping of plant cover types was based on several series of aerial photographs (Table 1). An initial base map was drawn based 4 I I I I I I J . I I I I I I t I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 5 Table 1. List of aerial photographs used in the mapping of plant communities on the Monte villa property. Source US Army Corps of Engineers Pacific Aerial surveys Inc. H.G. ChiCkering Inc. Wash. Dept. Natural Resources USDA - HAP Wash. Dept. Natural Resources Wash. Dept. Natural Resources US Army Corp. Engineers Raedeke Associates Types: B&W - CIR - C Black and white Color infra-red Color Date 1944 1961 1965 1970 1980 1981 1985 1985 1986 Type B&W B&W B&W B&W CIR B&W B&W CIR C Scale 1" = 12,000' 1" = 400' 1" = 400' 1" = 400' 1" = 4,833' 1" = 1,000' 1" = 1,000' 1" = 200' obliques on interpretation of black and white aerial photography (1986 Army Corps of Engineer series) enlarged to scale 1"- 200'. We then modified this map on the basis of field surveys and a special aerial survey flown by Raedeke Associates on August 23, 1986. We used the Braun-Blanquet cover-abundance method (Mueller- Dombois and Ellenberg 1974) to describe composition of the plant communities during our field visits (see Appendix A for sampling details). Species abundance, community composition, and species dominance were noted for each plant community surveyed. Scientific nomenclature of all plant species encountered (see Appendix B) follows that of Hitchcock and Cronquist (1973). The plant community descriptions satisfy the need to identify dominant vegetation, and classify plant community cover types present. Plant communities were defined based on the composition of the overstory (where present) and the understory vegetation. The classification of plant communities was based on both national and local systems. Wetlands plant associations were classified according to the USDI Fish and wildlife Service system (Cowardin et al. 1979). Upland communities were classified based on the system used by King County (1987) in their wildlife Habitat Profile. 2.4 Animal community inventories An inventory of the animal communities on the site was undertaken through field surveys, a compilation of information regarding the site from published sources, and from an extrapolation of existing information on species- habitat relationships for similar sites. Field surveys of the animal communities were conducted in conjunction with the plant community surveys. During these surveys, all species of birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians observed directly or indirectly were noted by habitat type. All information regarding reproduction, habitat use, activities observed, etc., were noted. These field observations were augmented by information on known species habitat preferences in order to evaluate the likelihood of occurrence of additional wildlife species. 2.5 Threatened and endangered species The Washington Natural Heritage Program (1987) lists were consulted for information on special plant species (i.e., threatened, endangered, or special concern, etc.) that might be found on the site or in the affected area. In addition, lists maintained by the Washington Department of wildlife (1987, 1988) were consulted for information on 6 I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I a I I 7 I I I I I I I I I I I a I . I I I I the occurrence of wildlife species of special concern that might use the site during some part of the year. Species accounts were consulted to determine habitat preferences of such species and to evaluate the likelihood of their occurrence on the property. 3.0 THE AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT The "affected environment" in this report refers to the biotic conditions (i.e., plant and animal communities) and soils currently existing on the site. For convenience, the plant and animal communities will be discussed separately, even though we recognize that the two are inseparable. A general overview of surface soils will also be presented. 3.1 Topography, soils, and drainage 3.1.1 Topography The Monte Villa property is located on the valley plain of North Creek. North Creek bisects the property from north to south. The creek channel is virtually straight, as it was channelized at some time in the past. The general topography of the site can be characterized as flat and rolling. The central portion of the property is generally flat. Topography rises in side slope areas on the east side of the property to about 60 feet above the level of North Creek at the northeast corner and on the west side to 90 feet above the creek on the northwest corner. These side slope areas comprise approximately two-thirds of the site on both sides of the central lowlands. The lowest portions of the site are located along the southern boundary of the property east and west of the creek corridor. These low areas are approximately 2 feet lower in elevation than adjacent portions of the creek bank. 3.1.2 Soils The soils of the site have been mapped by the USDA Soil Conservation service (Figure 2 from Debose and Klungland 1985). Soils mapped for the site include the following: 1 Alderwood gravelly sandy loam (2-8% slopes) 2 Alderwood gravelly sandy loam (8-15% slopes) 17 Everett gravelly sandy loam (0-8% slopes) 27 Kitsap silt loam (0-8% slopes) 32 - *McKenna gravelly silt loam 34 - *Mukilteo muck 39 - *Norma loam 56 Puyallup 64 - *Snohomish silt loam 69 - *Terric medisaprists Soil names marked by an asterisks (*) have been classified as hydric by the SCS (Soil Conservation Service 1985). It should be noted that the "hydric soils" list refers to soils in undrained condition; that is, soils on the list that are drained are no longer "hydric". Not all areas mapped by SCS 8 I I I I I I J I I I I I a I . I I I I I 'I I I I I , I I I I I 'I I I I' I I a I 10 as hydric soils support predominantly hydrophytic (e.g., wetland) vegetation, and thus would not be classified as wetlands by the COE. Detailed geophysical studies of the soils, particularly the sub-surface soils, have been conducted by GeoEngineers, Inc. (1986) and Hart Crowser (1988). Their studies have identified three principal areas of organic soils on the Monte Villa property. These peat soils were mapped with contours depicting thickness of peat or organic soils in Figure 1 of their report. Location of these organic soils is generally consistent with the USDA SCS (1985) mapping of the Mukilteo muck (34) and Terric medisaprists (69) soils. However, the GeoEngineers' mappings, based on detailed field probes and soil pits show these soils to be less extensive in distribution than shown on the SCS map. The soils data presented by GeoEngineers, Inc. (1986) and Hart Crowser (1988), together with observations of existing drainage patterns and plant communities, would suggest that with the exception of the organic soil areas, the other soils present are not currently "hydric." The soils formed under conditions no longer present in the area. Alteration of drainage patterns, including channelization of the creek and lowering of Lake Washington, has now effectively drained these soils (see the following sections). 3.1.3 Drainage The Monte Villa site is drained by North Creek directly or indirectly via excavated ditches that pass through the North Creek I development to the south. The natural drainage patterns of the site have been greatly altered through ditching, the installation of underground drainage pipes, and channelization of North Creek. A detailed description of the drainage patterns is given by Entranco Engineers, Inc. (1988). North Creek bisects the property north to south. Sometime in the past, the creek on the property was channelized and straightened. At this time the banks were armored with large rip-rap boulders. Due to topography, as shown on detailed topographic mappings and summarized above, surface drainage on the site is generally north to south and not directly east-west to North Creek. On the eastern side of North Creek, surface water flows parallel to North Creek, where it is intercepted by an east-west ditch. The ditch is then connected to North Creek by a sub-surface drain pipe. South of the ditch, water drains from Wetland 3 into North Creek via underground drain pipes and south via a culvert through the berm on the property boundary. 11 I On the west side of North Creek there are no surface water connections from the wetland to North Creek. Water drains from Wetland 4 south through a pipe in the berm. 3.2 Plant communities I I I I I , I I I I I I I I I I I I The entire site was probably once covered by a mixed conifer-deciduous forests. The Puget Sound lowlands were historically dominated by mature and old growth stands of western hemlock and Douglas fir on the drier lands and mixed coniferous-deciduous forests on the wetter lands. Remnants of these forest communities are found to the north, east, and west. However, most of the valley bottom areas have been cleared. The site was logged in the mid-1800's and cleared for dairy farming. Since that time, the plant communities on the site have undergone numerous changes. Most plant communities present are dominated by non-native species, and require continued disturbance for their maintenance. The site currently contains riparian forest, upland pasture grassland, and emergent wetland plant communities in addition to the urban community type. The distribution of cover types is given in Figure 3. A detailed listing of the plant species observed, as well as their cover-abundance, in each cover type is given in Appendix C. Table 2 gives a listing of the acreages of the plant community types present. It should be clearly noted that the plant communities on the entire site are continuously influenced by the grazing and grass cutting. Hence, plant communities present are more dynamic than normally encountered in the region. Plant community composition is highly dependent on the degree and timing of grazing and mowing. 3.2.1 Pasture grasslands The majority of the Monte Villa site is covered by non- native pasture grasslands. These grasslands are currently grazed by livestock and/or mowed. The species composition of the grassland communities varies considerably, depending on the degree of grazing or mowing in a particular pasture. In all cases, the pastures are dominated by grasses. In the intensively grazed areas, less palatable species of forbs and other plants are becoming more common. Common invaders are thistles and English plantain. Shrubs are invading areas where grazing has been restricted: for example, blackberry patches have developed along several of the fence lines. I I I I I I I I I I I I , I I I I I I. ,. I 12 Table 2. Acreages of the different plant community types identified on the Monte Villa site. Symbol Acreage Descripition Wetlands: PEM1d 0.18 Palustrine, persistent emergent Palustrine, persistent emergent ditched PEM1 10.15 -------- sub-total 10.33 Uplands: Fc 1. 73 Forest, coniferous Fr 3.28 Forest, riparian PIG 65.72 Pasture/grasslands U 4.94 Urban and internal roads -------- subtotal 75.67 Total 86.00 13 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 3.2.2 Upland riparian forest This riparian community has been classified as upland forest, because it is dominated by a mixture of conifers and deciduous trees, and many are species that are not found in wetlands. These trees were probably all planted along the creek, as they are located in rows. Also, many of the species present are not native to this portion of Washington (i.e., ponderosa pine, various spruce species, weeping willow, Lombardy poplar, etc.). The understory contains the greatest variety of plant species of any area on site. This is due to reduced grazing pressure, as a narrow strip (approximately 40 feet in width) along the top of the bank is fenced. Shrubs present include willow, hawthorn, rose, blackberries, and salmonberry. A great variety of herbaceous plants are present. Wetland plants such as sedges, Watson's willow herb, marshpepper smartweed, and willow weed grow at the waters edge. Species adapted to drier conditions, such as thistles, orchard grass, horsetail, pineapple weed, hairy cats-ear, English ivy, and common dandelion, are found on the upper banks. Many of these species are exotic and/or weed species. 3.2.3 Emergent wetlands The 1989 field studies indicate that the distribution of wetlands on the site has not changed since 1988 (Fig. 3). There are some changes of conditions within the wetlands which will be noted in the following descriptions. Four areas of seasonally flooded, palustrine, emergent wetland communities (PEM) have been identified and mapped on the Monte Villa property, in addition to several ditches with emergent plant communities (Figure 3). As noted in Section 2.1, these wetlands were delineated in the field with COE and Snohomish county staff, and the boundaries have been verified by both agencies. The persistent emergent (PEMI) wetland communities on site are dominated by soft rush, with other plants found in varying amounts, depending on grazing pressure. Associated species include water foxtail, northern mannagrass, white clover, water speedwell, Watson's willow-herb, thistle, marsh cudwell, marshpepper smartweed, and creeping buttercup. Many of these species, especially the willow weed, are considered "plants of little or no grazing value, ... noxious weeds" (Hitchcock and Cronquist 1973:85), and hence increase in dominance with grazing, and composition of the plant association at anyone time depends on degree of mowing and grazing. Detailed plant lists are given in Appendix A and C. I I I I I I I I I I II I I II I I I I I I 14 Intensive grazing by cattle and mowing of grasses maintains the plant communities in their current condition. If grazing and mowing were eliminated, the composition of the plant communities on site, including the wetlands, would undoubtedly change, with ultimate successional stage being mixed forest communities. Wetland 1 This wetland (PEM1) has formedd in a localized depression at the base of the hills10pe to the north in the northeast quadrant of the site. The wetland covers 0.32 acres, and is dominated by rush, grasses, and various herbaceous species. The actual composition changes within a given seasons depending on the degree and timing of grazing and mowing, and between years depending on soil moisture conditions. This wetland patch appears to be drying out over time, as the irrigation of its upslope watershed has been discontinued. In 1986, soils in the wetland were saturated with water to the surface. In 1988 surface saturation was not noted, while in 1989, the saturation zone in July was not encountered within 24" of the surface. As a result, the obligate wetland species such as Glvceria borealis, and other wet site species were not observed in 1989 (see Appendix C for detailed descriptions of plant associations). Soils are hydric, mineral soils, being somewhat poorly drained soil in the foots lope position. Wetland 2 This wetland is also located in a localized depression at the foot of the hillslope to the north, and appears to be fed by groundwater seepage. It is found in the center of the site, east of North creek, and covers 1.88 acres. As with the other wetlands on site, the plant community is dominated by herbaceous plants. Rush (FACW+) was the dominant species in 1986, with various grasses (FAC and FACU) becoming more abundant in 1989. The soils are hydric, Terris medisaprist - organic soils that are poorly drained, with alluvium. As was noted in wetland 1, this wetland is also in a drying phase, as groundwater was not noted to occur in the soil pits, even at 48 inches during the 1989 field studies. It is located at least partially within the 100 year flood plain. 15 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Wetland 3 This wetland occupies the lowland area along the douth property border east of Norht Creek, generally below the 35 foot elevation contour line. The wetland covers 5.31 acres. The composition of the vegetation association in this wetland is similar to that of the other PEM1 wetlands. Dominant species are grasses, rushes, and other herbaceous species. Species composition and dominance varies with degree of grazing and mowing. The wetland is within the 100 year flood plain, and ponding water is noted at times in this area during winter storms. This area collects the surface water runoff from much of the property east of North Creek and south of the east-west ditch. Soils are saturated to the surface during much of the growing season. The soils in the wetland are organic soils with alluvium. as being underlain by peat. hydric, Terrie medisaprist, and This is part of an area mapped Wetland 4 This wetland is found west of North Creek along the southern property boundary. The boundaries of this wetland are quite distinct, due to the topographic rise on the north and west, and the mineral soils to the east. The wetland covers 2.64 acres. Plant community in this wetland is similar to the other PEM1 wetlands. Rushes and other herbaceous species dominate, with composition dependent on degree and timing of grazing and mowing. The wetland is underlain by Mukilteo muck, which is saturated most of the year through groundwater seepage. Soils were saturated at 32 inches in July, 1989. The area is sometimes covered by ponding water during periods of high precipitation in winter. Other Areas There are two areas on the Monte Villa site that have some of the characteristics of wetlands, but do not meet the necessary criteria to be classified as wetlands. These are: Areas 1 - the land between wetlands 2 and 3, and Area 2 - the area along the east side of North Creek, north of the barns. Area 1 (Appendix C, plot 12, Table C-12) has a vegetation association that indicates soil moisture conditions more xeric than the wetland plant associations to the north I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I. I I I I 16 (Table C-9) and south (Table C-ll). The Weighted Mean Index for this area is 3.5, versus 3.0 to the north and 2.1 to the south. The water table in this area is intercepted ditch to the north, thus draining the area. not encountered during the field, while the at 24 inches in plot 11 to the south. by the drainage Water table was water table was Area 2 has positive indicators of hydric soils and marginal wetland vegetation (Table C-l), however, the hydrology parameter is absent. Evidence suggests that wetland hydrology is absent classify in this area for the following reasons. First, there is no evidence that this area is inundated or soils are saturated during the growing season, such that hydrophytic vegetation would predominate. The area varies in elevation from 49 to 41.5 feet, thus precluding surface water accumulation in the area; the area has not been included in the portions of the site within the floodplain of the creek. Also, the surface soils (in the plant rooting zone) are not saturated; the soils logs indicate groundwater interception (i.e., seepage) below the root zone at 3 feet (site 84-16) or no groundwater interception to 9.5 feet in depth (site 84-17). Secondly, in review of their soils information, and that of the previous reports, Hart Crowser, Inc., (David Winter, pers. corom.) finds that there is no indication of peat soils at or near the surface. Peat, or other organics that might be present in zones at lower elevations in the soils profile, below the soils rooting layer, would not be indicative of current wetland conditions in any case. It should be noted that "compressible soils" have been mapped in other areas of the project site that are clearly uplands, and have been so classified by COE and the Snohomish County staff. Compressibility of the soil, which may be important for engineering purposes, is not a good indication of surface soil conditions for wetland classification purposes. Finally, in the site reconnaissance with the Corps of Engineers (COE) and County staff, these agencies have concurred with the wetland mapping shown in Figure 3. At least three site visits were conducted with COE and County personnel. 19 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Wetland Hvdroloqv There was no standing water in any of the four identified emergent wetlands during any of the field surveys. However, winter ponding is reported to occur in these areas. Wetlands 3 and 4, at the base of the side slope area, apparently have developed in an area of seepage of groundwater from the hillslope areas to the north, where ground water lies atop impermeable soils at a depth of several feet (GeoEngineers, Inc. 1986). This ground water, particularly in Wetland 1, was augmented by irrigation in past years. The hydrologic conditions on site have been altered by past drainage and ditChing of the site. This has affected the distribution of wetland communities. For example, the area between wetlands 2 and 3 may be upland as a result of interception of the groundwater by the east-west ditch. The wetlands on site are not connected to North Creek by surface flows. They may still be connected by underground drainage pipes installed 15-20 years ago. As noted previously, there is a slight topographic rise of approximately 2 feet between the wetland depressions and the stream corridor. On this rise, the plant communities are dominated by upland species, the most noticeable species being trees such as ponderosa pine, DouglaS-fir, and other dry site conifers. soils are fine sand (Test pit 11) and fine silt (Test pits 8 and 9), with soil moisture rated as "moist", not saturated. us Fish and wildlife Service Wetland Manninq The mapping and delineation of wetlands on the site shown in Figure 3 is generally consistent with the most recent USFWS mapping as part of the National Wetland Inventory. While the USDI Fish and wildlife Service did not map any wetlands on the site in the 1979 mapping, other than riparian Scrub-shrub (PSS1) along North Creek (Fig. 4), the revised USFWS wetland inventory (Fig. 5), are consistent with our mapping (Fig. 3), with several exceptions. First, the area we mapped as Wetland 1 is not mapped as wetland by USFWS. Second, USFWS mapping shows a surface water connection from Wetland 2 to North Creek. This connection, the east-west ditch described in Section 3.2.4 of this report, does not connect to North Creek. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 20 Third, the distribution of Wetland 3 in the USFWS map is reduced in the north-south axis, and extends up slope, in an area of non-hydric soils on the east side of the wetland. The map also shows a surface water feature entering this wetland from the northeast. Such a feature was not found in the field. Fourth, the USFWS mapping shows Wetland 4 to be connected to North Creek. However, there is an area of elevated topography between the wetland and the creek that is underlain by drained, mineral, non-hydric soils. 3.2.4 Ditches Two ditches have been excavated perpendicular to North Creek to facilitate drainage and to create watering areas for stock. These ditches contain emergent (PEMld) plant communities distinct from the emergent wetlands and riparian areas along North Creek (Fig. 3). The central east-west ditch has the most well-developed plant community as it has been protected from grazing by fences. The other ditches have more limited plant communities. The central ditch contains cattail patches, soft rush, reed canarygrass, and a variety of forbs, such as water-cress, willow-herb, water speedwell, and buttercups. The banks are covered by blackberry patches, thistles, reedcanary grass, and other undifferentiated grasses in the areas protected from intensive cattle grazing. This ditch does not have a surface water connection to North Creek. On the west end, approximately 400 feet from North Creek, the ditch enters an underground pipe that drains into North Creek near the existing bridge. The pipe goes under a slight topographic rise that separates the center of the pasture from North Creek. Natural drainage would be to the south, not into North Creek (see drainage report of the DEIS). To the north of the central ditch is an open ditch that was excavated as a watering pond for stock, and thus is not fenced from cattle. This ditch contains open water during periods of precipitation. Plant coverage was mainly soft rush along the edges and in the eastern end in 1986; grazing had removed the other species. In 1989, it has been invaded by a variety of other grasses from the surrounding upland pasture. 21 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 3.3 Animal communities The study area contains a variety of habitats for native animals. However, past alteration of the plant communities on the site has already resulted in a substantial reduction in wildlife habitat and wildlife use of the property. 3.3.1 Birds The mix of habitat types on the Monte Villa site provides a variety of habitats for birds. The exact number of species occurring here is unknown at present. However, based on our field surveys and available literature, we compiled a list of species of birds that are expected to be present in the different habitats (Table 3). Species expected to inhabit the different upland and wetland habitats are indicated with the letter "E". Species detected on the Monte Villa property during our field surveys are coded "D." The species listed are based on research by Milligan (1983), and also taken from the lists of Hunn (1982), Penland (1984), and King County (198?). Seasonality and relative abundance indicators are also given in Table 3 based on Wahl and Paulson (1981). Bird species having special animal status in Washington State (Washington Department of wildlife 1988) are starred with their status given next to the species name. Scientific and common names of bird species noted in the text are given Appendix D. This list is undoubtedly not exhaustive, as field surveys were conducted during a limited time period, and published literature on bird species use of the area is limited. The list does give a representation of the bird community diversity and species richness that one might expect to find on such a site and serves as an indication of the relative suitability of the different habitats present. The riparian community had the highest species richness of all the habitats present. The species using this habitat included waterfowl, herons, hawks, kingfishers, swallows, and a variety of passerine birds. This relatively high species richness is due to the complexity of the habitat (i.e., tree overstory, shrub understory, herbaceous layer, and wetland species), and proximity to the water course. The riparian habitat also provides roosting and resting sites for a wide variety of species that use the adjacent habitats. Woodpecker holes were noted in several of the dead trees in this riparian forest. ------ I 22 I Table 3. Bird species detected or expected on the Monte I Villa property. A key to the tabled symbols follows. Upland Wetland I Common Name Fr PIG U PEM S/A I Great Blue Heron *PM* D E E R/C Canada Goose * * R/C I Green-winged Teal E E W/C Mallard D E E E R/C Northern pintail E E W/C Blue-winged Teal E SIC I Cinnamon Teal E E SIC Northern Shoveler E E W/C Gadwall E E W/C I Eurasian Wigeon E E W/U American Wigeon E E W/C Northern Harrier E E R/C Red-tailed Hawk D E E R/U I Rough-legged Hawk E E w/c American Kestrel E R/U Merlin E E E E W/U I Ring-necked Pheasant E R/C California Quail E E E E R/U Black-bellied Plover E M/U Killdeer D E * R/C I Semipalmated Sandpiper E M/R Western sandpiper E M/C Least Sandpiper D M/C I Dunlin E E W/C Short-billed Dowitcher E M/R Long-billed Dowitcher E M/C Common Snipe E R/C . Mew Gull E E W/C Ring-billed Gull E E R/C California Gull E M/C I Glaucous-winged Gull E E E R/U Band-tailed Pigeon E E R/U Rock Dove D D D R/C Common Barn Owl E E E R/U I Great Horned Owl E E R/C Short-eared Owl E E R/C Rufous Hummingbird E SIR I Belted Kingfisher D R/C Downy Woodpecker D R/C Northern Flicker E E E R/C willow Flycatcher D SIC I I I 23 I I Table 3. continued. I Upland Wetland I Common Name Fr PIG U PEM S/A Tree Swallow E E SIC I Violet-green Swallow * D D D SIC N. Rough-winged Swallow E E E E SIC Barn Swallow * D D D SIC I Steller's Jay D E R/C American Crow D E D E R/C Common Raven E R/U I Black-capped Chickadee D E R/C Bushtit E E R/C Bewick's Wren E E R/U Golden-crowned Kinglet E R/C I Ruby-crowned Kinglet E E WIC Swainson's Thrush E SIC American Robin E E E E R/C I Varied Thrush E E R/C Water Pipit E E WIC Cedar Waxwing E SIC European Starling D D D D R/U I Hutton's Vireo E R/U Warbling Vireo E S/U Red-eyed Vireo E SIc I Orange-crowned Warbler E SIC Yellow Warbler E SIC Yellow-rumped Warbler E E sIc MacGillivray's Warbler E SIC I Common Yellowthroat E SIC wilson's Warbler D SIC Black-headed Grosbeak E SIC I Rufous-sided Towhee E R/C Fox Sparrow E R/C Song Sparrow D R/C Savannah Sparrow D D R/C I White-crowned Sparrow D E WIC Dark-eyed Junco E E R/C House Sparrow D E D D R/C I Red-winged Blackbird E E R/C Western Meadowlark E R/C Brewer's Blackbird D D D D R/C Brown-headed Cowbird E D E SIC I Northern oriole E SIC House Finch E D E R/C I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 24 Table 3. continued. Upland Wetland Common Name Fr PIG U PEM SjA pine Siskin E D E D RjC American Goldfinch D D E D RjC Evening Grosbeak E E RjC Total observed 17 11 8 8 Total No. of Species 54 46 32 40 Key to Codes in Table Starred codes by species common name indicate "special animal status" in Washington State (Washington Department of wildlife (1988). *PS* Proposed Sensitive: a species proposed for State Sensitive classification. *PM* Proposed Monitor: a species proposed for State Monitor classification. HABITAT TYPE Upland Fr Forest, riparian PjG PasturlandjGrassland U Urban Wetland PEM Includes PEM1, PEM1d, PEM2 STATUS OF SPECIES ON SITE D Detected during our field surveys. E Expected to be present in the particular habitat. Species mention are based on the following sources: Wahl and Paulson (1981) Penland (1984) Hunn (1982) King County (1987) Milligan (1983) * Species detected flying low over a habitat type or feeding on the wing (i.e., swallows). 25 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Table 3. Key to Codes. Continued. SEASONALITY/RELATIVE ABUNDANCE (S/Al Seasonalitv R Resident; present all year; abundance may vary seasonally S Summer visitor only (includes spring and fall) W winter visitor only (includes spring and fall) M Migrant only (spring and fall) F Fall migrant only Relative Abundance C Common; often seen or heard in appropriate habitats; U Uncommon; usually present but not seen or hear on every visit to appropriate habitats; R Rare; present in appropriate habitats only in small numbers and seldom seen or heard. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I 26 The pasture grasslands had fewer observed species than the riparian areas, although both are expected to have similar numbers of species (King County 1987). The pasture grassland species numbers are relatively high, because of the expected use as a feeding area by gulls and a variety of waterfowl. The fields are used by waterfowl principally in the winter and during migration periods. Common waterfowl species reported are Canada geese, mallards, and wigeons. Few species would be expected to breed in this habitat, because of a lack of cover and protected nest sites. The pasture grasslands are preferred hunting areas for raptors and other predatory birds. These species feed on small rodents, amphibians, small birds, and other prey which are common in this habitat. Red-tailed hawks were commonly observed flying over this habitat. The pasture grasslands are also important feeding and resting areas for other birds, such as killdeer, robins, starlings, and swallows (over the grasslands). The emergent wetland patches had the lowest observed and expected bird species richness of the non-urban communities. There was complete overlap in bird species in this habitat and other habitats on the site. This community type is mainly expected to provide feeding and resting areas for migratory waterfowl, aerial feeding areas for swallows, and feeding areas for passerine birds. Again, as with the grasslands, few species are expected to nest in this habitat on site, because of continued grazing disturbance. Due to the highly urbanized nature of the property and surrounding lands, "urban' birds, including starlings, pigeons, house sparrows, crows, and robins, were the most commonly observed species in all habitats. 3.3.2 Mammals The habitats of the Puget Sound lowlands support a wide variety of mammals. Gunther and Kucera (1978) and King County (1987) developed species-habitat matrices for mammals of this region. These lists, in addition to our field surveys, provide the basis for the following discussion. Table 4 lists mammals observed or expected to occur on the Monte Villa property by general habitat type. Common and scientific names of mammals are given in Appendix E. The mammalian communities on the property have been greatly reduced in terms of the number of species and in abundance, because of conversion of the site from forests and riverine communities to intensively grazed pasture lands and general urbanization of the surrounding lands. Observations of mammals were limited to sightings of tracks, scat, or other sign, with the exception of domestic mammals (i.e., dogs and cats), which were sighted on all visits to the property. 27 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Table 4. Mammal species detected or expected to occur in habitats found on the Monte Villa property (compiled from Ingles 1965, Guenther and Kucera 1978, King County 1987). Keys to the habitat and status codes follow. Common Name Fr INSECTIVORES: Vagrant shrew Dusky shrew Pacific water shrew *PM* Shrew-mole Townsend's mole Coast mole HERBIVORES: Eastern cottontail Snowshoe hare Eastern gray squirrel Beaver Western pocket gopher Deer mouse Townsend's vole Creeping vole Muskrat House mouse Pacific jumping mouse CARNIVORES: Coyote Raccoon Long-tailed weasel Mink Spotted skunk Striped skunk Upland Wetland PIG U PEM Status D U D U PR E E E E D D x PR x x x U U U U x x u E E E * D D E E U U U o U U U x * x E E U PR U U U D U U U x x D E E E E E U U x Key to Habitats, Use, and Status Codes: *PM* = Proposed monitor species (Washington Department of Wildlife 1988) Habitat key: Fr - Riparian forest PIG - Pasture grassland U - Urban PEM - Palustrine, emergent wetland I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 28 Table 4. Key to Codes. continued. Habitat importance/seasonal status: PR - Primary/resident year-long Use codes: D - Dependent U - Uses On-site status: D - Detected on site E - Expected on site 29 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I The large mammals have been totally eliminated from the property. The remaining, smaller mammals are generally associated with the grassland habitats and the riparian corridor. Field mouse trails, mole mounds, and sign of pocket gophers were observed in the pasture grasslands. Other rodents are also likely to be present in this habitat. Raedeke Associates (1981) reported observing house mice, deer mice, Townsend's voles, and Towbridge's shrew in this grassland habitat, but in grasslands that were in a more fallow condition. Rabbits and hares probably use the grasslands for feeding and the adjacent shrub patches for cover. Squirrels may be present in the forest stand along the creek corridor. The riparian habitat below may provide habitat for weasels, mink, skunks, and other predators. Raccoons are also probably found in this habitat, as they were recorded for the adjacent Koll North Creek site to the south (Raedeke Associates 1981). Muskrats and beaver were also recorded for the adjacent Koll site, but because of the rip-rapping along the stream, their habitat on site is probably limited. Coyotes are common in all lowland habitats, and coyote scat was noted in the pasture grasslands. Coyotes readily adapt to urban and agricultural environments; they feed urban refuse and on rodents that often become pests in these areas. Coyotes have expanded their range in urban areas throughout the western united States. All species of mammals that still persist on the site are undoubtedly reduced in numbers and distribution as a result of predation by domestic dogs and cats. This is a common problem in urban areas. 3.3.3 Reptiles and amphibians The distribution and abundance of reptiles and amphibians is not well known for the site or for this region. Table 5 summarizes the available information for these taxa, based on general species habitat relationships compiled by Gunther and Kucera (1978), Nussbaum et al. (1983), and King County (1987). Common and scientific names of the herptofauna are given in Appendix F. The riparian areas, the seasonal emergent wetlands, and the drainage ditches should provide the best habitat for the amphibians that are water dependent during part of their life history. We would expect frogs, toads, newts, and salamanders to be present. Few species are expected to be present in the pasture grasslands, with garter snakes the most likely species. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 30 Table 5. Reptiles and amphibians expected to occur on the Monte Villa property, by general habitat type (Guenther and Kucera 1978, Nussbaum et al. 1983, King County 1987). Species Upland Wetland Fr PIG PEM U Northwestern salamander Long-toed salamander Rough-skinned Newt Ensatina Western red-backed salamander Western toad Pacific tree Frog Bullfrog Western fence lizard Northern alligator lizard Rubber boa Common garter snake Western garter snake Northwestern garter snake U U D U U U U D U U U U U U U U U PR PR PR PR x PR PR PR x PR PR PR PR x x x x Key to habitat use and status: Habitat key: Fr - Riparian forest PIG - Pasture grassland U - Urban PEM - Palustrine, emergent wetland Habitat importance/seasonal status: PR - Primary/resident year-long D - Dependent U - Uses x - expected to use, status undetermined Use codes: 31 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I A single species of amphibian, the Pacific-tree frog, was observed on the adjacent Koll Business Park site (Raedeke Associates 1981). No actual sightings of amphibians or reptiles have been made on the Monte Villa site during this study. 3.4 Threatened, endangered, or sensitive species of plants and animals There are no Federal or state threatened, endangered, or sensitive plant species known to exist on the project site (Washington Natural Heritage Program 1987). Field surveys did not reveal the existence of any species listed for Snohomish or King counties (Tables 6 and 7). The highly disturbed nature of the farmlands reduces the likelihood that any such species have persisted to the present time. The WNHP (1987) list for Snohomish County includes one state threatened and 17 state sensitive plant species (Table 6). The list for King County includes one endangered, ten sensitive, and one possibly extirpated plant species within Washington State (Table 7). Based on the natural history accounts of the WNHP (1987), and Hitchcock and Cronquist (1973), none of the listed species are likely to find adequate habitat conditions on the site. In addition, there are no known Federal or state threatened or endangered species of birds, mammals, reptiles or amphibians known, or likely to be present, on the Monte Villa property (Washington Dept. of wildlife 1987). The great blue heron is listed as a Proposed Monitor Species (Washington Department of Wildlife 1988), and has been reported for the immediate vicinity of the site. This heron feeds in riparian and emergent wetland habitats, and roosts in tall trees, especially in riparian areas. However, no roost trees or nesting areas have been identified on or near the site. 3.5 Wetland functional analysis An assessment of the wetlands, and potential impacts of the proposed development, will depend on an understanding of the functions of the wetlands present. The following is a brief discussion the functions of the wetlands, based on the functions identified by the u.s. Army Corps of Engineers (1979). I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 32 Table 6. Endangered, threatened, and sensitive vascular plants of Snohomish County, Washington, as of November, 1987. An explanation of the codes follows. status Fed st Scientific Name Common Name S Botrychium lanceolatum S B. montanum S B. pinnatum S Campanula lasiocarpa S Carex comosa S C. pauciflora S C. stylosa S coptis asplenifolia Lanced-leaved grape-fern Mountain moonwort St. John's moonwort Alaska harebell Bristly sedge Few-flowered sedge Long-styled sedge Spleenwort-leaved goldenthread S Dodecatheon pulchellum Few-flowered shooting star var. watsonii S Dryas drummondii Yellow mountain-avens S Fritillaria Indian rice, Black lily camschatcensis S Lobelia dortmanna Water lobelia S Montia diffusa (u) Branching montia S Plantago macrocarpa (L) Alaska plantain T Platanthera chorisiana Choriso bog-orchid S Ranunculus cooleyae Cooley's buttercup 33 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Table 6. continued. status Fed st Scientific Name Common Name S Saxifraga debilis Pygmy saxifrage S Utricularia intermedia Flat-leaved bladderwort Codes: Fed = Federal status: Plants that are candidates on the 1980 Federal Register, Notice of Review (and 1983 Supplement), are marked with a "C". A dash indicates no federal status. st = state status T = Threatened E = Endangered S = Sensitive (u) = unverified (i.e. , uncertain identification) (L) = likely occurrence in county Source: Washington Natural Heritage Program. 1987. Endangered, threatened and sensitive vascular plants of Washington. Dept. of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA. 33 pp. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 34 Table 7. Endangered, threatened and sensitive vascular plants of King County, Washington, as of November, 1987. An explanation of the codes follows. status Fed st Scientific Name Common Name C PE Arenaria paludicola (U) Swamp sandwort S Campanula lasiocarpa Alaska harebell S Carex comosa Bristly sedge S C. pauciflora Few-flowered sedge Clubmoss cassiope S Cassiope lycopodioides ssp. cristopilosa E Castilleja levisecta (L) C Golden indian paintbrush S Cimicifuga elata Tall bugbane S Gentiana douglasiana Swamp gentian S Lobelia dortmanna Water lobelia S Lycopodium inundatum Bog clubmoss S Pleuricospora fimbriolata Fringed pinesap S Puccinellia nutkaensis (L) Alaska alkaligrass 35 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Table 7. continued. Codes: Fed = Federal status: Plants that are candidates on the 1980 Federal Register, Notice of Review (and 1983 Supplement), are marked with a "C". A dash indicates no federal status. st = state status PE = Possibly extinct or extirpated in Washington. Taxa in this group are all high priorities for field investigation. If found, they will be assigned a status category. T = Threatened E = Endangered S = Sensitive (u) = Unverified (i.e., uncertain identification) (L) = likely occurrence in county Source: Washington Natural Heritage Program. Endangered, threatened and sensitive plants of Washington. Department of Resources, Olympia, WA 33 pp. 1987. vascular Natural I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 36 3.5.1 Food Chain Support Food chain support is defined as the direct or indirect use of primary production of the wetland plants by animals inhabiting the aquatic environments (Adamus and Stockwell 1983). Food chain support in these wetlands is limited to the internal wetland system, as there are no surface water connections to the aquatic habitats of North Creek, or any other aquatic habitats. 3.5.2 General Habitat Habitat functions of the wetlands have been described above in the animal sections. The wetlands do not support a faunal community distinct from that of the surrounding uplands (Table 3). 3.5.3 Aquatic Study Area, Sanctuary, or Refuge The site is currently not part of any study area, sanctuary, or refuge. It is not proposed for inclusion in any such system. The area is of local interest as an open space area and floodwater detention, but is not considered to be high in scientific, educational, and/or other public interest value. 3.5.4 storm and Flood Water storage The drainage patterns of the entire site, and the role that the wetlands play in stormwater retention/detention, is described in detail in a separate report (Bush, Roed, and Hitchings 1989). 3.5.5 Groundwater Recharge The wetlands appear to function as groundwater discharge areas. In the soils report, GeoEngineers, Inc. (1986) concluded that much of the site is underlain by impervious soil layers at varying depths, resulting in seepage areas (now with wetland plant communities) and seasonally flooded depressions fed by surface and groundwater flows. 3.5.6 Water Filtration and Purification The wetlands along the southern boundary and in the ditches serve to filter surface water. In these wetlands, stormwater is detained, and the plants have an opportunity to remove nutrients and other "pollutants" from the water. The northern wetland patches probably do not function in this manner, due to lack of stormwater detention in the wetlands. During surface water flow periods, the wetlands are fully saturated, and stormwaters are not detained in the wetland for a period sufficient to allow bio-filtering. 37 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 3.5.7 Renewable Resources and Agriculture The wetland areas and surrounding uplands are currently being used as livestock pasture lands. 3.5.8 Recreation The wetlands are entirely contained on private property, and thus do not support any hunting, trapping, or other recreational activities. Winter viewing of migratory waterfowl may be provided to users of surrounding lands. 3.5.9 Aesthetics The wetlands are part of open space farmland that is attractive, because of the contrast with surrounding land uses and the limited extent of this type of habitat in the area. However, the wetlands proper play only a minor role in this aesthetic function. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 38 4.0 IMPACTS OF PROPOSED ALTERNATIVES Two actions, a Comprehensive Plan Amendment and a Rezone of the property are proposed. Both actions have a series of alternatives for consideration in the impact assessment process. Specific alternatives under the Comprehensive Plan Amendment are the following: o Business Park (Proposed Amendment) o High Urban Residential o No Change Alternatives under the Rezone are: o Proposed Business Park -site plan 1 o Proposed Business Park - site plan 2 o No Rezone The actual descriptions of the different alternatives used in the assessment of impacts will be discussed in the appropriate sections below. More detailed information on site plan alternatives is given in the DEIS. In general all alternatives, including the No Change alternative, will result in a reduction of extent and composition of the existing plant communities, and a reduction in animal communities. These changes in plant and animal communities will vary between alternatives, due to varying amounts of habitat alteration associated with construction of buildings (i.e., both residential and commercial) and associated roads, and alterations of existing drainage patterns. 4.1 Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives Under this proposed change, the three alternatives listed above are to be considered. Impacts of the different alternatives on plant and animal communities will be discussed in the following sections. 4.1.1 Business Park Impacts - Proposed Alternative Description This plan amendment proposes that the 86 acre study area be reclassified from Suburban (S) and Watershed site Sensitive (WSS) to Business Park (BP). At full development, the site could contain 950,000 gross square feet of business park, covering a maximum of 35% of the site. The development plan would preserve an approximately 7 acre natural habitat corridor along North Creek (i.e., minimum 100' stream buffer 39 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I on each side). The plan includes an internal road in the eastern 55 acres, and a bridge across North Creek at the site of the existing bridge. The evaluation of impacts of the proposed business park alternative is based on the May 5, 1989 site plan provided by the proponent. The hydrologic conditions within the site would be altered with office park development. Conversion of portions of the site to impervious surfaces would reduce the area for groundwater recharge in the uplands, and shorten the time of transport of the water into the wetlands. However, landscape watering would off-set this reduction in ground water recharge. Part of the water from the parking lots and other impervious surfaces would be conveyed to the wetlands and part discharged into North Creek, after passing through sediment traps and oil-water separators, and at least 200 feet of grass-lined swales (with a slope of approximately 2%). This system is designed to remove pollutants from the water before discharge into the creek and wetlands. The amount of surface water runoff diverted to the wetlands would be designed to maintain the existing water balance in the wetlands. During storm events, surface water runoff would be conveyed to the wetlands via the swale system, and detained in the wetlands. The outlets of the wetlands on the southern boundary line of the site will be maintained in current configuration. Impacts to plant communities Under the proposed business park site plan, portions of all plant community types present on the site would be retained. However, portions of all plant community types would be lost, altered by construction, or altered due to natural successional patterns. The proposed business park site plan would result in the filling of less than 0.99 acres (<10%) of wet meadow (PEM1) wetlands in several patches for roadway and building construction. Of the upland grassland/pasture lands, approximately 49.2 acres (57%) will be coved by buildings, parking lots, and roadways. The areas remaining within the developed portion of the site will be converted to urban type plant communities, dominated by grass and ornamental shrubs. The grasslands and wetlands retained in open space would change over time, even without direct impacts of the development. Elimination of grazing and mowing of the grasslands and PEMl wetlands will result in natural succession into "old-field" grasslands and shrublands (Le., blackberry patches), and eventually into forest thickets, I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 40 dominated by deciduous trees such as red alder and black cottonwood. This would initially result in an increase in plant community diversity, however there would be an eventual decline as the shrubs and tree eventually dominate. The latter communities are often dominated by a few species in the overstory, with poorly developed understories. The forest community in the stream corridor would be retained in the 200' stream corridor buffer area. Without continued grazing and mowing of the grasses, we would expect the rapid development of shrub communities in the understory. The alteration of hydrologic conditions in the wetlands described above is not expected to result in measurable changes in the wetland plant communities for several reasons. First, change in hydrologic conditions would occur during the wet winter months, when plants are generally dormant. Altered water levels during this period would not affect plant survival. second, any potential changes in vegetation due to alterations in water levels would be masked by the natural successional patterns that would result from the elimination of grazing. The PEM wetlands would likely succeed into forest stands, as occurred on the property to the south after farming was abandoned. Any change in the distribution and extent of the flooding in 25 and 100 year storm events would not result in altered vegetation conditions. This conclusion in based on the infrequent nature of these events (i.e., once every 25 or 100 years), their occurrence in the non-growing season, and their short duration on site (i.e., several days at most). Impacts to animal communities The changes in the plant communities associated with the business park alternative described above would result in changes in the distribution and abundance of animals on the site. since patches of all habitat types present would be retained, the development should not result in the loss of any individual species, but rather a shift in the abundance of individuals in the different species. Species adapted to the urban habitats would likely increase, as much of the site is converted to this community cover type. sparrows, robins, crows, pigeons, starlings, swallows, and other passerine birds of urban environments would increase in number. Mallards, geese, and other urbanized waterfowl would increase if open water habitat were provided in the wetlands. Most mammals and herptiles would decrease as their habitat is lost, and few are adapted to urban habitat conditions (see Table 4 and 5). The riparian forest community will improve in habitat quality as grazing and mowing is reduced. The predicted increase in shrubs will improve habitat for small mammals and passerine birds. This area will provide improved habitat for beaver which are present both up-stream and down-stream. Some predators could also benefit as their prey species increase. Species adapted to the agricultural pastures will decline in numbers due to the loss of this habitat type. The resident small mammals, reptiles, and amphibians will perish during construction, or be displaced into adjacent habitats where probability of survival and/or reproduction would be low. Predatory species such as hawks will also decline as their prey species are reduced. Migratory waterfowl that use the PEM wetlands and grasslands for feeding during the winter months would be restricted to the areas retained in open space. These habitats would be less suitable for these grazing species due to natural plant succession after the cessation of grazing and mowing (i.e., conversion to forest stands). These species are thought to be limited by nesting habitat and hunting (Bellrose 1980). Loss of this habitat would likely be detrimental, however the impacts are not likely to be a one-for-one loss in animals. Alternate feeding areas may be available in the region. The impacts on the wildlife using the PEMl wetlands would be minimal due to habitat loss, as most of the wetlands would be retained, or replaced through mitigation. However, as with the grasslands, the elimination of grazing and mowing will result in a change in plant communities. The wetlands will likely be invaded by shrubs and eventually trees. This change would result in a reduction of grazing habitat (i.e., winter waterfowl use), and an increase in small mammal, herptiles, and forest birds habitat. We would expect to see an increase in mammals species such as rabbits, voles, mice, shrews, weasels, raccoons, etc., and birds such as quail, jays, chickadees, thrushes, warblers, sparrows, finches, etc. All habitats present will be subject to increased short and long term disturbance associated with construction of the business park, and normal operation activities. However, the long-term disturbance resulting from business park use of the site will be equal to or less severe than the current disturbance resulting from mowing, grazing, and other agricultural activities. 41 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I. 42 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 4.1.2 High Urban Residential Alternative Description This alternative would designate the 86 acre property for higher residential densities, with up to 880 multi-family units possible under full development. Development would likely be through a Planned Residential Development (PRD), allowing clustering of units and retention of open space and wetlands, and retention of the 200' stream corridor on North Creek. Impacts Impacts to plant and animal communities under this alternative would be similar to that of the proposed business park described above. Such high density development would require substantial development of roads, parking areas, buildings, and other impervious surfaces. This would result in the similar types and amounts of habitat loss and alteration as described above. However, under this alternative the exiting wetlands could be retained with clustering of the buildings. While this alternative would probably require less site coverage with structures and roads, the impacts to plant communities would be similar to the business park, as most areas within the bounds of the site would be converted to intensive urban landscapes (i.e., lawns, gardens, and ornamental shrubs). This would provide greater habitat for urban wildlife species, but little for the non-urban adapted species. When compared to the business park alternative, the high density urban alternative would result in greater human disturbance due to the continual presence and activities of the residents and their pets. Pets such as cats and dogs can act as super predators. In office parks, human activity is concentrated during the daylight hours when wildlife species are least active, and pets are generally absent. In contrast, human activity in residential areas is concentrated in the morning and evenings when wildlife species are generally most actively. 4.1.3 No Change Alternative The No Change alternative is the no-action alternative which would retain the existing North Creek Plan land use designations. At full development under this alternative, probably under a PRD, up to 191 single-family residential units could be constructed on the 86 acres. The PRD would allow clustering of units, and the retention of 43 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I open space and wetlands, a 200' stream corridor buffer, and 20% of the site in active recreation open space. The impacts of this alternative on the plant and animal communities would be generally less than the previous alternatives, mainly due to the less intensive use of the site. However, the same sorts of impacts would occur, as the majority of the site would be converted to urban landscape, with urban habitats provided. wildlife species adapted to urban habitats would increase, and others would decline. starlings, robins, sparrows, crows, rats, house mice, etc. would increase, while waterfowl, hawks, and herons would decline. It is likely that there would be little or no filling of wetlands under this alternative, as with lower density, it would be more feasible to avoid wetlands with roads, utilities, etc. Human disturbance would still be quite high, due to the continued presence of humans (and their pets) during period when wildlife species are most active. Natural succession in the undeveloped portions of the site would continue to change the habitats as noted in the business park alternative. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 44 4.2 Rezone alternatives Under this proposed change, the three alternatives listed at the beginning of this section are to be considered. Impacts of the different alternatives on plant and animal communities will be discussed in the following sections. 4.2.1 Business Park - Preferred site Plan Alternative This alternative is identical to the proposed business park alternative discussed in section 4.1.1 above. 4.2.2 Business Park - Alternative site Plan Alternative This alternative would be similar in nature to the preferred site plan alternative discussed in Section 4.1.1 above. 4.2.3 No Rezone alternative impacts This is the No Action Alternative, which would retain the existing zoning of Rural Conservation for the eastern 55 acres of the property. Under this zoning, 52 single-family residential homes could be constructed. This alternative would result in the least amount of impact on the plant and animal communities. However, as with the alternative discussed in section 4.1.3 there would still be significant impacts, as the majority of the site would be converted to urban residential uses. Urban "pest" species would increase, and more desirable species would disappear. Disturbance by residents and their pets would be less than in the other alternatives, but still a significant impact. Retained wetlands and grasslands would again be naturally converted into forest lands over time. Wildlife populations would also change in response. 45 5.0 MITIGATION MEASURES Mitigation has been defined by the national Environmental Policy Act (NEPA - 40 CFR Part 1508.20) as listed by Cooper (1987) fo the USFWS to include: 1. avoiding impacts by not taking action or parts of an action: 2. minimizing impacts by limiting the degree or magnitude of the action and its implementation: 3. rectifying the impacts by repairing, rehabilitating, or restoring the affected environment: 4. reducing or eliminating the impact over time by preservation and maintenance operations during the life of the action: and 5. compensation for the impact by replacing or providing substitute resources or environments. The overall mitigation features incorporated into the design have been discussed in the DEIS. The site plan incorporates a number of the elements that meet the definition of mitigation as follows: o site plan revisions to avoid many of areas identified by County staff as environmentally sensitive (i.e., wetlands and riparian corridor). o Preservation of a 200 foot buffer (containing 7+ acres of open space) along the entire length of North Creek, providing a mosaic of habitat types, and habitat unique to the area (e.g., riparian gallery forests, riparian shrublands, etc.). o Implementation of erosion control features during construction would prevent sediment from accumulating in the wetlands on site. These features would be installed prior to on-site excavation, and they would be adequately maintained during excavation and until construction and landscaping have been complete and the potential for erosion has passed. o Minimization of impacts to wetlands by biofiltering of surface water runoff before it enters the wetlands, and maintaining existing runoff amounts would minimize impacts on wetlands. o Retention of approximately 90% of the wetlands currently existing on site in undeveloped open space. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 46 o Natural vegetation buffers (generally greater than 25") around wetlands, and berms and landscaping in areas where appropriate would be provided. o In areas where the wetland abuts the development, landscaping within the lots would be included to screen wetlands from development impacts. o Petroleum wastes, cement washings, and other chemical pollutants would be controlled during construction to prevent their entry into the wetlands and stream. o Prior to excavation, containment barriers would be installed laterally along the entire boundary of the streamside and wetland construction lines to prevent sediment and silty surface runoff from spreading beyond the construction site. o Expansion of selected on-site wetlands could be done to compensate for the wetland filling for road and building construction, according to a predetermined enhancement/creation plan. The enhancement/creation plan objectives could include: Replacement of the maximum 0.99 acres of filled PEMl wetland with approximately 2.0 acres (2 to 1 replacement ratio) of complex wetland, including a mosaic of wetland classes and habitat features. Maintenance or enhancement of appropriate functional values of the wetland system (i.e., habitat, stormwater filtering, sediment removal, etc.) through manipulation of plant community cover types, water depths, etc. Incorporation of interpretive display around the wetlands to provide public education of wetland functions and value. Creation of approximation 2.0 acres of wetland would involve excavation of sufficient depth to intercept the ground water table and/or create an area where surface water runoff could be retained to provide appropriate wetland conditions. We would recommend that the excavation be of varying depths, leaving shallow areas for emergent vegetation to develop, creation of open water areas of greater depth, and leaving nesting island patches within the area excavated. The wetland should be planted with appropriate wetland species to speed up the successional process, and direct successional to most desirable conditions. Vegetation near wetlands that has been damaged or removed during the construction process should be replaced with native plant species. A maintenance program could be designed to maintain portions of the retained open space on the site in a mosaic of grassland, shrub, and forest community types. 47 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I 6.0 UNAVOIDABLE ADVERSE IMPACTS Development of the site under the alternatives addressed above would result in the following unavoidable adverse impacts: * Permanent reduction in productivity of the site as existing soils are covered by filling and grading, * Existing plat communities will be lost and replaced by non-native communities, * Paving for roads and parking lots, and construction of buildings will result in the permanent loss of plant and animal communities over much of the site, * Some individual animals will be displaced from the site, and will likely perish, and * Increased human use of the site will result in an increase in disturbance of the remaining habitats, and * Permanent loss of .99 acres of emergent wetland: however, mitigation will add a total of two acres of wetland to the site. 7.0 LIMITATIONS OF THIS REPORT We have prepared this report for the use of the Quadrant Corporation, and their consultants. It should be recognized that definition of plant community boundaries is an inexact science, and different individuals and agencies will often disagree on exact boundaries, and even plant community classifications. Hence, it is imperative that before any site work or detailed planning is undertaken, that appropriate regulatory agencies be contacted to verify the conclusions of this report. within the limitation of schedules and scope of work, we warrant that the work performed conforms to accepted standards in the field. The results and conclusions of the report represent our professional opinion based on the information provided by the project proponent and their consultants, and gathered in the course of the study. No other warranty, expressed or implied is made. 49 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 50 8.0 LITERATURE CITED Adamus, P.R., and L.T. Stockwell. 1983. A method for wetland functional assessment. Vol. I. u.s. Dept. Transport., Fed. Highway Admin., Washington, D.C. Rep. No. FHWY-IP-82-23. 176 pp. Anderson, J.R., E.E. Hardy, J.T. Roach, and R.E. witmer. 1976. A land use and land cover classification system for use with remote sensor data. u.s. Geological Survey Prof. Paper 964. 28 pp. Army Corps of Engineers. 1979. Wetland values: concepts and methods for wetland evaluation. Institute for Water Resources. Research report 79-RI. 109 pp. Bellrose, F.C. 1980. Ducks, geese, and swans America. wildlife Management Institute. Books, Harrisburg, PA. of North Stackpole Bush, Roed, and Hitchings, Inc. 1986. Drainage report. Unpubl. report to The Koll Company. 7 pp + maps. cooper, J.W. 1987. An overview of estuarine habitat mitigation in Washington State. Northwest Envir. J. 3(1):112-127. Cowardin, L., F. Golet, V. Carter, and E. LaRoe. 1979. Classification of wetlands and deepwater habitats of the United States. USDA Fish and wildlife Service Publ. FWS/OBS-79/31. 103 pp. Debose, A., and M.W. Klungland. 1985. Snohomish County Area, Washington. Conservation Service. 198 pp. Soil survey of USDA Soil Entranco Engineers, Inc. 1988. Water resources of the Fortin Farm, Snohomish County. Rept. to Digital computers Corp. (in press). Environmental Laboratory. 1987. Corps of Engineers Wetlands Delineation Manual. US Dept. of the Army Engineer waterways Exp. Sta., vicksburg, Mississippi. Tech. Rep. Y-87-1. Federal Interagency Committee for Wetland Delineation. 1989. Federal Manual for Identifying and Delineating Jurisdictional Wetlands. u.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Fish and wildlife Service, and U.S.D.A. Soil Conservation service, Washington, D.C. cooperative technical publication. 107 pp. 51 Federal Register. 1986. 40 CFR Parts 320 through 330: Regulatory programs of the Corps of Engineers: final rule. Vol 51. No. 219. pp. 41206-41260, U.s. Government Printing Office, washington, D.C. GeoEngineers, Incorporated. 1986. Supplemental geotechnical services North Creek II (Monte Villa Farms), Snohomish Washington. Report to the Koll Company. Gunther, K., and T. Kucera. 1978. wildlife in the Pacific Northwest: Occurrence by habitat, BLM district, and national forest. USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region, Portland, Oregon. 128 pp. Hart Crowser. 1988. Summary of existing conditions: Fortin Farms, Snohomish County. Rpt. to Digital Computers Corp. 4 pp. plus 24 figures. Hitchcock, C., and A. Cronquist, 1973. Flora of the Pacific Northwest. University of Washington Press, Seattle, Washington. 730 pp. Hunn, E. 1982. Birding in Seattle and King County. Seattle Audubon Society, Trailside Series. 160 pp. Ingles, L. G. Stanford 506 pp. 1965. Mammals of the Pacific States. University Press, Stanford, California. King County. 1983. notebook. Vol. Washington. King County wetlands inventory I-III. Planning Division, Seattle, King county. 1987. wildlife habitat profile. King County Open Space Program. Parks, Planning and Resources Development. seattle, Washington. 111 pp. Milligan, D.A. 1983. Longacres Race Track: There is more wildlife than just around the track. Report to Mr. M.J. Alhadeff, President. Longacres Race Track, Renton, Washington. 38 pp. Mueller-Dombois, D., and H. Ellenberg. 1974. Aims and methods of vegetation ecology. John Wiley and Sons, New York. 547 pp. Nussbaum, R., E. Brodie, Jr., and R. Storm. 1983. Amphibians and reptiles of the Pacific Northwest. The University Press of Idaho, Moscow. 332 pp. Penland, S.T. 1984. In: Raedeke, K.J. and D.A. Milligan. Flora and Fauna - Port Orchard Golf Club. Technical I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 52 report for the EIS to The McCormick Lands Company, Inc., Seattle, Washington. 38 pp + drawings. Raedeke Associates. 1981. Wildlife inventory and assessment, Koll Business Center - Bothell. Horton Dennis and Associates, Seattle, WA. Reprt. to 15 pp. Raedeke Associates. 1988. Assessment of the Plant and Animal Communities within the Fortin Farms Property, Snohomish County, Washington. RA-88-14. 85 pp. Reed, P.B., Jr. 1988. Wetland plants of the State of Washington - 1987. USDI Fish and wildlife Service, as provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District, Seattle, Washington. snyder, D.E., P. Gale, and R. Pringle. 1973. Soil survey, King County area, Washington. USDA Soil Conservation Service, Washington Agric. Exp. Sta. 100 pp. Soil Conservation Service. 1985. Hydric soils of the State of Washington 1985. USDA SCS. 10 pp. Tiner, R.W. 1989. A clarification of the U.S. Fish and wildlife Service's wetland definition. National Wetlands Newsletter 11(3):6-7. Wahl, T.R. and D.R. in Washington. pp. Paulson. 1981. A guide to bird finding Dot and Ditto, Lynden, Washington. 139 Washington Department of wildlife. 1987. endangered wildlife in Washington. olympia, Washington. 31 pp. Washington Department of wildlife. 1988. Proposed species status changes, Unpubl. Nongame program memorandum, Olympia, Washington. Threatened and Nongame Program, Washington Natural Heritage Program. 1987. Endangered, threatened, and sensitive vascular plants of Washington. Department of Natural Resources, Olympia, Washington. 33 pp. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I APPENDIX A Methodology Plant community Description and Classification Methods The plant communities on the property were described and classified into vegetation cover types using the Braun- Blanquet cover-abundance method (Table A.1) (Mueller-Dombois and Ellenberg 1974). Plant species composition and cover- abundance were noted within homogeneous cover types and recorded according to the Braun-Blanquet methodology ("plotless method"). The scientific and common nomenclature of all plant species encountered follows Hitchcock and Cronquist (1973), and with each species being assigned a wetland indicator status (WIS) (Reed 1988). The WIS ratings segregate species into "ecological groups" with similar probabilities of occurrence in wetlands, or abilities to withstand saturated soil conditions (Table A.2). The plant community descriptions satisfy the federal technical guideline for the identification of predominant vegetation. Two quantitative indices were used to simplify the task of analyzing the vegetation data and to classify the plant communities as either wetland and upland. The first index calculated was the percentage of dominant species with aWlS rating of facultative or wetter. For our calculations, a cover class value of 2 (5-25 % cover-abundance) in the Braun-Blanquet scale was used as the lower limit for the dominant vegetation. For each plot the percentage of species that were facultative or wetter, for all species with a cover value of 2 or greater, was calculated. An example of this calculation is provided below. The second vegetation index calculated for each plot was a weighted mean of the WIS ratings. This weighted mean index (WMI), averages the WIS of all species in the plot by weighting each of the species encountered, based upon their relative cover-abundance in the community. The WMI provides a measure of the adaptation of the plant community to saturated soil conditions and follows the recommendations of Wentworth and Johnson (1986) and the Federal Manual for Identifying and Delineating Jurisdictional Wetlands (Federal Interagency Committee for Wetland Delineation 1989). The calculation of a WMI involves taking the sum of the products of WIS and dominance values for all species in a given plot, and dividing this by the sum of all dominance values (See the example below). To accomplish this, WIS ratings were assigned numerical values (Table A.3) and the dominance values were calculated as the percentage midpoints of the Braun-Blanquet cover-abundance classes (Table A.4). The plus or minus signs assigned by Reed (1988) are ignored in these calculations. Plants that were not identifiable to I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I species and that had a range in WIS ratings were assigned the average for the range of WIS ratings. An example of a WMI calculation is provided below. Essentially, a WMI assigns a WIS to the community by weighting each species' WIS by its relative cover. The WMI provides an objective parameter useful in designating a plant community as wetland or upland. Figure A.1 shows a breakdown of the WMI scale. Ideally, the "breakpoint" between wetland and upland vegetation is a WMI of 3.0 (i.e., FAC), with wetland being less than 3.0 and upland being greater than 3.0. However, a WMI close to 3.0 implies a great deal of uncertainty in making a wetland determination. When the WMI is near 3.0, vegetation may not be clearly indicative of either wetland or upland. However, as the WMI of a plant community or plot approaches the extremes of the scale (i.e., 1 or 5), the probability of the vegetation being indicative of either wetland or upland increases. An investigation of the suitability of this methodology for a wide variety of plant communities in different portions of the u.s. was carried out by Wentworth and Johnson (1986) and should be referred to for more information. Using both the percentage of the dominant species that are FAC or wetter and a WMI provides an objective method for determining whether the vegetation of a community is adapted to wetland or non-wetland conditions. However, both of these indices, or guidelines, are only as good as the classification system on which they are based. Inaccuracies of the WIS assignments will be reflected in the indices. In cases where inconsistency occurs between a species' WIS and its ecological niche, based on field observation and apparent soil and hydrological conditions, vegetation indices may need to be evaluated more critically. All the plant communities on the property were further classified according to the predominant vegetative growth form, and in some cases, substrate material, flooding regime, and/or landuse. Wetland communities were classified according to a system developed by Cowardin et al. (1979), while upland communities were classified according to the system described by Anderson et al. (1976). Table A.1. Key to Braun-Blanquet Cover-Abundance Scale. 5 Any number, with cover more than 3/4 of the reference area (>75%): 4 Any number, with l/2 to 3/4 cover (50 - 75%): 3 Any number, with 1/4 to 1/2 cover (25 - 50%): 2 Any number, with 1/20 to 1/4 cover (5 - 25%): 1 Numerous, but less than 1/20 cover, or scattered, with cover up to 1/20 (5%) : + Few, with small cover (<5%); r SOlitary, with small cover (<5%) I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Table A.2. Key to Wetland Indicator status (WIS) categories. Indicator Cateqorv Indicator Symbol Definition Obligate OBL Plants that occur almost always (estimated probability >99%) in wetlands under natural conditions, but which may also occur rarely (est. probability <1%) in non-wetlands. Facultative Wetland Plants FACW Plants that occur usually (est. probability >67% - 99%) in wetlands, but also occur (est. probability 1% - 33%) in non-wetlands. Facultative Plants FAC Plants with a similar like- lihood (est. probability 33% - 67%) of occurring in both wetlands and non-wetlands. Facultative Upland Plants FACU Plants that occur sometimes (est. probability 1% - <33%) in wetlands, but occur more often (est. probability >67% - 99%) in non-wetlands. Obligate Upland Plants UPL Plants that occur rarely (est. probability <1%) in wetlands, but occur almost always (est. probability >99%) in non-wetlands under natural conditions. UPL FACU FAC FACW OBL Obligate Upland Facultative Upland Facultative Facultative Wetland Obligate Wetland 5 4 3 2 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Table A.3. united states Fish and wildlife Service Wetland Indicator status (WIS) and Equivalent Numeric Values. WIS Symbol WIS Category Numeric Value Table A.4. Braun-Blanquet scale values and cover class mid-points used in vegetation analysis. Braun-Blanquet Scale Cover Class Range (%) Cover Class Mid-point (%) 5 4 3 2 1 + r 75-100 50- 75 25- 50 5- 25 1- 5 <5 <5 87.5 62.5 37.5 15.0 2.5 2.5 2.5 I I I Range of Weighted Average Scores 1 I extreme wetland ~etl8nd <_........A......__> (100% obligate hydrophytes) Upland extreme uplard (100X obligate upland species) . I 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 1--------1-....---1...-----1--------1--------1--------1--------1--------1 I .<-------1------->. I High probability site is wetland .<-------1------->. I High probability site is upland .<------>. .<------>. 1 1 Good probability that site is wetland; additional data regarding soils and/or hydrology are desirable. 1 Good probability that site is an upland; additional data regarding soils and/or hydrology are desirable. .<--------------->. I Vegetation data alone ere inadequate for designation of site; additional data regarding soils and/or hydrology are mandatory. I Figure A.1 ~eighted Mean Index (WMI) Scale (Wentworth and Johnson 1986). Varying degrees of confidence may be assigned to wetland or upland designation based on weighted average scores; scores that are farther from the theoretical wetland/upland botrdary of 3.0 are considered to be better indicators of wetland or upland status. I 1 I I I I I 1- WMI = sum of (CCM * WISl sum of (CCM) I 1 1 I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I 1 I 1 Example calculation for veqetation indices: The following example (Table A.5) demonstrates the calculation of the two indices used in assessing the vegetation. The Braun-Blanquet cover class and the WIS values are used to calculate the these indices. 1. Calculation of the percent of the dominant species that are rated FAC or wetter: % FAC or wetter species = y/x * 100 Where, x = number of species classified as dominant. Dominant species being those species with a cover class of 2 or greater according to the Braun-Blanquet methodology. y = number of dominant species and that have WIS ratings of FAC or wetter 2. Calculation of a Weighted Mean Index (WMI): For the calculation of a WMI, the Braun-Blanquet cover abundance ratings are converted to the mid-points of the cover class and the WIS assignments are converted to numerical values. Then the calculation is done according to the following formula: where, CCM = percent cover class midpoint for each species, WIS = Wetland Indicator status value for each species. I I I I I I I I I I II I I I 1 I I 1 I Table A.5. Example Calculation of Vegetation Indices. Scientific Name WIS WIS Symbol Value B-B Cover Value Cover Class Midpoint Midpt. x WIS Value Hierochloe odorata FACW 2 4 62.5 125.0 Ranunculus repens FACW 2 2 15.0 30.0 Phalaris arundinaceae FACW 2 1 2.5 5.0 Holcus lanatus FAC 3 1 2.5 7.5 Dactylis glomerata FACU 4 1 2.5 10.0 Lolium perenne FACU 4 + 2.5 10.0 Juncus spp. FAC-OBL 2 + 2.5 5.0 TOTALS 90.0 192.5 WMI = 192.5/90.0 = 2.1 Percent of the dominant species rated FAC or wetter = 2/2*100 = 100% soil Description and Classification Methodology Soil morphology can be used to identify and Classify a soil as hydric. Therefore the morphology of the soils on the property were assessed in regards to hydric properties. Soils were examined using exposed prOfiles within pits or by using samples obtained by augering. Observations of topography, soil texture, and degree of disturbance (i.e., filling and/or grading) were also recorded. Soil augering was used to determine the variation and distribution of soil properties across the property. In addition to the field investigation, U.S.D.A. Soil Conservation service Soil Survey maps were examined to determine the mapping unites) for the property according to this agency. Soil color descriptions in this report are based on the three spectral variables: hue (the dominant spectral color), value (the relative brightness of color) and chroma (a measure of the purity of color) (Buol et ale 1980). Alphanumeric values were assigned to these spectral variables using the notation of the Munsell Color System (Munsell Color 1975). Soils were examined for hydric soil indicators within the upper 18 inches of the profile. Hydric soil indicators include, but are not limited to, 1) gley, 2) mottling in a low chroma matrix, 3) histic soil horizons, and 4) saturated or inundated conditions. Gley is the presence of gray, greenish gray, or bluish colors in the soil. Gley indicates that soil conditions are anaerobic for sufficient time that iron occurs in a reduced form. Mottling in a low chroma matrix is the occurrence of "spots" of contrasting soil colors within a soil that has a low chroma matrix color. Low chroma is defined as having a chroma less than or equal to 2, according to standard Munsell notation, and indicates colors of low purity, or gray colors. The presence of mottles in a low chroma matrix indicates alternating oxidized and reduced conditions, or alternating saturated and unsaturated soil conditions. A histic soil horizon is a horizon dominated by organic soil material. In most cases, organic soils are indicators of very poorly to poorly drained conditions. Histic horizons typically develop on sites with nearly constantly saturated conditions, since anaerobic conditions associated with saturated conditions retard the decay of plant materials. Saturated or inundated soil conditions are an indicator of hydric soils. However, recent weather conditions must be taken into account, as intense precipitation can produce saturated or inundated conditions in an otherwise non-hydric soil. While hydric soil morphology can be an indicator of wetland soil, it does not by itself define a soil, or area, as wetland. Drained hydric soils that continue to exhibit hydric morphology but are no longer flooded or saturated for I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I sufficient time to favor the growth and regeneration of hydrophytic vegetation are no longer classified as wetland (Cowardin et ale 1979; Soil Conservation service 1985). conversely, a soil may be subjected to saturated or flooded conditions for a sufficient period to favor the growth of hydrophytic vegetation, yet lack "typical" hydric soil morphology. This phenomena occurs commonly in young or poorly developed soils. Examples of soils lacking hydric morphology, yet meeting the hydric soil definition, include poorly drained recent deposits, such as sand bars, and poorly drained minesoils, or other recently disturbed soils. Hydric soil morphology may not be developed in these soils because of their young age. Also, in some soils certain soil materials may "mask" the usual morphological indicators of poorly drained conditions and therefore soil colors and other morphological properties indicative of poorly drained conditions may not be prevalent. Therefore, careful observation of soil morphology in association with vegetation, topography, and hydrology is needed where soils are young or disturbed. Finally, soil morphology is an indicator of the environmental conditions under which the soil developed. However, morphology may not necessarily reflect present environmental conditions when conditions have been recently altered or where soil development is limited. In these circumstances, evaluation of vegetation and hydrology must be weighted heavily in a wetland determination. Characterization of Hydrology The importance of water to the existence of wetland is clearly stated in the COE definition of wetlands as: "those areas that are inundated or saturated by surface or ground water at a frequency and duration sufficient to support, and that under normal circumstances do support, a prevalence of vegetation typically adapted for life in saturated soil conditions" (Federal Register 1986). Wetland hydrology, being the primary determinant for the development of hydric soils and hydrophytic vegetation, is the most critical factor necessary for wetland formation. without wetland hydrology an area cannot be classified as wetland. Thus, in identifying and delineating wetlands, the goal is to determine the extent of wetland hydrology. "The term 'wetland hydrology' encompasses all hydrological characteristics of areas that are periodically inundated or have soils saturated to the surface at some time during the growing season. Areas with evident characteristics of wetland hydrology are those where the presence of water has an overriding influence on characteristics of vegetation and soils due to anaerobic and reducing conditions, respectively..." (Environmental Laboratory 1987:34) Indicators of wetland hydrology include both recorded and field data. Recorded data typically include the stream, lake, and tidal gage records of the COE, US Geological Survey (USGS), state, county and/or local governments. Field data includes visual observation of inundation, soil saturation, watermarks, driftlines, sediment deposits, and drainage patterns (Federal Interagency committee for Wetland Delineation 1989. Topography and soil properties are the factors controlling local hydrology. Wetland hydrology exists because 1) topography directs water towards or impedes water flow out of an area, or 2) soil conditions impede drainage, or 3) both topographic and soil conditions favor wetland hydrology. Therefore, observations of topography and soil properties are a necessary part of any wetland determination. Inundation or soil saturation are the most direct evidence of wetland hydrology. However, observations of inundation or saturation must be considered in the context of the prevailing weather conditions. Saturation does not necessarily indicate wetland hydrology, for even a well drained soil may have ponded or saturated conditions when the rate of precipitation exceeds the infiltration rate, or I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I hydraulic conductivity of the soil. However, saturated soil in association with hydric soil morphology is a reasonable indicator of wetland hydrology. Due to the seasonality of precipitation in the Pacific Northwest a positive indicator of wetland hydrology (i.e., saturation) may not be present during all seasons of the year. During the drier seasons, the presence of hydric soil morphology and hydrophytic vegetation can imply wetland hydrology. However, care must be taken when implicating wetland hydrology from soil morphology because hydric soil morphology may persist even when wetland hydrology is no longer present, as in drained soils. A drained hydric soil is not a wetland if it fails to support hydrophytic vegetation (Cowardin et ale 1979; Soil Conservation service 1985). On the other hand, the lack of hydric soil moroholoqv does not necessarily preclude an area from having wetland hydrology or being wetland. Therefore, care must be made in interpreting soil and vegetation information in regards to its relevance to hydrology. Scientific Name Common Name I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I Appendix B. Scientific and common names of plant species observed at the Monte Villa property. TREES: Acer spp. Alnus rubra Fraxinus latifolia picea spp. Populus nigra Pseudotsuga menziesii Salix babylonica Salix spp. Maple (ornamental) Red alder oregon ash Spruce (ornamental) Lombardy poplar Douglas fir Weeping willow willow SHRUBS: Alnus rubra Crataegus spp. Rose spp. Rubus discolor Rubus laciniatus Rubus spectabilis Salix spp. Sambucus spp. Red alder Hawthorn Rose Himalayan blacckberry Evergreen blackberry Salmonberry willow Elderberry HERBS: Alopecurus geniculatus Athyrium felix-femina Bidens cernua Callitriche stagnalis Capsella bursa-pastoris Carex spp. Cerastium arvense Chenopodium album Cirisium arvense Cirisium vulgare Compositae spp. Dactylis glomerata Epilobium watsonii Equisetum arvense Equisetum telmateia Water foxtail Lady-fern Nodding beggar-ticks Pond water-starwort Shephard's-purse Sedge Field chickweed White goosefoot Canadian thistle Bull thistle Mustard Orchard-grass Watson's willow-herb Common horsetail Giant horsetail I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Appendix B. continued. Scientific Name Common Name Galium spp. Glyceria borealis Gnaphalium uliginosum Gramineae spp. Hedera helix Hypochaeris radicata Juncus effusus Lactuca spp. Lysichitum americanum Malva neglecta Matricaria matricaria ides Mimulus spp. Musci Myosotis laxa Phalaris arundinacea Plantago lancelata Plantago major Polygonum hydropiper Polygonum lapathifolium Ranunculus repens Ranunculus sceleratus Rorippa curvisiliqua Rorippa nasturitum aquaticum Rumux spp. Sisymbrium officinale Solanum dulcamara Taraxacum officinale Trifolium pratenses Trifolium repens Typha latifolia urtica dioica Veronica anagallis-aquatica Vicia spp. Bedstraw Northern mannagrass Marsh cudweed Undifferentiated grasses English ivy Hairy cats-ear Soft rush Lettuce Skunk cabbage Dwart mallow Pineapple weed Monkey-flower Undifferentiated mosses Small-flowered forget-me-not Reed canarygrass English plantain Common plantain Marshpepper smartweed willow weed creeping buttercup celeryleaved buttercup Western yellowcress Water-cress Dock Hedge mustard Bittersweet nightshade Common dandelion Red clover White clover Common cat-tail Stinging nettle Water speedwell Vetch The following tables summarize the data collected in the field for use in determining the classification of the different plant associations on the site, and classification into uplands and wetlands. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Appendix C. Summary of vegetation, soils, and hydrology data used to classify the plant associations on the Monte Villa site. The data are presented for the most recent surveys conducted in July 1989 (Tables C-1 to C-13), and for the previous surveys in 1986. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I Appendix C. Summary of classification of plot locations on the Monte Villa site, based on 1989 field data. Hydrophytic Hydric Wetland Plot vegetation soil hydrology Classification 1 yes* yes* no upland 2 no no no upland 3 no no no upland 4 yes yes yes wetland 5 no no no upland 6 no no no upland 7 no no no upland 8 no no no upland 9 yes yes yes wetland 10 no no no upland 11 yes yes yes wetland 12 yes* yes no upland Plot 12 - yes* = vegetation is transitional, with weighted mean index of 3.5. Table C-1. Field Survey Data for Plot 1 - 1989. VEGETATION SPECIES Class Midpt. WIS x Midpt. WIS Herbs Lolium perenne Ranunculus repens Poa trivial is Alopecurus geniculatus Cirsium vulgare Rumex acetosella 87.5 87.5 37.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 350.0 175.0 75.0 5.0 10.0 10.0 4.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 SUMS 220.0 625.0 Weighted Mean Index: 2.8 % of Dominant Species w/FAC or Wetter WIS: 66.7 HYDROPHYTIC VEGETATION: YES SOIL Hydric mineral soil. Nearly level. Norma series - coarse- loamy alluvial soil that is poorly drained, in the undrained condition. Drainage of the soil probably affected by alterations to stream. Description: Depth (in) 0-22 Description sandy loam. Very dark grayish brown (10YR 3/2) surface soil, over mottled dark grayish brown (10YR 4/2) upper subsoil. 22-36 Sand. Gray (5Y 5/1). Water table at 32 inches. HYDROLOGY Nearly level alluvial plain. Water table at 32 inches. No evidence of surface ponding or flooding. I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Table C-2. Field survey Data for Plot 2 - 1989. VEGETATION SPECIES WIS Class Midpt. WIS x Midpt. Herbs Poa trivial is cirsium arvense Holcus lanatus Lolium perenne Trifolium repens Ranunculus repens Rumex acetosella Taraxacum officinale 2.0 4.0 3.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 62.5 37.5 15.0 15.0 15.0 2.5 2.5 2.5 SUMS 152.5 Weighted Mean Index: 3.0 125.0 150.0 45.0 60.0 60.0 5.0 10.0 10.0 465.0 HYDROPHYTIC VEGETATION: NO % of Dominant Species w/FAC or Wetter WIS: 40.0 SOIL Non-hydric mineral soil. Gently sloping to nearly level terrace. Kitsap silt loam - moderately well drained soil formed in silty deposits on a terrace. silt loam. Dark grayish brown (10YR 4/2) silt loam. Light olive brown (2.5Y 5/6). Silt loam. Light olive gray (5Y 7/2), faintly mottled. Description: Depth (in.) Description 0-6 6-20 20-28 to nearly level terrace that is moderately No water table encountered, nor any evidence flooding. Soil properties indicate that a table is present during wetter periods of the portion of subsoil. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Table C-2. Continued. HYDROLOGY Gently sloping well drained. of ponding or perched water year in lower I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Table C-3. Field Survey Data for Plot 3 - 1989. VEGETATION SPECIES WIS Class Midpt. WIS x Midpt. Herbs Lolium perenne Agropyron repens Cirsium arvense Poa trivial is Capsella bursa-pastoris Dactylus glomerata sitanion jubatum 4.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 87.5 87.5 15.0 15.0 2.5 2.5 2.5 SUMS 212.5 Weighted Mean Index: 3.8 350.0 350.0 60.0 30.0 7.5 10.0 10.0 817.5 % of Dominant Species w/FAC or Wetter WIS: 25.0 HYDROPHYTIC VEGETATION: NO SOIL Non-hydric mineral soil. Puyallup series - well drained soil formed on gently sloping to nearly level terrace. Description: Depth (in.) Description 0-6 Very fine sandy loam. Dark grayish brown (10YR 4/2). 6-24 Very fine sandy loam. Light olive brown (2.5Y 5/4). HYDROLOGY Well drained terrace deposits. No water table encountered, nor any evidence of ponding or flooding. No soil morphological evidence of a perched water table encountered to a depth of 24 inches. WIS x Midpt. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Table C-4. Field Survey Data for Plot 4 - 1989. VEGETATION SPECIES WIS Class Midpt. Herbs Ranunculus repens Agropyron repens Alopecurus geniculatus Holcus lanatus Lolium perenne poa trivial is Polygonum lapathifolium Epilobium watsonii Mimulus guttatus SUMS Weighted Mean Index: 2.7 2.0 4.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 1.0 62.5 37.5 15.0 15.0 15.0 15.0 15.0 2.5 2.5 180.0 125.0 150.0 30.0 45.0 60.0 30.0 30.0 5.0 2.5 477.5 % of Dominant Species w/FAC or Wetter WIS: 71.0 HYDROPHYTIC VEGETATION: YES SOIL Hydric organic soil. Mukilteo series - nearly level, deep very poorly drained organic soil. Formed within a depression. Description: Depth (in.) Description Black to brown sapric material (well decomposed organic deposits), with lenses of hemic material (intermediate stages of decomposition) and wood fragments. Water table at 32 inches. 0-48 HYDROLOGY Nearly level depression at base of gentle slope. Apparent water table at 32 inches. Soil morphology indicates that soils were formed under very poorly drained conditions. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Table C-5. Field Survey Data for Plot 5 - 1989. VEGETATION SPECIES WIS Class Midpt. WIS x Midpt. Herbs Agropyron repens Holcus lanatus Agrostis tenuis Cirsium arvense Dactylus glome rata Trifolium repens 4.0 3.0 6.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 62.5 15.0 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 250.0 45.0 12.5 10.0 10.0 10.0 SUMS 87.5 337.5 Weighted Mean Index: 3.9 % of Dominant Species w/FAC or Wetter WIS: 50.0 HYDROPHYTIC VEGETATION: NO SOIL Non-hydric mineral soil. Gently sloping hillside. Alderwood series - moderately well drained soil formed in glacial till. Description Depth (in.) Description 0-6 Sandy loam. Dark grayish brown (10YR 4/2) 6-30 Gravelly sandy loam. Light olive brown (2.5Y 5/6, dry), dark brown (10YR 4/3, moist). 30-32 Gravelly sandy loam. Light grayish brown (2.5Y 6/2, dry) with mottles. HYDROLOGY Gently sloping hillside. No water table encounter, nor any evidence of ponding or flooding. Soil morphology indicates a perched water table is present in lower portion of subsoil during wetter periods of the year. Table C-6. Field Survey Data for Plot 6 - 1989. VEGETATION Vegetation in this plot was essentially the same as plot 5. SOIL Non-hydric mineral soil. Gently sloping hillside. Alderwood series - moderately well drained soil formed in glacial till. Too gravelly to use a bucket auger; excavated a shallow soil pit with a shovel. Description: Depth (in.) 0-4 Description Very gravelly sandy loam. Very dark grayish brown (10YR 3/2). 4-18 Very gravelly sandy loam. Brown (10YR 5/3). HYDROLOGY Lower hillslope. No water table encountered, nor any evidence of ponding or flooding. During wetter periods of year, a perched water table would form in the subsoil due to landscape position and underlying soil deposits. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ; I I. . I I I I I I I I I I I I I Table C-7. Field survey Data for Plot 7 - 1989. VEGETATION SPECIES WIS Class Midpt. WIS x Midpt. Herbs Trifolium repens Lolium perenne Poa trivial is Dactylus glomerata Holcus lanatus Plantago major Ranunculus repens 4.0 4.0 2.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 62.5 37.5 37.5 15.0 15.0 2.5 2.5 SUMS 172.5 Weighted Mean Index: 3.4 250.0 150.0 75.0 60.0 45.0 7.5 5.0 592.5 % of Dominant species w/FAC or Wetter WIS: 40.0 HYDROPHYTIC VEGETATION: NO SOIL Gently sloping footslope deposits. Moderately well drained to somewhat poorly drained soils ("lower end" of Alderwood soil). Some signs that soils had been disturbed in this area included a berm along the stream, east of the soil observation. Too gravelly to use a bucket auger: excavated a shallow soil pit using a shovel. Description Depth (in.) Description 0-18 Very gravelly sandy loam to loamy sand. Very dark grayish brown (10YR 3/2). HYDROLOGY No water table encountered, nor any evidence of ponding or flooding. A water table is probably present in the subsoil during the wetter periods of the year, due to landscape position and the underlying deposits. Table C-8. Field survey Data for Plot 8 - 1989. VEGETATION SPECIES Class Midpt. WIS x Midpt. WIS Herbs Holcus lanatus 3.0 Lolium perenne 4.0 Trifolium repens 4.0 Capsella bursa-pastoris 3.0 87.5 262.5 87.5 350.0 15.0 60.0 2.5 7.5 192.5 680.0 SUMS Weighted Mean Index: 3.5 % of Dominant species w/FAC or Wetter WIS: 33.3 HYDROPHYTIC VEGETATION: NO SOIL Non-hydric mineral soil. Moderately well drained very gravelly alluvial deposits. A nearly level alluvial plain with undulating micro-relief. Too gravelly to use bucket auger; excavated a shallow soil pit with shovel. Description: Depth Description 0-5 Extremely gravelly sandy loam. Very dark grayish brown (10YR 3/2). 5-18 Extremely gravelly sandy loam to loamy sand. Dark brown (10YR 4/3). Many roots to 18 inches, no mottling around roots. HYDROLOGY No water table encountered, nor any evidence of ponding or flooding. No soil morphological indications of a water table to 18 inches. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I Table C-9. Field survey Data for Plot 9 - 1989. VEGETATION SPECIES WIS Class Midpt. WIS x Midpt. Herbs Holcus lanatus Juncus effusus Poa compressa Trifolium repens Poa trivial is Alopecurus geniculatus Dactylus glomerata Carex spp. 3.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 2.0 62.5 37.5 37.5 37.5 37.5 15.0 15.0 2.5 SUMS 245.0 Weighted Mean Index: 3.0 187.5 75.0 150.0 150.0 75.0 30.0 60.0 5.0 732.5 HYDROPHYTIC VEGETATION: YES % of Dominant Species w/FAC or Wetter WIS: 71.0 SOIL Hydric organic soil. Terric medisaprist drained organic deposits with alluvium. depression at the base of hillside on an - very poorly Located within a alluvial plain. Description: Depth (in.) Description 0-30 Sapric material. Black. Common woody debris. Thin gray sand lense at 10 inches. 30-48 silt loam. Dark gray to gray (5Y 4/1 to 5/1). HYDROLOGY Depression at base of gently sloping hillside. Located on a nearly level alluvial plain. Soils were moist, but no water table was encountered. Soil morphology indicates that these soils were formed under very poorly drained conditions. No evidence of ponding or flooding. Table C-10. Field survey Data for Plot 10 - 1989. VEGETATION SPECIES WIS Class Midpt. WIS x Midpt. Herbs Agropyron repens Holcus lanatus Cirsium arvense Poa trivialis 4.0 3.0 4.0 2.0 87.5 350.0 37.5 112.5 15.0 60.0 15.0 30.0 155.0 552.5 SUMS Weighted Mean Index: 3.6 % of Dominant Species w/FAC or Wetter WIS: 50.0 HYDROPHYTIC VEGETATION: NO SOIL Non-hydric mineral soil. Nearly level, moderately well drained sandy alluvial soils. Description: Depth (in.) 0-8 Description sandy loam. Very dark grayish brown (10YR 3/2). 8-18 Coarse sand. Grayish brown (2.5Y 5/2) to brown (10YR 5/3). 18-28 Coarse sand. Olive gray (5Y 5/2) to gray ( 5Y 5/1). 28-48 Gravelly coarse sand, with thin lenses of sapric material. Gray (5Y 5/1). Water table at 42 inches. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I 1 I I I I I Table C-I0. continued. HYDROLOGY Water table at 42 inches. flooding. soil morphology an apparent water table in No evidence of ponding and landscape position the subsoil. or indicates Table C-11. Field Survey Data for Plot 11 - 1989. VEGETATION SPECIES WIS Class Midpt. WIS x Midpt. Herbs Alopecurus geniculatus 2.0 Glyceria borealis 1.0 Trifolium repens 4.0 Juncus effusus 2.0 Rumex acetosella 4.0 62.5 125.0 62.5 62.5 37.5 150.0 15.0 30.0 2.5 10.0 180.0 377.5 SUMS Weighted Mean Index: 2.1 % of Dominant Species w/FAC or Wetter WIS: 75.0 HYDROPHYTIC VEGETATION: YES SOIL Hydric organic soil. Terric medisaprist - organic soil with alluvium. Depth (in.) Description 0-8* Black sapric material. 8-17 silt loam. Dark gray to gray (5Y 4/1 to 5/1) . 17-32 Very gravelly coarse sand. Gray (NS/O). Water table at 24 inches. * A near by probe had 18 inches of sapric material at the surface. HYDROLOGY Water table encountered at 24 inches. indicates that soils formed under very conditions. No evidence of ponding or soil morphology poorly drained flooding. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Table C-12. . Field Survey Data for Plot 12 - 1989. VEGETATION Class WIS x SPECIES WIS Midpt. Midpt. Holcus lanatus 3.0 37.5 112.5 Lolium perenne 4.0 37.5 150.0 Agropyron repens 4.0 37.5 150.0 Ranunculus repens 2.0 15.0 30.0 Trifolium repens 4.0 2.5 10.0 Rumex acetosella 4.0 2.5 10.0 SUMS 132.5 462.5 Weighted Mean Index: 3.5 % of Dominant species w/FAC or Wetter WIS: 50.0 HYDROPHYTIC VEGETATION: TRANSITIONAL SOIL Hydric organic soil. soil over alluvium. affected drainage of Description: Terric medisaprist - shallow organic Drainage ditch to north probably soil. Depth (in.) Description 0-18 Sapric material. Black. 18-24 silt loam. Gray (5Y 5/1). 24-48 Lenses of loamy sand to silt loam. Dark gray (5Y 4/1). Some dark greenish gray (5GY 4/1) mottles in upper portion. HYDROLOGY No water table encountered. No evidence of ponding or flooding. The soil was formed under very poorly drained conditions but is currently affected by a drainage ditch to the north. I Table C-13. Summary of vegetation cover by species. I Plant species Plot numbers I ------------------------- ----------------------------------- WIS Scientific Name 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 4 Acer macrophyllum I 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 Agrostis tenuis 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 I 2 Alopecurus geniculatus 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 4 0 3 Capsella bursa-pastoris 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 Carex spp. (#1) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 r 0 0 0 4 Cirsium arvense 0 3 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 I 4 Cirsium vulgare r 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 Dactylus glomerata 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 2 Epilobium watsonii 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 I 1.5 Glyceria spp. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 3 Holcus lanatus 0 2 0 2 2 0 2 5 4 3 0 3 2 Juncus effusus 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 2 0 4 Lolium perenne 5 2 5 2 0 0 3 5 0 0 0 3 I 1 Mimulus guttatus 0 0 0 + 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Plantago major 0 0 0 0 0 0 r 0 0 0 0 0 0 Poa spp. 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 1 I 2 Ranunculus repens 5 1 0 4 0 0 + 0 0 0 0 2 4 Rumex acetosella 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 Taraxacum officinale 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 Trifolium repens 0 2 0 0 1 0 4 2 3 0 3 1 I 4 Agropyron repens 0 0 5 3 4 0 0 0 0 5 0 3 2 Poa trivialis 0 4 2 2 0 0 3 0 3 2 0 0 I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Appendix C-14. Plant species composition of vegetation plots at Monte Villa, August 20, September 3, and September 11, 1986. Keys to vegetation plot numbers, plant community classification, Braun-Blanquet cover abundance scale, and wetland indicator status (WIS) categories follow. Scientific Name TREES: Acer spp. Alnus rubra Fraxinus latifolia picea spp. Populus nigra Pseudotsuga menziesii Salix babylonica Salix spp. SHRUBS: Alnus rubra Crataegus spp. Rosa spp. Rubus discolor Rubus laciniatus Rubus spectabilis salix spp. Sambucus spp. HERBS: Alopecurus geniculatus Athyrium felix-femina Bidens cernua Callitriche stagnalis Capsella bursa-pastoris Carex spp. cerastium arvense Chenopodium album Cirsium arvense Cirsium vulgare Compositae spp. #1 Compositae spp. #2 Dactylis glomerata Epilobium watsonii Equisetum arvense Vegetation Plot Numbers 1 5 WIS 6 7 2 3 4 1 1 1 + + 1 1 1 FACW FACW FAC+ + FACW + 1 2 + + 1 2 + FACU- r 4 + FACW+ FAC FAC+ OBL FAC- + + + + + + + + + + + + NC FAC FACU+ + + 2 + + + + + + + 1 1 + + + 1 + + + FACU 3 + + + FAC --- I Appendix C. continued. I Vegetation Plot Numbers I Scientific Name 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 WIS* I HERBS: I Galium spp. + + Glyceria borealis 4 + eBL Gnaphalium uliginosum + + 1 I Gramineae spp. 4 1 5 3 1 5 5 Hedera helix + HYPochaeris radicata + + I Juncus effusus 3 1 4 + FACW+ Lactuca spp. + + Lysichitum americanum r OBL Malva neglecta + I Matricaria matricarioides + + FACU Mimulus spp. r Musci + I Myosotis laxa + + + eBL Phalaris arundinacea 4 3 FACW Plantago lancelata + + + + FACU+ Plantago major + + FAC+ I Polygonum hydropiper I + + 1 OBL Polygonum lapathifolium 1 + + 2 5 2 FACW+ Ranunculus repens 1 1 + 2 + + FACW Ranunculus sceleratus + + OBL I Rorippa curvisiliqua + + NR Rorippa nasturitum- aqquaticum 2 I Rumex spp. + + + + + + Sisymbrium officinale + Solanum dulcamara + 1 FAC I Taraxacum officinale + 2 FACU Trifolium pratense + FACU Trifolium repens 2 4 5 + FACU+ Typha latifolia 2 eBL I Urtica dioica 1 + FACU,W Veronica anagallis- aquatica 4 + eBL Vicia spp. (yellow) + I Vicia spp. (purple) + I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Appendix C. continued. Plot numbers and key to the plant community classification Plot No. Classification Wetland: 1 PEMl Palustrine, emergent wetland, persistent, dominant plant species are Juncus effusus and wetland grass species. 4 PEMld - Palustrine, emergent wetland, persistent and nonpersistent dominate, ditched 5 PEM2 Palustrine, emergent wetland, nonpersistent, dominant plant species is Polvqonum laoathifolium. Upland: 2 Fr Forest, riparian 3,6,7 PIG Pasture/Grassland Appendix C. continued. Key to Braun-Blanquet Cover-Abundance Scale 5 Any number, with cover more than 3/4 of the reference area (>75%); 4 Any number, with 1/2 to 3/4 cover (50 - 75%); 3 Any number, with 1/4 to 1/2 cover (25 - 50%); 2 Any number, with 1/20 to 1/4 cover (5 - 25%); I Numerous, but less than 1/20 cover, or scattered, with cover up to 1/20 (5%) ; + Few, with small cover (<5%); r Solitary, with small cover (<5%); x species present, but no cover abundance rating was assigned. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I Appendix C. Continued. (WIS) Wetland Indicator status Indicator Cateqorv Indicator SYmbol Definition Obligate OBL Plants that occur almost always (estimated probability >99%) in wetlands under natural conditions, but which may also occur rarely (est. probability <1%) in nonwetlands. Facultative Wetland Plants FACW Plants that occur usually (est. probability >67% - 99%) in wetlands, but also occur (est. probability 1% - 33% in nonwetlands. Facultative Plants FAC Plants with a similar like- lihood (est. probability 33% - 67%) of occurring in both wetlands and nonwetlands. Facultative Upland Plants FACU Plants that occur sometimes (est. probability 1% - <33% in wetlands, but occur more often (est. probability >67% - 99%) in nonwetlands. Obligate Upland Plants UPL Plants that occur rarely (est. probability <1%) in wetlands, but occur almost always (est. probability >99%) in nonwetlands under natural conditions. FAC+ species are considered to be wetter (i.e., have a greater estimated probability of occurring in wetlands) than FAC species, while FAC- species are considered to be drier (i.e., have a lesser estimated probability of occurring in wetlands) than FAC species (Environmental Laboratory 1987:18-19) Plants that have the wetland indicator status (WIS) listed as a range (i.e., Carex spp. FAC-OBL, Salix spp. FAC-OBL), indicates that the plant was unable to be identified to species, and that most of the species in that particular genus fall in that particular range of indicators. Appendix C. Wetland Indicator status. continued. "NR" indicates that the plant species was not rated. For purposes of this report, any plant species not appearing on the National List of Plant Species That Occur In Wetlands of the Pacific Northwest (coded UPL*) "was assumed to be an upland species" (Environmental Laboratory 1987). I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Appendix D. Common and scientific names of bird species mentioned in text or tables of this report. Common Name Scientific Name Great Blue Heron Canada Goose Green-winged Teal Mallard Northern pintail Blue-winged Teal cinnamon Teal Northern Shoveler Gadwall Eurasian Wigeon American Wigeon Northern Harrier Red-tailed Hawk Rough-legged Hawk Merlin American Kestrel Ring-necked Pheasant California Quail Black-bellied Plover Killdeer semipalmated Plover Western Sandpiper Least Sandpiper Dunlin Short-billed Dowitcher Long-billed Dowitcher Common snipe Mew Gull Ring-billed Gull California Gull Glaucous-winged Gull Band-tailed Pigeon Rock Dove Western Screech Owl Common Barn Owl Short-eared Owl Great Horned Owl Rufous Hummingbird Belted Kingfisher Downy woodpecker Northern Flicker willow Flycatcher Tree Swallow Violet-green Swallow N. Rough-winged Swallow Barn Swallow Steller's Jay Ardea herodias Branta canadensis Anas crecca Anas platyrhynchos Anas acuta Anas discors Anas cyanoptera Anas clypeata Anas strepera Anas penelope Anas americana Circus cyaneus Buteo jamaicensis Buteo lagopus Falco columbarius Falco sparverius Phasianus colchicus Callipepla californica Pluvialis squatarola Charadrius vociferus Charadrius semipalmatus Calidris mauri Calidris minutilla Calidris alpina Limnodromus griseus Limnodromus scolopaceus Gallinago gallinago Larus canus Larus delawarensis Larus californicus Larus glaucensis Columba fasciata Columba livia otus kennicottii Tyto alba Asio flammeus Bubo virginianus Selasphorus rufus Ceryle alcyon picoides pubescens Colapes auratus Empidonax traillii Tachycineta bicolor Tachycineta thalassina Stelgidopteryx serripennis Hirundo pyrrhonota Cyanocitta stelleri Appendix D. continued. Common Name Scientific Name American Crow Common Raven Black-capped Chickadee Bushtit Bewick's Wren Golden-crowned Kinglet Ruby-crowned Kinglet swainson's Thrush American Robin Varied Thrush Water Pipit Cedar Waxwing European starling Hutton's Vireo Warbling Vireo Red-eyed Vireo Orange-crowned Warbler Yellow Warbler Yellow-rumped Warbler Black-throated Gray Warbler Townsend's Warbler MacGillivray's Warbler Common Yellowthroat Wilson's Warbler Black-headed Grosbeak Rufous-sided Towhee American Tree Sparrow Fox Sparrow Song sparrow Savannah Sparrow White-crowned Sparrow Dark-eyed Junco House Sparrow Red-winged Blackbird Western Meadowlark Brewer's Blackbird Brown-headed Cowbird Northern Oriole House Finch pine Siskin American Goldfinch Evening Grosbeak Corvus brachyrhynchos Corvus corax Parus atricapillus Psaltriparus minimus Thryomanes bewickii Regulus satrapa Regulus calendula Catharus ustulatus Turdus migratorius Ixoreus naevius Anthus spinoletta Bombycilla cedrorum Sturnus VUlgaris Vireo huttoni Vireo gilvus Vireo olivaceus vermivora celata Dendroica petechia Dendroica coronata Dendroica caerulescens Dendroica townsendi oporornis tolmiei Geothlypis trichas Wilsonia pusilla Pheucticus melanocephalus Pipilo erythrophthalmus Spizella arborea Passerella iliaca Melospiza melodia Passerculus sandwichensis Zonotrichia leucophrys Junco hyemalis Passer domesticus Agelaius phoeniceus Sturnella magna Euphagus cyanocephalus Molothrus ater Icterus galbula Carpodacus mexicanus Carduelis pinus Carduelis tristis Pheuticus melanocephalus I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Appendix E. Common and scientific names of mammalian species mentioned in the text and tables. Common Name Scientific Name INSECTIVORES Vagrant shrew Dusky shrew Pacific water shrew Shrew-mole Townsends mole Coast mole Sorex vagrans Sorex monticolus Sorex bendirii Neurotrichus gibbsii Scapanus townsendii Scapanus orarius HERBIVORES Eastern cottontail Snowshoe hare Mountain beaver Eastern gray squirrel Beaver Western pocket gopher Deer mouse Townsend's vole Creeping vole Muskrat House mouse Pacific jumping mouse Silvilagus floridanus Lepus americanus Aplodontia rufa Sciurus carolinensis Castor canadensis Thornornys mazama perornyscus maniculatus Microtus townsendii Microtus oregoni Ondatra zibethicus Mus musculus Zapus trinotatus CARNIVORES coyote Raccoon Long-tailed weasel Mink Spotted skunk Striped skunk Domestic dog Domestic cat Canis latrans Procyon lotor Mustela frenata Mustela vison spilogale putorius Mephitis mephitis canis familiaris Felis domesticus Common Name Scientific Name I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Appendix F. Common and scientific names of reptiles and amphibians mentioned in the text and tables of this report. SALAMANDERS AND NEWTS Rough-skinned newt Northwestern salamander Long-toed salamander Ensatina Western red-backed salamander Taricha granulosa Ambystoma gracile A. macrodactylum Ensatina eschscholtzi Plethodon vehiculum FROGS AND TOADS Western toad Pacific tree frog Bullfrog Bufo boreas Hyla regilla R. catesbeiana LIZARDS AND SNAKES Western fence lizard Northern alligator lizard Rubber boa Western garter snake Northwest garter snake Common garter snake Sceloporus occidental is Elgaria coerulea Charina bottae Thamnophis elegans T. ordinoides T. sirtalis I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Appendix F I I I I, I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I APPENDIX F TRANSPORTATION Methodoloqv Trip Generation The North Creek Valley Traffic Projections (TDA, Inc./Entranco Engineers, June 1989) reported actual trip generation rates from the Koll and Quadrant business parks immediately south of the Monte Villa Center. The reported trip rate for office space of 0.58 trips per employee was used for the Monte Villa Study. However, due to unusual shift changes and partial buildout of the development, the reported light industrial rate of 0.46 trips per employee was not considered applicable to the Monte Villa site. Therefore, for light industrial uses, as well as for the high urban residential and rural residential alternatives, trip rates were developed from the Trio Generation Manual (ITE, 4th Edition, 1987). The inbound-outbound split of 19%-81% for the p.m. peak found in the North Creek Valley study and substantiated by the Trip Generation Manual, was used for the Monte Villa Center. All trips generated by the Monte villa Center were based on trip rates per employee for general office and light industrial uses. Employment was used in place of floor area because there is a higher correlation between employment and vehicle trips than between floor area and vehicle trips for office and light industrial uses. The residential trips generated for the High Urban and No Rezone alternatives were based on the forecasted number of dwellings on the site. Trip generation rates for each residential density were taken from the Trio Generation Manual CITE, 4th Edition, 1987) . Trip Distribution The distributions used in the Monte Villa Center analysis are the same as were used in the Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) DEIS (Entranco Engineers, 1988) for the same site. Parts of these distributions were actually developed as part of previous traffic studies. Minor modifications were made to account for additional network links such as the extension of 120th Avenue N.E. to N.E. 180th Street. 1 2 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I As in previous studies, separate trip distributions were used for residential and business park trips. The residential trip distribution was originally developed for the site in the Northcreek II Business Park Traffic Analysis (The Transpo Group, 1986) and was based on transportation information developed by PSCOG and Snohornish County. The business park distribution used here and in previous studies was arrived at after extensive discussions between Snohornish County staff and consulting staff. The distribution was largely based on regional trip distribution information gathered from previous studies in the North Creek valley. A secondary factor was information about the types of businesses expected to locate at the site. Most of these businesses can be expected to move from locations south of the proposed site so the north-south split is expected to be heavily weighted to the south. The change in the business park distribution between 1994 and 2000 reflects the propensity, over time, for existing employees to relocate closer to their employment. Relocation opportunities are somewhat higher to the north than to the south. It also reflects the increased likelihood that new employees would have residential trip ends to the north. The business park distribution used in this study is strongly supported by a residential zip code analysis in 1989 of existing employees at the Koll and Quadrant Northcreek Business Parks located directly south of the proposed site. The north-south split for work-to-home trips, based on the zip codes, is very similar to the north-south split being used in this study. The differences in the trip distribution between the business park and residential alternatives reflect the proposed change in land use. The residential distribution has a much higher percentage of traffic destined to the north than does the business park alternative. This is due to the interaction with employment opportunities to the north if zoned for the residential land use. The business park distribution is more heavily oriented to the south due to the previously mentioned expectation of businesses relocating to the site from the south. Another significant difference in the residential and business park alternatives is the split between the inbound and outbound p.m. peak traffic generated at the site. The business park split is 19%-81% (inbound-outbound) as compared to 68%-32% for the residential traffic in the p.m. peak. A separate trip distribution was used for the 1994 analysis which assumed the 39th Street extension was not constructed. Under this scenario, it was assumed that the percentage of traffic headed north would remain the same. However, it was also assumed that a slightly higher percentage of traffic would access I-405 from the 195th Street interchange as opposed to the SR 527 interchange. This same distribution was used for the 1996 Business Park analysis without the 39th Avenue extension. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Traffic Forecasts Traffic volume forecasts for the study area were based on three elements. First is the general growth expected in the existing background traffic. Second is the addition of new traffic generated by planned developments. The third element is the traffic generated by the amendment site. General traffic growth due to popUlation/employment increases (excluding specific projects in the study area) has been derived from King County and puget Sound Council of Governments (PSCOG) projections. The projections for the Bothell/Northshore and southeast Snohornish County regions are for a 2.5% annual growth rate through the year 2000. This is the same growth rate assumed for the Truly Phase II report and the DEC DEIS. The growth rate, compounded for the appropriate analysis year, is applied to all existing traffic counts except as noted below for existing developments that are partially developed. Proposed projects to be included as part of the forecasted volumes are identified by permit applications and review of environmental planning studies. Table T-1 lists planned/proposed developments, land use assumptions and amount of development by 2000. Trip generation rates from the ITE Trip Generation Manual, 4th Edition, were used to develop trips for most of the proposed projects listed in Table T-1. Trips for the Koll and Quadrant North Creek business parks were calculated using the rates developed in the North Creek Valley Traffic Projections study. The trip distribution for these other proposed projects was based on the distribution used in the North Creek Valley Traffic Projections study. The distributions used in this report were predicated on the proposed project's EIS. Modifications were made to account for added links in the street network such as the 120th Avenue N.E./N.E. 180th Street extension. Table T-2 shows general distribution patterns used for the other proposed projects. In addition to the projects listed in Table T-1, four projects at the north end were included in a different format. Trips for the Canyon Park - North Creek project, Canyon Park - Business Center, Eldec and ATL were taken directly from the appendix of the Canyon Park Traffic Analysis (HNTB, May 1989) report which presented project generated turning movements at each intersection. The turn volumes reported for the year 2000 were used directly without modification in the Monte Villa Center analysis. The 1995 volumes reported were used for the 1996 analysis and ninety percent of the 1995 volumes were used for the 1994 analysis. Link volumes for the p.m. peak were modified 3 4 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I to reflect the additional trips contributed by these specific projects in the Canyon Park - North Creek study. In addition, the ADT volumes were modified to include these projects by assuming the p.m. peak to be 10% of the ADT volumes. Trip generation and distribution for these projects was implicitly included in the reported turn volumes at the intersections. The traffic generated by the proposed projects is combined with the existing traffic volumes, factored for the appropriate analysis year, and the project site traffic to arrive at the traffic forecasts for each alternative. Exceptions to this procedure were made for the Koll and Quadrant North Creek business parks and the Victorian/Northshore Apartments. The latter project had been completed at the time existing traffic counts (1988) were collected and the North Creek business parks were at partial buildout. In order to avoid double counting, these existing trips should not be factored as part of the background traffic and are therefore subtracted from the existing counts prior to applying the growth factor. These trips are accounted for as part of the total trips generated by the specific projects. It should be noted that when calculating existing levels of service, the existing counts were used without subtracting out any trips. Included in this appendix are tables for each intersection which show the background traffic factored for the appropriate analysis year, the traffic contributed by each of the "other projects" included in the analysis, and the traffic generated by the proposed site. Tables are provided for each alternative and each year analyzed. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I TABLE T-1 Other Planned/Proposed Developments Site/Proiect New Units by Land Use 1996 2000 Shopping Center 880,000 gsf Restaurant 10,000 gsf Hotel 220 rooms Light Industrial 335,000 gsf Office 100,000 gsf Mul ti -Family 216 du Truly Property Victorian/North- shore Village Apartments Koll - North Creek Multi-Family 376 du Business Park 210,000 gsf 210,000 gsf Mul ti -Family 106 du Single-Family 69 du Light Indust. 1,200,000 gsf Office 642,000 gsf Retail 8,500 gsf Hotel-166 rooms 92,000 gsf Light Indust. 1,400,000 gsf Office 350,000 gsf Retail 80,000 gsf Northbrook Apartments Hawke's Property North Creek Heights Quadrant - North Creek 5 TABLE T-2 Trip Distribution for Other Developments Direction Quadrant Northbrook & Hawke's N.Creek Truly Koll Victorian Apt Prop. Heights Retail --------- -------- ------------- ------- ------- ------ North via I-405 18% 20% 20% 20% 15% via local 2% 10% 10% 5% 5% * South via 1-405 55% 0% 15% 55% 55% via SR 522 2% 45% 35% 0% 0% via 132nd St. 5% 10% 5% 5% 5% West via local 8% 10% 5% 15% 20% East via SR 522 10% 5% 10% 0% 0% * Includes traffic using 1-405 access to eastbound SR 522. Source: North Creek Valley Traffic Projections (TDA/Entranco, 1989) 6 I I I Truly Offic. ----1 18% 2% . 65% .. 0% , 5% I 10% 0% I I I I I I I J I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I Level of Service Calculations The intersections within the study area were analyzed according to the methods described in the Hiqhway Capacity Manual (Transportation Research Board, 1985). The capacity of an intersection is described by the concept of "level of service". A level of service (LOS) is defined by the Hiqhway Capacity Manual as a qualitative measure describing the operational conditions within a traffic stream and perceptions of them by drivers. Six levels of service are used to describe the traffic operations at an intersection. They are given letter designations, A through F, with LOS A representing the best conditions and LOS F the worst case conditions. There are two methods for estimating the LOS at a signalized intersection; the operational analysis and the planning level analysis. The operational analysis was used to estimate the LOS for the intersections in this study. This method requires an assumption of an optimum cycle length and assignment of green times to each phase of the signal. Average delay per vehicle is calculated based on the signal timings and traffic volumes. Other parameters such as the peak hour factor and platoon factor affect the operational analysis. Closely spaced signalized intersections that would likely be operating as a coordinated system were analyzed using a common cycle length and a high platoon factor for appropriate approaches. This implies that vehicles will be arriving grouped as platoons and will arrive during the green phase of the cycle. This decreases the delay at an intersection and therefore improves the level of service. High platoon factors were only used on approaches where signal coordination is expected. Side street approaches would have a normal platoon arrival pattern. Examples of such locations are the signals along SR 527 and along 228th Street which would likely operate as a single system. Similarly, the signals along 195th Street would probably operate as a coordinated system. The peak hour factor (PHF) is another factor used in calculating the level of service. The PHF is an indicator of whether the peak hour traffic is concentrated over a short period of time or evenly spread over the peak hours. The PHF has a maximum value of 1.0 which implies the traffic is spread evenly over the peak hour; lower values indicate more of a concentrated peak of 15 or 30 minutes. In the analysis of this report, a PHF of 0.95 was used as a default in most cases. In corridors such as along NE 195th Street or along SR 527 where traffic is concentrated and traffic is expected to be sustained fairly evenly over the peak hours, a PHF value of 0.98 was used. The higher value will result in a higher level of service but is justified in concentrated traffic corridors. 7 The methodology of analyzing unsignalized (stop sign controlled) intersections is based on the number and length of gaps in the major street traffic flow which will allow the cross-street traffic to pass through the intersection. For stop sign control on the minor street (side streets), the method prioritizes the turning movements which will use the available gaps in the following order: 1. Right turns from minor street 2. Left turns from major street 3. Through movements from minor street 4. Left turns from minor street A LOS for each of the turning movements is then calculated. The left turn movement from the side street normally has the lowest LOS. Special circumstances exist at some intersections which require engineering judgment on how to apply the level of service calculations. One special situation encountered in this study is the proposed improvements along 228th Street. Snohomish County's Six year TIP has programmed the widening of 228th Street to three lanes between the 1-405 overpass and 39th Street in 1995. The 228th Street Design Report (Skilling Ward Rogers Barkshire Inc., 1987) provides for a dedicated left and right turn lane on each side street along 228th as well as a "refuge lane" for vehicles turning left off the side streets onto 228th Street. This "refuge lane", at each T-intersection, would be the center lane of the three lane section. This provides for much improved levels of service because the left turn vehicles from the side street would be able to turn onto 228th Street without directly conflicting with the through traffic in the same direction. Therefore, the compatible through volume on the main street would not be included in the conflicting volumes when calculating the level of service for the side street left turn movement. movement not included in calculating (or side street le(t turn movement. ~ - RefU98 lone~ " - \ \ ~,. ~ 8 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I - - I 015 I 3.0 PROJECT : ~ONTE VILLA CENTER I CALCULATIONS rOR: AVERAGE DAILY TRIPS (ADT) -----------------------------.---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- EIISTING DAILY CALINE 3 19'H BACK8ROLlND 1 '154 8AU,GF:OUND I VOLUMES rDP 1'185 INPUT ADTS CALINE3 PLUS S l1E L;~K 1. D. INPUT ADTS CALH~E3 ASA ENTRANCO LINK NAME INPUT I , 2'1 1-405 SOUTH or 185TH ST 64800 4HO 101428 7607 29 104177 7813 H 8 18 35TH AVE SOUTH or 228TH ST 1420 107 ;106 3~)a !S 4768 352 C 27 1-405 NS OFr RAMP AT 185TH 25(iO 263 J5B9S 1191 27 17270 129~r I 0 28 1-405 S8 ON RANP AT 185TH 2540 I'll 15605 1170 28 16S8') 1274 - 2~ 1-405 NB ON RANP AT 195TH 19(10 143 6243 468 26 6447 484 r 25 1-405 SB orr RANP AT 185TH 2000 ISQ 5'354 447 25 iI57 462 6 24 BEARDSLEE RD WEST or 1-405 RANPS 6510 488 324E! 2436 24 33143 248b I H "' 185TH EAST or N.CREEK PKWAY BOOO 600 258'l4 1'150 23 29312 2'"' -- ...Jt r 23 lS5TH ST EAST or 1-405 RAMPS 80CO 600 25994 1950 23 29912 2236 J NA l'l5TH OVERPASS 5B4 2194 t''' 2361 '" I 21 120,H AVE NOR1H Dr IS5TH ST 2(\00 150 7459 559 21 11582 8,9 L II 1-405 SOUTH or SR 527 f,53(l(i 48'?8 8941S 67G7 II 8'i83E, 6738 N 10 1-405 NORTH or 5R 527 64800 4800 88211 bE!; l,'j 88822 6m " II 8 1-405/SR 527 NB orr RA~P 9560 7J7 1288! %8 8 12881 888 I 0 4 S8 SR 521 TO N8 1-405 3710 278 6606 4'~5 4 6806 495 f' 5 1-405/SR 521 S8 o'r f'A~P 126% 943 1643~ 1.....'" < 18538 1240 ......"" - ~ 7 NB Sf' 527 TO SB 1-405 2010 151 3195 240 7 31Q~ 240 ..- I R 1 Sf' 527 NORTH or 1-405 2800 210 40417 3031 I 40518 3039 S 2 Sf' 527 SOUTH or 1-405 20200 1515 27956 2087 ^ 28261 2120 - OI5 13 223TH ST EAST or Sf' 521 12300 9:23 19823 1472 13 20031 15')6 I ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 18'16 BACKGROUND 18% BACK6ROUND I FLUS SITE AOTS CAL!NE3 ADTS CALlNE3 UN;: I.D. INPUT INFUT I ASA ENTRANCO U NK NAME A 2'1 1-405 SOUTH or 185TH ST 108477 B136 11257 B 8443 B IB 35TH AVE SOUTH or 22BTH ST 1255 94 1406 105 I ,. ,27 1-405 HB orr RANP AT IS5TH 1762B 1322 1987B 1476 , D 28 1-405 SB ON RANP AT 185TH 17323 1298 19374 1453 E 26 1-405 NB ON RANP AT 185TH 6844 513 7072 530 I r 25 1-405 SB orr RANP AT IS5TH 6540 481 6767 50B 8 24 BEARDSLEE RD WEST or 1-405 RAMPS 35670 2675 36657 2748 H 23 195TH EAST or N.CREEK PKWAY 2B763 2157 34307 2573 I 23 185TH ST EAST or 1-405 RANPS 28763 2157 34307 2573 I J NA 195TH OVERPASS 2416 2662 K 21 120TH AVE HORTH or 185TH ST 8m 615 14185 1065 L 11 1-405 SOUTH or Sf' 527 94B66 7115 95321 7148 I " 10 1-405 NORTH or SR 527 93548 7016 94384 7078 H e 1-405/SR 527 HB orr RANP 13642 1023 13642 1023 0 4 SF SR 527 TO NF 1-405 70BO 531 70FO 531 P 5 1-405/SR 527 58 orr RANP 17373 1303 17525 1314 I 0 7 NB SR 527 TO SB 1-405 3408 256 3409 256 R 1 SR 527 NORTH or 1-405 42843 3221 43018 3226 S 2 SR 527 SOUTH or 1-405 2%45 2223 30025 2252 I T 13 22BTH ST EAST or SR 527 20'140 1571 21548 1616 .:;15 19~4 NO ~CTIDN Al T. 1000 PM PEAK ADTS CALINES PEM' HOUR L!NK U. riSA 3':TRANCO LINK NAME A 2~ 1-405 SOUTE Of 195TH ST 101713 7628 13105 B 18 35TH AVE SOUTH Of 228TH ST 42~3 321 164 , 27 1-405 NB Off RAMP AT 195TH 16038 1203 236~ - D '0 1-405 5B ON RAMP AT 195TH 15m 1181 2240 .v E 26 1-405 NB ON RAMP AT 1~5TH 5984 4 A'~ 85'j ,- , " 1-405 5B OFF RAMP AT 195TH 5984 449 873 .J G 24 BEAR['SLEE RD WEST Of Hi)5 RAMP 32556 2442 3640 , 23 195TH EAST OF N.eREEK PKWAY ....~~-~ 2442 45192 ':'';.J.Ju ,.. 1~5TH ST EAST OF 1-405 f:AMPS 16414 19Sz 4529 " NA 195TH OvE~:F'ASS 24538 r 21 ~2r)TH AVE ~JRTH OF I'3STH ST 7902 593 I'm L 11 1-405 ,ClUTH OF SR 527 89489 5712 10665 M li1 H05 NOf:TH Of SR 1:'..... 8.3414 6631 10454 .J~I j 8 I-4(1~J5F: 527 NB OFF RAMP 12881 %6 1488 C' . Sf SR 527 TO Na 1-40~ 66% 4'15 70'; , r 0 ! -4(!5!SR =:,'"' sa OFF FAKF- 16505 1238 1889 ~'..' , 7 NB S. 527 TO sa 1-405 3195 241, 362 " R 1 Sf: 527 NOF:TH OF 1-405 '0462 3035 4766 S 2 SF: 527 SOUTH OF 1-405 28144 2111 3265 13 228TH ST EAS; OF SR 527 19840 1488 2345 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 015 I -.-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2000 aHCKGROUND 2000 BACKGROUN[> PLUS SITE I ms CHLINE3 HOTS CALINE3 LINt: J.D. INPUT INPUT ASA ENTRHNCO LINK NME I H 23 1-405 SOUTH or 135TH ST 116B07 B7b1 120528 9040 a 18 35TH HVE SOUTH or 228TH ST 139> 105 1551 116 C 07 1-405 N8 orr RHMP AT 135TH 13003 1425 20863 I5b5 ., 0 00 J-405 sa ON RHMP AT 135TH 17711 m8 13572 1468 I .v E 26 1-405 NB ON RAMP HT 135TH 7175 538 7441 558 r 25 1-405 sa orr RAMP AT 135TH 7310 .548 7576 568 a 24 BEARDSLEE RD WEST or 1-405 RAMPS 37236 2737 38207 2660 , I H 23 135TH EAST or N.CREEK PKWAY 23366 2202 34531 25S0 I ^? 195TH ST EAST OF J-405 RAMPS 29366 2202 34531 2590 ,. " NH 195TH OVERPASS 2553 2782 I K 21 120TH AVE NORTH or 195TH ST 8572 643 14193 1064 L 11 1-405 SOUTH Dr SR 527 103226 7742 103757 7782 M 10 1-405 NORTH or SR 527 100435 7533 101422 7607 N 8 1-405/SR 527 Na orr RHMP 14871 1115 14871 1115 I 0 4 sa SR 527 TO NB J-405 7030 532 7090 532 P 5 1-'05/SR 527 sa orr RHMP 18533 1334 18783 J403 ~ 7 Na SR 527 TO sa 1-405 3623 272 3623 272 I R SR 527 NORTH or 1-405 47115 3534 47131 353~ S 0 SR 527 SOUTH or J-405 31948 23% 32404 2430 . oIs 13 228TH ST EAST OF SR 527 22222 1667 mOG 1718 I ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I 2000 HIGH URaAN ALT. BACKGROUND PLUS SITE AOTS CAL INE3 LINK 1.0. I ASA ENTRANCO LINK NHME A 29 1-405 SOUTH OF 195TH ST 118806 8310 I 8 18 35TH AVE SOUTH OF 228TH ST 1925 144 C 27 J-405 Na orr RAMP AT 195TH 20002 1500 D 28 1-405 S8 ON RAMP AT 195TH 18711 1403 E 26 (-405 NB ON RAMP AT 195TH 7307 548 I r 25 J-405 SB orr RAMP AT 195TH 7441 558 G 24 BEARDSLEE RD WEST or (-405 RAMPS 37822 2837 H 23 195TH EAST or N.CREEK PKWAY 32259 2419 I J 23 (35TH ST EAST or J-405 RAMPS 32259 2419 J NA 135TH OVERPASS 2679 K 21 120TH AVE NORTH OF (95TH ST 11518 864 L 11 1-405 SOUTH OF SR 527 103489 7762 I M 10 1-405 NORTH or SR 527 101855 7639 N 8 J-405/SR 527 NB orF RAMP 14871 1115 0 4 sa SR 527 TO NB J-405 7090 532 I P 5 1-405/SR 527 SB orr RA~P 19171 1438 Q 7 NB SR 527 TO S8 J-405 3623 272 R 1 SR 527 NORTH or J-405 47431 3557 S 2 SR 527 SOUTH OF (-405 33421 2507 I T 13 228TH ST EAST or SR 527 23906 1793 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Appendix G I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I PRH'iTED AUG 2 2 1989 STORM SEWER CALCULATIONS 25 YEAR 24 HOUR STORM BUSH, ROED & HITCHINGS, INC. 2009 MINOR AVENUE EAST SEATTLE, WA 98102 1-206-323-4144 I 8/ 9/89 Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. page 1 QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM I HYDROGRAPH 1... DEVELOPED UPPER BASIN~HYDROGRAPH AT CANYON PARK Be ===================================================================== I DETAIL HYDROGRAPH SUMMARY HYDROGRAPH No. 1 CD I Peak runoff: 1062.2000 cfs Total Vol: 1422.37 ac-ft fIXE DESIGIl TIXE DESIGK fIXE DESIGK TIXE DESIGX TIXE DESIGIl RUNOFF RCJIO FF RUNOFF RUNOFF IIUl10FF I (Din) (cfs) (min) (cfs) (Din) (cfs) (min) (cfs) (min) (cfs) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------.-------------------------------- 10 410 20.9100 810 484.9600 1210 1040.5000 1610 722.0833 20 0.0200 420 25.2000 820 506.5900 1220 1034.7667 1620 715.4267 I 30 0.0400 430 29.4900 330 525.9067 1230 1029.0333 1630 708.7700 40 0.0600 440 43.4033 840 545.2233 1240 1023.3000 1640 701. 8100 50 0.7067 450 57.3167 350 564.5400 1250 1016.5333 1650 694.8500 I 60 1. 3533 460 71.2300 860 583.1367 1260 1009.7667 1660 687.3900 70 2.0000 470 90.1733 370 601. 7333 1270 1003.0000 1670 679.3800 30 3.1567 480 109.1167 880 620.3300 1230 996.3467 1630 671.3700 90 4.3133 490 128.0600 390 641.3767 1290 989.6933 1690 663.8600 I 100 5.4700 500 145.9200 900 662.4233 1300 983.0400 1700 655.0267 110 5.5567 510 163.7800 910 683.4700 1310 975.8600 1710 646.1933 120 5.6433 520 181.6400 920 706.4067 1320 968.6800 1720 637.3600 I 130 5.7300 530 190.5467 930 729.3133 1330 961. 5000 1730 627.6233 140 5.7767 540 199.4533 940 752.2800 1340 954.2333 1740 617.8867 150 5.3233 550 208.3600 950 776.6933 1350 946.9667 1750 608.1500 160 5.8700 560 212.9667 960 801.1067 1360 939.7000 1760 596.3667 I 170 5.9200 570 217.5733 970 825.5200 1370 932.5367 !770 585.5833 180 5.9700 580 222.1800 930 350.9200 1380 925.3733 1780 574.3000 190 6.0200 590 224.3133 990 376.3200 1390 918.2100 1790 562.0267 I 200 6.0400 600 226.4467 1000 901. 7200 1400 911.6400 1800 549.7533 210 6.0600 610 228.5300 1010 922.0433 1410 905.0700 1810 537.4800 220 6.0800 620 230.2400 1020 942.3667 1420 398.5000 1820 525.2633 230 6.1067 630 231.9000 1030 962.6900 1430 889.7433 1830 513.0467 I 240 6.1333 640 233.5600 1040 977.2267 1440 380.9867 1840 500.8300 250 6.1600 650 239.4233 1050 991.7633 1450 872.2300 1850 488.6233 260 6.2033 660 245.2867 1060 1006.3000 1460 861. 5267 1860 476.4167 I 270 6.2467 670 251.1500 1070 1016.5667 1470 850.3233 1870 464.2100 280 6.2900 680 261. 9400 1030 1026.8333 1480 340.1200 1880 451.3900 290 6.3900 690 272.7300 1090 1037.1000 1490 828.9000 1890 m.5700 300 6.4900 700 283.5200 1100 1044.0667 1500 317.6300 1900 425.75GO I 310 6.5900 710 297.7167 1110 1051.0333 1510 806.(600 1910 m.1533 320 6.8500 720 311.9133 1120 1058.0000 1520 796.7667 1920 398.5567 330 7.1100 730 326.1100 1130 1059.4000 1530 737.0733 1930 31(.9600 I 340 7.3700 740 343.4000 1140 1060.8000 1540 m.38oo 1940 370.(833 350 1.3067 75G 360.6900 1150 1062.2000 1550 763.7667 1950 356 .0067 360 9.2433 760 377.9800 1160 1059.8000 1560 760.1533 1960 341.5300 370 10.1800 770 399.2200 1170 1057.4000 1570 751. 5(00 1970 325.1133 I 380 12.3267 780 (20.(600 1180 1055.0000 1530 743.9400 1930 310.1567 390 14.4733 790 441.7000 1190 1050.1667 1590 736.3400 1990 294.(700 (00 16.6200 300 463.3300 1200 1045.3333 1600 728.7400 2000 279.1867 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I t 8/ 9/89 Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. page 2 QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM HYDROGRAPH 1.. . DEVELOPED UPPER BASIN~HYDROGRAPH AT CANYON PARK BC ==;================================================================== DETAIL HYDROGRAPH SUMMARY HYDROGRAPH No. 1 Peak runoff: 1062.2000 cfs Total Vol: 1422.37 ac-ft fIllE DESIGIl TIXE DESIGIl . fIXE . DESIGIl fIXE DESIGX fIXE DESIGX RUNOFF IIU1lOFF IIU1lOFF RUlIOFF IIU1lOFF (Din) (ets) (Din) (cfs) (Din) (cfs) (Din) (cfs) (Din) (cfs) -------------------------------------._-------------------------------------._--------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------.----------------- 2010 263.9033 2210 15.1000 2410 2610 2810 2020 248.6200 2220 7.5500 2420 2620 2820 2030 234.5567 2230 2430 2630 2830 2040 220.4933 2240 2440 2640 2840 2050 206.4300 2250 2450 2650 2850 2060 193.5467 2260 2460 2660 2860 2070 180.6633 2270 2470 2670 2870 2080 167.7800 2280 2480 2680 2880 2090 156.0333 2290 2490 2690 2890 2100 144.2867 2300 2500 2700 2900 2110 132.5400 2310 2510 2710 2910 2120 122.6700 2320 2520 2720 2920 2130 112.3000 2330 2530 2730 2930 2140 102.9300 2340 2540 2740 2940 2150 39.5500 2350 2550 2750 2950 2160 76.1700 2360 2560 2760 2960 2170 62.7900 2370 2570 2770 2970 2130 49.4100 2380 2580 2780 2980 2190 36.0300 2390 2590 2790 2990 2200 22.6500 2400 2600 2800 3000 2210 15.1000 2410 2610 2810 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ,4- 8/ 9/89 Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 1 4 PM ===================================================================== BASIN SUMMARY BASIN ID: A NAME: ORIGINAL EAST AREA INTO CREEK ~ SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: 10.60 Acres BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs RAINFALL TyPE....: TYPE1A PERVIOUS AREA PRECIPITATION....: 2.90 inches AREA..: 10.60 Acres TIME INTERVAL....: 10.00 min CN....: 86.00 TIME OF CONe.....: 15.00 min IMPERVIOUS AREA ABSTRACTION COEFF: 0.20 AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 PEAK RATE: 3.86 cfs VOL: 1.39 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min BASIN ID: AIMP NAME: INPROVED EAST AREA INTO CREEK Q@0 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: 21.00 Acres BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs RAINFALL TyPE....: TYPE1A PERVIOUS AREA PRECIPITATION....: 2.90 inches AREA..: 21.00 Acres TIME INTERVAL....: 10.00 min CN....: 94.00 TIME OF CONC.....: 10.00 min IMPERVIOUS AREA ABSTRACTION COEFF: 0.20 AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 PEAK RATE: 12.02 cfs VOL: 3.94 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min BASIN ID: AR-ll SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: e NAME: AREA ELEVEN 310.00 Acres TYPE1A 2.90 inches 10.00 min 14.00 min 0.20 PEAK RATE: VOL: BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 310.00 Acres CN....: 78.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres eN....: 98.00 27.33 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min 63.15 cfs 8/ 9/89 4 PM Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 2 ===================================================================== BASIN ID: AR-13 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 31. 31 cfs BASIN ID: AR-8 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 106.93 cfs BASIN ID: AR-9 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 167.18 cfs - ~ BASIN SUMMARY NAME: AREA THIRTEEN @ 225.00 Acres TYPE1A 2.90 inches 10.00 rnin 60.00 rnin 0.20 BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 225.00 Acres CN....: 78.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 Ac-ft TIME: 479 min VOL: 19.79 NAME: AREA EIGHT @ 725.00 Acres TYPE1A 2.90 inches 10.00 min 50.00 rnin 0.20 VOL: BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 725.00 Acres CN....: 78.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 64.07 Ac-ft TIME: 479 min NAME: AREA NINE @ 1260.00 Acres TYPE1A 2.90 inches 10.00 min 66.00 min 0.20 BASEFLOWS: PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 1260.00 Acres CN....: 78.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres eN....: 98.00 VOL: 111.09 Ac-ft TIME: 483 min 0.00 cfs I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 8/ 9/89 Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 3 4 PM ======;============================================================== BASIN SUMMARY BASIN ID: B NAME: ORIGINAL EAST AREA INTO CREEK (j) SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL.AREA.......: 13.50 Acres BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs RAINFALL TyPE....: TYPE1A PERVIOUS AREA PRECIPITATION....: 2.90 inches AREA..: 13.50 Acres TIME INTERVAL....: 10.00 min CN....: 86.00 TIME OF CONC.....: 20.00 min IMPERVIOUS AREA ABSTRACTION COEFF: 0.20 AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 PEAK RATE: 4.74 cfs VOL: 1.77 Ac-ft TIME: 473 min BASIN ID: BIMP NAME: IMPROVED WEST AREA INTO CREEK (IT) SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: 16.15 Acres BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs RAINFALL TyPE....: TYPE1A PERVIOUS AREA PRECIPITATION....: .2.90 inches AREA..: 16.15 Acres TIME INTERVAL....: 10.00 min CN....: 94.00 TIME OF CONC.....: 10.00 min IMPERVIOUS AREA ABSTRACTION COEFF: 0.20 AREA..: 0.00 Acres eN....: 98.00 PEAK RATE: 9.24 cfs VOL: 3.03 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min BASIN ID: C NAME: ORIGINAL WEST AREA TO SOUTH @ SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: 11.80 Acres .BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs RAINFALL TyPE....: TYPE1A PERVIOUS AREA PRECIPITATION....: 2.90 inches AREA..: 11.80 Acres TIME INTERVAL....: 10.00 min CN....: 86.00 TIME OF CONC.....: 15.00 min IMPERVIOUS AREA ABSTRACTION COEFF: 0.20 AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 PEAK RATE: 4.30 cfs VOL: 1.55 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min 8/ 9/89 Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 4 4 PM ===================================================================== BASIN SUMMARY BASIN ID: CIMP NAME: IMPROVED WEST ARE INTO WETLAND ~ SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: 5.25 Acres BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs RAINFALL TyPE....: TYPE1A PERVIOUS AREA PRECIPITATION....: 2.90 inches AREA..: 5.25 Acres TIME INTERVAL....: 10.00 min CN....: 94.00 TIME OF CONC.....: 10.00 min IMPERVIOUS AREA ABSTRACTION COEFF: 0.20 AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 PEAK RATE: 3.01 cfs VOL: 0.99 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min BASIN ID: D NAME: ORIGINAL EAST AREA TO SOUTH ~ SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: 41.20 Acres BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs RAINFALL TyPE....: TYPE1A PERVIOUS AREA PRECIPITATION....: 2.90 inches AREA..: 41.20 Acres TIME INTERVAL....: 10.00 min CN....~ 86.00 TIME OF CONC.....: 25.00 min IMPERVIOUS AREA ABSTRACTION COEFF: 0.20 AREA..: 0.00 Acres eN....: 98.00 PEAK RATE: 13.84 cfs VOL: 5.41 Ac-ft TIME: 472 min BASIN ID: DIMP NAME: IMPROVED EAST ARE INTO WETLAND ~ SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: 23.00 Acres BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs RAINFALL TyPE....: TYPE1A PERVIOUS AREA PRECIPITATION....: 2.90 inches AREA..: 23.00 Acres TIME INTERVAL....: 10.00 min CN....: 94.00 TIME OF CONC.....: 10.00 min IMPERVIOUS AREA ABSTRACTION COEFF: 0.20 AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 PEAK RATE: 13.17 cfs VOL: 4.32 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min 7 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Ie I 8/ 9/89 Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 5 4 PM ===================================================================== BASIN SUMMARY BASIN ID: WLC NAME: WETLAND WITHIN ORIGINAL AREA C ~ SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: 3.90 Acres BASEFLOWS:" 0.00 cfs" RAINFALL TyPE....: TYPE1A PERVIOUS AREA PRECIPITATION....: 2.90 inches AREA..: 3.90 Acres TIME INTERVAL....: 10.00 min CN....: 86.00 TIME OF CONC.....: 10.00 min IMPERVIOUS AREA ABSTRACTION COEFF: 0.20 AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 PEAK RATE: 1.46 cfs VOL: 0.51 Ac-ft TIME: 476 min BASIN ID: WLD NAME: WETLAND WITHIN ORIGINAL AREA D ~ SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: 7.80 Acres BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs RAINFALL TyPE....: TYPE1A PERVIOUS AREA PRECIPITATION....: 2.90 inches AREA..: 7.80 Acres TIME INTERVAL....: 10.00 min CN....: 86.00 TIME OF CONe.....: 10.00 min IMPERVIOUS AREA ABSTRACTION COEFF: 0.20 AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 PEAK RATE: 2.93 cfs VOL: 1.03 Ac-ft TIME: 476 min 8/ 9/89 Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 6 4 PM ===================================================================== HYDROGRAPH SUMMARY PEAK TIME VOLUME HYD RUNOFF OF OF Contrib NUM RATE PEAK HYDRO Area cfs min. cf-AcFt Acres --------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------- 1 1062.200 1150 61958268 cf 0.00 N.oen+c:~.:. ~ c..? ec.. 2 106.363 480 2791193 cf 725.00 3 166.490 490 4837923 cf 1260.00 4 58.888 470 1190268 cf 310.00 5 31.228 480 862171 cf 225.00 6 3.733 470 60697 cf 10.60 7 4.625 470 77244 cf 13.50 8 4.156 470 67568 cf 11. 80 9 13.578 470 235841 cf 41. 20 10 11. 850 470 171840 cf 21. 00 11 9.114 470 132153 cf 16.15 12 2.963 470 42960 cf 5.25 13 12.979 470 188206 cf 23.00 14 1.406 470 22341 cf 3.90 15 1185.803 1130 71777764 cf 2544.10 ~O~+~>::.. ~\-ml-Ul 16 2.813 470 44682 cf 7.80 17 4.369 470 65301 cf 9.15 . 18 15.792 470 232887 cf 30.80 ~ I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I late: 13.5& cfs ,iE: 7.13 br Vol: s.n Ac-ft Int: 10.00 ain Ilyd 10.: 10 late: 1097.01 cfs 'be: 19.17 br Vol : lU6.H Ac-ft lnt: 10.00 aiD Ilyd 10.: 11 late: 1157.34 cfs 'be: 19.00 br Vol: 1597.51 Ac-ft lnt: 10.00 lin Ilyd 10.: U late: 1173.16 cfs ,iE: 1a.a3 br Vol : 1624.83 Ac-ft Int: 10.00 aiD Ilyd 10.: 13 late: 1134.30 cfs 'be: 1a.a3 br Vol : 1644.62!c-ft lilt: 10.00 ain Ilyd 10.: 14 late: 1134.96 cfs ,iE: la.a3 br Vol: 1646.02 Ac-ft Int: 10.00 aiD Ilyd 10.: 15 late: 1115.10 cfs 'i~: 1a.a3 br .JC. Vol: 1647.79 Ac-ft Int: 10.00 aiD Ilyd 10.: 16 late: 0.00 cfs 'i~: 1U3 br Vol: 0.00 Ac-ft lilt: 0.00 ain Ilyd 10.: 17 late: 0.00 cfs ,iE: 1U3 br Vol: O.OO!c-ft Int: 0.00 aiD If ~X:\-::'T1I...L& 'ibTM- ~'f!)I<..oC~rt-' 1M \..tOC2-l\-\: C~l(. G StrM R.Jl):::r I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 14 I 8/11/89 Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 1 2 pm ===================================================================== BASIN SUMMARY BASIN ID: A NAME: ORIGINAL EAST AREA INTO CREEK (f) SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: 10.60 Acres BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs RAINFALL TyPE....: TYPE1A PERVIOUS AREA PRECIPITATION....: 2.90 inches AREA..: 10.60 Acres TIME INTERVAL....: 10.00 min CN....: 86.00 TIME OF CONC.....: 15.00 min IMPERVIOUS AREA ABSTRACTION COEFF: 0.20 AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 PEAK RATE: 3.86 cfs VOL: 1.39 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min BASIN ID: AIMP NAME: INPROVED EAST AREA INTO CREEK ~ SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: 21.00 Acres BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs RAINFALL TyPE....: TYPE1A PERVIOUS AREA PRECIPITATION....: 2.90 inches AREA..: 21.00 Acres TIME INTERVAL....: 10.00 min CN....: 94.00 TIME OF CONC.....: 10.00 min IMPERVIOUS AREA . ABSTRACTION COEFF: 0.20 AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 PEAK RATE: 12.02 cfs VOL: 3.94 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min BASIN ID: B NAME: ORIGINAL EAST AREA INTO CREEK G) SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: 22.40 Acres BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs RAINFALL TyPE....: TYPE1A PERVIOUS AREA PRECIPITATION....: 2.90 inches AREA..: 22.40 Acres . TIME INTERVAL....: 10.00 min eN....: 86.00 TIME OF CONC.....: 20.00 min IMPERVIOUS AREA ABSTRACTION COEFF: 0.20 AREA..: 0.00 Acres eN....: 98.00 PEAK RATE: 7.87 cfs VOL: 2.94 Ac-ft TIME: 473 min 8/11/89 Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM 2 page 2 pm ===================================================================== BASIN SUMMARY BASIN ID: BIMP NAME: IMPROVED WEST AREA INTO CREEK ~ SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: 16.15 Acres BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs RAINFALL TyPE....: TYPE1A PERVIOUS AREA PRECIPITATION....: 2.90 inches AREA..: 16.15 Acres TIME INTERVAL....: 10.00 min CN....: 94.00 TIME OF CONC.....: 10.00 min IMPERVIOUS AREA ABSTRACTION COEFF: 0.20 AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 PEAK RATE: 9.24 cfs VOL: 3.03 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min BASIN ID: C NAME: ORIGINAL WEST AREA TO SOUTH ~ SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: 11.80 Acres BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs RAINFALL TyPE....: TYPE1A PERVIOUS AREA PRECIPITATION....: 2.90 inches AREA..: 11.80 Acres TIME INTERVAL....: 10.00 min CN....: 86.00 TIME OF CONC.....: 15.00 min IMPERVIOUS AREA ABSTRACTION COEFF: 0.20 AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 PEAK RATE: 4.30 cfs VOL: 1.55 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min BASIN ID: CIMP NAME: IMPROVED WEST ARE INTO WETLAND Q3) SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: 5.25 Acres BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs RAINFALL TyPE....: TYPE1A PERVIOUS AREA PRECIPITATION....: 2.90 inches AREA..: 5.25 Acres TIME INTERVAL....: 10.00 min CN....: 94.00 TIME OF eONC.....: 10.00 min IMPERVIOUS AREA ABSTRACTION COEFF: 0.20 AREA..: 0.00 Acres eN....: 98.00 PEAK RATE: 3.01 cfs VOL: 0.99 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min IS I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I . f4 I 8/11/89 2 pm Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 3 ===================================================================== BASIN ID: D SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 13.84 cfs BASIN ID: DIMP SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 13.17 cfs BASIN ID: WLC SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 1.46 cfs VOL: BASIN SUMMARY NAME: ORIGINAL EAST AREA TO SOUTH 41.20 Acres TYPE1A 2.90 inches 10.00 min 25.00 min 0.20 VOL: BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 41.20 Acres CN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 5.41 Ac-ft TIME: 472 min NAME: IMPROVED EAST ARE INTO WETLAND 23.00 Acres TYPE1A 2.90 inches 10.00 min 10.00 min 0.20 VOL: 4.32 BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 23.00 Acres CN....: 94.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA.:: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min NAME: WETLAND WITHIN ORIGINAL AREA C 3.90 Acres TYPE1A 2.90 inches 10.00 min 10.00 min 0.20 BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 3.90 Acres eN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres eN....: 98.00 0.51 Ac-ft TIME: 476 min @ @ @ 8/11/89 Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 2 pm 4 BASIN SUMMARY ===================================================================== BASIN ID: WLD NAME: WETLAND WITHIN ORIGINAL AREA D ~ SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: 7.80 Acres BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs RAINFALL TyPE....: TYPE1A PERVIOUS AREA PRECIPITATION....: 2.90 inches AREA..: 7.80 Acres TIME INTERVAL....: 10.00 min CN....: 86.00 TIME OF CONC.....: 10.00 min IMPERVIOUS AREA ABSTRACTION COEFF: 0.20 AREA..: 0.00 Acres eN....: 98.00 PEAK RATE: 2.93 cfs VOL: 1.03 Ac-ft TIME: 476 min '7 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I /'0 I 8/11/89 Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 1 2 pm ===================================================================== STAGE DISCHARGE TABLE INLET CONTROL CULVERT ID No. 2 Description: 15 INCH @ EAST WETLAND Diameter (ft): 1.25 ~ntrance type: Length (ft) : 500.00 Invert Elev : Slope (ft/ft): 0.0050 No. of Clvrts: Mannings n : 0.0240 Max Ponding ell Stg-Dis Increment : 1 28.00 1 37.00 0.10 SUGE <--DISCHARGE---> STAGE <--DISCH!JGE---> STAGE <--DISCBARCE---> STAGE <--DISCHARCE---> (ft) ---cfs-- ------- (ft) ---cfs-- ------- (ft) ---cfs-- ------- (ft) ---cfs-- ------- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 23.00 0.0000 30.30 3.1232 32.60 3.8894 34.90 4.5278 28.10 0.0555 30.40 3.1604 32.70 3.9194 35.00 4.5536 28.20 0.1109 30.50 3.1971 32.80 3.9491 35.10 4.5791 28.30 O.lm 30.60 3.2334 32.90 3.9785 35.20 4.6016 28.40 0.4362 30.70 3.2691 33.00 4.0078 35.30 4.6299 28.50 0.7286 30.80 3.3049 33.10 4.0368 35.40 4.6550 28.60 1.0418 30.90 3.3401 33.20 4.0657 35.50 4.6801 28.70 1.3852 31.00 3.3749 33.30 4.0943 35.60 4.7050 2UO 1.7476 31.10 3.4093 33.40 4.1227 35.70 4.7297 28.90 2.1277 31.20 304m 33.50 4.1510 35.80 4.7544 29.00 2.5917 31.30 3.4n1 33.60 4.1790 35.90 4.m9 29.10 2.6364 31.40 3.5106 33.70 4.2069 36.00 4.8033 29.20 2.6803 31.50 3.5437 33.80 4.2345 36.10 4.3275 29.30 2.7236 31.60 3.5765 33.90 4.2620 36.20 4.3517 29.40 2.7661 31.70 3.6090 34.00 4.2894 36.30 4.3157 29.50 2.8080 3l.S0 3.6412 31.10 4.3165 36.40 4.3996 29.60 2.8193 31.90 3.6732 34.20 4.3435 36.50 4.9234 29.70 2.3900 32.00 3.7019 34.30 4.3703 36.60 4.9470 29.30 2.9302 32.10 3.7363 34.40 4.3969 36.70 4.9706 29.90 2.9698 32.20 3.7674 34.50 4.4234 36.80 4.9940 30.00 3.0089 32.30 3.7983 34.60 4.4493 36.90 5.0174 30.10 3.0m 32.40 3.8239 34.70 4.4759 37.00 5.0406 30.20 3.0855 32.50 3.8593 34.80 4.5020 8/11/89 Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 2 pm 1 STAGE STORAGE TABLE =====;=============================================================== CUSTOM STORAGE ID No. 2 Description: EAST WETLAND STAGE <----STORAGE----> STAGE <----STORAGE----> STAGE <----STORAGE----> STAGE <----STORAGE----> (ft) ---cf--- --Ae-Ft- (ft) ---cf--- --Ae-Ft- (ft) ---cf--- --Ae-Ft- (ft) ---cf--- --Ae-Ft- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 32.00 545.00 0.0125 33.30 132287 3.0369 34.60 696598 15.992 35.90 950769 21.827 32.10 1768 0.0406 33.40 172123 3.9514 34.70 744175 17.084 36.00 957865 21.990 32.20 2992 0.0687 33.50 211958 4.8659 31.80 791752 18.176 36.10 960816 22.057 32.30 4215 0.0968 33.60 251794 5.7804 34.90 839329 19.268 36.20 963767 22.125 32.40 5t39 0.1249 33.70 291630 6.6949 35.00 886906 20.361 36.30 966718 22.193 32.50 6662 0.1529 33.80 331466 7.6094 35.10 894002 20.523 36.40 969669 22.261 32.60 7886 0.1810 33.90 371301 8.5239 35.20 901098 20.686 36.50 972620 22.328 32.70 9109 0.2091 34.00 411137 9.4384 35.30 908194 20.849 36.60 975572 22.396 32.80 10333 0.2372 34.l0 458714 10.531 35.40 915290 21.012 36.70 978523 22.464 32.90 11556 0.2653 34.20 506291 11. 623 35.50 922385 21.175 36.80 981474 22.532 33.00 12780 0.2934 34.30 553868 12.715 35.60 929181 21. 338 36.90 984425 22.599 33.10 52616 1.2079 34.40 601445 13.807 35.70 936577 21. 501 33.20 92451 2.1221 31.50 649021 11.899 35.80 913673 21. 664 Co I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I "2.0 I 8/11/89 Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM 1 3:30 PM page ===================================================================== LEVEL POOL TABLE SUMMARY MATCH INFLOW ST DI <-PEAK-> STORAGE <--------DESCRIPTION---------> (cfs) (cfs) id id <-STAGE> id VOL (cf) ----------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------- EAST WETLAND 25 YR ........... IMPl2()UEf) U))..,(CHTIOM 0.00 12.98 2 2 33.03 20 23001.38 .....:-._ ...u..__ . ij . . 'S ~ s \t..orn t1? C) .. _. . " ,..'-' v''"'C''" l~ 'L ... EA'S"- WET\..AND:. . . --.---. .-..-,---.-. . - .- 3L4 .~~ A r~I''''Z,s- oS c..._ _._.~._._.~:.='. ---_____ -..1= ( 'l.., ., 'l..C; ;(, lJ> ') . ~ - ... ---.--.- ...- .. c 4'~ . . -. -::> -:>. .......-.- ..-.- - '~,.. Co I- - .. -------- -- _. .- ... ~12._._::::___3_7;._,.__ h_~..A =~~::2.SPIl.?--z.Z; _..sr'" ~h~":<;~ . .. .. . . ..'t... .:.- ... . . .-:' ..-.--'...j,_....,.,-_<.... - .. .. , ___._'._ _---'_L_ _~_'.' :'''h_:~:' v,~--f6.\1;?;;<\~.~~ ~1'\f~I~~C.~~\l,::~_)__~: -~::~i~ic;~'~-~~- .. '-.- ----. -:----,.----. ---..--.--'-- - . . - -.....,. '.. ~.. -.. ...- .. ,: ", ,.:.:.- .. ;;-:~.~.~:'-? :::. -.."-;... -. .._--~~'. .. -_..~-_.- .-. . . -.. .. . . .-.". ..T".,';.'~.f... _...-.~~..::...<-.:'..~.:.=~~~.2:_~..:-:~;~~,~: :.._.~< .~'.:. .:...-..~ .- ~.2>A~-:_...'7;,~--~:-._.~4-~-_10?,~ ~~~Q-- :s~,_::,::._$,.~~._::c~:...-.~__~.,.: :.~-~.-~'~'. V :. .u. "_ n ..._.. ___..'. __ ,4- '1_~';:~.J~E1.~~~F - . ~c; - ~~- . At; :. . ...... . -.-._a___~~7'----' ..;_7"'_-:::::.--:::::~_. 4':; \ \':;0 SF _..._.==-'-__-'-______. . . , , . . .__0 __.... . ..... . __ ... _ h v. -= '10 ~ Sq.. (. r . I.::. ._.- _.... -_.-- . ._----_.~--_..- . . ....' . .- --.-.-.-.' .' _-.-..., .. n. _. .".' --....-.-.--. 'Z-I I I I ~ltl 1--- V - ~ ~I ~~ ~ ~l.., 'tIS st=" 't'" '5 II (,.t=- 1-.-.-- 1- -ro+,::). \? - I~'~--~-'-- :,d. _:.~ I ;.4 ::___3 'j".. _.______ _. I.. ._._.-- -. ----- ----~------.-.. . . _.__._.___.__...._..-.__. __._ __._._.___..~ 0"" . ......-- ~-_._- .~-_. -'-_..~.:.;.,_~.s 4..S .G ~. 4 d" .... . . _d -' r,:.,~-_..-:_~> L..----~~~.:.---':~::.:=-- __~~_~;:d . -..........-~_. --_. -,_.""'. ..-......--- .. ~ '.., \ A - .., 4--- - . 1_-:-'__-:- ._~<:: ::-~ _'-:,-:-:l~~.::-~:~-::.~:::._~<.~. __::_~~:.,._\ ;Z., !J ~:C:J G~ ..A_LI_',..J.."S .~ "'-:; . '. c.F- '- . --_.~'-.: _.-.~":'__. .- . 3.1 4 -",\C;. ... - ......:. - ,-0. _ ~. .'.. _". . .. .". , . -. ... -- ~-- _._-;~'_:.--="""':'" ..:--~. --~...:::...:.....; ...... e, -'0 . _.BJ",~~"C';-c-f.e_c..F: . . ~;,.,:.:=;._=-.....:. .'-":~ .:.:"::;: .~ . . . . .......... ~ ......,. - . ~ 1-~?'.~-~4: ..;::)z:~~~.n.. .-. .--_.. "'-" . .."" ~L S :J-i-~-~-':>..- c.f . . '-._ _" .' 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'i:;::.:'::.;~:;:.'..~.:->'::C.:':"::' ':-.'.;~::-" '_-:~: ~~~:~~~--~--_.._' ~-.-:-~1;/fiA~~ ~~~. ~-'-:.-:~;~~::: <s? '~ ~:_: . -:t!!l~,,'-'_:=-- ..-..:-:- _ ----:-:-:--. ~'~--'-=:-:--~'-:-:-:-'-:~'I- _.I~~.-~-_r--~'-~"':--:--- ... ..--- - ~-'"-~--,,,,"'- I . --"'."-"~ I --------.. ...,-~--- --. ._'..-.". . - ........~~~., .~\j .,~,,~:.:...-.;:~~_:. . '., .. __ ,.~h:~i~,~\=:~i~\~.g:...;~-~. ...... I ._c::.::'~'_':::' ~';-'. .' -._..;....,.:... "- , , ..........--.- ---..------ -'.;'.-,' , ....:;...": -'-'--- . IQ \' :.\ . ::n,":> --...--=----'----- p.~'-' I ---_.~- . ....:.... ....- .... .~ :::~ ~..-.:=::....~~._- , , ........I-,.~,=.::-,. -' ..... . _:~. ",""", . . ". ~. --- ... '-'4-'" 4 .- ~ .- I _ ~'::> '(.. I .~~.C;c,~-.3 .4.._ .",-,-:",,"-=-~- :..~-:-..-~ -..-......- ---..-.-.--.---------. I i..... . ~~,.5 ..:__n3_~___. ..___..__~~~~ ~_-.'" ....... --_._. -- ...-, --.--. . ... ~._ ~..-') ~..\~~t...'-Y . . ~ I . . I ~ <" c:; ."1~ c:q ~ \ 'Z.. \ I Cy I I _..-- _. . I I ...."""'\. ....--. .. .-- ......_.... .._._~-_.._. _n "~-.' --.--.---- --- .'-. '.~-.....--... "z3"-."- . -......-..- -' . - -....-..,.....---.....,.-. .--.. ". '.-' . .....,....-.._--.. .. .....- .-....----....--...... . :~--.;:..'!:!....--..-......,..- . :;..-.._.;.~......., .. 1 I I I I 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I I oz1 I 8/11/89 7AM Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 1 ===================================================================== BASIN ID: A SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 3.86 cfs BASIN ID: A10 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 2.95 cfs BASIN ID: A100 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 5.78 cfs BASIN SUMMARY NAME: ORIGINAL EAST AREA INTO CREEK 10.60 Acres TYPE1A 2.90 inches 10.00 min 15.00 min 0.20 VOL: 1.39 BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 10.60 Acres CN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres eN....: 98.00 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min NAME: ORIGINAL BASIN A 10 YEAR SCS 10.60 Acres TYPE1A 2.50 inches 10.00 min 15.00 min 0.20 VOL: BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 10.60 Acres CN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 1.10 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min NAME: ORIGINAL BASIN A 100 YEAR SCS 10.60 Acres TYPE1A 3.70 inches 10.00 min 15.00 min 0.20 VOL: BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 10.60 Acres CN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 2.01 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min 8/11/89 7AM Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 2 ===================================================================== BASIN ID: A2 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 1. 29 cfs BASIN ID: A5 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 2.29 cfs BASIN ID: A50 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 4.81 cfs z.s BASIN SUMMARY NAME: ORIGINAL BASIN A 2 YEAR SCS 10.60 Acres TYPE1A 1.70 inches 10.00 min 15.00 min 0.20 VOL: BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 10.60 Acres CN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 0.56 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min NAME: ORIGINAL BASIN A 5 YEAR SCS 10.60 Acres TYPE1A 2.20 inches 10.00 min 15.00 min 0.20 VOL: BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA . AREA..: 10.60 Acres eN....-: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 0.89 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min NAME: ORIGINAL BASIN A 50 YEAR SCS 10.60 Acres TYPE1A 3.30 inches 10.00 min 15.00 min 0.20 VOL: BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 10.60 Acres CN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 1.70 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I u I 8/11/89 7AM Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 3 ===================================================================== BASIN ID: AIMP SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.....~.: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 12.02 cfs BASIN ID: AR-11 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 63.15 cfs BASIN ID: AR-13 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF eONC.....: ABSTRACTION eOEFF: PEAK RATE: 31.31 cfs BASIN SUMMARY NAME: INPROVED EAST AREA INTO CREEK 21. 00 Acres TYPE1A 2.90 inches 10.00 min 10.00 min 0.20 VOL: BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 21.00 Acres CN....: 94.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 3.94 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min NAME: AREA ELEVEN 310.00 Acres TYPE1A 2.90 inches 10.00 min 14.00 min 0.20 VOL: BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 310.00 Acres CN....: 78.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 27.33 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min NAME: AREA THIRTEEN 225.00 Acres TYPE1A 2.90 inches 10.00 min 60.00 min 0.20 BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 225.00 Acres eN....: 78.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres eN....: 98.00 Ac-ft TIME: 479 min VOL: 19.79 8/11/89 7AM Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 4 --------------------------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------------------------- BASIN ID: AR-8 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 106.93 cfs BASIN ID: AR-9 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 167.18 cfs BASIN ID: B SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 4.74 cfs Z7 BASIN SUMMARY NAME: AREA EIGHT 725.00 Acres TYPE1A 2.90 inches 10.00 min 50.00 min 0.20 VOL: 64.07 NAME: AREA NINE 1260.00 Acres TYFE1A 2.90 inches 10.00 min 66.00 min 0.20 VOL: 111. 09 BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 725.00 Acres CN....: 78.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 Ac-ft TIME: 479 min BASEFLOWS: PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 1260.00 Acres CN....: 78.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 Ac-ft TIME: 483 min 0.00 cfs NAME: ORIGINAL EAST AREA INTO CREEK 13.50 Acres TYPE1A 2.90 inches 10.00 min 20.00 min 0.20 BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 13.50 Acres CN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres eN....: 98.00 1.77 Ac-ft TIME: 473 min VOL: I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I ZJJ I 8/11/89 7AM Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 5 ===================================================================== BASIN ID: B10 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 3.61 cfs BASIN ID: B100 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 7.14 cfs BASIN ID: B2 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF eONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 1. 56 cfs BASIN SUMMARY NAME: ORIGINAL AREA B 10 YEAR SCS 13.50 Acres TYPE1A 2.50 inches 10.00 min 20.00 min 0.20 VOL: 1.40 BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 13.50 Acres CN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 Ac-ft TIME: 473 min NAME: ORIGINAL AREA B 100 YEAR SCS 13.50 Acres TYPE1A 3.70 inches 10.00 min 20.00 min 0.20 VOL: 2.56 BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 13.50 Acres CN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 Ac-ft TIME: 473 min NAME: ORIGINAL AREA B 2 YEAR SCS 13.50 Acres TYPE1A 1. 70 inches 10.00 min 20.00 min 0.20 VOL: BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 13.50 Acres eN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres eN....: 98.00 0.71 Ac-ft TIME: 476 min 8/11/89 7AM Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 6 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ===================================================================== BASIN ID: B5 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 2.80 cfs BASIN ID: B50 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 5.92 cfs BASIN ID: BIMP SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF eONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 9.24 cfs :1 BASIN SUMMARY NAME: ORIGINAL AREA B 5 YEAR SCS 13.50 Acres TYPE1A 2.20 inches 10.00 min 20.00 min 0.20 VOL: 1.13 BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 13.50 Acres CN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 Ac-ft TIME: 473 min NAME: ORIGINAL AREA B 50 YEAR SCS 13.50 Acres TYPE1A 3.30 inches 10.00 min 20.00 min 0.20 VOL: 2.16 BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 13.50 Acres CN....~ 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 Ac-ft TIME: 473 min NAME: IMPROVED WEST AREA INTO CREEK 16.15 Acres TYPE1A 2.90 inches 10.00 min 10.00 min 0.20 VOL: 3.03 BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 16.15 Acres CN....: 94.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 30 I 8/11/89 .7AM Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 7 ===================================================================== BASIN ID: C SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 4.30 cfs BASIN ID: C10 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 3.28 cfs BASIN ID: C100 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 6.44 cfs BASIN SUMMARY NAME: ORIGINAL WEST AREA TO SOUTH 11.80 Acres TYPE1A 2.90 inches 10.00 min 15.00 min 0.20 VOL: BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 11.80 Acres CN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres eN....: 98.00 1.55 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min NAME: ORIGINAL AREA C 10 YEAR SCS 11.80 Acres TYPE1A 2.50 inches 10.00 min 15.00 min 0.20 VOL: BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 11.80 Acres CN....,; 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 1.22 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min NAME: ORIGINAL AREA C 100 YEAR SCS 11.80 Acres TYPE1A 3.70 inches 10.00 min 15.00 min 0.20 VOL: BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 11.80 Acres eN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 2.24 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min 8/11/89 7AM Bush, Roed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 8 ===================================================================== BASIN ID: C2 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 1. 43 cfs BASIN ~'): C5 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 2.55 cfs BASIN ID: C50 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF eONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 5.36 cfs 31 BASIN SUMMARY NAME: ORIGINAL AREA C 2 YEAR SCS 11. 80 Acres TYPE1A 1.70 inches 10.00 min 15.00 min 0.20 VOL: 0.62 BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 11.80 Acres CN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min NAME: ORIGINAL AREA C 5 YEAR SCS 11. 80 Acres TYPE1A 2.20 inches 10.00 min 15.00 min 0.20 BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 11.80 Acres CN.....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 0.99 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min VOL: NAME: ORIGINAL AREA C 50 YEAR SCS 11.80 Acres TYPE1A 3.30 inches 10.00 min 15.00 min 0.20 VOL: 1.89 BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 11.80 Acres eN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I~~ I 8/11/89 7AM Bush, Reed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 9 ===================================================================== BASIN 10: CIMP SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 3.01 cfs BASIN ID: 0 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION. . . . : . TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 13.84 cfs BASIN 10: D10 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 10.52 cfs BASIN SUMMARY NAME: IMPROVED WEST ARE INTO WETLAND 5.25 Acres TYPE1A 2.90 inches 10.00 min 10.00 min 0.20 VOL: BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 5.25 Acres CN....: 94.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 0.99 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min NAME: ORIGINAL EAST AREA TO SOUTH 41.20 Acres TYPE1A 2.90 inches 10.00 min 25.00 min 0.20 VOL: BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 41.20 Acres CN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 5.41 Ac-ft TIME: 472 min NAME: ORIGINAL AREA D 10 YEAR SCS 41.20 Acres TYPE1A 2.50 inches 10.00 min 25.00 min 0.20 VOL: BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 41.20 Acres eN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 4.27 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min 8/11/89 7AM Bush, Reed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 10 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ===================================================================== BASIN 10: 0100 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 20.89 cfs BASIN ID: 02 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 4.55 cfs BASIN 10: D5 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 8.16 cfs 33 BASIN SUMMARY NAME: ORIGINAL AREA 0 100 YEAR SCS 41. 20 Acres TYPE1A 3.70 inches 10.00 min 25.00 rnin 0.20 VOL: 7.81 BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 41.20 Acres CN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 Ac-ft TIME: 472 min NAME: ORIGINAL AREA D 2 YEAR SCS 41.20 Acres TYPE1A 1.70 inches 10.00 min 25.00 min 0.20 VOL: 2.16 BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 41.20 Acres CN..... 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min NAME: ORIGINAL AREA D 5 YEAR SCS 41.20 Acres TYPE1A 2.20 inches 10.00 min 25.00 min 0.20 VOL: 3.44 BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 41.20 Acres CN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 34 I 8/11/89 7AM Bush, Reed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 11 ===================================================================== BASIN 10: D50 SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 17.31 cfs BASIN ID: DIMP SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 13.17 cfs BASIN ID: WLC SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: BASIN SUMMARY NAME: ORIGINAL AREA D 50 YEAR SCS 41. 20 Acres TYPE1A 3.30 inches 10.00 min 25.00 min 0.20 VOL: 6.60 BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 41.20 Acres CN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 Ac-ft TIME: 472 min NAME: IMPROVED EAST ARE INTO WETLAND 23.00 Acres TYPE1A 2.90 inches 10.00 min 10.00 min 0.20 BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 23.00 Acres CN... ..: 94.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres CN....: 98.00 4.32 Ac-ft TIME: 475 min VOL: NAME: WETLAND WITHIN ORIGINAL AREA C 3.90 Acres TYPE1A 2.90 inches 10.00 min 10.00 min 0.20 1. 46 cfs VOL: 0.51 BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 3.90 Acres eN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres eN....: 98.00 Ac-ft TIME: 476 min 8/11/89 7AM Bush, Reed & Hitchings, Inc. QUADRANT MONTE VILLA FARM page 12 ===================================================================== BASIN ID: WLD SCS METHODOLOGY TOTAL AREA.......: RAINFALL TyPE....: PRECIPITATION....: TIME INTERVAL....: TIME OF CONC.....: ABSTRACTION COEFF: PEAK RATE: 2.93 cfs 3C BASIN SUMMARY NAME: WETLAND WITHIN ORIGINAL AREA D 7.80 Acres TYPE1A 2.90 inches 10.00 min 10.00 min 0.20 VOL: 1.03 BASEFLOWS: 0.00 cfs PERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 7.80 Acres CN....: 86.00 IMPERVIOUS AREA AREA..: 0.00 Acres eN....: 98.00 Ac-ft TIME: 476 min I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I WATER & SANITARY SEWER BUSH, ROED & HITCHINGS, INC. 2009 MINOR AVENUE EAST SEATTLE, WA 98102 1-206-323-4144 P,"{il\"i'fD AUG 2 2 1989 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I !-lEoW \'2.." e -..,s"\'-- 'S.E.. 1 4-oc:C) 01'1-1 DE;MAt-lO I '-\-II<... VA\....vt; KYPIPE SIN: 56011278 HMVersien: 4.01 RUN DATE: 08/09/1989 TIME: 12:59:00.93 Data File: MVCTR.2 FLOWRATE IS EXPRESSED IN GPM AND PRESSURE IN PSIG A SUMMARY OF THE ORIGINAL DATA FOLLOWS PIPE NO. NODE NOS. LENGTH DIAMETER ROUGHNESS MINOR LOSS K FIXED GRADE (FEET) (INCHES) 1 0 1 100.0 12.0 111. 0 2.80 520.00 2 1 2 3300.0 12.0 111.0 2.80 .3 2 3 2600.0 12.0 111. 0 2.80 4 0 3 10400.0 12.0 111.0 4.60 520.00 5 3 4 4400.0 8.0 109.0 4.60 6 4 5 1290.0 8.0 109.0 .3.10 7 5 6 1360.0 6.0 108.0 3.10 8 6 7 1900.0 6.0 108.0 2.80 THERE IS A CHECK VALVE IN LINE NUMBER 8 9 8 7 2400.0 6.0 108.0 2.80 10 1 8 1600.0 6.0 108.0 2.80' 11 2 5 4000.0 12.0 130.0 2.80 . 12 5 9 460.0 8.0 130.0 2.50 13 9 10 850.0 8.0 130.0 2.80 14 11 10 540.0 8.0 130.0 2.80 15 6 11 670.0 6.0 108.0 2.80 .:JUNCTION NUMBER 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 DEMAND 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 4000.00 0.00 ELEVATION 411. 00 194.00 75.00 52.00 54.00 97.00 345.00 380.00 36.00 49.00 83.00 CONNECTING PIPES 1 2 10 2 3 11 3 4 5 5 6 6711 7 li 15 8 9 9 10 12 13 13 14 14 15 12 :JUTPUT SELECTION: ALL RESULTS ARE OUTPUT EACH PERIOD THIS SYSTEM HAS 15 PIPES WITH 11 JUNCTIONS , 3 LOOPS AND 2 FGNS PIPE NUMBER 1 4 FLOWRATE 2588.13 1411.87 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I THE RESULTS ARE OBTAINED AFTER 4 TRIALS WITH AN ACCURACY = 0.00021 MONTE VILLA CENTER WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM PIPE NO. NODE NOS. FLOWRATE HEAD LOSS PUMP HEAD MINOR LOSS VELOCITY HL/1000 1 0 1 2588.13 1.98 0.00 2.34 7.34 19.77 2 1 2 2588.13 65.25 0.00 2.34 7.34 19.77 3 2 3 -624.55 -3.69 0.00 -0.14 -1.77 -1.42 4 0 3 1411.87 66.94 0.00 1.15 4.00 6.44 5 3 4 787.32 71. 54 0.00 1.80 5.02 16.26 6 4 5 787.32 20.97 0.00 1.22 5.02 16.26 7 5 6 963.32 131.59 0.00 5.71 10.89 96.76 THE eHECK VALVE IN LINE NUMBER 8 IS eLOSED 9 8 7 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 10 1 8 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 11 2 5 3212.68 88.09 0.00 3.61 9.11 22.02 12 5 9 3036.68 65.74 0.00 14.58 19.38 142.92 13 9 10 3036.68 121.48 0.00 16.33 19.38 142.92 14 11 10 963.32 9.21 0.00 1.64 6.15 17.05 15 6 11 963.32 64.83 0.00 5.16 10.89 96.76 JUNCTION NUMBER DEMAND GRADE LINE ELEVATION PRESSURE 1 0.00 515.68 411.00' 45.36 2 0.00 448.09 194.00 110.10 3 0.00 451. 92 75.00 163.33 4 0.00 378.58 52.00 141.52 5 0.00 356.39 54.00 131;04 6 0.00 219.09 97.00 52.90 7 0.00 515.68 345.00 73.96 8 0.00 515.68 380.00 58.79 9 0.00 276.07 36.00 104.03 10 4000.00 138.25 49.00 38.68 11 0.00 149.10 83.00 28.64 THE NET SYSTEM DEMAND = 4000.00 ~UHMARY OF INFLOWS (+) AND OUTFLOWS ( -) FROM FIXED GRADE NODES 'rHE NET FLOW INTO THE SYSTEM FROM FIXED GRADE NODES ~ 4000.00 'tHE NET FLOW OUT OF THE SYSTEM INTO FIXED GRADE NODES ~ 0.00 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I l-IE:W \'L- e -:,s" s.~. ~oOO b?1-1 'D€;I-1AlJD J .c.i-\~. vA\...vE:;. KYPIPE SIN: 56011278 HMVersien: 4.01 RUN DATE: 08/09/1989 TIME: 12:48:21.65 Data File: MVCTR.1 FLOWRATE IS EXPRESSED IN GPM AND PRESSURE IN PSIG A SUMMARY OF THE ORIGINAL DATA FOLLOWS PIPE NO. NODE NOS. LENGTH DIAMETER ROUGHNESS MINOR LOSS It FIXED GRADE (FEET) (INCHES) 1. 0 1 100.0 12.0 111. 0 2.80 520.00 2 1 2 3300.0 12.0 111.0 2.80 ._.~-_._- -. 3 2 3 2600.0 12.0 111.0 2.80 .-.. - .._~, ,. . . _... ~. . "-- -. . 4 0 3 10400.0 12.0 111. 0 4.60 .--'. 520.00 5 3 4 4400.0 8.0 109.0 4.60 6 4 '5 1290.6 8.0 109.0 3.10 ,.......".~" ~-'. ;~. .. ...... 7 '5 6 1360.0 6.0 108.0 3.10 ,.. - -. ..- -.".... 8 6 7 1900.0 6.0 108.0 2.80 ., THERE IS A CHECK VALVE IN LINE NUMBER 8 . ---.-.,. .. .. , .. . _._-~-. -.'. 9 8 7 - 2400.0 6.0 108.0 2.80 10 1 8 1600.0 6.0 108.0 2.80 . -,- " . . . 11 2 5 4000.0 12.0 .130.0 2.80 12 5 9 460.0 8.0 130.0 2.50 -. -. l3 9 10 850.0 8.0 130.0 2.80 14 11 10 540.0 8.0 130.0 2.80 15 6 11 670.0 6.0 108.0 2.80 .:JUNCTION NUMBER DEMAND ELEVATION CONNECTING PIPES 1 .. 0.00 411.00 1 2 10 2 0.00 194.00 2 3 11 3 0.00 75.00 3 4 5 4 0.00 52.00 5 6 '5 0.00 54.00 6 7 11 12 6 0.00 97.00 7 8 15 7 0.00 345.00 8 9 8 0.00 380.00 9 10 9 0.00 36.00 12 13 10 3000.00 49.00 13 14 11 0.00 83.00 14 15 OUTPUT SELECTION: ALL RESULTS ARE OUTPUT EACH PERIOD THIS SYSTEM HAS 15 PIPES WITH 11 JUNCTIONS , 3 LOOPS AND 2 FeNS PRESSURE 46.16 123.01 175.55 166.89 160.39 106.99 74.76 59.59 147.90 107.36 95.36 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I THE RESULTS ARE OBTAINED AFTER 4 TRIALS WITH AN ACCURACY = 0.00013 MONTE VILLA CENTER WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM PIPE NO. NODE NOS. FLOWRATE HEAD LOSS PUMP HEAD MINOR LOSS VELOCITY HL/1000 1 0 1 1941.81 1.16 0.00 1.32 5.51 11.61 2 1 2 1941.81 38.33 0.00 1.32 5.51 11.61 3 2 3 -467.81 -2.16 0.00 -0.08 -1.33 -0.83 4 0 3 1058.19 39.24 0.00 0.64 3.00 3.77 5 3 4 590.38 . 41. 98 0.00 1.01 3.77 9.54 6 4 5 590.38 12.31 0.00 0.68 3.77 9.54 7 5 6 721. 45 77.03 .0.00 3.20 8.16 56.64 THE eHECK VALVE IN LINE NUMBER 8 IS CLOSED 9 ,8 7 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 10 1 8 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 11 2 5 2409.62 51. 71 0.00 2.03 6.84 12.93 12 5 9 2278.55 38.62 0.00 8.21 14.54 33.96 13 9 10 2278.55 71.37 0.00 9.19 14.54 83.96 14 11 10 721.45 5.39 0.00 0.92 4.60 9.98 .15 6 11 721. 45 37.95 0.00 2.89 8.16 56.64 'JUNCTION NUMBER 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 DEMAND 0.00 0.00 - 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3000.00 0.00 GRADE LINE 517.52 477.88 480.12 437.13 424.14 343.90 517.52 517.52 377.31 296.74 303.06 THE NET SYSTEM DEMAND = 3000.00 ELEVATI!)N 411.00 194.00 75.00 52.00' 54.00 97.00 345.00 380.00 36.00 49.00 83.00 SUMMARY OF INFLOWS(+) AND OUTFLOWS(-) FROM FIXED GRADE NODES PIPE NUMBER 1 4 FLOWRATE 1941.31 1058.19 THE NET FLOW INTO THE SYSTEM FROM FIXED GRADE NODES ~ 3000.00 THE NET FLOW OUT OF THE SYSTEM INTO FIXED GRADE NODES ~ 0.00 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I c..~. 10 e l.SW ":..Co. -1;,000 6:>Pt-1 ~l-'\A,JD c-l4i<:.. vAl-ve I , KYPIPE SIN: 56011278 HHVersien: 4.01 RUN DATE: 08/09/1989 TIME: 12:44:55.68 Data File: MVCTR.KYP FLOWRATE IS EXPRESSED IN GPM AND PRESSURE IN PSIG A SUMMARY OF THE ORIGINAL DATA FOLLOWS PIPE NO. NODE NOS. LENGTH DIAMETER ROUGHNESS MINOR LOSS K FIXED GRADE (FEET) (INCHES) - 1 0 1 100.0 12.0 .111.0 2.80 520.00 2 1 2 3300.0 12.0 111.0 2.80 3 2 3 2600.0 12.0 111.0 .. 2.80 ' , 4 0 3 10400.0 12.0 111.0 4.60 520.00 5 3 4 4400.0 8.0 109.0 4.60 6 4 5 1290.0' ':, 8.0 ' 109.0 3.10 7 5 6 ':, 1360.0 6.0 108.0 3.10 8 6 7 1900.0 6.0 '108.0 2.80 '" THERE IS A eHECK VALVE IN LINE NUMBER 8 9 8 7 2400.0 6.0 108.0 2.80 . .. 10 1 8 1600.0 6.0 108.0 2.80 11 2 5 4000.0 6.0 108.0 2.80 12 5 9 460.0 8.0 130.0 2.50 13 9 10 850.0 8.0 130.0 2.80 14 11 10 540.0 8.0 130.0 2.80 _ .. " 15 6 11 670.0 6.0 108.0 2.80 JUNCTION NUMBER DEMAND ELEVATION eONNECTING PIPES 1 0.00 411.00 1 2 10 " 2 0.00 194.00 2 3 11 3 0.00 75.00 3 4 5' 4 0.00 52.00 5 6 5 0.00 54.00 6 7 11 12 6 0.00 97.00 7 8 15 7 0.00 345.00 8 9 8 0.00 380.00 9 10 9 0.00 36.00 12 13 10 3000.00 49.00 13 14 11 0.00 83.00 14 15 OUTPUT SELECTION: ALL RESULTS ARE OUTPUT EACH PERIOD ' THIS SYSTEM HAS 15 PIPES WITH 11 JUNCTIONS , 3 LOOPS AND 2'FGNS THE RESULTS ARE OBTAINED AFTER 4 TRIALS WITH AN ACCURACY MONTE VILLA CENTER WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM NO. NODE NOS. o 1 1 2 2 3 o 3 3 4 4 5 5 6 CHECK VAJ.VE 8 7 1 8 2 5 5 9 9 10 11 10 6 11 PIPE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 THE 9 10 11 12 13 ,14 15 FLOWRATE 1870.55 1870.55 774.61 1129.45 1904.06 1904.06 721.45 IN LINE NUMBER 0.00 0.00 1095.94 2278.55 2278.55 721.45 721.45 0.00 0.00 12.39 14.54 14.54 4.60 8.16 I I I I I I I I I q I I I I I I I I I I = 0.00076 SUMMARY OF INFLOWS(+) AND OUTFLOWS(-) FROM FIXED GRADE NODES ",.: . PIPE NUMBER 1 4 FLOWRATE 1870.55 1129.45 HEAD LOSS 1.08 35.76 5.51 44.27 367.13 107.64 77.03 8 IS 0.00 0.00 491.46 38.62 71.37 5.39 37.95 PUMP HEAD MINOR LOSS 0.00 1.22 0.00 1.22 0.00 0.21 0.00 0.73 0.00 10.55 0.00 7.11 0.00 3.20 CLOSED 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 6.68 8.21 9.19 0.92 2.89 VELOCITY HL/1000 5.31 10.84 5.31 10.84 2.20 2.12 3.20 4.26 12.15 83.44 12.15 83.44 8.16 56.64 0.00 0.00 122.87 83.96 83.96 9.98 56.64 JUNCTION NUMBER' DEMAND, GRADE LINE ELEVATION PRESSURE 1 0.00 517.69 411.00' 46.23 2 0.00 480.71 194.00 124.24 3 0.00 474.99 75.00 173.33 4 0.00 97.31 52.00 19.64 5 0.00 -17.43 54.00 -30;95 6 0.00 -97.67 97.00 -84.36 7 0.00 517.69 345.00 74.83 8 0.00 517.69 380.00 59.67 9 0.00 -64.26 36.00 -43.45 10 3000.00 -144.82 49.00 -83.99 11 0.00 -138.52 83.00 -95.99 THE NET SYSTEM DEMAND = 3000.00 THE NET FLOW INTO THE SYSTEM FROM FIXED GRADE NODES = THE NET FLOW OUT OF THE SYSTEM INTO FIXED GRADE NODES = 3000.00 0.00 I I iEC2 SiB: 32011652 HWiersion: 5.01 Data File: QU~JrMD9.HC2 I .*i*ittttt*************************************ttt*t** , WATER SURFACE PROFILES . . VERSIOn OF SEPTEMBER 1988 · I:' · UPDATED: 16 FEBRUARY 1989 · RUB DATE 2/ 2/90 TIME 14:03:10 · tttttt.,....*,.""*..."t.,.,.,*,.,.*.,..,*,.*,..,.,, I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I x x mxxxx XXXXX xmx x x x x x x x x x x x x XXXXXIX xxxx x XXIXX XXXXX x x x x x x x x x x x x x mxxxx XXXXX xxxxxxx .............................................. .............................................. .............................................. .............................................. FULL HICRo-COKP,IER IKPLEHE1ITATIOll .............................................. .............................................. .............................................. .............................................. ----------------------------- ----------------------------- HAESTAD HETHODS ----------------------------- ----------------------------- **"'*****'****************'*""'*'*'* . D.S. ARIlY CORPS OF ENGIIIEERS . . THE HYDROLOGIC EllGIIIEERlllG CIlITER . . 609 SECOND SnEET, SOITE D . . DAVIS, CALIFORlIIA 95616 . . . ***************'*'****"""'t,tt"*"* 37 Brookside Road . Waterbury, Connecticut 06708 · (203) 755-1666 ElID OF BJJmER 'l.(sl<=10 ~H4-d\ "t Df-V ~Th ~(,,+\- ~ \ Tfz "" 1,q)1.L (w ITlk ~~\' 1l7~ ) W<J ~ 'l40l"lt tl\..lA- THIS RlCN EXECUTED 02/02/90 14:03:10 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Run Dote: 2/ 2/90 Run Time: 14: 3:10 IDflersion: 5.01 Data File: QUAD-KD9.HC2 Page 1 ttttt*..*.*t..*............**.**....t...*.***..** HEC2 RELEASE DATED SEP 88 UPDATED FEB 1989 ERROR CXlRR - 01 HODIFICATION - *******************************************1***** 1 QUADRAHT 1 HUNTE VILLA FARM / FILE C:\HEC2\QUAD-KD9.HC2 2 100 YEiJl FLOOD DEVELOPED CXlIIDITIONS ADD DEVELOPED SITE 3 NORTH CREEK I ICHECK lIIQ NIlfl IDIR SIRT IlETInC HVlIIS Q WSEL FQ 0 0 0 0 0,001 0 0 944.3 34.6 0 5 LPRllJ' NUHSEC ........REQUESTED SECTION lIUKBERS........ -10 -10 'C 0.035 0.035 0.035 0.100 0.300 .1 60 22 2030.0 2051.0 0 0 0 1 R 37.0 2003.0 37.0 2012.0 33.8 2019.0 30.2 2030.0 29.7 2033.0 :R 29.7 2049.0 30.3 2051.0 30.5 2051.0 30.5 2057.0 31.1 2060.0 R 31.1 2069.0 31.8 2075.0 31.8 2078.0 32.4 2081.0 32.4 2090.0 :R 32.5 2093.0 32.5 2096.0 32.7 2099.0 32.7 2105.0 34.0 2110.0 .R 37.0 2116.0 37.0 2126.0 1 110 26 2030.0 2045.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 I ;R 37.4 2001.0 37.4 2012.0 31.0 2018.0 31.2 2027.0 30.5 2030.0 :R 29.8 2031.0 29.8 2042.0 30.5 2045.0 30.5 2048.0 30.9 2051.0 ;R 30.9 2057.0 31.4 2060.0 31.4 2069.0 31.9 2072.0 32.1 2075.0 :R 32.1 2078.0 32.6 2082.0 32.6 2090.0 32.8 2093.0 32.8 2096.0 iR 32.9 2099.0 32.9 2106.0 33.2 2108.0 31.2 2117.0 37.3 2118.0 iR 37.3 2125.0 ] 340 15 2023.0 206l.O 230.0 230.0 230.0 1 :R 38.8 2007.0 31.2 2025.0 31.2 2028.0 30.0 2033.0 30.0 20n.o :R 30.5 2045.0 30.9 2049.0 30.9 2058.0 31.4 2061.0 31.4 2070.0 ;R 31.9 2073.0 32.2 2075.0 32.2 2078.0 32.7 2082.0 38.9 2095.0 1 410 21 2030.0 2051. 0 70.0 70.0 70.0 1 iR 37.7 2000,0 37.7 2010.0 34.7 2017 .0 31.5 2027.0 31.5 2030.0 :R 30.1 2036.0 30.1 2045,0 3I.l 2051.0 31.1 2060.0 31.6 2063.0 iR 31.6 2069.0 32.1 2072,0 32.1 2075.0 32.6 2078.0 32.6 2084.0 :R 33.0 2087.0 33.0 2093.0 33.5 2096.0 34.7 2100.0 37.6 2107.0 :R 37.6 2116.0 Run Date: 2/ 2/90 Run Time: 14: 3:10 HH'lersion: 5.01 Data File: QUAlHID9.BC2 fORTH CREEK lUllllARY PRINTOUT TABLE 150 SECllO Q CWSEL DIFWSP DIF'.lSI DIOOS TOPIIID ILCB 60.000 944.30 34.70 .00 .00 .10 94.35 .00 110.000 944.30 34.74 .00 .05 .00 100.49 50.00 340.000 944.30 35.00 .00 .26 .00 70.83 230.00 410.000 944.30 35.13 .00 .13 .00 85.04 70.00 840.000 944.30 35.69 .00 .56 .00 95.96 430.00 890.000 944.30 35.74 .00 .06 .00 96.90 50.00 . 1200.000 944.30 36.11 .00 .37 .00 75.29 310.00 . 1215.000 944.30 37.25 .00 1.14 .00 900.94 15.00 . 1305,000 944.30 37.25 .00 .00 .00 729.88 105.00 . 1475.000 944.30 37.24 .00 -.01 .00 387.11 220.00 . 1895.000 944.30 37.50 .00 .26 .00 65.51 420.00 . 2225,000 944.30 39.79 .00 2.29 .00 161. 86 330.00 2480.000 9H.30 40.46 .00 .67 .00 90.49 255,00 Page 4 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I .- .. 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'" 0 , '" a.. , C) , N M , C) N <1' '" M " a " <t M M M , M N UOI+ "O^a13 .. .~~~d'. ,,. J" j.. '" '~.~.Z . .... I I NORTH CREEK FLOODWA Y FROM KOLL STUDy 1982 I J + I .1llLL~~"~ . I 0 . 'i) i=l.~(!l ~~" ~ (~"PJ II') \ N I , \ 0 \ .,. . N , N I Vl , Z , [J. 1 . - I- .1llLL~~~~.. <t , .. -l , I ::> ~Ll' , w-l w<t I I. o:U I !" uJ I . :z:<t I .. . I-Z --. il!G , 0_ I .~ .... " zo:. , 0 U , Z , ,j- , I -l .1llLL.~~"~ . 0 , ~ , .. , M I I. , e" 0 a N IT> -n M 0 ,.... I v M M M M N .. uel+'Ohil13 .t ..'ec. I: I I .. .1llLL.~~~~. .. .1llLL.~~~~. . .. I I" !.. .. I I " , . . "'I..~ , ,,,. ......~.. . . .- I I I III HEC2 SIB: 32011652 I IDlVersion: 5.01 Data File: totde634.bc2 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I i*.tit*tttt****************'******'***************_*** . WATER SURFACE PROFILES . . VERSION OF SEPTEl!BER 1988 . . . . UPDATED: 16 FEBRCJ.RY 1989 · . RUB DATE 3/30/90 TIKE 07:43:48 · tit*tittttttti**************************************** x X XIXXXXX XXXIX XXXXX X X X X X X X X X X X X XXX XXX X XXXX X XXXXX XXXXX X X X X X X X X X X X X X XXXXXXX XXXXX xmxxx .............................................. .............................................. .............................................. .............................................. FULL KICRO-COKPUTER IKPLrKEIITATIOIl .............................................. .............................................. .............................................. .............................................. ----------------------------- ----------------------------- HAESTAD KErHODS ----------------------------- ----------------------------- ..""'."'.iiiiiiiii"i'iiiiiiiiiiiiii . U.S. ARIlY CORPS OF ENGINEERS . . THE HYDROLOGIC ENGINEERING CENTER · . 609 SECOlID STREET, SUITE D . . DAVIS, CALIFORNIA 95616 . . . iii"*'*iiiii*i"'*i"'ii*ii*ii'ii*i'i. 37 Brookside Road . .aterbury, Connecticut 06i08 · (203) 755-1666 !lID OF BHnlER I Run Date: 3/30/90 Run Time: 7:43:48 llllVersion: 5.01 Data File: totde634.hc2 Page 1 I I THIS RUN EXECOTED 03/30/90 07:43:48 tit*ttttttttt_***_********_**_******_****_******** I HEC2 RELEASE DATED SEP 88 OPDATED FEB 1989 ERROR CORR - 01 I HODIFIC.\TION - tit*ttttttttti********_***********_*_*_*_*__*_**_* I Tl QO}j)R}JlI / HOUTE VILLA F}JlK / FILE C:\HEC2\TOTDE634.HC2 T2 FEll.\ 100 YE.l.R FLOOD DEVELOPED CONDITIONS, 240TH ST. TO 195TH ST I 13 THROCGH BOTH SITES J1 ICHECK INQ NUN IDIR STIlT IlETllIC HVINS Q WSEL FQ 0 2 -1 30 I J2 IIPROF IPWT PRr,S xsrcv XSECH FII ALUX: IBW CHJlIK ITIlACE -1 I QT 1 634 I IIC 0.09 0,09 0.04 0.100 0.300 Xl 1 10 20 46 0 0 0 Xl 0 I GR 34.3 0 27.5 16 27.5 20 24.7 20.5 25.2 32 GR 25.2 32 25.5 44 27.9 46 27.9 50 )4,5 64 Xl 2 8 16 39 360 404 382 I n 0 GR 35.32 0 28.9 16 26,7 19 26.2 35 28.8 39 CR 29.6 95 33.4 105 34,78 108 Xl 2.1 0 0 0 80 80 80 0 0 I X3 0 BT 2 6 35.7 32.4 95 35.7 32.4 I Xl 2.2 9 36 62 5 5 5 X3 0 GR 35.8 8 31.4 16 28.0 36 27.0 43 27.0 57 I CR 28.0 62 29.0 77 31.4 86 35.8 94 Xl 3 8 27 60 60 60 60 X3 0 I CR 36.3 0 30.0 11 28.0 27 26.9 33 26.9 51 CR 28.4 60 30.0 76 36.3 88 Xl 4 11 26 54 650 650 650 I X3 0 :;R 36.7 0 29.3 15 29.3 26 27.75 32 27.75 49 GR 29.4 54 30.6 81 31.5 90 32 140 34 610 I .. 36.03 615 -" I I I Run Date: 3/30/90 Run Tine: 7:43:48 IlJ!Version: 5.01 Data File: totde634.hc2 Page 2 I Xl 5 18 56 79 520 260 500 X3 0 GR 37.06 0 31.1 11 29.6 19 29.4 56 28.4 60 I GR 28.4 77 29.7 79 3Q.4 93 31.9 106 31.0 120 GR 30.0 170 30.0 195 31.0 220 30.0 245 30.0 275 GR 32.0 308 34.0 560 36.0 566 I Xl 6 13 58 85 520 220 500 13 0 GR 37.03 0 32.0 9 32.4 21 30.4 58 29.1 60 I GR 29.1 82 30.4 85 31.9 100 31.0 120 30.2 200 GR 32.0 380 34.0 520 36.0 550 Xl 7 10 14 40.5 500 500 500 I X3 0 GR 37.59 0 33.0 9 32.4 14 29.55 24 29.55 36 GR 31.1 40.5 31.2 61 31.8 72 32.9 88 37.72 100 I Xl 8 13 17 46 400 400 400 13 0 GR 40.14 0 34.1 8 32.8 17 31.1 20 30.4 25 I GR 29.7 33 29.7 35 30,6 40 31.6 46 31.5 62 GR 33.3 70 33.7 76 40.02 90 Xl 8.1 0 0 0 5 5 5 0 0 I BT 2 8 38.21 34.23 76 38.62 34.83 Xl 8.2 9 16 39 45 45 45 Xl 0 I GR 40.14 0 34.1 8 32.4 16 29.9 25 32.3 39 Gp. 31.9 55 32.6 67 39.2 71 40.02 90 I Xl 9 10 13 35 220 280 250 X3 0 GR 38.92 0 34.6 9 34 13 31.3 19 30.3 23 GR 30.4 27 30.5 29 32.5 35 33.9 94 38.7 106 I Xl 10 10 35 70 460 500 480 GR 41.72 0 36.52 9 35.52 35 30.42 43 30.32 51 GR 30.82 60 35.02 70 37.12 75 36.82 96 40.02 106 I Xl 1200 8 2055.0 2075.0 310.0 310.0 310.0 Gp. 38.0 2000.0 36.8 2007.0 34.4 2055.0 31.0 2060.0 31.0 2070.0 Gp. 34,0 2075.0 36.6 2101.0 38.0 2108.0 I lie 0.035 0.035 0.035 0.6 0.3 Xl 1215 15 3285.0 3323.0 15.0 15.0 15.0 I GR 40.0 3065.0 36.0 3080.0 35.9 3110.0 34.7 3210.0 35.5 3285.0 GR 32.5 3293.0 31.2 3318.0 34.2 3323.0 34.5 3375.0 33.5 3450.0 GR 33.5 3640.0 34.0 3840 36.0 3970.0 38.0 3980.0 40.0 4000.0 I I I Run Date: 3/30/90 Run TiDe: 7:43:48 ~Iersion: 5.01 Data File: totde634.hc2 Page 3 NC 0.035 0.035 0.035 0.100 0.300 Xl 1305 11 3045.0 3075.0 150.0 90.0 105.0 GR 40.0 2933.0 36.0 2945.0 34.1 3045.0 31.6 3060.0 30.9 3070.0 GR 33.9 3075.0 35.7 3150.0 34.8 3200.0 34.5 3350.0 36.0 3658.0 GR 40.0 3700.0 Xl 1475 11 2970.0 3000.0 245.0 170.0 220.0 GR 40.0 2800.0 40.0 2859.0 36.6 2870.0 35.0 2970.0 33.0 2980.0 GR 33.0 2995.0 35.5 3000.0 36.2 3080.0 35.6 3140.0 36.0 3230.0 GR 40.0 3310.0 Xl 1895 12 2730.0 2757.0 460.0 420.0 420.0 GR 40.0 2400.0 40.0 2450.0 40.0 2500.0 40.0 2624.0 38.0 2630.0 GR 39.0 2675.0 35.9 2730.0 33.4 2737.0 33.0 2751. 0 36.5 2757.0 GR 38.0 2772.0 40,0 2832.0 Xl 2225 7 2383.0 2412.0 330.0 330.0 330.0 GR 40.0 2375.0 39.1 2383.0 34.6 2391.0 34.1 2405.0 38,1 2412.0 GR 39.6 2520.0 40.0 2560.0 Xl 2480 6 2288.0 2322.0 255.0 255.0 255.0 GR 40.4 2280.0 39.7 2288.0 35.2 2297.0 34.7 2314.0 38.7 2322.0 GR 40.8 2380.0 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Run Date: 3/30/90 Run Time: 7:43:48 BJlVersion: 5.01 Data File: totde634.hc2 Page 4 I SECllO DEPTH CWSEL cms WSELK EG HV HL OLOSS BAliK ELEV Q QLOB QCB QROB ALOB ACH AroB VOL TWA LEFT/RIGJIT TIHE ,lOB VCH VROB XHL XllCB ill WTII ELIIIN SSTA I SLOPE XLOBL XLCH XLOBR ITRIAL IOC lCONT COOO TOPIlID ElIDST I ipROF 1 I CCHV= .100 CEHV= .300 iSEClIO 1.000 3720 CRITIClJL DEPTH ASSUMED 1.00 3.27 27.97 27.97 30.00 29.24 1.27 .00 .00 27.50 I 634. 3. 631. O. 2. 70. O. O. O. 27.90 .00 1.31 9.05 .39 .090 .040 .090 .000 24.70 14.89 .018857 O. O. o. 0 13 0 .00 35.26 50,15 I iSEClIO 2.000 I 3301 Ifi ClL'lIGED HORE TlL'll lfiIMS 3302 WARlIIJIG: COlr:EY.'lICE CIl!.IlGE OUTSIDE OF ACCEPrABLE RAIlGE I 2.00 4.96 31.16 .00 .00 31.44 .28 2.11 .10 28,90 634. 6. m. 146. 6. 100. 113. 1. 1. 28.80 .03 .86 Ul 1.29 .090 ,040 .090 .000 26.20 10.36 I .002568 360. 382. 404. 5 0 0 .00 88.75 99.11 I iSECI10 2.100 3370 JIORll',L BRIDGE, IIRD= 2 HIli ILTRD= 35.70 ll~! ELLC= iii.i..i I 2.10 5.20 31.40 .00 .00 31.63 .23 .18 .00 28.90 634. 6. 469. 159. 8. 106. 128. 2. 1. 28.80 .03 .82 4043 1.24 .090 .040 .090 .000 26.20 9.75 .002024 80. 80, 80. 2 0 0 .00 90.01 99.76 I 'SEClIO 2.200 2.20 4.37 31.37 .00 .00 31.66 .29 .01 .02 28.00 I 63L 39. 5IL 81. 33. 108. 54. 2. 1. 28.00 .03 1.16 4.78 1.52 .090 .040 .090 .000 27.00 16.19 .002514 5. 5. 5. 2 0 0 .00 69.69 85.88 I I I I I Run Date: 3/30/90 Run Time: 7:43:48 llIIVersion: 5.01 Data File: totde634.bc2 Page 5 I SEetlO DEPTH CWSEL CRIWS WSELK EG HV HL OLOSS BAliK ELEV I Q QLOB QCH QROB ALOB ACH .\ROB VOL TWA LEFT/RIGHT TIKE \'l.OB VCH \'ROB XIlL XNCH XNR liru ElllIN SSTA SLOPE XLOBL XLCH XLOBR ITRIAL IDC ICON! CORAR TOPIIID ENDST I *SECHO 3.000 3.00 4.70 31.60 .00 .00 31. 78 .19 .11 .01 28.00 I 634. 50. 541. 44. 44. 145. 41. 2. 1. 28.40 .04 1.13 3.73 1.07 .090 .040 .090 .000 26.90 8.21 .001416 60. 60. 60. 2 0 0 .00 70.82 79.04 I *SECNO 4.000 4.00 4.78 32.53 .00 .00 32.69 .16 .90 .00 29.30 I 634. 56. 461. 117. 46. 125. 154. 6. 3. 29.40 .10 1.21 3.69 .76 .090 .040 .090 .000 27.75 8.45 .001368 650. 650. 650. 2 0 0 .00 256.71 265.16 *SECIIO 5.000 I 3302 W.lJll/IIIG: COJriWJICE CHAlIGE OCTSIDE OF ACCEPTABLE RAlIGE I 5.00 4.55 32.95 .00 .00 32.97 .02 .27 .01 29.40 634. 106. 192. 336. 152. 101. 613. 11. 6. 29.70 I .22 .70 1.89 .55 .090 .040 .090 .000 28.40 7.59 .000371 520. 500. 260. 2 0 0 .00 420.03 427.62 *SEctIO 6.000 I 6.00 3.99 33.09 .00 .00 33.12 .02 .15 .00 30.40 634. 37. 210. 387, 74, 105. 662. 17, 8, 30,40 .31 .49 2.01 .59 .090 .040 .090 .000 29.10 7.04 I .000496 520. 500. 220. 2 0 0 .00 449.45 456.49 *SEOIO 7.000 I 3302 WARlIIlIG: COlfiEY.UICE CllUIGE OUTSIDE OF ACCEPT,<BLE RAlIGE 7.00 3.87 33.42 .00 .00 33.80 .38 .57 .11 32.40 I 634. 3. 477. 153. 4. 85. 85. 23. 11. 31.10 .34 .91 5.63 1.80 .090 .040 .090 .000 29,55 8.18 .005034 500. 500. 500. 2 0 0 .00 81.11 89.29 I *SEctIO 8.000 I I I I I I P.>.m Date: 3/30/90 Run Tine: 7:43:48 IDl'Jersion: 5.01 Data File: totde634.hc2 Page 6 I SEClIO DEPTH CtSEL CRIWS WSELK EG ll\1 HL OLOSS BMlK ELEV Q QLOB QCH QROB !LOB ACH AroB VOL TWA LEFT/RIGHT TIHE VLOB VCH VROB XNL XNCH XNR .'TI1 ELKIN SSTA I SLOPE XLOBL XLCH XLOBR ITRIAL IOC ICOllT com TOP'.ID EIIDST I 3302 WARNIIIG: CONVEY AIlCE CH.1.NGE OUTSIDE OF ACCEPTABLE RANGE 8.00 5.07 34.77 .00 .00 35.00 .23 1.18 .02 32.80 I m. 10. 510. 113. 12. 122. 79. 24. 12. 31.60 .37 .86 4.20 1.42 .090 .040 .090 .000 29.70 7.11 .001946 400. 400. 400. 2 0 0 .00 71.26 78.37 I 'SECHO 8.100 I 3302 W.\RlIIIIG: COJriEY!JlCE CH.IJlGE OUTSIDE OF ACCEI'l'ABLE RAIIGE 3370 NOPll'l BRIDGE, l~lF 2 HIll ELTID: 38.21 IlIX ELtc= ........ I 8.10 5.07 34.77 .00 .00 35.02 .26 .02 .01 32.80 m. 5. 503. 126. 8. 112. 77. 21. 12. 31.60 .37 .71 4.49 1.64 .090 .040 .090 .000 29.70 7.11 I .006176 5. 5. 5. 2 0 0 -16.43 71.25 78.37 'SEClIO 8.200 I 8.20 5.02 34.92 .00 .00 35.26 .34 .21 .02 32.40 634. 18, 465. 151. H. 87. 79. 25. 12. 32,30 .37 1.34 5.32 1.91 .090 .040 .090 .000 29.90 6.91 I ,003566 45. 45. 45. 2 0 0 .00 61.49 68.41 'SEClIO 9.000 I 9.00 5,45 35.75 .00 .00 35.95 .20 .68 .01 34.00 634. 6. m. 211. 7. 96. 155. 26. 13. 32.50 .39 .86 4.34 1.37 .090 .040 .090 .000 30.30 6.61 .002031 220. 250. 280. 2 0 0 .00 92,01 98,62 I 'SECllO 10.000 10.00 6.22 36.54 .00 .00 36.75 .22 .80 .00 35.52 I 634. 5. 628. 1. 13. 167. 3. 28. 13. 35.02 .43 .39 3.75 .48 .090 .040 .090 .000 30.32 8.98 .001376 460. 480. SOO. 2 0 0 ,()() 64.61 73.59 I I I , I ------------ -- I Run Date: 3/30/90 Run Time: 7:43:48 IlIIVersion: 5.01 Data File: totde634.hc2 Page 7 I SECNO DEPTH C'liSEL CRIWS WSELK EG WI HL OLOSS BAliK ELEV I Q QLOB QCH QROB ALOB ACH !.ROB VOL Till. LEFT/RIGHT TIKE VLOB VCH \'ROB X1IL X1lCH XNR WTIl ELIHU SSTA SLOPE XLOBL XtCH XLOBR ITRIAL IOC ICONT CORAR TOI'.ID ENDST I *SECNO 1200.000 I 1200.00 6.00 37.00 .00 .00 37.32 .32 .54 .03 34.40 634. 66. 518. 49. 68. 104. 45. 30. 14. 34.00 .45 .98 4.98 1.11 .090 .040 .090 .000 31. 00 2005.81 .002247 310. 310. 310. 2 0 0 .00 97.21 2103.02 I CCBV= .600 CDfI= .300 *SEClIO 1215.000 I 3302 W.\RIIIIIG: COW/EYAIICE CHAJIGE OUTSIDE OF ACCEPT!.JBLE RANGE 1215.00 6.31 37.51 ,00 .00 37.51 .00 .00 .19 35.50 I 634. 73. 53. 507. 453. 194. 2275. 30. 14. 34.20 .47 .16 .28 .22 .035 .035 .035 .000 31.20 3074.33 .000005 15. 15. 15. 2 0 0 .00 903.23 3977.56 I carl= .100 CDfI= .300 *SECIIO 1305.000 I 3302 WARJIIIIG: COrr.'EY.lJICE CH.\JIGE OUTSIDE OF ,!,CCEPT.\BLE RANGE 1305.00 6.61 37.51 .00 .00 37.51 .00 .00 .00 34.10 I 634. 80. 83. 471. 250. 158. 1455. 36. 16. 33.90 .55 .32 .52 ,32 .035 ,035 ,035 .000 30.90 291'0.46 .000017 150. 105, 90, 2 0 0 .00 733,41 3673.88 I 'SEaIO H75,OOO 3302 WARlIIlIG: COlrIEY.\NCE CH.\NGE OUTSIDE OF ACCEPT!.JBtE RANGE I 1475.00 4.51 37.51 .00 .00 37.53 ,02 .01 .00 35,00 634. 142. 169. 323. 173. 119. 407. 41. 19, 35.50 I .60 .82 1.42 .79 .035 .035 .035 .000 33.00 2867.04 .000184 245. 220. 170. 0 0 0 .00 393.25 3260.29 'SEaIO 1895.000 I 3301 BV CH.\NGED MORE THAN BVIHS I I I I I I I I Run Date: 3/30/90 Run Time: 7:43:48 BMVersion: 5.01 Data File: totde634.hc2 Page 8 SEClIO DEPTB CWSEL CRIWS WSELK EG HV IlL OLOSS BAIlK ELEV Q QLOB QCB QROB .\LOB ACB AROB VOL TWA LEFT/RIGHT TIME VLOB VCH VROB XIlL XIlCB XIlR lI'TII ELllIIl SSTA SLOPE XLOBL XLCB XLOBR ITRI.\L IOC lCOm CORAR TOP',;ro E/lDST I 3302 WlillIIIlG: COIriEY.>llCE CBAIlGE OUTSIDE OF ACCEPTABLE lWIGE 1895.00 4.33 37.33 .00 .00 37.92 .59 .22 .17 35.90 m. 42. 586. 6. 18. 92. 3. 45. 21. 36.50 .62 2.32 6.36 1.61 .035 .035 .035 .000 33.00 2704.56 .004664 460. 420. 420. 2 0 0 .00 60.78 2765.34 'SECIIO 2225.000 2225.00 4.76 38.86 .00 .00 39.42 .56 1.50 .00 39.10 634. O. 604. 30. O. 98. 20. 46. 21. 38.10 .64 .00 6.14 1.47 .000 .035 .035 .000 34.10 2383.44 .004427 330. 330. 330. 2 0 0 .00 82.84 2466.28 'SEClIO 2480.000 I I I I 3302 WARHIIIG: COlNEYAlICE CBAHGE OUTSIDE OF ACCEI'l'ABLE R.\l/GE I I I I I I I I I I 2480.00 634. .65 .002131 5.18 O. .39 255. 39.88 608. 4,64 255. .00 26. 1.38 255. .00 O. .035 2 40.20 131. .035 o .32 19. .035 o .76 47. .000 .00 .02 22. 34.70 68.55 39.70 38.70 2285.97 2354.52 I PROFILE FOR STREAIl THROUGH BOTH SITES I PLOTTED POI/ITS (BY PRIORITY) E-ENERGY,W-WATER SURFAeE,I-INVERT,e-CRITICAL W.S.,L-LEFT BANK,R-RIGHT B.~,M-LOWER END STA I ELEVATION 25. 27. 29. 31. 33. 35. 37. 39. 41. 43. I SEOIO CUJlI)IS 1.00 o. I L W E M . I 50. eI L RW . E M. 100. e I LE .W E M. I 150. e I LE. W E K. 200. e I L . WE. K. 250. e I L. W E K 300. e I LE W.E M I 350. e I L .W E M 2.00 400. e I. RL . W E K 450. e I. RL WE K 2.10 500. e I. RL liE K I 2.20 550. e .1 L W E K 3.00 600. e .1 L R . WE K. 650. e .1 L R. WE K. 700. e . I L R. liE K . I 750. e . I L R E K. 800. e . I L R liE K. 850. e I LR WE K I 900. e I L.R E M 950. e I LR WE . K 1000. e I L R WE . K 1050. e I .LE WE. K I 1100. e I .LR WE. K 1150. e I . LR WE. K 4.00 1200. e I L WE " 1250. e I LR WE K I 1300. e I LR E K 1350. e I LR E K 1400. e I LR WE K I 1450. e I LR ~E " 1500. e I LE WE K 1550. e I. L R .E K 1600. e I . L R .E M I 1650. e I. L R .E " 5.00 1700. e I . LR .E K mo. e r. LR .E K 1800. e I. L R .E K I 1850. e I LR .WE K 1900. e I LE . E M 1950. e I LR . E K 2000. e .1 LR . E M I 2050. e .1 L . E K 2100. e .1 LE. . E M 2150. e . I L . . E K I 6.00 2200. e . I L . . E K 2250. e . I L. . E K 2300. e . I RL . liE K . 2350. e I RL . WE K. I I I I 2400. C 1 R L E H 2450. C 1 R L WE H 2500. C 1 .R L WE .H I 2550. C 1 .R L WE . H 2600. C 1 .R L WE H 2650. C 1 . R L. WE H 7.00 2700. C 1 . R L. WE H I 2750. C 1 . R L. W E H 2800. C 1 R L. WE H 2850. C 1 R L. WE. H. I 2900. C 1 R L. WE. ." 2950. C 1 R L WE. . H 3000. C 1 R L WE H 3050. C 1 R L WE H I 8.00 3100. C 1 R L WE H 8.10 3150. C 1 R L WE H 8.20 3200. C 1 RL. .W E H 3250. C 1 R L . WE H I 3300. C 1 R . L WE H 3350. C 1 R. L WE H 9.00 3400. C 1. R. L WE H I 3450. C 1. R L WE .K 3500. C 1 . . R L . liE .K 3550. C 1 . R L. WE . K 3600. C 1 . R L WE . K I 3650. C 1 . R L liE . K 3700. C 1 . R .L WE. K 3750. C 1 . R. L ~E. K 3800. C 1 . R. L W E K I 3850. C 1. .R L liE K 10.00 3900. C 1 . . R L WE H 3950. C I. .R L liE H 4000. C I. R L WE H I 4050. C 1 R.L li E .H 4100. C 1 R L .WE H mo. c .1 R L .W E H . I 1200.00 4200. C .1 R L. .W E H 1215.00 4250. C 1 R . L E H 1305.00 BOO. C .1 RL E H mo. c 1 L . E H I 4400. C 1 LR E H 4450. C 1 . LR E H 4500. C .1 .L R E H 1175.00 4550. C .1 .L R E H I 4600. C .1 . L R E " 4650. C .1 LR ~E H 4700. C .1 L R Ill: H I 4750. C .1 L R liE K 4800. C .1 L R WE H 4850. C .1 L R. W E K 4900. C .1 L R. W E " I 1895.00 4950. C .1 L R. W E K 5000. C . 1 L R W E H 5050. C 1 .L W E . K 5100. C 1 L W E K I 5150. C 1 R L W .E K 5200. C 1 R LW. E H 5250. C 1 R \1'1 E H 2225.00 5300. C 1 R .WL E " I 5350. C 1 . R . WLE K 5400. C 1 . R . W E H 5450. C 1. R. WE H . I 5500. C 1. R. LW EK . 2180.00 5550. C 1 R LW EM. Run Date: 3/30/90 Run Tine: 7:43:48 HHVersion: 5.01 Data File: totde634.bc2 ti**tt*titi't*.',**,,**..***.*.****,.**.********** HEC2 RELEASE DATED SEP 88 UPDATED FEB 1989 ERROR CORR - 01 MODIFICATION - tit.itt'tttt******'*'*'****_'*'******'************ THIS RtJIl EXECUTill 03/30/90 nOIr- ASIrRISK 1*) AT LEFT OF CROSS-SECTIOn NL1IBER lllDICATES KESS.ICE III SU!III.l.RY OF ERRORS LIST THPOCGN BOTH SIIES SLllH'J.'i PRnlTOO! T!.BLE 150 SEOIO * 1.000 * 2.000 2.100 2.200 3.000 4.000 * 5.000 6.000 * 7.000 * 8.000 * 8.100 8.200 9.000 10.000 1200.000 * 1215.000 * 1305.000 XLCH .00 382.00 80.00 5.00 60.00 650.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 400.00 5.00 45.00 250.00 480.00 310.00 15.00 105.00 EL!RD me .00 .00 .00 .00 35.70-999999.00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 38.21-999999.00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 ELMIN 24.70 26.20 26.20 27.00 26.90 27.75 28.40 29.10 29.55 29.70 29.70 29.90 30.30 30.32 31.00 31.20 30.90 Q 634.00 634.00 634.00 631.00 634.00 634.00 631.00 634.00 634.00 634.00 634.00 634.00 634.00 634.00 634.00 634.00 634.00 CliSEL 27.97 31.16 3UO 31.37 31.60 32.53 32.95 33.09 33.42 34.77 34.77 34.92 35.75 36.54 37.00 37.51 37.51 CRIWS 27.97 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 EG 29.24 31.44 31.63 31. 66 31. 78 32.69 32.97 33.12 33.80 35.00 35.02 35.26 35.95 36.75 37.32 37.51 37.51 10*KS 188.57 25.68 20.24 25.14 14.16 13.68 3.n 4.96 50.34 19.46 61. 76 35.66 20.31 13.76 22.47 .05 .17 VCH 9.05 4.81 4.43 4.78 3.73 I I I I I I I I ARE.I .01K 72.15 46.17 I 219.70 125.12 241.62 140.93 I 194.42 126.45 229.39 168.47 II 325.47 171.43 866.15 329.34 II 840.87 284.63 173.58 89.36 I 213.27 143.73 196.59 80.68 I 179.99 106.17 II 257.70 140.67 183.43 170.94 I 216.32 133.76 2921.90 2820.74 I 1862.35 1522.55 II I Page 9 07:44:00 3.69 1.89 2.01 5.63 4.20 U9 5.32 4.34 3.75 4.98 .28 .52 I I I P.1.m D~te: SEQIO I * 1475.000 * 1895.000 I 2225.000 * 2480.000 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 3/30/90 XLCH 220.00 420.00 330.00 255.00 Run Tine: 7:43:48 ELIRD ELLC .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 IDfJersion: 5.01 ELKIN Q 33.00 634.00 33.00 m.oo 34.10 634.00 34.70 634.00 Data File: CWSEL 37.51 37.33 38.86 39.88 totde634.be2 CRIliS EC .00 37.53 .00 37.92 .00 39.42 .00 40.20 10*KS 1.84 46.64 44.27 21.31 VCR 1.42 6.36 6.14 4.64 Page 10 AREA .01K 699.27 467.30 113.89 92.83 118.88 95.29 150.37 137.34 I Run Date: 3/30/90 Run Tine: 7:43:48 HHVersion: 5.01 Data File: totde634. be2 Page 11 I THROCCH BOIH SITES II SLl!lI.!J1Y PRIIlTOL"T TABLE 150 SECNQ Q CliSEL DIrwSP DIFWSX DIFXWS TOPliID XLCH I * 1. 000 634.00 27.97 .00 .00 -2.03 35.26 .00 I * 2.000 634.00 31.16 .00 3.19 .00 88.75 382.00 2.100 634.00 31.40 .00 .23 .00 90.01 80.00 I 2.200 634.00 31.37 .00 -.03 .00 69.69 5.00 3.000 634.00 31. 60 .00 .23 .00 70.82 60.00 I 4.000 634.00 32.53 .00 .94 .00 256.7l 650.00 * 5.000 631.00 32.95 .00 .42 .00 420.03 500.00 II 6.000 634.00 33.09 .00 .14 .00 449.45 500.00 * 7.000 634.00 33.42 .00 .32 .00 81.11 500.00 II * 8.000 634.00 34.77 .00 1.36 .00 71.26 400.00 II * 8.100 631.00 34.77 .00 -.01 .00 71.25 5.00 8.200 634.00 34.92 .00 .15 .00 61.49 45.00 II 9.000 631.00 35.75 .00 .83 .00 92.01 250.00 10.000 634.00 36.54 .00 .79 .00 64.61 480.00 II 1200.000 631.00 37.00 .00 .47 .00 97.21 310.00 * 1215.000 634.00 37.51 .00 .51 .00 903.23 15.00 I * 1305.000 634.00 37.51 .00 .00 .00 733.41 105.00 * 1475.000 634.00 37.51 .00 .00 .00 393.25 220.00 I * 1895.000 631.00 37.33 .00 -.18 .00 60.78 420.00 2225.000 634.00 38.86 .00 1.53 .00 82.84 330.00 I * 2480.000 634.00 39.88 .00 1.02 .00 68.55 255.00 I II II II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Run Date: 3/30/90 Run Tine: 7:43:48 IlJfJersion: 5.01 Data File: totde634.be2 Page 12 SU!III.'J.Y OF ERRORS }11D SPECTAL NOTES CAUTION SECNO= 1.000 PROFILE= 1 CRITICAL DEI'l'H ASSlJlIEI) W}J.UING SEOIO= 2.000 PROFILE= 1 COtrJmllCE CHANGE OO1SIDE ACCEm.BLE RANCE WWING SECNO= 5.000 PROFILE= 1 CONVEYANCE CHANGE OO1SIDE ACCEPTABLE RANCE WAPllINC SEOIO= 7.000 PROFILE= 1 CONVEYANCE OOllCE OO1SIDE ACCEPTABLE RANCE WW1NG SECNO= 8.000 PROFILE= 1 CONVEYAJlCE CH.IDGE OO1SIDE ACCEI'T}.BLE RANCE li}.PlIINC SECHO= 8.100 PROFILE= 1 COlflWllCE CH.\lICE OO1SIDE ACCEPV.BLE R.llIGE WARNING SECNO= 1215.000 PROFILE= 1 COWIEY.IDCE 00llCE OO1SIDE ACCEPTABLE RANCE W~.RlllllC SEOIO= 1305.000 PROFILE = 1 COlrlEY!llCE CH.\lIGE OUTSIDE ACCEPT.'.BLE R.I.lIGE W.\RIIING SECNO= 1475.000 PROFILE= 1 OOIl'IEYAJlCE OO.llCE OUTSIDE ACCEPTABLE RU/CE WARlllllC SECI/O= 1895.000 PROFILE= 1 COlrm.>1lCE Cll.'lIGE OUTSIDE ACCEPn.BLE RAlIGE WWIIIG SECNO= 2480.000 PROFILE= 1 COWlml/CE CH.IDGE OUTSIDE ACCEP'J'}.BLE RIDCE Norna1 prograc tercination