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Monte Villa Center - Final Environmental Impact Statement Snohomish County Planning Department riijl@~~tf@ I ~:t= I ~ CQl>dJt'\)l Ii . .. . TO: Final EIS Recipient: Greg Williams. Director , . 5th Floor. Administration Bldg. . Everett. Washington 98201 lVillis D. Thcker. County Executive June 7, 1991 SUBJECT: Final Environmental Impact Statement, I-405/County Line North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan Amendment and Quadrant Monte Villa Center Rezone The attached EIS, titled Final Environmental Impact Statement. I-405/Countv Line North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan Amendment and Ouadrant Monte Villa Center Rezone, has been issued in accordance with Chapter 197-11 WAC. The proposal consists of two proposed actions: 1. An amendment to the North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan which would change the current Suburban and Watershed/Site Sensitive designa- tions on an 86-acre parcel to a Business Park designation with Watershed/Site Sensitive overlay. This action is being processed by the Snohomish County Planning Department and will require consideration and recommendation from the Snohomish County Planning commission and approval by the Snohomish County Council. 2. A request to change the current Rural Conservation and Residential 9600 zoning classifications on the same parcel to a Business Park zone. The site development plan submitted with the rezone request proposes the ultimate construction of 950,000 gross square feet of building area, parking for approximately 3,325 vehicles, and the retention of the site's most sensitive features. Approximately 27 acres of the project site is proposed to be retained in open space and left predominantly in its present natural condition. A 200-foot wide stream corridor will be retained along North Creek. Access to the site will be provided via 39th Avenue SE. The rezone._ request will be considered by the Snohomish County Hearing Examiner subsequent to final action on the proposed plan amendment. Both actions are proposed on the same site which is located between I-405 and 39th Avenue SE and which 1ies adjacent to the King county line to the south. A Draft EIS was issued with appendices on July 31, 1990. It provides a comprehensive discussion of the environmental impacts of the project and alternatives. I405FEIS.DOC/schilde Page 1 ~ ) / (206) 388.3313 Comprehensive Planning (206) 388-3508 Current Planning Fax, (206) 258-3472 Toll Free, 1-800-562-4367 Scan' 649-3313 An Equal Opportunity Employer . . . ..... . The attached F~nal EIS and the Draft EIS together const~tute the F~nal EIS for tne'proposed actions. The attached portion of the Final EIS consists of letters commenting on the Draft EIS, responses of the planning Division, an errata chapter with corrections and modifications to the Draft EIS text, and revised draft text changes for the comprehensive plan. The Snohomish County Planning commission will conduct a public hearing to consider the proposed comprehensive plan amendment and make recommendations to the Snohomish county council for final action on the comprehensive plan amendment only. Any rezone proposal will be heard at a later date by the Hearing Examiner. The Planning commission hearing is scheduled for Tuesday, June 25, 1991, beginning at 2:00 p.m. in the Ginni stevens Hearing Room on the First Floor of the County Administration Building. It is possible that the public hearing will be continued to additional dates and times certain. For further information, contact Klaus Schilde (plan amendment) (206) 388-3313 or Gary Reiersgard (rezone request) (206) 388-3508), Planning Department. I405FEIS.DOC/schilde Page 2 I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT for I-405/COUNTY LINE NORTH CREEK COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT and QUADRANT MONTE VILLA CENTER REZONE SNOHOMISH COUNTY Prepared for the Review and Comment of Citizens, Groups and Governmental Agencies In Compliance with The state Environmental Policy Act of 1971 Revised Code of Washington 42.31 and Snohomish County SEPA Policies and Procedures Date of Issue: June 7, 1991 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I FACT SHEET Pursuant to provisions set forth in WAC 197-11, Snohomish County, through the Planning Department as lead agency, has released this Final Environmental Impact statement (FEIS) entitled, "Final Environmental Impact Statement for I-405/County Line North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan Amendment and Quadrant Monte Villa Center Rezone". Complete descriptions of impacts, mitigating measures, and background information are found in the Draft EIS and Appendices issued July 31, 1990. PROJECT DESCRIPTION The proposed actions consist of: 1. An amendment to the North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan which would change the current Suburban and Watershed-site Sensitive designation on an 86-acre parcel located between I-405 and 39th Avenue SE and between 240th Street SE and the King County line to a Business Park designation with a Watershed-site Sensitive Overlay. Alternatives considered include a proposed plan designation of High Urban and No Change (No Action). 2. A rezone request to change the current Rural Conservation and Residential 9600 zoning classification on the same parcel (as described above) to a Business Park zoning classification. Alternatives considered include alternative site development plans and no rezone. PROPONENT Snohomish County (plan amendment request) Planning Department 4th Floor, County Administration Building Everett, WA 98201 Quadrant Corporation (rezone request) P. O. Box 130 Bellevue, WA 98009 LEAD AGENCY INFORMATION Lead Agency: Snohomish County i II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Responsible Official: Greg Williams, Director Snohomish County Planning Department County Administration Building Everett, WA 98201 Contact Person: Klaus Schilde, Principal Planner Gary Reiersgard, Principal Planner (206) 259-9311 PERMITS AND LICENSES REOUIRED State Hydraulic Project Approval Snohomish County North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan Amendment Rezone Shoreline Substantial Development Permit Grading permit Driveway permit Building permits Utility Districts Water connection Sewer connection Electrical service extension AUTHORS AND PRINCIPAL CONTRIBUTORS This Draft Environmental Impact Statement was prepared under the direction of the Snohomish County Planning Division. Research, analysis, and document preparation were provided by the following firms and individuals: Author/Contributor Responsibilitv The Ferris Company Key Bank Bldg., suite 506 10655 NE 4th Street Bellevue, WA 98004 (206) 462-7650 environmental analyses and document preparation Lance Mueller & Assoc. 130 Lakeside Avenue, #F Seattle, WA 98122 (206) 325-2553 project architect and site plans ii I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Entranco Engineers 5808 Lake Washington Blvd. NE Kirkland, WA 98033 (206) 827-1300 traffic analyses Bush, Roed and Hitchings 2009 Minor Avenue E. Seattle, WA 98102 (206) 323-4144 civil engineering, utilities analyses Hart Crowser, Inc. 1910 Fairview Avenue E. Seattle, WA 98102-3699 (206) 324-9530 soils and geotechnical analyses Raedeke Assoc. Scientific Consulting 4106 Stone Way N. Seattle, WA 98103 (206) 547-8086 wetlands, plants and animals analyses Towne, Richards & Chaudiere 105 NE 56th Street Seattle, WA 98105 (206) 523-3350 noise analysis American Services Assoc. 15049 Bel-Red Road, Suite 100 Bellevue, WA 98007 (206) 641-5130 DATE OF ISSUE Draft EIS - July 31, 1990 air quality analysis Final EIS - June 7, 1991 RECIPIENTS OF THE FEIS A list of recipients of the EIS is presented in Draft EIS Appendix A. LOCATION OF ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTS AND BACKGROUND DATA Technical reports, background data, and other relevant informa- tion are available at the following locations: Snohomish county Planning Department County Administration Building Everett, WA 9820l The Ferris Company 10655 NE 4th Street, suite 506 Bellevue, WA 98004 Hi I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I COST OF EIS Copies of the EIS and Appendices are available from the Snohomish County Planning Division at a cost of $8.00 per copy, plus tax. Mailed copies will be subject to a $2.00 mailing and handling fee. iv I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I' TABLE OF CONTENTS NOTE: There are no substantive differences in the proposed actions, impacts or mitigating measures described in the Draft EIS as compared to this Final EIS. Minor corrections and clarifications are found in Chapter 5, Errata. Therefore, this document, together with the Draft EIS and Appendices, constitutes the Final EIS as outlined below. Where figures or tables have been revised or augmented, they have been provided in the Final EIS document at locations noted under the heading FEIS Paqe. COVER SHEET FACT SHEET TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES LIST OF TABLES CHAPTER 1 - SUMMARY CHAPTER 2 - PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES Name of Proposal and Sponsors Project Location Proposed Actions Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives Rezone Alternatives Benefits/Disadvantages of Delaying Proposal Implementation DEIS Paqe FEIS Paqe i i iv v viii x x xii 1-1 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-6 2-14 CHAPTER 3 - AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT, ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS, MITIGATING MEASURES, AND SIGNIFICANT UNAVOIDABLE ADVERSE IMPACTS 3-1 EARTH Affected Environment General site Geology Geologic Hazards Topography Erosion Environmental Impacts Mitigating Measures Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impacts v 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-2 3-2 3-7 3-7 3-12 3-12 II I. I I I II I I I I I I I . I I I I I TABLE OF CONTENTS (Cont'd.) AIR Affected Environment Weather and Climate Pollutants Environmental Impacts Mitigating Measures Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impacts WATER Affected Environment Surface Water Movement Runoff/Absorption Flooding Groundwater Water Quality Environmental Impacts Mitigating Measures Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impacts PLANTS AND ANIMALS Affected Environment Plants Wetlands Animals Fisheries Environmental Impacts Mitigating Measures Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impacts NOISE Affected Environment Noise-Sensitive Land Uses Noise Descriptors Noise criteria Existing Sound Levels Environmental Impacts Mitigating Measures Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impacts vi DEIS FEIS Paqe Paqe 3-13 3-13 3-13 3-13 3-17 3-19 3-21 3-22 3-22 3-22 3-22 3-24 3-26 3-26 3-28 3-36 3-38 3-39 3-39 3-39 3-41 3-42 3-44 3-45 3-50 3-52 3-53 3-53 3-53 3-53 3-54 3-56 3-58 3-62 3-63 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I TABLE OF CONTENTS (Cont'd.) LAND USE Affected Environment site Description - Aesthetic Character Existing Uses Light and Glare EXisting Comprehensive Plan Designations Existing Zoning Environmental Impacts Mitigating Measures Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impacts EMPLOYMENT Affected Environment Environmental Impacts Mitigating Measures Significant unavoidable Adverse Impacts POPULATION Affected Environment Environmental Impacts Mitigating Measures Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impacts HOUSING Affected Environment Environmental Impacts Mitigating Measures Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impacts HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL PRESERVATION Affected Environment Environmental Impacts Mitigating Measures Significant unavoidable Adverse Impacts vii DEIS FEIS Paqe Paqe 3-64 3-64 3-64 3-64 3-67 3-67 3-69 3-71 3-77 3-79 3-80 3-80 3-80 3-85 3-85 3-86 3-86 3-86 3-92 3-92 3-93 3-93 3-95 3-98 3-98 3-99 3-99 3-99 3-100 3-100 I I TABLE OF CONTENTS (Cont'd.) DEIS FEIS I Paqe E2gg TRANSPORTATION 3-101 Affected Environment 3-101 I Existing Street System 3-101 Existing Traffic Volumes 3-103 Accidents 3-103 I Transit, Pedestrian and Bicycle Activity 3-103 Planned/Programmed Projects 3-107 I Environmental Impacts - Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives 3-109 Environmental Impacts - I Rezone Alternatives 3-123 Rezone Impacts - Year 1994 3-126 Rezone Impacts - Year 1996 3-131 I Other Impacts 3-133 Title 26B SCC Analysis 3-135 Mitigating Measures 3-140 Significant Unavoidable Adverse I Impacts 3-145 PUBLIC SERVICES 3-147 I Affected Environment 3-147 Fire 3-147 Police 3-147 I Schools 3-148 Parks and Recreation 3-150 Environmental Impacts 3-151 Comprehensive Plan Amendment I Alternatives 3-151 Rezone Alternatives 3-156 Mitigating Measures 3-158 I Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impacts 3-159 I UTILITIES 3-160 Affected Environment 3-160 Water 3-160 Stormwater 3-160 I Sanitary Sewer 3-163 Solid Waste 3-163 Electricity 3-165 I Communications 3-165 Environmental Impacts 3-165 Comprehensive Plan Amendment I Alternatives 3-165 Rezone Alternatives 3-169 Mitigating Measures 3-169 Significant Unavoidable Adverse I Impacts 3-170 I viii I, I 'I I I I II I I I I I I I I, I I I I I TABLE OF CONTENTS (Cont'd.) DEIS Paqe CHAPTER 4 - ERRATA CHAPTER 5 - COMMENT LETTERS AND RESPONSES CHAPTER 6 - DRAFT TEXT CHANGES FOR BUSINESS PARK COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT REFERENCES LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS APPENDICES A. Distribution List A-1 B. Draft Text Changes for Business Park Comprehensive Plan Amendment C. Relationship to Existing Plans and Policies C-1 D. Geotechnical Engineering Assessment D-1 E. Plants, Animals and Wetlands Study E-1 F. Traffic Study F-1 G. Water Resources Calculations G-1 NOTE: Appendices A through G are contained in a separate volume and are avail- able at an additional cost at the Snohomish County Planning Division. ix FEIS Paqe 4-1 5-1 6-1 6-1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7A 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 16A 17 18 19 20 21 22 LIST OF FIGURES Ficrure DEIS Paqe Location Map Vicinity Map Proposed Comprehensive Plan Amendment (on-site) with Existing Comprehensive Plan Designations (off-site) Watershed-Site Sensitive Area Map 2-4 Preferred Rezone site Plan Key Plan for site sections 2-10 Site sections 2-11 Revised Cross-section B Alternative Rezone site Plan 2-15 Soils Exploration Map 3-3 Surficial Soils Map 3-4 Existing Topography 3-6 Slope Analysis 3-8 Air Quality Monitoring Locations 3-14 Carbon Monoxide Emissions 3-20 Existing Site Drainage 3-23 Floodway and Floodplain Map 3-27 Floodway After Monte Villa Development 3-27A Floodplain Modification 3-34 Plant Community Cover Type Map 3-40 Noise Measurement Locations and Existing Sound Levels 3-57 Existing Land Use Existing Comprehensive Plan Existing Zoning 3-65 3-68 3-70 x FEIS Paqe 1-2 1-3 1-5 1-8 4-2 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 31A 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 * Note: LIST OF FIGURES (Cont'd.) 1990 Commute Zones Existing Street Network Existing Traffic Volumes* Average Annual Accident Occurrence (1985 - 1987) Trip Distribution - Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives Other Development sites Year 2000 Average Daily Traffic Volumes - Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives Planned Improvements for SR 527/228th Avenue SE Trip Distribution - Preferred Rezone site Plan Alternative Trip Distribution without 120th Avenue! 180th Street Extension - Preferred Rezone Site Plan Average Daily Traffic Volumes - Preferred Rezone site Plan Alternative PM Peak Directional Volumes - Preferred Rezone site Plan Alternative Average Daily Traffic Volumes - No Rezone Alternative PM Peak Directional Volumes - No Rezone Alternative water Supply Proposed Storm Drainage sanitary Sewer system Figures 25, 29, and 32 through 35 have response to Draft EIS comments; Figure in response to Draft EIS comments. xi DEIS Paqe FEIS Paqe 3-89 3-102 4-4 3-106 3-112 3-113 4-5 3-117 3-125 4-6 4-9 4-10 4-12 4-14 3-161 3-162 3-164 been revised in 31A was created r - I I I I I I I I I I I II I. I . II I I I I I Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 LIST OF TABLES Table Summary of Environmental Impacts, Mitigating Measures, and Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impacts Preferred Rezone Site Plan site Statistics summary of Soil Types, Characteristics and Development Limitations Existing Eight-Hour Average Carbon Monoxide Levels (PPM) Comparison of Modeled and Monitored (Actual) Data Projected Eight-Hour Average Carbon Monoxide Levels (PPM) - Project Impacts and Background Conditions for 1994, 1996, and 2000 Stormwater Flows From site Areas Stormwater Runoff Pollutant Loadings Stormwater Runoff Volume Summary Noise Impact criteria Snohomish County Primary Noise Limits Leq, Lmax, and Ldn Corresponding to Snohomish County Noise Limits for Residential Receiving Property Existing Weekday Sound Levels EPA Construction Noise Estimates For Locations Next to Construction and "Most Adverse Conditions" Calculated Peak Hour Leq and 24-Hour Ldn in dBA 50 Feet From Road Center- line - Year 2000 Calculated Peak Hour Leg in dBA 50 Feet from Road Years 1994/1996 and 24-Hour Ldn Centerline - xii DEIS Paqe 1-7 2-9 3-5 3-15 3-16 3-18 3-24 3-31 3-32 3-54 3-55 3-56 3-58 3-59 3-60 3-61 FEIS Paqe 1-10 II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Number 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 LIST OF TABLES (Cont'd.) Table Employment Trend Within Census Tract 519.04, North Creek Planning Area and Snohomish County Potential Direct Employment - Year 2000 Population Growth Profile without Comprehensive Plan Amendment Existing and Projected Population within Commute Distance of the site Without the Project Direct and Indirect Population Generated From Business Park Comprehensive Plan Amendment and Rezone Alternatives in the Year 2000 By Commute Zones Existing and Projected Housing units within Commute Distance of the site Persons Per Household Average Vacancy Rates (1989) Increase in Housing units By the Year 2000 With Full Development of Business Park/ Rezone Alternatives Level of Service Analysis - Existing Conditions Business Park Comprehensive Plan Amendment Trip Generation Estimates Year 2000 P.M. Peak Hour Level of service (LOS) Summary - Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternative High Urban Comprehensive Plan Amendment Trip Generation Estimates No Change Comprehensive Plan Amendment Trip Generation Estimates xiii DEIS Paqe 3-81 3-82 3-87 3-88 3-90 3-94 3-94 3-95 3-96 3-105 3-111 3-121 3-122 FEIS Paqe 4-7 II I Number I 31 I 32 I 33 I 34 I 35 I 36 37 I I I I I I I I I I I LIST OF TABLES (Cont'd.) Table Business Park Rezone Alternatives - 1996 Trip Generation Estimates PM Peak Hour Level of Service (LOS) Summary - Rezone Alternatives 1996 Trip Generation Estimates No Rezone Alternative Enrollments and Capacities of Schools in the Northshore School District Enrollment Projections for the Northshore School District (1989-2000) 3-150 Sanitary Sewer Loading for Each Alternative 3-167 Allowabale Industrial site utilitation In WSS and Upland Plateau Areas (Per Number of Greater Than Basic criteria Met) xiv 4-17 I I I I I I I I I I I I , I I I I I I I SUMMARY I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I CHAPTER 1 SUMMARY INTRODUCTION This chapter provides a summary of the proposed actions and alternatives. These alternatives were developed to comply with the state Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). They were presented for purposes of comparison and were developed without regard to whether they represent all possible alternatives; rather, they constitute "reasonable alternatives" as that term is used in SEPA Chapter 197-11 WAC. Thus, they allow an assessment of the relative impacts of a range of alternatives. Chapter 5 includes the comment letters received during the public comment period and responses to the issues and concerns voiced in the letters. More complete descriptions of the proposal, alternatives, impacts and mitigating measures can be found in the Draft EIS and Appendices, both of which are considered part of the Final EIS. PROPOSED ACTION This Environmental Impact statement (EIS) analyzes two distinct actions: first, a comprehensive plan amendment, initiated by Snohomish County; and second, a rezone, initiated by the Quadrant Corporation. The plan amendment is for an 86-acre site in the North Creek subarea of unincorporated Snohomish County (see Figures 1 and 2). The rezone is proposed for the same 86 acres covered by the proposed plan amendment. If the plan amendment is not adopted by the Snohomish County Council, then the rezone could not be approved. The location of these two actions is immediately east of Interstate 405, generally south of 240th street S.E., west of 39th Avenue S.E. and immediately north of the Snohomish/King County line. Subsequent to the plan amendment and rezone, Quadrant proposes to develop the site infrastructure and subdivide the site into up to 20 parcels, which would accommodate finished lot sales as well as build-to-suit or for-lease research and development space and flexible office space, in a manner similar to the Quadrant Bothell Business Park and Koll North Creek developments to the south. These business/industrial park developments are occupied by small to medium-sized businesses, many of which focus on high technology products and services. Thus, the buildings are designed for office, assembly, and light manufacturing activities. Based upon experience with their Bothell Business Park, and on the pace of development elsewhere along the Technology Corridor, Quadrant anticipates that the proposed development would be completed in four to seven years from the start of construction. At full buildout, an estimated 2,500 persons would be employed on the site. 1 - 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I The first action addressed by this EIS is a possible amendment of the 1977 North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan from Watershed-site Sensitive (WSS) - Suburban to Business Park (BP) with a WSS overlay. On a gross scale, approximately 61 acres, or 70 percent of the site, is designated WSS by the Plan; the remaining 25 acres are designated Suburban, which allows residential uses at a density of up to four dwelling units per acre (see Figure 3). In addition to the change to Business Park, the Watershed-site Sensitive (WSS) designation would be reduced to about 27 acres and applied to certain sensitive features of the site. The difference in the area covered by the existing and proposed WSS designations results from site-specific studies which identify the actual size of the wetlands, floodplain, creek corridor, peat soils, and areas with slopes over 15 percent, consistent with 'criteria of the Plan's Development Area Model. The purpose behind the business park designation is to provide for business and clean light industrial uses which can be constructed and operated in a manner consistent with surrounding, less intensive uses such as residential development. The WSS designation would limit development and site coverage on the site's wetlands and other sensitive areas. The 86-acre site could potentially include a mixture of office, high technology, light industrial, general business and incidental service retail space. At full development, the business park could contain approximately 950,000 gross square feet (gsf) of floor area in structures up to 50 feet in height. Comprehensive Plan Amendments are processed by the County in three steps. First, public meetings are held by Planning Department staff to discuss the proposed amendment and explore alternatives. Second, the Planning Commission holds a public hearing and subsequently issues a recommendation on the proposed amendment to the County Council. The Council then holds a final public hearing and subsequently reaches a decision on the amendment. The second action addressed by this EIS involves a rezone of the 86 acres from Rural Conservation (RC) and Residential 9600 (R9600) to Business Park (BP) and concurrent approval of a preliminary site plan. The BP zone requires unified control of a tract of at least four acres of land (ref. 18.60.020 SCC). The BP zone generally allows those uses which are permitted in the Light Industry zone, although it prohibits outside storage and most retail/commercial uses. Rezones to BP require a two-step approval process. First, the rezone application and a preliminary site plan are reviewed concurrently through the rezone process with approval by the County Hearing Examiner. Second, a final plan is reviewed and then approved or disapproved administratively by the County planning director. 1 - 4 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I OBJECTIVES OF THE PROPOSAL Objectives of the proposed comprehensive plan amendment include: 1. Make available additional land in the North Creek Planning Area that is suitable for future development of planned business park uses; 2. Provide new employment and economic growth opportunities in the North Creek area; 3. Re-examine the most appropriate long-term use for this portion of the North Creek Planning Area in light of recent land use changes in the adjacent area; 4. Provide economically feasible development opportunities for new businesses locating in the North Creek area; and 5. Ensure that future development of business park uses is compatible with surrounding development and is sensitive to site features through implementation of the Watershed-site Sensitive overlay. Objectives of the proposed rezone include: 1. Provide new employment and economic growth opportunities in the North Creek area; 2. Provide an economically viable plan for development of the property; 3. Preserve and enhance natural features of the site such as the stream corridor and the wetlands; 4. Preserve reminders of the site's agricultural history; 5. Enable a single developer to commit to the development of the entire site as an integrated business park; and 6. Contribute to establishing south Snohomish County as a center of business and commerce. MAJOR ISSUES Potential issues relating to the proposed comprehensive plan amendment and rezone include contribution to intensified land use in the North Creek Valley, sensitivity of North Creek and other natural features to development of the site, and increases in traffic volumes on nearby freeways and arterials. 1 - 6 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ALTERNATIVES The proposed comprehensive plan amendment is to business park, as described above. In addition, two other plan amendment alternatives, High Urban and No-Change, are evaluated in this Environmental Impact Statement. The proposed rezone is to Business Park, described below as the Preferred Rezone site Plan. In addition, two rezone alternatives, Alternative Rezone site Plan and No Rezone, are evaluated in this EIS. COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT ALTERNATIVES 1. Hiqh Urban - This alternative would designate the site for higher residential densities, up to 7 to 12 units per acre, with an approximately 27-acre Watershed-site Sensitive overlay as described above for the proposed business park designation. Up to 880 multi-family units could be developed under this alterna- tive. This would likely be accomplished through a Planned Residential Development, allowing clustering of units and reten- tion of open space. 2. No Chanqe - This alternative is the no-action plan amendment alternative which would retain the existing North Creek plan designations (Watershed-Site Sensitive and Suburban). Basic development in Watershed-site Sensitive areas is provided at 1 unit per 2.2 acres for residential uses. Greater than basic development is allowed if certain development criteria are met. At full development, this alternative could yield up to 191 single-family residential units, if all applicable development criteria for greater than basic development under the Watershed- site Sensitive designation are met. REZONE ALTERNATIVES 1. Preferred Rezone site Plan - This proposal calls for a rezone from Rural Conservation and Residential 9600 to Business Park. At full development, the 86-acre site could include up to 950,000 gross square feet of business space, allocated between office, light manufacturing, or assembly uses. An internal roadway would connect the east and west portions of the site, with general vehicle access to 39th Avenue S.E., the street bordering the eastern edge of the site, and emergency access from 240th Street SE, the street bordering the northern edge of the site (see Figure 5). Up to 20 lots would be established on the site. All but 0.99 acres (approximately) of the site's wetland areas would be excluded from the building lots in the Preferred Rezone site Plan; this amount of existing wetlands would be filled. Additional filling would occur in the 100-year floodplain. Overall site coverage of impervious surfaces would be a maximum of 60 percent, including roads, parking areas, buildings and sidewalks. Up to 22 percent (or 5.98 acres) of the Watershed-site Sensitive designated areas of the site (27 acres) would be covered by these impervious 1 - 7 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I surfaces. Parking, walkways and landscaping would meet Snohomish County Business Park zoning requirements. Under the proposed rezone, the existing farmhouse and two primary barns would be retained; all other existing structures would be demolished. 2. Alternative Rezone Site Plan - This Rezone Alternative would entail a change to the same new zone (BP) and basically the same size of development (square footage and height) as the Preferred Rezone Site Plan. However, general vehicle access to 240th Street SE would be provided via one access driveway on the northwest perimeter of the site. Also, only eight percent of the Watershed-Site Sensitive area would be proposed for development, and none of the existing structures would be retained. 3. No Rezone - The rezone area is currently zoned Rural Conservation (which allows one single-family residential unit per 100,000 square feet) and Residential 9600, (which allows one single-family dwelling per 9,600 square feet). Development under this rezone alternative could yield up to 52 single-family residential homes on the 86-acre site. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS, MITIGATING MEASURES, AND SIGNIFICANT UNAVOIDABLE ADVERSE IMPACTS Table 1 summarizes the most significant elements of the impact analysis; Table 1 has been updated to reflect clarifications of the proposals or impacts identified in the Draft EIS and hereby supersedes the Draft EIS version. Table 1 presents the key differences between the proposed action and the alternatives. A complete discussion of environmental impacts may be found in Chapter 3 of the Draft EIS issued July 31, 1990. In addition, Quadrant is negotiating a separate written agreement with the city of Bothell, in which Quadrant will commit to additional measures in order to mitigate impacts within the City of Bothell. These commitments are expected to include mitigating measures in addition to those identified in Table 1. See Comment Letter No. 7 from the City of Bothell. 1 - 9 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Table SUMMARY OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS, MITIGATING MEASURES, ANO SIGNIFICANT UNAVOIOABLE ADVERSE IMPACTS Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives Rezone Alternatives Alternative Site Plan Preferred Site Plan Element. of the Envi ronment No Rezone A nominal amount of grading would be requf red for new roads and for re.identia1 building devel- opment on two. acre lots. Earth-related impact. would be minimal under this alternative Impacts woul d be the same as those de.cribed for the Preferred Rezone Site Plan. Overall impacts waul d be the same as those de'" .crlbed for the Business Park Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternative. The creek cor- ridor would be left undi.turbed, with the excep- tion of trail and bridge construc- tion. Approx- Imately 190,000 cubic yard. of cut and fi 11 would be balanced on the .Ite. A portion of Lot. 7 and B, located In the flood plain, would be filled. Development would be located pri- marily out.lde of peat areas. No Chanqe The .Ingle- fami ly residen- tial alternative would generate fewer impacts to .011. than either the Business Park or High Urban alternatives. 1 10 Hiqh Urban mpacts to soils would be .lmi1ar to those de- .crlbed for the Business Park alternative. The amount of grading would be gener- ally less under this alternative, and the potential for erosion and sedimentation may be reduced during construction. Park Full development would re.ult in alterations in the topography of the .Ite. There Is adequate structural fi 11 material avall- able on site, thereby reducing the amount of material that would be Imported to or exported from the .ite. Soil. in the northwest, north central and northeast por- tions of the .ite are .ultab1e for development. Soil. wou1 d be .u.ceptlb1e to erosion during excavation, gradl ng and flll activities, and sediment could be transported to North Creek and other off-.lte areas. ness Bu. EARTH Envi ronmenta Impacts - - - - - - - - - - ... - - - - - - - - Contfnued Table Rezone Alternatives ternatives rehensive Plan Amendment A Com No Rezone Mitigating measures would be the same as those proposed for the No Change Compre- hensive Plan Amendment Alter- native. ve Mitigating measures would be the same as those proposed for the Preferred Rezone Site Plan. A lternat Site Plan Preferred Site Plan Siltation ponds, temporary silt fence of 1 traps, grasstined swales, and other erosion/pollution control measures would be Imple- mented to mini- mize erosion. Foundation support alter- natives would be selected to minimize settle- ment impacts. No ChanQe oetention/infi1 tratf on facll i- ties and other measures to mini- mize contribution of sediment to North Creek would be implemented as necessary HfQh Urban Same as those proposed for the Busi ness Park alternative Park WSS overlay and Comprehensive Phn policies would limit earth impacts. Flex- ible building design would be requi red for building. located in compressible soi 15 areas and perf odi c resur- facing or repair of paved areas over such soi 1 s would 11 kely be necessary Business El ements of the Environment Mitigating Measures None are expected None are expected None are ex pee te d None are expected None are expected None are expected Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impacts The level of particulate mat- ter may 1 ncrease during construc- tion as a result of the movement of soi 15, but ambient air qual i ty standards would not be exceeded. The maximum a-hour average CO levels In 2000 would be 4.3 ppm .ub.e- quent to develop- Impacts would be the same as those under the Pre- ferred Rezone Site Plan There would be temporary impacts during construc- tion the same as those anti- cipated under the Business Park Comprehensive Pl an Amenanent Alternative. At full bui1dout (2000), the maxi- mum a-hour aver- age CO level in the area would be During construc- tion, an increase in parti culate matter coul d result from the movement of soils, but ambi- ent ai r qual ity standards would not be exceeded. The a-hour aver- age CO levels could reach a maximum of 4.3 ppm. The contribution to 1-11 During construc- tion, impacts would be similar to those gener- ated under the Business Park alternative. Upon full development of BBO multi-family residential unit. (2000), the highe.t B-hour average CO levels would be 4.4 ppm, .tlll within the During construc- tion, properties east and north of the site could be affected by a minor increase in particulate mat- ter and a mi nor increase in car- bon monoxide (CO) and other emis- sions from con- struction equip- ment and trucks. Ambient al r quality standard. A IR QUALITY Environmenta Impacts - - - - - - - - - - - - - .. - - - - - Rezone Alternatlves Alternative Site Plan No Rezone ment. Measures outlined None. under the Busi- ness Park Com" prehensfve Plan Amendment would be implemented under this alter- native. Table Continued Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives Preferred SIte Plan 4.4 ppm, a 2 per- cent increase over maximum levels expected upon full devel- opment of the No Change alterna- tive. Impacts related to other emissions, inclUding nitrogen oxide, sulfur dioxide and ozone, are not expected to be .i gnlfi cant Measures outlined under the Bust.. ness Park Com- prehensive Plan Amendment would be implemented under this alter- native. No Change CO levels under full development of this alterna- tive would not be .ignlficant. None. 1- 12 h Urban maximum standard of 9 ppm. The CO level would be .lightly higher than the maximum a-hour average expected under the No Change alternative. Other levels of po 11 utants are not expected to be .ignificant. Hi Business Park are not expected to be violated by constructi on activities. Upon full development, the most signifi- cant contributor to air pollution would be carbon monoxide from project-reI ated traffic. El emen ts of the Environment Envi ronmenta Impacts (Cont. ) Measures outlined under the pro. posed Business Park alternative would apply to this alternative as well. Comprehensive Plan pollcie. would llmlt development to 950,000 g.f. During construc. tion, watering and/or hydro. seedi ng of ex. posed soils would reduce the emis. 5 i on of su spended particulates and dust into the air. Carbon monoxide emis- sions could be lessened at full development with the reduction of vehicle trip.. This could be encouraged by carpooling measures and the Mitigating Measures: - - - - Rezone Alternatives - Alternative Site Plan No Rezone - - - - - .. - - - - - .. - - - El ements of the Environment Mitigating Measures (Cont. ) None are expected None are expected Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impacts: WATER RESOURCES mpacts would be similar to those in the No Change alternative. Impacts of the alternative site plan would be no di fferent than the Preferred Site Plan. mpacts to water quantity and quality would be the same as the Bus; ness Park Comprehensive Pl an Amendment Alternative. A storm water drainage system, designed and constructed in compliance with Snohomish County standards (Title 24) would route runoff through oil/water separators, grass-lined swales, with part going to North Creek and part gO;"9 to the wetlands prior to discharge through culverts to the south in Ko 11 Center-North Creek. The type of water quality and quantity impacts would be less than under the proposed Business Park. Runoff from the low density resi- dential would be 1 ess than the Business Park and High Urban alter- nati ves. The same type of contaminants would occur, but in lesser quan- tity than the Business Park and High Urban alter- natives, except for fecal coli- forms, which would be greater than the Business Park, but less than the Hi gh Urban alterna- tive. Residen- tial use would impact wetlands through recrea- tional use. 1- 13 The type of water quantity and quality impact. would be similar to the proposed Business Park impacts . Residential use would result in 1 esser quanti ty of contaminants than the Business Park, except for fecal cOliforms, which would be greater. A 1 esser quanti ty of runoff than the business park would result from high den.ity residential uses Residential use would put a greater stress on the wetl and through recrea- tional use by residents and pet.. There would be increases in the volumes of storm water runoff resulting from increased impervious surfaces. Con- version of the site to a busi- ness park would lower fecal coliform levels in storm water runoff. Business park development would increase other types of water conta- minants, such as solids, nitrates, phosphates, and total heavy metals. Without migitation, the increased runoff and increased contami nant levels could reduce water quality in the wetland and North Creek. Environmenta Impacts - - - - - - - - .. ~- - - - - - - - - Table I Continued Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives Rezone Alternatives - Alternative Site Plan No Rezone Element. of the Environment Some a. the No Change Comprehen- .ive Plan Amend- ment alternative. The measures would be the .ame a. the Preferred Si te Plan. Preferred Site Plan A TESCP would be provided to limit erosion and sedimentation impacts. Oil traps and grassy swales ,",ould be in.talled. Fill in Lots 1 and 8 would be planted with grasses to inhibit erosion. Bridge elevation would be placed to not hinder floodwaters. be ChanQe Measures would the same as the Business Park alternative. No h Urban Measures would be the same as the Business Park alternative. Hi Park Comprehensive Plan policies would call for maximizing pervious surfaces and treating stonn runoff prior to dis- charge. A tem- porary erosion and sedimentation contro 1 plan would be u.ed during construc. tion. Storm water from the park; 09 area would be filtered before di.charge into the wet- lands. Wetlands and/or grass. lined swales would be utilized as a means of storm water cleansing prior to di.charge from the site. Business Mitigating Measures: None are expected. Impact. would be the same as under the Preferred Site Plan. Some poll utant loading of the wetlands and North Creek would occur during con- struction and after develop- ment. None are expected Impact. would be the same as under the Business Park Alternative. Some pollutant loading of the wetl ands and North Creek would occur during con- struction and after develop' ment. Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impacts: This alternative would result in least amount of impact on the plant and animal communities. Disturbance by Impacts would be the same as the Preferred Site Plan. Impacts would be the same as the Business Park Comprehensive Plan Amendment alternative. There would be a Impact. to plant communities would occur as the majority of the .ite would be converted to urban landscape. 1.14 Impact. to plant and animal com- munities would be similar to the Bu.iness Pork alternative. Thi. alternative Without continued grazi ng and mowing, natu: lucces s ion 0 plant .pecie the wetland would re.ult ra f . in areas in MALS Envi ronmental Impacts: PLANTS AND AN - ... - - - - - - - Table Continued Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives - - - - - - - - - - Rezone Alternatives El ements of the Environment a No Rezone rest dents and pets would be Tess than the other a1 terna- tlve. but .tlll significant I..,act. A I ternatl ve Site Plan Preferred Site Plan maximun loss of 9.8\ (0.99 acre.) of wet meadow .peel e. by fl1ll ng for roadway and/or bull dl ng con- struction. Areas in developed portions would be converted to urban type plant communi tie.. All habitat. would be .ubject to In- creased short- and long"'term disturbance associated with contructfon and operation of the business park. No ChanQe Impacts to animal communities would be generally Ie.. than previous alternatives due to less intensive use, but hunan disturbance would .tlll be high. h Urban would provide greater habitat for urban wild- life .pecle.. A greater hunan disturbance of habitat would result due to presence and activities of residents and thel r pet.. Hi Park II loog-term re- duction of dlver- .Ity and becane doml nated by shrubs and trees. Changes In plant species would re.ult In a .hlft In the dl.trlbu- tI on and abun- dance of anfmal species. Resident animals would decline or be displaced during construc- tion. Migratory waterfowl would be re.trlcted to the wetland. and other habitats. There could be increased conta- minated surface runoff, turbidity and .edlment load to North Creek durl ng project construction, potentially Im- pacting fl.herle. habitat. Business Envi ronment.1 I..,acts: (Cont.) The.e would be the same .s for the Preferred Site Plan. The.e would be the same as for the Preferred SI te Plan. These would be the same as for the Business Park Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternative. Ad- ditional measures would Include the following: (I) pre.ervatlon of stream buffer Measures would be the same as for the Business Park alternative 1-15 Measures would be same as for the Business Park alternative Po..lble mitiga- ting measures would Include: u.e of WSS overl ay on the Comprehensive Plan, wetland expansion and enhancement, use of temporary erosion and sedi- MI tl gatl ng Measures: - - - - - .. - - - - - - - - - - - - - Continued I Table Rezone Alternatives rehensfve Plan Amendment Alternatives c, E1 ements of the E nv f ronment No Rezone Alternative SI te Plan Preferred Site PI an (minimum of 100 feet wide each side of creek); (2) retention of 90.2\ of exl.tlng wetlands in open .pace; (3) blo- filtering of stonmwater runoff prior to dis- charge to creek No ChanQe Hlqh Urban Business Park mentation control plans during con- struction, and use of contafn- ment bard erl. An enhancement/ creation plan would be approved by the county. Also. human acti- vity in areas near the stream could be dis- couraged. Water- shed-.en.ltlve overlay would designate areas of the 51 te on which development would be reduced Mltl gatl ng Heasures: (Cont. ) The.e would be the same as for the Preferred Site Plan. The.e would be the same as the Preferred Sf te Plan. The.e would be the same as the Business Park Camp rehen 5 f ve Plan Amendment Alternative. The.e would be the same as the Business Park alternative. The.e woul d be the same as for the Business Park alternative. There would be a 10.5 of dlver.lty of p !ant and animal connunf- ties over much of the .fte. There would be an In- creased distur- bance of habitat. by human actlvl- tie.. Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impacts Noise Impact. would be compar- able to tho.e de- .crlbed for the No Change Compre- hensive Plan Amendment Alter- native. Noise Impacts would be .Imllar to those de- .crl bed for the Preferred Site Plan. Construction noise impacts would be the same as those de- .cri bed for the Business Park COfI1)rehensive Plan Amendment Alternative. By 1994, .ound levels (back- ground plus project) would Nol.e Impacts from construction would generally be less than those described for the Business Park and High Urban alterna- tive.. The Im- act. of traffic nol.e from 1-405 on future resi- dences would be 1-16 Construction noise impacts would be similar to those de- .crlbed for the Business Park alternative. The High Urban alter- native would Increa.e 19BB sound levels from arterial traffic by an average of .e There would be temporary non- significant no Impacts during construction. Subsequent to development, this alternative would increase the predicted traffic notse by no more than 1.0 dBA, as compared to the NOISE Envtronmenta Impacts: - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Table Continued Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives Rezone Alternatives No Rezone Alternative SI te Plan Preferred Site Plan increase close to Ldo65 dBA along seyments of some surrounding arte- rials, but to about Ld 65 dBA along 39~h Avenue SE 'outh of 240th Street SE. The levels along Beard.lee Blvd. would be about 71 Ldn In 1994. Measures would be the same as de- scribed under the High Urban Com- prehensive Plan Amendment Alter- native. Same a. the Preferred Site Plan. The .Ite plan would bo de.lgned to ensure that there are no .Ignlflcant nol.e sources located on portions of the site close to existing resi- dences, and that adequate buffers are provided between such noise sources and any noise- sensitive loca- tions. No Chanqe .Imllar to tho.e de.crlbed for the High Urban alter- native. Measures would be the same as the High Urban Alternative 1-17 Element. of the Environment h Urban 3.28 dBA, .Imllar to the No Change alternative. Under this alternative, sound increases would average about 0.50 dBA more than those predicted for the Business Park al ternative. Residences pro" po.ed in tho western portion of the site may be .ignificantly Impacted by 1-405 traffic noise. Sound levels from cumulative growth in the area are expected to ex- ceed Ldn6S dBA by tho year 2000. HI a.siness Park No Change Alter- native. an aver- age increase from 1988 of 3.28 dBA Increa.e In 2000. Increases under 5 dBA are con- sfdered non- .ignlflcant. By the yoar 2000, cumulative growth plus development under the pro- posed comprehen- sive plan amend- ment would result tn sound level s along 39th Avenue SE and the exton- .Ion, 228th Street SE, and Beardslee Boule- vard exceeding Ldn 65 dBA. Envi ronmenta 1 Impacts: (Cont.) Resfdences within 500 feot of 1-405 could be de- .Igned to Include acoustic windows and exterior re- creation spaces that are .hlelded by bull ding. or barriers from the highway noise. Comprehensive Plan policle. would dl.courage locating .Ignlfl- cant noise sources on por- tion. of tho .Ite near existing residences and would encourage adequate buffers such as ea rth berms. Mitigating Measures: - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Table I Continued Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives Rezone Alternatives Preferred A lternatl ve Site Plan Site PI an No Rezone - Impacts would be Impact. would be The Impact. would the same as the the same as the be the same as Business Park Business Park described under Comprenehsive Comprehensive the No Change Pl an Amendment Plan Amendment Comprehens f ve Alternative. Alternative. Plan Amendment alternative. No Chanqe The Impacts of traffic noise from 1-405 on future residences would be .Imllar as those de- .crlbed for the High Urban alternative. Hiqh Urban The residences on-sfte within 300 feet of the 1-405 rlght-of- way are expected to have sound levels above Ldn 6S dBA by the year 1996. Business Park Tho re.ultlng sound levels from increases tn area traffl c by the year 2000 wi th or without the pro- posal would ex- ceed L d 65 dBA at .evePal locations. The low den.lty re.ldentlal development permitted under the Rural Conser- vation zone (2.3 acre. per dwelling unit) would not be compatible with the overall trend towards bustness and off! ce park development tn the North Creek Valley. Impact. under thl. alternative would be the .ame as those de- scribed for the Preferred Site Plan. Full development under this alter- native would change the .ite from grazing and agricultural uses to a 950,000- square-foot busi- ness park. The .Ingle-famlly residence and two primary barns would not be removed. Devel- opment under this alternative would be compatible with adjacent uses. Business park development would conform to performance standards regula- ting open space, landscaping, site coverage, height, bull ding de.ign and mated a 1 s, 11 ght i ng. park- ing, and set- back.. This Development of 191 .Ingle-famlly re.ldentlal dwelling. would be consistent with the exl.tlng land use designa- tions tn the cOf'llJrehensive plan and would be compatible with existing low den.lty develop- ment north and ea.t of the .Ite. Development under this alternative would be Ie.. compatible with the business parks located Immediately .outh of the .ite. 1-18 The site area would be tran.- formed from grazing land to high den.ity multl-famlly residential use. Structures would be clustered to allow for common open space and landscaping. Development under this alternative would continue the northward trend of higher den.lty develop- ment In the North Creek Valley. Residential use of this .Ite caul d cause business park development to "leap frog" in response to .teadlly .trong demand. Tho existing agricultural character of the .ite would be altered to accom- modate the con- struction of business park uses. Develop. ment under thi s alternative would be compatible with existing business parks located Immedi- ately 'outh of the site. Al- though the .1 te Is also located adjacent to lower den.lty re.lden- tlal and agricul- tural uses to the north and east, the propo.ed business park land u.e de.lgna- tlon Is Intended to apply develop' ment controls and limit. to en.ure El ements of the Environment Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impact., LAND USE Envl ronmental Impact., .- - - .. - - -- - - Table I Continued Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives - - - - - - - - - - Rezone Alternatives Elements of the Environment No Rezone Alternative Site Plan Preferred Site PI an rezone alterna- tive may contri- bute to a poten- tial increase in rezone requests In the vicinity, but this demand I. not likely to be .Ignlflcant. Thl. alternative may also contri- bute to increased demand for multi- family residen- tial hou.lng for employees, and the subsequent need for compre- hensive plan amendments to re.ldentlal de.lgnation.. No ChanQe h Urban HI Park compatlbllty with adjacent neigh- borhood.. Full development under this alternative may contribute to increased demand for sfmilar com- prehensive phn amendment re- que.t.. This demand should not be .Ignlflcant due to the lack of large, con- .011 dated and vacant parcels .ultable for business park development tn the vicinity of the site. Dove I opl ng the .Ite with a business park .imllar to adjacent land could lessen the lIkellhood that development would "leap froglt into other areas. Business Envl ronmental Impacts: (Cont.) The 52 .Ingle- family home. would generate a minimal amount of 11 ght and no glare. Impacts under thl. alternative would be the .ame as those under the Preferred Site Plan Alter- native. Ught and glare impacts would be the same as those under full devel- opment of the Business Park Comprehensi ve Plan Amendment. Impacts resulting from 11 ght and glare waul d be greater than those under the Business Park alternative. Again, these 1.19 U ght and glare impacts generated by multi-family re'ldentlal de- velopment would be greater than the proposed Bu.lne.. Park Sources of light and glare would be created by .treet lIghts, lighting In parking areas, vehicles and Interior and - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Continued Table Rezone Alternatives . Alternative Si te Plan No Rezone an Amendment Alternatives rehensive P Com Elements of the Environment Preferred Si te Plan ChanQe Impact. would be due to more nighttime vehi- cular traffic. The Impact. would be less, however. than those under the Hi gh Urban alternative. No h Urban alternative due to the antici- pated increase tn vehicular traffic entering and exiting the property at night. This source of light would affect .Ingle-famlly residences loca- ted north and east of the site HI Business Park exterior lighting of bull dl ngs. The mo.t .en.l- tive receptors of llght would be the .Ingle-famlly residences across 39th Avenue SE and 240th Street SE. It Is anti- cipated, however, that 11 ght and glare Impacts from development would not be .Ig- nlflcant due to appropriate llghtlng de.lgn Envtrorvnental Impacts: (Cont.) Thl. alternative would transform the .Ite from open space to suburban rest- dentlal develop- ment. The 52 .Ingle-famlly lot. would pre- serve much of the planning area's lower density re.ldentlal character. Impact. would be .Imllar to tho.e under the Prefer- red Site Plan Re- zone Alternative. Impact. would be the same as de- scribed under the Bu.lne.. Park Ccmprehensive Plan Amendnent Alternative. Common open space would not likely be included under thl. alternative. The vl.ual Impact would be a con- ti nuatl on of valley floor development, although I e.. fntensfve than either the Bu.I- ness Park or High Urban Alterna- tives. 1- 20 The vl.ual Impact of this ...ltl- famlly re.lden- tlal development alternative would be a contfnuation of valley floor development. Thl. alternative would likely be a planned resfden- tfal development, and a minimum of 17 acres of open space would be provided In the 86'"'acre sfte. Development under this alternative would be gener- ally compatible with .urroundlng development. The vacant .Ite would be trans" fonned to a more urban .ettlng and would Include roadways, parkfng areas, and low- rise bull dings. A park-like .et- tlng would be provided through- out the .1 te. Open space would be maintained along North Creek. Develop- ment wou 1 d be ae.thetlcally compatlb Ie wi th business parks located to the south In Bothell. The height and bulk of building. would be .Imllar - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Table Continued Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives Rezone Alternatives Rezone No Alternatl ve Site Plan Preferred Site Plan None. be would the te Measures the same as Preferred SI Plan A park-like .et- tlng would be created by open space areas, and landscaping. These features would also help buffer nearby re.1 dent fa I properties. Also, the exist- ing rows of poplar trees would be retained. No Chanqe None. 1- 21 El emenh of the [nvi fonment h Urban H Park to the.e neigh- boring uses. Cumulatively, the propo.ed plan amendment and the exl.tlng Bothell business parks would continue to alter land use on the valley floor, the valley's rural appearance, and views from 1-~05. Business Envl ronmental Impacts (Cont.) The planned re.1 dentlal develop. ment would have a .ignlflcant amount of common open space. This could serve tn part as a buf- fer between the hi gh den.lty residential development and surrounding lower den.ity .ingle- famlly re.lden- tial areas, and business parks. Propo.ed Compre- hen.lve Plan policies would def! ne and re.trlct develop- ment. The pro. posed amendment would Include the retention of approximately 2' acres as Watershed-Site Sen.ltlve. An open space cor- ridor would be preserved a 1 on9 North Creek, and a pede.trlan/ bicycle path would provide access to the creek corridor. land.caped buffer. along perimeter roads would help create a tran.ltlon between 10 nd uses. MItigating Measures: - - .. - - - - - - Table Continued Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives - - - - - - - - - - Rezone Alternatives Elements of the [nYi fonment No Rezone None Alternative Site Plan Impact. would be the same as the Preferred Site Plan alternative Preferred Site Plan Building materi- al. would be .elected to mini- mize glare from development. On-.lte lIght sources would be confined to .peclflc area. by land.caplng and/or .hleldlng to minimize off-site Impacts No ChanQe None h Urban None Hi Business Park Land.caped buffer areas along perimeter roads would help screen 11 ght eml tted within a bu.lne.. park development. Lighting for parking areas, access drives, and bull dl ng .ecurlty would be de.lgned to minimize off-site Impact.. HI tlgatl ng Measures: (Cont.) None be Measures would the same as the Preferred Site Plan Rezone Al- ternative The parking areas would be land- scaped to screen the views of the parking and bull dl ng from residential areas. Views of North Creek would be protected by a 100-foot buffer on each side of the creek. Development, except for 1 eS5 than one acre of flll, woul d not be located In the wetlands or other sensitive areas. 1- 22 None A minimum of 17 acres of open space woul d be provided If thl. alternative is developed as a planned residen- tial development. A park-like set- tl ng would be provided on the site with open space and land- .caplng. Roadway de.lgn would Include land- scaped buffer.. Th Is Coq>rehen- slve Plan desig- nation would require develop- ment under BP zone standards wi th final .Ite plan review and conformance with covenants. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Table 1 Continued Comp~ehensfve Plan Amendment Alternatives Rezone Alternatives El ements of the Environment No Rezone Alternative 51 te Plan Preferred Site Plan Land.caped buffers Ire proposed along perimeter and tnternal roadways. No Chanqe h Urban HI Business Park MI tl gat! ng Heasuresl (Cont.) The vl.ual char- acter of the Irea would be altered from open space pasture land to 10" density .Ingle-famlly development. Impact. "ould be the same IS the Preferred Site Plan. Impact. "ould be the same as the Business Park Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternative. The vl.ual char- acter of the site would be changed from a primarily rural, agricul- tural environment to a slngle- famlly re.lden- tlal development The vl.ual char- acter of the site "ould be changed from primarily a rural, agricul- tural environment to a high-den.lty ...ltl-famlly re.ldentlal development. The vl.ual char- acter of the site would be changed from primarily a rural, agricul- tural place to a bu.lness park "Ith 57 percent open space. Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impact$! There would be no direct and only minimal Indirect emp loyment as a re.ult of this alternative. Impact. would be the same as those described under Preferred Site Plan. Impact. would be the same as de- scribed under the Business Park Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternative. Upon full devel- opment, direct employment of 2,500 workers could result. An additional 4,700 Indirect jobs could also be generated regionally for an estimated total of 7,200 job.. Impact. would be similar to those de.crlbed for the High Urban alter- native. There lIOul d be some temporary construction jobs on site, but there would be no direct employment upon full devel- opment of this alternative. Any indirect increase In employment I. oot anticipated to be .Ignlfl- cant. There would be temporary i 0- crease in con- struction workers on .Ite. With business park development, the .Ite would be a significant contributor to the overa 11 employment In the census tract in which the .Ite I. located, and in the North Creek p hnnt n9 area. a EMPLOYMENT Environmental Impacts: Measures would be None the same as the Preferred Site Plan. Measures would be the same as the Business Park Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternative. 1.23 None None Bu.lne.s park de- velopment Is expected to be phased over four to seven years, thereby .preadlng HI t' gat! ng Measures; ~- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Conti nued Table Rezone Alternatives rehensfve Plan Amendment Alternatives C No Rezone Alternative Site Plan Preferred Site Plan No ChanQe h Urban HI Business Park employment- related Impacts over time None are expected None are expected. None are expected None are expected. None are expected. None are expected. Thl. alternative would generate a population of 129 persons, or 1.0 percent and 0.2 percent of the forecasted population for CT 519.04 and the North Creek Plannl ng Are the year 2001 respectively population I crease would cur outside site. a In 0, . No n- ac- the Population Impacts would be the same as under the Preferred Site Plan. Population In- creases would be the same as those expected under full development of the Business Park Comprehen- sive Plan Amend- ment Alternative. A portion of the employee. would 11 kely be local hire. which would reduce the per- centage popu. lation increases In the vlclnlty Thl. alternative would generate an e.tlmated .Ite population of 521 persons. Thl. would repre- sent 4.1 percent of the CT 519.04 forecasted popu. lation In 2000, and 0.6 percent of the North Creek Pl anni 09 Area in 2000. This alternative would not create any population increase outside the .lte. 1- 24 Thl. alternative would generate an estimated site population of 2,402 persons. This population would account for 19.1 percent of the year 2000 forecasted population In CT 519.04, and 2.9 percent of the North Creek Planning Area population In 2000. No popu- lation increases are expected out- .Ide the .Ite a. a re.ult of thl. al ternative Ba.ed on the job. that NOul d be generated at full development, an increase in popu- lation would occur in the site's census tract, CT 519.04, but mo.t of the population increase would be all ocated e 1oe- where within cOlMlUtl ng dis- tance from the .Ite. Potential population In- creases would be 1.0 percent, of the year 2000 population In the 15-minute, 25- minute, and 35- mi nute conmute distance lones. Impacts from population In- creases are ex- pected to be noticeable, but not .Ignlflcant. Element. of the Environment Mitigating Measures: (Cont.) Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impacts: POPULA T I ON Envl ronmenta I Impacts: - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Continued Table Rezone Alternatives rehensfve Plan Amendment Alternatives Canl No Rezone None. None are expected The existing .Ingle-famlly re.ldentlal unit would remain in the .hort to medium term. The 52 .Ingle-famlly re.ldentlal unit. proposed under thl. alternative would represent 0.15. percent of the hou.lng .tock expected In the North Creek Planning Area by the year 2000. No additional demand for housing would be created outside of the rezone Alternative SI te Plan Impacts would be the same as the Preferred Site Plan None are expected. Hou.lng Impacts would be the same as under the Preferred Site Plan Alternative. Preferred Site Plan Impact. would be the same as the Business Park Plan Amendment Alternative. None are expected. The Impact. would be the same as those described under the Busf- ness Park Compre- hensive Plan Amendment Alter- native. The exl.tlng .Ingle- family house on the .Ite would not be removed, but It. u.e would change. This alternative would generate an Indirect demand for 5,592 hou.lng unit. within a 0- to 35-mlnute commute distance. No ChanQ8 None None are expected The exlstl ng .Ingle-famlly hou.1 ng unit would be removed Thi. alternative would generate 191 .ingle-famlly unf ts on the site, represent- I ng 0.6 percent of the total number of housing untts tn the North Creek Planning Area projected for the year 2000. No Indirect demand for hou.lng unit. Is expected outside of the site. 1- HIQh Urban Multl-famlly re.ldentlal de- velopment would be phased over a three- to five- year period. 25 None are expected The existing .Ingle-famtly hou.lng unit would be removed The 880 multi- famtly re.lden- tlal unit. would represent 2.6 percent of the expected number of .Ingle-family and multi-family housing units in the North Creek Planning Area by the year 2000. There would be no additional demand for hou.lng out.lde the .Ite. Business Park Bu.lne.. park development on the site Is expected to be phased over four to seven years. thereby .preadlng population impacts over time. Regional growth would depend on overall economic growth and the perform- ance of other employers In the area. None are expected Indirectly, the anticipated population In- crease would create a demand for 6,213 addi- tional hou.lng units In the vicinity and elsewhere in the metropolitan region. The per- centage increases in the amount of hou.lng .tock as I result of the proposed plan amendment would not be .Ignlfl- cant (1.0 percent for the North Creek Plannl ng Element. of the Environment Mitigating Heasures: Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impacts: HOUSING Envi rormenta 1 Impacts: - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Conti nued 1 Table Rezone Alternatfves Plan Amendment Alternatives rehensfve c, El ements of the Environment No Rezone area. Alternative Site Plan Preferred Site Plan No ChanQ8 Hiqh Urban Park Area In 2000) due to the large geographical area In which the In- creases would be expected to DC. cur, and the anti cl pated pha.lng of devel- opment which Is expected to .pread hou.lng- related Impacts over a four- to seven-year period or longer Business Envi formenta 1 Impacts: (Cont.) None Impact. would be the same as the Preferred Site Plan Impact. would be the same a 5 the Bu.lne.. Park Comprehensive Pl an Amendment Alternative. None Multi-family re.ldentlal de- velopment would be phased over a three- to flve- year period. Potential bu.l- ness park devel- opment fs ex- pected to be phased over four to seven years, thereby .preadlng the Indirect demand for new housing over the same time period. Regl anal growth would depend on overall economic growth and the performance of other emp toyers In the area. Mitigating Heasures: None are expected. None are expected. None are expected None are expected 1-26 None are expected. None are expected Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impacts - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Continued I Table Rezone Alternatives Amendment Alternatives rehensive Plan Coml Elements of the Environment Rezone No Alternative Site Plan Preferred Si te Plan Change No h Urban Hi Busi ness Park No impacts are expected HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL PRESERVATION No impacts are expected. Environmental Impacts No impacts are expected Mitigating meas- ures would be the same as under the Preferred Site Plan. No impacts are expected Mitigating mea.- ures would be the same as under the Preferred Site Plan. except that all structures would be removed. No impacts are expected Mitigating meas- ures would be the same as under the Business Park Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternative. The farmhouse and two primary barns would be retained. No impacts are expected. Hitigating meas- ures would be the same as under the Business Park alternative Mitigating mea.- ures would be the same as under the Business Park alternative. If any artifact. are found, the State Office of Archeology and Historic Preser- vation would be notified. Mitigating Measures: None are expected None are expected None are expected. None are expected None are expected None are expected Si gnificant Unavoidable Adverse Impacts An e.timated 552 vehicular trip. would be gener- ated daily, with 59 trips oc- curring during the P.M. peak hour. A majority of trips would be distributed on 39th Avenue SE, both north and south of the rezone area if the extension is complete. If it is not complete, more trips would be di.tributed on 39th Avenue SEt 120th Avenue NE and on 35th Ave- Trip generation and distribution would be the same a. that for the Preferred Site Plan Rezone al- ternative. Im- pacts to LOS, transit service, and pedestrian and bicycle activity would be the same, as well Full development under this alter- native would gen- erate the same impacts discussed under the Busi- ness Park Compre- hensive Plan Amendment Alter- native. If the 39th Avenue SE extension is not completed by 1996, a higher proportion of trips would occur on 35th Avenue SE and the LOS of two intersections would fall. If the 39th Avenue SE exten.ion is Full development would generate an estimated 1,876 daily vehicle trip., and 200 P.M. peak hour trip.. The trip distribution would be the same as that described for High Urban alternative. While the LOS at the 10 vicinity intersections would be about the same as under the other alter- natives, .the number of inter- sections to the north with more than 10\ of the 1- 27 Full development would generate an e.timated 5,261 daily vehicle trip., with ~02 trip. during the P.M. peak hour. Trip distribution would be oriented more to the north than is the Busi- ness Park alter- native. The lower trip gener- ation but higher distribution to the north would result in about a 5\ increase in total traffic to the north over the Business Park alternative Full development would generate up to 7,595 vehicle trip. daily, and 1,170 during the P.M. peak hour. ISH measures were not included 1n the analysis. LOS analy.is assumes the implementation of planned or prograrrmed improvements in the vicinity, including the exten.lon of 39th Avenue SE to 228th Street SE, among other improvements. TRANSPORT A TI ON Envi ronmenta 1 Impact. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Table Continued Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives Rezone Alternatives - Alternative Site Plan No Rezone Elements of the Envi ronment nue SE. levels of service under thi. alternative would be the .ame as those expected under the Pre- ferred Site Plan and Alternative Site Plan Rezone Alternative. if the 39th Avenue SE extension is completed, except for intersections along 228th Street SE. The.e intersections would have higher (better) levels of servi ce than the other rezone alternatives. Minimal traffic accidents and impacts to transit, pedes'" trian and bicycle facilities are expected. Preferred Site Plan complelcd by 1996, the Ic..-vel of service at two inteBeCtions (228th Sl and 35th Ave. and 240th St. and 39th Ave.) would be impnJYed, the level or service at one intersection (228lh SI. and 39th Ave.) would be worse, and the level ofservicc al10 intersections studied would not be changed. Over- all, traffic generated under this alternative would not com- pound critical traffic movements in the area. The primary traffic pattern in the P.M. peak hour i. into the area, whereas the development's primary traffic pattern would be to exit the area. All parking would be accolTInodated on the si tee The increase in demand may result in transit serv. ice being pro- vided in the vicinity earlier than would other- wise occur and satisfying cur- rent unmet demand for service. No Chanqe site generated traffic would increase. Some of the additional intersections would require mitigation due to a poor level of service. This alternative would not generate sig~ nificant levels of bicycle and pedestrian acti- vity. No pedes- trian/bicycle trail is proposed along North Creek. Sidewalks would be devel- oped as part of the plat, how. ever. This al- ternative would generate fewer accidents than either the Busi- ness Park or High Urban alterna- tive.. Parking would be accom~ modated on indi- vidual residen- ti.1 lot.. 1- 28 h Urban While the LOS at the 10 vi ci ni ty intersections would be about the same as under the other alter- natives, the number of inter- sections to the north with more than 10\ of the site generated traffic would increase. Some of the additional intersections would require mitigation due to a poor level of service. The increase in accidents would likely be greater than those gener- ated under the No Chango alterna- tive, and less than those under the Business Park alternative. Transit, pedes" trian and bicycle activity would be similar to those levels expected under the Busi- ness Park alter~ native. Side- walks and a pedestrian/bicyc- le trail would be constructed in the .ite. All parking would be accorrmodated on the .ite. Hi Park 8y2OOO.1..05 al18 intcnections under Ihil alternative would be Ihe same u those expected under thc No Change Altemarive. or Ihcsc J 8, 8 would be at LOS E or below with or without this all<rnallve. A14 ~herinte~ft>OI LOS would drop one or more levels (from AtoB, EtoF.etc.) under this Alternative as compared to the No Change Allernative. Pedestrian or bicycle activity in the area is expected 10 increase. 11le number or accidents would increase although Ihe rale of accidents would noL Business [nvi ronmental Impacts: (Cont.) - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Table Continued Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives Rezone Alternatives El emenh of the Environment Rezone No Alternative Site Plan Preferred Site Plan Traffic safety impact.' would be related to potential increases 1n traffic volume. Pede.trian and bicycle activity would increase due to the proposed trail along North Creek. No ChanQe h Urban Hi Business Park Envi ronmenta 1 Impacts (Cont. ) Development under the No Rezone Alternative would al$o have to comply with Title 268. Mitigating meas- ures would be the same as the Preferred Site Plan. 39th Avenue SE between the Snohomish/King County line and 240th Street SE would be widened to include three travel lanes and a .idewalk on the west 51de of the .treet. 240th Street SE between 39th Avenue SE and Fitzgerald Road SE would be widened to in- clude two travel 1 anes. The 1-40S/NE 19Sth Street i nter- section would be upgraded through a fair share contribution. Development under the No Change Alternative would have to comply with Title 26B. It i. likely that this alternative would require mitigation at more intersec- tions than the Business Park alternative due to more inter- sections to the north receiving more than 10\ of the si te gener- ated traffic. Specific mitiga- tion has not been Identified for full development under this plan amendment alter- native. Any development would, however, comply w;th the Snohomish County Road Ordinance (Title 26B). It is llkely that this alternative would require mitigation at more i ntersec- tions than the Busi ness Park alternative due to more inter- sections to the north receiving more than 10\ of the site gener- ated traffic. Regional trans- portation impact. should be .tudied on an ongoing ba.is with improvements funded on a fair-share basis. Please refer to the TRANSPORTA- TION section for additional proposed improve- ments. Install- ation of improve- ments would be pha.ed a. development occurs. Mitigating Measures: None are expected. Adver.e traffic conditions are not expected to be significant due to proposed mitigating measures. Adverse traffic conditions are not expected to be .ignificant due to proposed mitigating measures. None are expected 1- 29 None are expected. None Ire expected if propo.ed mitigating measures arl implemented Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impacts - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Table Continued Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives Rezone Alternatives Alternative Site Plan Preferred Site Plan ~ No Rezone lli! ThIs alternative would have mini- mal Impact to the fire district. lli! Impacts would be the .ame a. the Preferred SIte Plan. lli! Impact. would be the same as those expected under full development of the Bus f ness Park Comprehen- sive Plan Amend- ment Alternative. No Chanqe Fire Thl. alternative would generate approximately 26 call. per year. The im- pacts wou I d be 1 ess than those for either the Business Park or High Urban alter- natives. Never- theless, single- family develop- ment would also contribute to the overall increased demand experi- enced by Fire ~istrict '10. 1.30 Bu.lne.. Park Hfqh Urban lli! lli! This alternative would re.ult In approximately 120 calls for service per year Thl. alternative would not result In .Ignlflcant impacts, but would be a con- tributing factor to the overall impacts experi- enced by Fi re District '10. Upon full devel- opment, business park development would f ncrease the demand for fi re protection services. Fire District. '10 anticipate. that additional .taff would be required due to the ex" pected increase I n the number of alarm.. At this time, however, the exact Impact has not been quantified. Indirect popula- tion growth In the metropolitan area reSUlting from thl. alter- native would increase the demand for ff re protection ser- vice., but this is not expected to adverse 1 y affect other di.trlct. In the area. This alternative. comb i ned wi th deve 1 opment underway or pro- po.ed In the dls. trict. would con- tribute to the overall Impacts experl enced by the ff re dis- trict. Element. of the Environment PUBLIC SERVICES Envl ronmental Impact.. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Continued 1 Table Rezone Alternatives rehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives C, El ements of the Environment No Rezone ~ The number of additional calls generated under this alternative would not be expected to adver.ely affect the Sheriff'. Department Alternative Site PI an Impacts would be the same as the Preferred Site Plan. ~ Preferred Site Plan ~ Impact. would be the same as those discussed under the Business Park Comprehensive PI an Amendment Alternative. ChanQe ~ There would be approximately 212 calls for service (an increase of 3.5\ over 1988 level) annually under this alternative. re.ultlng in the need for an additional 0.13 officer.. This alternative alone would not .Ignlficantly Impact the Sheriff'. Depart- ment, but It would contribute to curoo1atfve impacts expert enced by the department. No h Urban ~ Approximately 975 annual calls for service (an Increa.e of 16\ over 1988 level) would be generated under this alternative. Thl. would re.ult in the need for an additional 1.49 officer. In the Sheriff'. Department. Thl. alternative would contribute to the cunulative im'" pact. that devel- opment In the vicinity would have on the Sheriff'. Depart- ment. Pha.lng could occur over three to ftve years, so it is unllkely that adverse impacts to the Sheriff'. Department would occur innedf'" ately. HI Park Approximately 677 call. for police service (an Increa.e of 11.1\ over 1988 level) would be generated annual- ly by thl. alter- native. The Sheriff'. Depart- ment would re- quire an addi- tional officer to acconrnodate the development. Spinoff employ- ment and popula- tion re.ultlng from this alter- native would al.o p lace added demand on poltce services tn Snohoml.h County, King County and the munlclpall- tie.. Full de- velopment Is expected to be phased over a four- to seven- year period, thus .preadl ng out related Impacts over time. Business ~ Envi ronmental Impacts: (Cont.) . Approximately 43 students would be generated in the rezone are.. The North.hore School ol.trlct would not be adversely Schoo Schoo ls Impacts would be the same as those de.crlbed for the Preferred Site Plan. Schools Impacts to .chool. would be the same as de sed bed under the Comprehen.lve Plan Amendment Alternative Schools Single-hmlly development would generate approxi- mately 162 .tu- dents on the .1 te. Students would attend 1-31 Schools An e.tlmated 290 students would be generated on~sfte as a result of 880 multi-family units. Student. would attend Schoo Is The alternative would not gener- ate a student population within the site. How- ever. the new population re.ul - - ------.- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Continued 1 Table Rezone Alternatives Amendment Alternatives rehensfvo Plan Com Element. of the Environment No Rezone affected by this fncrease tn stu. dent population. Alternative SI te Plan Preferred Site Plan ChanQe the North.hore School ol.trlct. Impacts would be .imilar to but somewhat les$ than those from the High Urban alternative. No h Urban North.hore School District. The dl.trlct would be ab 18 to Becan" modate the new .tudent.. Multl- famlly develop' ment allowed under this alter- native would not likely be pha.ed over an extended period of time, though. The Influx of .tu- dents could occur over three to five years, which could have a greater impact on the dlstr' ct than the propo.ed c~rehensive plan amendment. HI Business Park tlng from direct and IndIrect em- ployment would Include school- age children. The Influx of additional .tu- dents would be distributed within the metro- politan area and would occur over an extended period of time. This gradual f ncrease waul d allow the North.hore Dis- trict to I""le- ment measures to accommodate stu. dent. Indirectly generated by bustness park development. Impacts to other .chool dl.trict. are not known .Ince the di.trl- butlon of .tu- dents cannot be determined. Envl ronmental I""acts: (Cont.) ~ The small number of additional residents ex. pected under this alternative would not place a sig- nificant demand on existing facllitle.. ~ Impacts would be the same as under the Preferred Site Plan ~ Increased demand for recreational opportunities in the vlclnlty would be the same a. that de.cribed for the Bu.lne.s pa rk Comprehen- sive Plan Amend- ment Alternative. Employees would have access to Parks The 521 people re.ldlng on the .Ite would place additional demand for recreational facllltle. In the vicinity. The probable lack of anyon-site open space or acti ve recreational facllltle. would 1-32 ~ A .Ite population of 2,402 per.on. would create additional demand for parks and recreational facllltle. In the vicinity. Im- pacts would likely be miti- gated by the provisIon of ~ The direct Impact on recreational opportunitle. created by on- site employee. I. not expected to be significant due to the degree of proposed re- creational ameni- ties. Recrea- tional features - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Table I Continued Comprehensive PTan Amendment Alternatives Rezone Alternatives Element. of the Environment Rezone No A I ternatl ve 51 te Plan Preferred Si te Plan the pede.trlan/ bicycle trail and open space areas. Spinoff re.lden- tlal development would create .Imllar Indirect impacts to exl.tlng facili- ties as mentioned for the Business Park Comprehen- sive PTan Amend- ment Alternative. No Change likely re.ult In impacts on parks and recreational facllltle. In the vicinity, particularly the Bothell faclll- tie. at the Koll and Ouadrant business parks located south of the .Ite. 1.33 HIgh Urban active and passive recrea- tional facllltle. as part of a planned residen- tial development. These could Include .port courts, swimming pool, pede.trlan/ bicycle trail In the North Creek corridor, and .ub.tantlal open space areas. The.e facilities would be avail- able for u.e by the on-.lte population, al- though the trail coul d be acces'" sible to the pub- llc. The .Ite population would likely u.e the CI ty of Bothe 11 .ports field. located at the exl.tlng Quadrant business park .outh of the .Ite. Bothell'. facllitle. would be Impacted. Business Park Include a park- 11 ke .ettl ng, extensf YO open .pace In the form of wetlands and land.caped buf- fers, a stream corridor and a pede.trian/blcyc- Ie trail In the stream corrf dor. The trail woul d become part of the North Creek Valley trail sy.tem and would connect with trails at the exl.tlng Koll and Quadrant bu.lness park. to the .outh. Spinoff population growth would Indirectly increase the demand on the parks and recro- ati ona I faclll- ties elsewhere tn unincorporated Snohoml.h and King Counties. and In local munIcipalities. This Is not expected to be .ignlflcant because employees would re.lde throughout the region. [nvi rOrlllenta 1 Impacts: (Cont.) - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Continued Table Rezone Alternatives rehensfY8 Plan Amendment Alternatives Coml Elements of the [nvi ronment No Rezone Tax revenues generated under this alternative would help offset added demand on goverrwnent services. A I ternatl ve Site Plan Mitigating meas- ure. would be the same as the Preferred Site Plan Preferred SI te Plan Mitigating meas- ures would be the same as Business Park Comprehen- sive Plan Amend- ment Alternative In addition, security systems at a business park development would augment police services. The trail and open space would benefit recrea'" tlonal opportuni- ties In the vicinity. No ChanQe Tax revenues generated under this alternative would help offset added demand on goverrvnent services. h Urban Tax revenues generated under this alternative would help offset added demand on goverrment ser- vices. Open space and active recreational facilities would augment existing recreational facilities In the vicinity. HI Business Park Tax revenues generated from development would help offset added demand placed on Fire District #10, the Snohomlsh County Sheriff's Depart- ment, Northshore and other af- fected schoo' districts, and the Countys' park departments. Business park development Is expected to be phased over a 5 to 7-year perl od, thereby spreading Impact. to service pro" vlder. over time Mitigating Measures: None are expected requirements. Impacts would b. the same as the Preferred Site Plan. ow Impact. would be the same as the Business Park Comprehens i ve Plan Amendment Alternative. fl re f1 meetl ng Measures, Single-family development would contribute to cunulative im'" pacts experienced by public service providers. Parks and recreational facilities would probably be Im- pacted to the hIghest degree. ng regardl 1- 34 section, Mitigating This alternative would contribute to cumulative increased service demand on public service pro- vider.. Phasing of development over 3 to 5 years would mean the Impacts would be generated in the short-term. LITlES Business park development on .Ite would contribute to cunulative service demands on Fire District '10 and the Sheriff'. Depart- ment. UT See Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impacts: - - - - - - ... - - - - - - - - - - - - Conti nued Table Rezone Alternatives rehenstve Plan Amendment Alternatives C, Elements of the Environment No Rezone Water The Impact. would be the same IS the No Change Comprehensive Plan Amendment alternative. Alternative Site Plan !!i!!: The Impacts would be the same as the Preferred Site Plan. Preferred SHe Plan Water The Impacts and mitigation would be the same as the Business Park Comprehensive PI an Amendment alternative. No Chanqe Water The existing water lines would be adequate. No extens f on of water lines would be necessary. HIQh Urban Water Impacts would be similar to the Business Park alternative. Business Park Water Existing water lines would not be suff;clent for fl re f1 ow re- quirements for all stages of development. The Alderwood Water and Sewer 015. trl ct plans to Install a 12-Inch line In 39th Avenue SE to increase flaw and capacity for the district. Fire flow requirements can be met wi th CI ty of Bothe 11 supply; If so, the service from Alderwood District would be provided In an a-Inch line. LITlES Environmental Impacts: UT Sewer The a1 ternative would have the fewest impacts; existing lines and use of on-site septic systems should be sufflclent to accOfIITIodate Impacts of this alternative. Sanltar Sewer Impacts would be the same as the Preferred Site Plan Sanltar Sewer Impacts and mitigation would be the same as the Business Park Comprehensive P1 an Amendment Alternative. Sanitar Sewer The I mpacts of this alternative would be the same as for the High Urban A 1 terna- tlve. 1- 35 Sanitar Sewer The extended 42-Inch trunk sewer line would have sufficient capacity to accommodate this and other new development in the vicinity. Sanitar Sewer The existing 24-lnch line would not have the capacIty to serve the pro. posed develop- ment. An extension of the 42-Inch METRO/ A 1 derwood sewer line from the County line through the sl te to 240th Street SE Is currently under design; It will be extended Sanitar' - - - ------- - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - Conti nued 1 Table Rezone Alternatives Amendment Alternatives rehensfve Plan C, El ements of the [nvirorvnent No Rezone Alternative Site Plan Preferred SI te Plan No Change Urban HI Business Park whether or not the development is constructed and would al $0 serve other growth I n the area. Environmental Impacts: (Cont.) Solid Waste Thl. alternative would produce a minimal amount of .olld waste (14 cyds per week). Solid Waste d be those Impacts woul the SIme as under the Preferred Site Plan Rezone Alternative. Solid Waste The increase tn solid wa.te tonnage generated under this aTter- native would be the same as that generated under the Buslnes. Park Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternative. The figure would be reduced by re- cycling efforts. Solid Waste This alternatIve would produce the 1 ea st amount of solid waste (63 cyds per week) as compared to the other cOfl1>rehensive plan amendment alternatives. Solid Waste It I. anticipated that this al ter- native would generate 110 cyds per week of solid waste. Itrpacts are not expected to be significant. Solid Waste Approximately 2,380 cubic yards per week of solid waste would be generated by a business park at full development. The private disposal company that serves the vicinity would be able to provide the necessary services. Im- pacts related to solid waste dis- posal are not expected to be significant. Electricity On-.lte exten- sfons and/or improvements would be necessary to serve this a Tternati ve Electricity Impacts would be the same as those under the Preferred Site Plan Rezone Alternative El ectrf cl ty The Snohomlsh County PUD would have sufficient capacity to provide electri- cal service to the business park development under this alternative. Impacts would be the same as those requi red under Electricity This alternative coul d be served by the Snohomlsh County PUD as welt. Necessary extensions and/or improvements would be similar to those de- scribed under the Business Park alternative. 1- 36 Electrfclty This alternative could be served by the Snohomlsh County PUD as well. Necessary extensions and/or improvements would be similar to those de- scribed under the Business Park alternative. Electrlclty The Snohomlsh County PUD would be able to pro- vide electricity to the site under this alternative. Service capacity In the vlclnlty would be In- creased by 1990 wi th the con- struction of I - - - - - - - .. - - - - - - - - - - - Table Continued Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives Elements of the Environment No ChanQo h Urban HI Park new substation. Some off-.lte improvements may be required In addition to the extensions tnto the .Ite. The PUD Is not axpected to be adversely affected. Business Envl ronmental Impacts: (Cont.) Telephone Impacts would be less under this aTternative as compared to the other alterne- tlve.. GTE could acconrnodate the tncreased demand resulting from thl. alternative Tel ephone d be those te Impact. woul the samo as under the Preferred SI Phn Rezone Alternative. e Telephone GTE would be ab to accanmodate the demand for telephone ser- vice. Extensions to bull dl ngs would be the responsibility of the bull dl ng owners. Tel ephone GTE would be able to provide service to 191 single-family residences. Telephone It Is anticipated that GTE woul d be ab 1 e to accorn'" modate the addi- tional telephone service demands of this multi- family reslden" tlal alternative. An agreement between GTE and the developer would determine each party's responsibilities. Telephone To adequately serve full devel- opment of a busi- ness park, General Telephone C~lny, Inc. (CTE) would re- qui re an under- ground dlstrlbu" tlon cable within the site. CTE and the developer would enter tnto an agreement to determf ne each party's responsi- bilities. No mitigating measures are needed, except for residential service extensions Mitigating meas" ures would be the same as the Preferred Site Plan. Mitigating meas- ures would be the same as the Business Park Comprehensive Pl an Amendment Alternative. Recycling measures could be added by the proponent, building owners, or tenants to Mitigating meas- ures would be the same as the Business Park alternative. 1- 37 Mitigating meas- ures would be the same as the Business Park alternative. The proponent may contribute to the construction costs of the 12-Inch water main and the 42-Inch trunk sewer 11 ne on a fair-share basis. The proponent, the PUD, and the telephone company would enter into Mitigating Measuresl - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - Conti nued 1 Table Rezone Alternatives rehens1ve Plan Amendment Alternatives Com El ements of the Environment No Rezone Alternative Site Plan Preferred SI te Plan reduce the generatton of solid waste No ChanQe h Urban HI Business Park an agreement regardl ng the Installation of cOfJInunfcatfons and power equipment. Mitigating Heasures: (Cont.) None are expected. None are ex pected. None Ire expected. None are expected 1-38 None ere expected None are expected. Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impacts: I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ERRATA I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I DEIS Page Reference 1. (1-1) 2. (1-25) 3. (2-6) 4. (2-11) 5. (3-9) Chapter 4 ERRATA Amend third paragraph, second sentence as follows: "On a gross scale, approximately 61 acres, or 71 percent of the site, is designated WSS by the Plan; the remaining 25 acres are designated Suburban, which allows residential uses at a density of up to four dwelling units per acre." (Also see revised DElS Chapter 1 in Final ElS.) Amend Business Park column, first, second and third sentences as follows: "By 2000, LOS at 18 intersections under this alternative would be the same as those expected under the No Change Alternative. Of these 18, 8 would be at LOS E or below with or without this alternative. At 4 other intersections LOS would drop one or more levels (from A to B, E to F, etc.) under this Alternative as compared to the No Change Alternative." Amend Preferred site Plan column, first sentence as follows: n. . . completed by 1996, the level of service at two intersections (228th st. and 35th Ave. and 240th st. and 39th Ave.) would be improved, the level of service at one intersection (228th st. and 39th Ave.) would be worse, and the level of service at 10 intersections studied would not be changed." (Also see revised DElS Table 1 in Final EIS.) Amend second paragraph, third sentence as follows: "Approximately 10 acres immediately west of North creek and 9 acres of slopes over 15 percent on the westerly slope are also designated WSS." Replace cross-section B on Figure 7 of the DEIS with the revised cross-section B as shown on Figure 7 on page 4-2 of the Final ElS. Amend sixth paragraph, second sentence as follows: "This alternative would involve the clearing, grading, and conversion to impervious surfaces of about 35 percent of the site as compared to 4 - 1 I I I I I I , I I I I I I I I I I I I I I approximately 60 percent under the Business Park Alternative." 6. (3-51) Amend subsection B.9, first paragraph as follows: "Expansion of selected on-site wetlands would be done to compensate for the wetland filling for road and building construction, according to a predetermined enhancement/creation plan. The enhancement/creation plan would be approved by the Snohomish County Planning Division prior to final Plan approval." (3-51) Amend subsection B.10 as follows: "Creation of approximately 2.0 acres of new wetland would involve excavation of sufficient depth to intercept the groundwater table and/or create an area where surface water runoff could be retained to provide appropriate wetland conditions. The created wetlands would be planted with appropriate wetland species to speed up the successional process." 7. (3-101) Amend the second paragraph, second sentence as follows: "The four-lane controlled access facility connects with SR-522, SR-520, and I-90 to the south, providing access to Kirkland, Bellevue, and Seattle." 8. (3-104) Delete Figure 25. Replace with revised Figure 25 on page 4-4 of the Final EIS. 9. (N/A) Add new Figure 31A on page 4-6 of the Final EIS. (3-124) Amend subsection B.1.a, last paragraph, first sentence as follows: "Trip distribution for the Preferred Rezone site Plan is shown in Figures 31 and 31A." 10. (3-115) Delete Figure 29. Replace with revised Figure 29 on page 4-5 of the Final EIS. (3-118) Delete Table 28. Replace with revised Table 28 on page 4-7 of the Final EIS. (3-120) Add new paragraphs under section titled "NE 195th/I- 405 Ramp Intersections" as follows: "Each of the alternatives, including the No-Change Alternative, results in particularly high traffic volumes for the southbound on-ramp. The demand for this movement well exceeds the capacity of a single- lane ramp. During the AM peak, the reverse direction 4 - 3 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Table 28 YEAR 2000 PM PEAK HOUR LEVEL OF SERVICE (LOS) SUMMARY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT ALTERNATIVES ~e Proposed No Business High Intersection Controll Park Urban Change SR 527 & 1-405 NB Ramps S F F F SR 527 & 1-405 SB Ramps S B B B SR 527 & 228th St. S D D D 228th St. & 15th Ave. S B B B 228th St. & 19th Ave. S B B B 228th St. & 27th Ave. U E E E 228th St. & 31st Ave. U D D D 228th St. & 35th Ave. U D D D 228th St. & 39th Ave. U F E E S2 B 240th St. & 39th Ave. U B A A Site Entrance & 39th Ave. U D NA3 NA3 S2 B 240th St. & 35th Ave. U A A A 195th St. & 1-405 SB Ramp S F F F On-Ramp S F F F Off-Ramp S F F F 195th St. & 1-405 NB Ramp S F F F On-Ramp S F F F Off-Ramp S E E D 195th St. & N. Creek Pkwy. S F F F 195th St. & 120th Ave. S F C C 132nd Ave. & 180th St. U D D D SR 502 & SR 522 WB Ramps S D D D SR 502 & SR 522 EB Ramps S D D D I U = Unsignalized; S = Signalized for unsignalized intersecions, the LOS shown is for the worst movement (i.e., northbound left 2 northbound through, etc.) With Mitigation 3 Not applicable. Entrances not determined under this alternative Source: Entranco Engineers, 1990; HNTB, 1990. 4-7 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 'I I I (the northbound off-ramp), would experience similarly high volumes. A level of service analysis was performed for the freeway-ramp junction point at each of the four ramps. The analysis evaluates the level of service at the point where traffic must merge for on-ramps; for off-ramps, it evaluates the need for traffic to position itself in the right lane for exiting. The results of this analysis are shown for the Comprehensive Plan Amendment in amended Table 28 on page 4-7. In all cases the low level of service is a result both of very high mainline volumes, as well as high ramp volumes. The mainline volumes are well above the capacity of the existing 4-lane configuration." (3-127) Delete Figure 32. Replace with revised Figure 32 on page 4-9 of the Final EIS. (3-128) Delete Figure 33. Replace with revised Figure 33 on page 4-10 of the Final EIS. (3-129) Delete Table 32. Replace with revised Table 32 on page 4-11 of the Final EIS. (3-130) Add new paragraphs under section titled "NE 195th/ I-405 Ramp Intersections" as follows: "Each of the alternatives, including the No-Rezone Alternative, results in particularly high traffic volumes for the southbound on-ramp. The demand for this movement well exceeds the capacity of a single- lane ramp. During the AM peak, the reverse direction (the northbound off-ramp), would experience similarly high volumes. A level of service analysis was performed for the freeway-ramp junction point at each of the four ramps. The analysis evaluates the level of service at the point where traffic must merge for on-ramps; for off-ramps, it evaluates the need for traffic to position itself in the right lane for exiting. The results of this analysis are shown for the Rezone Alternatives in revised Table 32 on page 4-11. In all cases the low level of service is a result both of very high mainline volumes, as well as high ramp volumes. The mainline volumes are well above the capacity of the existing 4-lane configuration." (3-138) Delete Figure 34. Replace with revised Figure 34 on page 4-12 of the Final EIS. 4 - 8 I. I . I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Table 32 P.M. PEAK HOUR LEVEL OF SERVICE (LOS) SUMMARY REZONE AL1ERNATIVES 1994w/o 1996 with 1996w/o 39th Avenue 39th Avenue 39th Avenue Type of Business No Business No Business In tersection Control1 Park Rewne Park Rewne Park 228th St. & 27th Ave. U E E E E E 228th St. & 31st Ave. U C C D D D 228th St. & 3Sth Ave. U D C C C D 228th St. & 39th Ave. U D D E E D S2 B B 240th St. & 39th Ave. U A A A B B Site Entrance & 39th Ave. U B N/A3 C N/A3 C 240th St. & 3Sth Ave. U A A A A A 19Sth St/N. Creek Pkwy. S F D F F F 19Sth St/I-40S SB Ramp4 S F F F F F 19Sth Sl/I-40S NB Ramp4 S F F F F F NB Off-RampS U D D D D D NB On-RampS U E E E E E SB Off-RampS U F F F F F SB On-RampS U F F F F F 1 U = Unsignalized, S = Signalized For unsignalized intersections, the LOS shown is for the worst movement (i.e., northbound left, 2 northbound through, ete.) With mitigation 3 Not Applicable. Entrances not determined under lhis alternative. 4 Values shown are for signalized intersections where ramps meet 19Sth Street. S Values shown are for ramp junctions, where ramp volumes merge or diverge with mainline I-40S traffie. Source: Entranco Engineers, 1990. 4 - 11 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I (3-139) Delete Figure 35. Replace with revised Figure 35 on page 4-13 of the Final EIS. 11. (3-108) Add the following new paragraphs at the end of the last paragraph as follows: o Koll North Creek Koll Business Center - Bothell: Final EIS- Wilsey & Ham, Inc., June 1981. This study analyzed the environmental impacts of the now partially completed business park at the northeast corner of 1-405 and NE 195th street interchange. Alternative improvements were proposed for the NE 195th street corridor, 120th Avenue NE, and for the I-405/NE 195th street interchange. Final improvements for this corridor were incorporated into the city of Bothell/Koll Center - North Creek Quadrant Corporate Park agreement. o Quadrant corporate Park Bothell Ouadrant Corporate Park Bothell: Final EIS - Shapiro and Associates, Inc. - April 1982. This study analyzed the environmental impacts of the now partially completed business park at the southeast corner of 1-405 and NE 195th Street interchange. Alternative improvements were proposed for the NE 195th street corridor, the 1- 405/NE 195th Street interchange, 120th Avenue NE, and the extension of NE 180th Street to 130th Avenue NE. Final improvements for these corridors were incorporated into the City of Bothell/Koll Center - North Creek Quadrant Corporate Park agreement. o North Creek Area-wide Study North Creek Vallev Traffic Proiections - TDA, Inc., Entranco Engineers, Inc., June 1989. This study was prepared for The Koll Company and The Quadrant Corporation. The study analyzes vehicle trips generated by the partially developed business parks north and south of NE 195th street. Data is based on surveys and traffic counts showing actual trips generated rather than rates derived from the ITE Trip Generation Manual. The analysis identifies each development's proportionate share of total traffic on key street segments where improvements have been required or anticipated as a condition of development for the respective business parks. 4 - 13 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 12. (3-143) Revise subsection B.3 as follows: "3. No change Alternative The locations requiring traffic mitigation under the No-Change Alternative would be identical to those required for the High Urban Alternative. The trip distribution percentages are the same as are the levels of Service." 13. (C-16) Delete the first and second paragraphs and replace with the following: "In the Upland Plateau areas, "basic development" for industrial uses allows 25 percent site utilization as noted in the Development Areas Model discussion on page C-14. "Greater than basic development" allows up to 100 percent site utilization when all of the six development criteria specified by the North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan are met. In this case, it would appear that five of the six criteria could be met and, therefore, that a development could utilize up to 87 percent of the Upland Plateau areas of the site. The soils outside the WSS area are well- drained, slope conditions do not exceed 15 percent on more than 25 percent of the site, both public sewer and water are available, no forest clearing is needed, and the BP designation would support industrial uses on the site. Transportation access is not a major arterial or major highway. Because the Upland Plateau covers the majority of the site, development would utilize only a small portion of the WSS area. Basic development on WSS areas allows up to 10 percent site utilization as noted in the Development Areas Model discussion on page C-14. "Greater than basic development" allows up to 55 percent site utilization when all five development criteria specified by the comprehensive plan are met. In this case, it is estimated that three of the five criteria could be met, and therefore, that develop- ment could utilize up to 37 percent of the WSS areas of the site. An approved site development plan will be utilized; development will occur outside the creek corridors and steep slope areas; and public utilities are available. However, transportation access is not on a major arterial or major highway and more than 50 percent of the soils in the WSS areas are poorly drained or organic. (C-17) Delete the second, third and fourth paragraphs and replace with the following: 4 - 15 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I "This alternative would comply with the development Areas Model of the North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan as discussed on pages C-13 through C-15. The allowable intensity of industrial development in both the Upland Plateau Areas and the Watershed site Sensitive Areas (WSS) is governed by basic site development criteria and greater than basic site development criteria for Commercial, Industrial, Community Facilities and Utility Installations. For development within Upland Plateau (UP) areas, the basic level of development is 25 percent site utilization; this level can be increased to 100 percent site utilization when all six applicable development criteria are met. For development within the WSS areas, basic development is 10 percent site utilization; this level can be increased up to 55 percent when all five development criteria are met. In both cases (WSS & UP), a determination as to what development level is allowed is based upon how many of the applicable criteria can be met. The allowable percentage of site utilization, therefore, occurs somewhere between the basic level and the maximum greater than basic level, and is increased proportionately above the basic level, dependent upon how many criteria are met. Therefore, if all criteria are met, maximum development (maximum site utilization as prescribed by the comprehensive plan) is allowed. If less than all criteria are met, a proportional decrease in allowable development level is computed as denoted in Table 37 on page 4-17. Upland Plateau (UP) areas cover approximately 58 acres (67 percent) of the project site. As noted above, greater than basic development allows up to 100 percent site utilization for industrial uses if all applicable criteria can be met. This alternative proposes development on approximately 79 percent of the UP area. The alternative meets five of the six greater than basic development criteria. Soils in the UP area are well drained. Slope conditions do not exceed 15 percent on more than 25 percent of the site. Public water currently serves the site and there is a public sewer stub just across the south property line. Both utilities either have enough capacity for the proposal or could be upgraded. Forest clearing is not needed on the site. The requested Business Park Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternative would support business park and industrial uses on the site. Major transportation access is not on a major arterial or major highway. since five of the six criteria are met for greater than basic industrial development in the UP area, an 4 - 16 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 87.5 percent site utilization is allowed in the UP area as shown in Table 1. The proposed use of the UP area is 79 percent (46 acres); and is therefore consistent with the development areas model in the comprehensive plan. Watershed/Site Sensitive (WSS) areas cover approximately 27 acres (32 percent) of the project site. As noted above, greater than basic development allows up to 55 percent site utilization for industrial uses if all applicable criteria are met. This alternative proposes development on approximately 22 percent of the WSS areas. The alternative meets three of the five greater than basic development criteria: an approved site development plan will be utilized, development will occur outside the creek corridors and steep slope areas, and public utilities are available; however, transportation access is not on a major arterial or major highway and more than 50 percent of the soils in the WSS area are poorly drained or organic. Since three of the five criteria are met for greater than basic industrial development in the WSS area, a 37 percent site utilization is allowed in the WSS area as shown in Table 37. The proposed use of the WSS area is 22 percent (6 acres); and is therefore consistent with the development areas model of the comprehensive plan. Table 37 ALLOWABLE INDUSTRIAL SITE UTILIZATION IN WSS AND UPLAND PLATEAU AREAS (PER NUMBER OF GREATER THAN BASIC CRITERIA MET) Criteria Met Percent site utilization Acres WSS (27 acres) None 1 of 5 2 of 5 3 of 5 4 of 5 5 of 5 (Basic) 10 19 28 37 46 55 2.7 5.1 7.6 10.0 12.4 14.9 (Maximum) 4 - 17 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Upland Plateau (58 acres) None 1 of 6 2 of 6 3 of 6 4 of 6 5 of 6 6 of 6 (Basic) 25 37.5 50 62.5 75 87.5 (Maximum) 100 14.5 21.8 29.0 36.3 43.5 50.1 58.0 Based upon Table 37 above, the allowable site utilitzation for the project site can be summarized as follows: wss UP % Acres % Acres Maximum allowable site utilization for proposal 37 10 87.5 51 Proposed site utilization 22 6 79.0 46" 14. (C-18) Delete the first full paragraph and replace with the following: "NO REZONE - The Development Areas Model does not apply to the No Rezone Alternative because the existing Rural Conservation zone does not allow an increase in density above the density allowed under Basic Development." 15. (C-20) Delete the third paragraph and replace with the following: "NO CHANGE - This alternative would also contribute to the need for additional transportation facilities." 16. (C-22) Amend the fourth paragraph, second sentence as follows: "Catch basins in the parking lots would cleanse the runoff by use of oil/water separators and/or grease traps. Runoff would then flow through grasslined swa1es (minimum 200 feet) before being released into North Creek." 17. (C-25) Amend the third paragraph, fifth sentence as follows: "A 30-foot landscaping buffer would be located along 240th street NE, 39th Avenue NE and 1-405." 4 - 18 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 18. (C-33) Add a new subsection following paragraph 7 as follows: "River Svstems The Snohomish County Shoreline Management Master Program River System Policy 3B sets forth an urban designation for North Creek to preclude unnecessary conflict between the county's other land use plans and the Master Program. This policy recognizes the natural functioning of North Creek by maintaining a 100-foot setback for commercial or industrial uses, and a 50-foot setback for residential uses." (C-35) Add a new paragraph following the second paragraph as follows: "For the River Systems section, the proposed rezone site plan would maintain a minimum setback of 100 feet along North Creek and therefore be consistent with this part of the Master Program." 19. (C-44) Amend third paragraph, next to last sentence as follows: "Under the proposed BP designation, 48,730 vehicle trips per day would be generated through the SR- 527/228th Street intersection while 48,640 vehicle trips per day at full development (2000) would be generated under the current plan designations." 20. (3-119) Amend second and third paragraphs as follows: "Snohomish County's Six-Year TIP has programmed the widening of 228th Street to three lanes between the 1-405 overpass and 39th Street in 1995. The 228th Street Design Report (Skilling Ward Rogers Barkshire Inc., 1987) provides for a dedicated left and right- turn lane on each side street along 228th as well as a center lane for vehicles turning left off the side streets onto 228th Street. The 27th Avenue intersection would operate at LOS Ei the 31st Avenue and 35th Avenue intersections would operate at LOS D. The 27th Avenue intersection " 21. (3-131) Amend second and third paragraphs as follows: "Snohomish County's Six-Year TIP has programmed the widening of 228th Street to three lanes between the 1-405 overpass and 39th Street in 1995. The 228th Street Design Report (Skilling Ward Rogers Barkshire Inc., 1987) provides for a dedicated left and right- turn lane on each side street along 228th as well as 4 - 19 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I a center lane for vehicles turning left off the side streets onto 228th street. The 27th Avenue intersection would operate at LOS Ej the 31st Avenue and 35th Avenue intersections would operate at LOS D. The 27th Avenue intersection ..." 22. (3-133) Amend subsection B.1.f, second and third paragraphs as follows: "Snohomish County's Six-Year TIP has programmed the widening of 228th Street to three lanes between the 1-405 overpass and 39th Street in 1995. The 228th Street Design Report (Skilling Ward Rogers Barkshire Inc., 1987) provides for a dedicated left and right- turn lane on each side street along 228th as well as a center lane for vehicles turning left off the side streets onto 228th Street. The 27th Avenue intersection would operate at LOS Ej the 31st Avenue and 35th Avenue intersections would operate at LOS D. The 27th Avenue intersection ..." 23. (3-136) Delete the third line of the paragraph listing the 1996 levels of service (without the 39th Avenue extension) and replace with a new line as follows: "228th Street SE and 35th Avenue SE D" 24. (3-143) Revise subsection C.2.a, last paragraph by deleting the third sentence and revising the second sentence as follows: "An all-way stop at this intersection would cause increased overall delay at this time." 25. (3-145) Delete the third line of the paragraph listing the 1996 levels of service (without the 39th Avenue extension) and replace with a new line as follows: "228th Street SE and 35th Avenue SE D" 4 - 20 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I COMMENT LE'lTbRS AND RESPONSES I I I I I I I I I I I " I " I I I I I I CHAPTER 5 COMMENT LETTERS AND RESPONSES This chapter contains copies of the comment letters on the DEIS. Following each letter are the responses to comments made in that letter. Responses are keyed in the right margins of the letters. A total of 12 letters was received. The letters are numbered and responded to in the following order: 1. Federal Emergency Management Agency Washington State Department of Ecology Washington State Department of Fisheries Washington State Department of Transportation Everett School District No. 2 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Northshore School District 7. city of Bothell 8. Mr. Donald E. Marcy for Cairncross, Ragen & Hempelmann 9. Ms. Debbie Abrahamsen 10. Ms. Elaine Crawford 11. Department of the Army - Corps of Engineers 12. Snohomish County PUD 5 - 1 I I I , I I I t I I I I I I I I I I I Letter No.1 Federal Emergency !vfanagement Agency Region X Federal Regional Center BotheU, Washington 98021-9796 th'. Gary Reiersgard Snohomish County Planning Department 5th Floor. County Administration Bldg. Everett. Washington 98021 RECEIVED :-~.~~ -.. :;~.~, Dear Ml'. Reieregard: AUG 21 t~n/ ,.C..t:7 ....-/ ...., co. PLANNING IJIVJSION The purpose of this letter is to comment on the Draft EIS entitled "I-405/CoW1ty line North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan Amendment and Quadrant 11ont", Villa ~nter Rezone." At:; 1'10 sure you are aware. a detailed flood Insurance Study for North Creek in Snohomish CoW1ty has never been completed by our Agency. However. it appears from t.he DEIS that the C)I.lIlty is requiring detailed study for develo~nts such &$ the one completed for this project. Within the next two months. . we 1 anticipate initiatir,g a reanalysis of North Creek. Because of fW1dir,g restrictions, we anticipate limitir,g our restudy from the San.namish Slough to the SnohomishjKing County line. We n,quest a copy of the hydraulic model and work map for the hydraulic analysis perfonned for the DEIS so that we may include the results in our update. Also. if there are other develo..'IlleIlts along North Creek for which similar ir,formation is available, we would be interested ir, obtaining that data. Next fiscal year, we again will be looking for projects. Swamp Creek in SnoholDish County is curI""-Iltly underway and North Creek appears to be another likely candidate. Detailed information when given to FEMA such as that completed for the Draft EIS constitutes cost sharing and may be COW1ted toward the Community Rating System score for Snohomish County. In the same light. any 2 additional data such as surveys. mapping, hydrologic or hydraulic tasks performed by the County that is not part of a study may also be counted toward their score. Please contact me at (206) 487-4703 with any information that we may use irl the up:xJUJir-.g study or future studies. Sincerely J j~o..v (~~ . Lawrence P. Basich Matural and Technological Hazards Division =: Jerry Louthain, Department of Ecology, Washington I I I I I I I I ,I I I I I t I I , I I 1. 2. RESPONSE TO LETTER #1 FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY Comment acknowledged. Comment acknowledged. The proponent would be willing to share the modeling and other analytical work prepared for this project with FEMA. In addition, any other flood study data prepared in conjunction with future projects within the Swamp Creek and North Creek basins will be transmitted to FEMA. 5 - 3 I: I I I la , I , I I I Ii I I I I I I I I Letter No.2 STATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY M.il Stop PV-l1 . Olympi., W.shington 98504-8711 . (206) 459-&JOO August 24, 1990 RECEIVED Mr. Greg Williams, Director Snohomish County Planning Department County Administration Building Everett, WA 98201 AUG 29 1990 Cu, I'LANi\INli UI'I~iUN Dear Mr. Williams: Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the draft envi- ronmental impact statement for the "I-405jCounty Line North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan Amendment and Quadrant Monte Villa Center Rezone". We reviewed the DEIS and have the fol- lowing comments. Comments on Table 1: Impervious Surfaces - Table 1 indicates there will be 950,000 square feet of proposed impervious surfaces from the building foot prints. It should also include roads, sidewalks, 3,325 parking stalls, paved storage areas, truck loading and stag- ing areas, and six acres of impervious services proposed in the Watershed-site Sensitive (WSS) area. (As noted on page 1-6, up to 60% or 51 acres could be covered with impervious surfaces. ) Air Quality - No mention is made of emissions from businesses and industries. Known emissions from the kinds of business and industry expected in the proposed development should be listed and given consideration in the FEIS. This will allow for a more realistic appraisal of the proposal's potential impacts. Water Quality - As with air impacts, potential discharges to surface and ground water depend on what kinds of activities are expected to occur on the site. Some so-called "clean in- dustries" require dangerous substances be stored, used, and or generated on-site. Above and below ground tanks, bins, and pressure vessels are common. Paints, solvents, acids, alkalis, compressed gasses, fuels, sand, and solid and liquid waste should be expected. This should be addressed in the FEIS. Plants and Animals - Application of the WSS overlay area, in and of itself, will not mitigate anything. In fact, its ap- plication will not prevent the grading and paving of six acres of the 27 acre overlay area. Exactly what the WSS overlay can and cannot do should be clearly stated in the FEIS. <€"_3 1 2 3 J4 - ".J I I I I I I II I I I I , I I I I I I a I Letter to Mr. Williams August 24, 1990 Page 2 Noise - No discussion of industrial process generated noise ] 5 is included, and no mention is made of state and local noise standards. The state noise regulations are contained Chapter 70.107 RCW and Chapter 173-60 WAC. Land Use - We believe industrializing this environmentally sensitive rural site will set an unintended example. Expec- tations may be raised in all southwest Snohomish County for similar land use decisions. Rural areas in general and sen- sitive areas in particular will be at increased risk. The 6 discussion on the development's aesthetic compatibility with similar adjacent developments should be balanced with a dis- cussion on its incompatibility with the existing land use and adjacent rural and suburban areas. As noted above, the proposed mitigation of retaining 27 acres as Watershed-site Sensitive is misleading (page 6). Also misleading is the statement: "Development, except for less than one acre of fill, would not be located in the wetlands 7 of other sensitive areas" (page 1-19). six of those 27 acres will be developed with impermeable surfaces, leaving 21 acres of the original 70 acres designated WSS (page 1-6 paragraph 2) . Comments on the text Page 1-1 - The DEIS states that approximately 70 acres of the ] site are currently designated Watershed-Site Sensitive. This 8 conflicts with statements on page 2-6 that indicate 61 acres are designated WSS. This should be corrected in the FEIS. Page 2-14 - One of the benefits of not developing the site is its use as open space. Demand for open space has increased to the point where it is being purchased with tax revenues, and tax incentives are use to induce owners of open space to keep it that way. The DEIS notes this site "is the last, large undeveloped parcel in a growing commercial/industrial area." Allowing it to remain in low intensity rural, but nevertheless productive, use will: 9 a. provide more open space where it's needed, b. prevent water quality degradation associated with industrial development and increased impervious surfaces, c. provide greater protection for sensitive areas and wildlife habitat, 1_ u ---- - I . I J I I I - I I I I I I , I I I I I I I Letter to Mr. Williams August 24, 1990 Page 3 d. not increase traffic congestion, air pollution, or demands on utilities and infrastructure, and e. not increase the demand for more taxpayer financed infrastructure As noted on page 3-38, the proposal would cause "significant unavoidable adverse impacts" to North Creek and wetlands. Considering the North Creek Basin is already stressed by de- velopment impacts, retaining this last large open space seems advisable. Shoreline Manaqement Act issues The proposed project must be consistent with all applicable policies and other provisions of the Shoreline Management Act, its rules, and the local shoreline master program. This includes, but is not limited to, those master program provisions pertaining to River System Policy 3.b for North Creek, commercial development, landfill, roads, shoreline stabilization and flood protection, utilities, and the Urban shoreline designation. Particular attention should be paid to Commercial Development Policy 1 and General Regulation 1, pertaining to the water dependent aspects of the proposal. The total proposal must be included in the required shoreline permit application. The project site plan included in the shoreline permit application must meet the requirements of WAC 173-14-110. The County should consider whether the precedent-setting im- pacts of the proposal and the cumulative impacts of other similar actions will be significant. If you have any questions,please call Mr. Don Bales of the Shorelands Program at (206) 459-6762. Sincerely, _ 0;: ". "'~-7,. -. --:-..- /- I' . --:_.l ;.,':.-l$ Cl.'l~L~ i-f. f...L(s~"_L_'::' Barbara J. 'Ritchie Environmental Review section BJR: 4335 cc: Don Bales, Shore lands Linda Rankin, Shorelands J9 }o 11 ] ]13 I I I I t I I I 'j I I I I I I I I - I 3. 4. 5. RESPONSE TO LETTER #2 WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY 1. Table 1 on page 1-9 of the DEIS cites 950,000 gsf as the total floor area of proposed development under the Comprehensive Plan, not impervious surfaces. Impervious surface figures include roads, parking areas and all other hard surfaces (see Draft EIS Table 2, p. 2-9); the impervious surfaces would total 51.8 acres, or 60 percent of the site area. 2. Typical businesses and industries in Quadrant Business Park are cookie bakeries, software production, newspaper printers, offices, book distributors, etc. Any discharges must meet puget Sound Air Pollution Control Authority standards. However, no adverse air emissions from these types of users have been identified. No development within 100 feet of the creek would be allowed. Use, storage and disposal of hazardous chemicals, paints and solvents would be required to conform to the proper environmental procedures specified in applicable Federal, State and local regulations. The North Creek Comprehensive Plan helps protect wetlands, stream corridors, floodplains, steep slopes, and areas of organic soils by designating those elements as Watershed- site Sensitive (WSS) areas. Thus, not all WSS-designated areas are wetlands. An examination of page C-14 of the DEIS Appendices explains that the WSS overlay does not prohibit development and does not require all WSS areas to be retained. Instead, the WSS designation contains criteria that limit the intensity of development and seek to provide for development compatible with sensitive natural features. Within the WSS, the Plan envisions two levels of develop- ment: "basic" and "greater than basic". Basic development is where site conditions would generally limit the intensity of uses which might ordinarily be placed on a particular piece of land in a particular area. Greater than basic development permits more intensive uses where it can be shown that a specific site is capable of supporting them by satisfying a specific set of criteria. Commercial and industrial development may be located in a WSS area, but only 10 percent of the site can be utilized under the basic development criteria or, up to 55 percent if criteria for greater than basic development are met. See Chapter 4, Errata #13 for further analysis of the development areas model. As stated on pages 3-54 to 3-58 of the DEIS, State and local environmental noise limits approximate the Federal criteria discussed in the DEIS. The Snohomish County Noise Ordinance 5 - 7 I I I I I I I II II I I I I I I I I I I designations and limits are examined on page 3-55. The DEIS states on page 3-63 that the site plan for the proposed business park would ensure that no significant noise sources are located on portions of the site close to residential uses, and that adequate buffers would be provided for any noise-sensitive locations on- or off-site. 6. The parcel is adjacent to a major regional freeway, served by urban utilities, surrounded by industrial parks and suburban residential neighborhoods and is relatively small for an agricultural parcel. For these ~easons, the County recognized the diminishing viability and marginal quality of the subject site as farmland and did not include the site in the County-wide agricultural preservation plan. In light of these considerations, the County has studied this site for its potential for urban development. The City of Bothell's plan for this area is consistent, in that it promotes business park development. Development of this largely undeveloped, level site in an urbanizing area that possesses an urban level of public services, could probably lessen rather than stimulate demand for similar developments elsewhere within rural and suburban areas of Snohomish County. Aesthetic compatibility with other uses is described on DEIS pages 3-72, 3-76 and C-24. These references state the ways in which development of the proposed business park will be made compatible with adjoining residential, retail, commercial or other less intensive land uses. Rezones are reviewed under specific Comprehensive Plan and zoning criteria (BP standards) to determine their ability to be compatible with and blend with the surrounding area. The BP zone performance standards require that buildings be compatible with their surroundings, and that exterior building materials be in harmony with the surrounding natural and man-made environment. All new utilities must be located underground. All areas zoned BP must be designed to include sufficient landscaped or natural open space areas to create a park-like setting. Open spaces cannot include areas devoted to buildings, parking, or vehicular access. A landscaping strip, consisting of a mix of evergreen and deciduous trees, shrubs, and groundcovers, with a minimum width of 30 feet, must be provided as a visual buffer between rights-of-way or private access roads and building or parking areas. All outdoor lighting must conform to the unified architectural lighting scheme for the BP development and must not shine on adjacent properties. No on-street parking is permitted within a BP zone. Maximum lot coverage for all structures cannot exceed 35 percent, and the maximum allowable building height is 50 feet. 5 - 8 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 7. As stated in the DEIS Appendices on page C-13, the North Creek Comprehensive Plan makes provisions for two types of environments: Watershed-site Sensitive and Upland Plateau. Watershed-site Sensitive (WSS) areas have been distinguished because these lands have drainage characteristics which carry surface and subsurface water originating in Upland Plateaus and lowland portions of WSS areas and drain directly into streams or creeks. These WSS areas may contain wetlands but are not necessarily all wetlands themselves. Refer to response to Comment #4 for additional discussion of the WSS classification. The North Creek Comprehensive Plan provides the opportunity to refine WSS boundaries based upon site-specific studies. Site-specific studies for this DEIS have mapped the floodplain, wetlands, organic soils, steep slopes, and stream corridor. This information is reflected in the proposed WSS area of approximately 27 acres shown in DEIS Figure 4, page 2-4. 8. See Chapter 4, Errata #3. The description of the WSS areas in the No-Change Alternative on DEIS p. 2-6 omits the area of steep slopes located immediately east of Interstate 405 from the total; the total stated on DEIS p. 1-1 is correct. ~ 9. The site is located in an urbanizing area with existing and planned utilities designed for an urban level of service. Allowing development in this location could minimize development pressures on adjacent rural areas. The Preferred Rezone site Plan provides for open space, protection of the creek, and enhancement of the wetlands as compensation for the proposed wetland loss. Water quality in the Creek would be protected through several stages of runoff cleansing, including biofiltration. The policy of local government, as reflected in numerous plans, resolutions, and regulations, is to locate growth in areas where utility and traffic infrastructure already exists and additional improvements are planned. 10. Under the heading "Significant Unavoidable Adverse Impacts", the statement on DEIS p. 3-38 is that the proposal could cause impacts to North Creek and the wetlands. Listed on pp. 3-36 to 3-37 are precautions required during construction and features to be designed into the development which will lessen the likelihood and degree of impact on these areas. 11. Comment acknowledged; the Draft EIS evaluated all the specific pOlicies with the exception of the River System Policy 3.b. See Chapter 4, Errata #18 for additional discussion of this shoreline policy. 12. Only a portion of the drainage swales, stormwater outfalls and the bridge would be located within the required 100-foot 5 - 9 I I II I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I shoreline setback. Appropriate applications for these improvements will be made as each individual construction project is undertaken. Each application will be complete and will meet submittal requirements of Snohomish County and WAC 173-14-110. 13. Comment acknowledged. Precedent for the proposed Comprehen- sive Plan amendment and rezone have been set. The County's Shoreline Master Program (SMMP) recognizes the area up to 240th Street SE as appropriate for uses permitted in the urban environment of the SMMP including commercial and industrial. Further, the SMMP emphasizes directing new urban development into already developed, but under-utilized areas. In the consideration of other proposals, the County has stated that this site may be appropriate for urban development. Direct and indirect impacts, as well as cumulative impacts from other developments, were identified and evaluated in the DEIS, appropriate mitigation which lessens the identified impacts was developed and has been set forth in the DEIS. 5 - 10 IJO~Ef'H R 8lC,'.1 Director ....-:-=:-.-:....... (~J~~~,,;~ '";;";,iP'j '~ Letter No.3 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I . I I STATE OF \V-\SH'\:CTO!' ~ DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES 115 Genera! Administration Bi.1ilding _ O/rmpia. \Vashingcon 9850-1 . (!06) 75J-tl6t\) . (SC4.I'..) :!]';-660i August 29, 1990 RECEIVED Snohomish County Planning Department ATTENTION: Greg Williams County Administration Building Everett, Washington 98201 SEP 7 1990 cu. i'LANMNU UlvlSION SUBJECT: I-405 / County Line Comprehensive Plan Amendment and Quadrant Monte Villa Center Rezone. Section 32, Township 27 North, Range 5 East. WDF File No. 11913. North Creek, WRIA 08.0070 Dear Mr. Williams: North Creek is a valuable salmon producing stream, but its productivity is declining due to rapid conversion of its watershed from a rural to a more urban character. Adverse impacts to North Creek resulting from this conversion include, but are not limited to, increased flood flows caused by storm water, a loss of summer flows due to increased impervious surfaces and a loss of wetlands, a loss of riparian habitat, and a loss of instream cover. Each of these reduces instream habitat, and when added together, the loss of fish life is significant. The alternatives addressed in the DEIS for 86 acres which are bisected by North Creek and contain considerable wetlands will only exacerbate these already substantial impacts to North Creek and its fisheries resource. - 1 - - The creation of a business park will directly impact the stream, while its 2,500 employees will add considerably to the suburban sprawl engulfing the south county region. This in turn will result in even more adverse impacts on what little remaining functioning habitat there is in the region. Business parks and housing developments have already consumed almost all of the North Creek valley, leaving not much more than these 86 acres in a rural state. A more environmentally sound land use would be to preserve this 86 acre site as an open space area, with special consideration given to the stream, fish, wetlands, and wildlife of the area. Along with fish and wildlife, the residents of the south county would also benefit from open spaces, but not from the congestion that will occur if this business park is constructed. 2 - Development of the site will have adverse impacts on the 1 fisheries resource. If development is allowed, those impacts 3 must be reduced as much as possible. oo-;~.:.;.., 3 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Snohomish County August 29, 1990 page 2 The creation of impervious surfaces will increase storm water runoff and reduce summer flows. The affect of this on fish life in North Creek was not adequately discussed in the DEIS, but both of these are already at a critical point beyond which the streams' ability to sustain fish life may be lost. The alterations of flows may also impact the wetlands. To reduce these impacts, we request the following: 1. Reduce the amount of impervious surface. This could include reducing roadways, buildings, and parking areas. The buildings and parking areas could be multi- level to create more space. Required parking could be reduced and mass transportation provided. Or, parking areas could be pervious. 2. Non-polluted water (roof water) should be infiltrated into the ground. 3. If the summer flows are reduced because of a loss of ground water, supplemental supplies should be provided to the wetland and stream. The stream needs to be protected with 100 foot Native Growth Protection Areas (NGPA) extending from the top of each bank. Buildings need to be set back at least 15 feet from the NGPA. There should be no intrusions into this corridor. This includes trails or stream crossings. Stream crossings always result in both short term and long term habitat loss. Therefore, we allow stream crossings only when other alternatives are unavailable. Access to the site is available from several different roads and directions, so a stream crossing is not necessary and we will not be permitting one. Storm water needs to be properly bio-filtered prior to release to any stream or wetland. The release of storm water that changes the flow of the stream or the construction of an outfall requires a Hydraulic Project Approval. Protection of wetlands is critical. Intrusion into the wetlands should be avoided if at all possible. Lost wetlands must be replaced with wetlands of a similar or superior function and habitat value at a rate of 2:1. All wetlands should be protected with a 100 foot NGPA. 3 ]4 ] 5 ] 6 7 ] 8 ] 9 I I :. 'I I I I I I 'I I I I I I I I I I I, Snohomish County August 29, 1990 page 3 Habitat degradation will occur under any of the actions in the DEIS, so additional habitat mitigation and restoration will need to be identified and performed. This may include, but not be limited to, enhancement of instream habitat, of the riparian zone, and of the existing wetlands. Sincerely, ~c: Richard E. J nson Regional Habitat Manager II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. RESPONSE TO LETTER #3 WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES L Comment acknowledged. Summer flows in North Creek are lower, and storm flows in the basin are increasing due to urbanization. The DEIS states (p. 3-48) that sufficient surface runoff will be directed to the on-site wetlands to retain them in their existing configuration. This runoff will infiltrate the wetlands and recharge the aquifer which feeds the creek (downstream of the site) during periods of low rainfall. The proposed design's allowances for infiltration of stormwater runoff would minimize the proposed business park'S adverse impacts on flows in North Creek. Comment acknowledged. Refer to responses to Comments #6 and 19, Letter No.2, Department of Ecology. The calculations and analysis for this document were based on a site with almost 35 acres (40 percent) of pervious surface, of which about a third has been dedicated to water quality treatment swales and landscaping. This will provide extensive areas for storm water to infiltrate while being biofiltrated in conveyance, reducing the chance of polluting the stream or aquifer. As stated on DEIS pages 3-32 and 3- 33, use of portions of the pervious areas (40 percent of the site) for stormwater treatment and conveyance, would eliminate the necessity for more pervious area allocation for stormwater purposes. Pre-development runoff rates will be maintained so recharge of surface wetlands and groundwater tables will occur; infiltration of all roof water is not necessary to maintain existing overland flows. While total pervious area would be reduced by the development proposals, the absorption of storm waters into the groundwater system will remain about the same, especially during dry summer periods when the water table drops (DEIS p. 3-22), by providing areas for stormwater concentration and possible infiltration in grasslined swales. The flow during dry times will also be more consistent due to landscape irrigation overflow and by concentration of storm waters which should enhance infiltration and conveyance to the wetland areas. A 100-foot NGPA is consistent with the setback from North Creek required under the Snohomish County Shoreline Management Master Program. The only proposed intrusion within this setback would be the bridge, portions of roadway leading to it, and water quality facilities as shown on the preferred rezone site plan (DEIS Figure 5). The Preferred site Plan also respects a greater than l5-foot setback from 5 - 14 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I the shoreline setback for all buildings. The only features proposed to be located within the 15-foot setback from the shoreline setback would be the trail, sewer line, and portions of the features also located within 100 feet of the Creek. Landscaping and parking lots may be located within 15 feet of the 100-foot shoreline setback. The Preferred site Plan is consistent with the County's Shoreline Management Master Program and Aquatic Resources Program, as well as City of Bothell shoreline regulations which apply to the stream corridor south of the site. 7. While alternate access seems possible, other age~cies and neighboring residential areas have expressed ser10US reservations concerning multiple site entry/exit points. Also, in order to handle increased traffic volumes, the existing crossing at 240th street SE would need to be widened. It is very unlikely that such alternative access would be approved due to these concerns. It is possible to design the proposed bridge elements to minimize both long and short-term impacts of stream crossing. The bridge will shade the stream and habitat enhancement will be provided as required by reviewing agencies. The proposed bridge would be constructed in consultation with all interested agencies to assure minimal impacts on the creek and the surrounding habitat. The proponent is exploring bridge design options that would further minimize impacts on stream corridor continuity. County-wide efforts are underway to explore additional means to further improve and protect water quality in North Creek. Refer to response to Comment #2, Letter No.7, City of Bothell for further information (FEIS p. 5-33. 8. As noted above, the proposed business park development would comply with State Department of Fisheries stormwater quality discharge guidelines, which includes swales for collection and discharge of storm water (pp. 3-32 and 3-33). Also, according to modeling of the stream, release of storm water to the stream as proposed would not affect either the velocity of the creek or its high water mark during design storms (DEIS p. 3-29). 9. The proposed business park development has been planned to include large areas for wetlands preservation and replacement at a 2:1 ratio. In addition, the retained and enhanced wetlands will be replenished by a stormwater system that will be constructed with water quality and treatment measures. Also, the site plan proposed buffer averaging which will approach 50 feet on average. The new Comprehensive Plan policies (see Chapter 6) will become new SEPA policies; hence, they will guide decision-making on the rezone as well as preliminary and final plan approval. 10. Comment acknowledged. 5 - 15 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Letter No.4 ..rlII\IlIl. V/~ Washington State Department of Transportation District 1 15325 S.E. 30th Place Bellevue. WashIngton 98007-6538 (206) 562-4000 Duane Berentson :;t;".;r..:::,_,~. '/ !~,":-"';~~'..:~ ;:' RECEIVED August 29, 1990 AUG 301990 co. t'LANNING ul\llS10N Mr. Greg Williams, Director Snohomish County Planning Department 4th Floor, County Administration Building Everett, WA 98201 1-405/County Line North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan Amendment and Quadrant Monte Villa Center Rezone DEIS Review Comments Dear Mr. Williams: The Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) has reviewed the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the proposed Quadrant Monte Villa Center Rezone and the concurrent 1-405/County Line North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan Amendment. Both actions involve the same 86-acre site, which is located between SR 405 and 39th Avenue SE and between 240th street SE and the King County line. The rezone request would change the current Rural Conservation and Residential 9600 zoning classification to a Business Park zoning classification. The preferred alternative for an amendment to the comprehensive plan would change the current Suburban and Watershed-site Sensitive designation to a Business Park designation with a Watershed-Site Sensitive overlay. The other two alternatives considered as an amendment to the comprehensive plan include a High Urban alternative and a No Change alternative. If the Business Park alternative is implemented, completion of the development would occur in four to seven years following the start of construction at the site. Our comments regarding the contents of this DEIS are as follows: 1. The DEIS identifies three alternatives for development of the site, but nowhere in this document is there any mention of the University of Washington I s proposal to utilize the same site as a branch campus location. In its June 1990 DEIS, the University of Washington indicated that the site is one of three potential locations for a branch campus in the Bothell/Woodinville area. This branch campus site, identified as Site N-3a in their DEIS, would include the entire 86-acre site - 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Mr. Greg Williams 1-405/County Line North Creek August 29, 1990 Page 2 plus an additional 42 acres immediately south of the King County line. At buildout, the branch campus would generate 9,200 daily trips and 1,900 PM peak hour trips. It appears that a conflict exists between potential uses for the site. Before an amendment to the comprehensive plan is approved, several issues need to be resolved. Who owns the parcel and what are their intentions for development of the land? If Quadrant owns or has an option to buy the parcel, will they only develop the site for commercial businesses or will space be leased for other purposes, such as educational facilities? Is a branch campus allowed as a conditional use in a business park zone? 2. In the Transportation Section of the DEIS (page 3-101), SR 405 is incorrectly described as an eight-lane controlled access facility. At this location, SR 405 is a 4-lane divided, access controlled highway with two northbound lanes and two southbound lanes. 3. Traffic counts from 1988 were manipulated in an unusual process to produce traffic volumes for existing and future year conditions. The volumes expected to be generated by the Koll and Quadrant North Creek Business Parks and the Victorian/Northshore Apartments were subtracted from the 1988 counts before a 2.5 percent growth rate was applied to obtain a particular year I s background traffic volume. The generated volumes were then added to the background traffic along with the traffic generated by the currently prcposed development. It seems that a more accurate method of determining the existing traffic volumes would have been simply to recount them in 1990. 4. Unsatisfactory or borderline level of service conditions are forecast for 2000 at the SR 405/SR 527 interchange, SR 405/NE 195th Street interchange, SR 522/SR 202 interchange and the SR 527/228th street SE intersection despite the assumption that major improvements, now in the planning stage, will be in place. Obviously, additional mitigation is needed to address those locations where LOS "F" is forecast to occur. J 1 2 ] 3 4 5 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Mr. Greg williams I-405/County Line North Creek August 29, 1990 Page 3 5. As mitigation for traffic impacts at the SR 405/NE 195th street interchange, the DEIS suggests that the appropriate government agencies initiate a design report study to determine the interchange and access improvements required to improve the LOS to an acceptable level. The developer would then contribute his fair share toward constructing the necessary improvements. Title 26B SCC requires a developer to mitigate the adverse traffic impacts created by his project. Citing a "regional problem" is not an excuse to forego a developer I s responsibility for implementing appropriate mitigation measures. Should the developer be unable or unwilling to provide the necessary mitigation measures, then the proposal should be denied by the County. 6. If a practical solution to the mitigation. of traffic impacts in this area is not forthcoming, we question the appropriateness of allowing parcels to be rezoned to a higher density. Thank you for the opportunity to comment on this DEIS. If you have any questions concerning these remarks, please contact Mr. David Oberg of my staff at 562-4106. sincerely, 98;:J~' JERRY B. SCHUTZ Developlment Planning Engineer DAO:em 14/dao-i405 6 ] 7 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 3. 4. 5. RESPONSE TO LETTER #4 WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION 1. This EIS covers reasonable alternatives to the proposed action, including those acceptable to the proponent. The University of Washington branch campus site-selection process commenced after the proponent's action was in process and the alternatives identified and agreed upon. An EIS has been prepared to support the University's site- selection process; the impacts of locating a branch campus on the Monte Villa site were evaluated in that EIS. The site was not selected for the branch campus. 2. The Quadrant Corporation has obtained an exclusive option to purchase the property from the property owners and intends to develop it as a business park. The property owners have been attempting to sell the property for several years. Ownership of the site has no bearing on the Comprehensive Plan Amendment or rezone. The University branch campus would be a permitted use in the BP zone. The text on p. 3-101, 2nd paragraph, which refers to 1-405 being an 8-lane facility is incorrect; see Chapter 4, Errata #7, where revised. Draft EIS Figure 24 correctly identifies the facility as being developed with four lanes. The intent of the process described was not to arrive at 1990 traffic volumes as implied by the comment. Rather, the intent was to develop a more accurate projection of future traffic. The portion of the existing trips generated by the adjacent Koll and Quadrant North Creek Business Parks were subtracted because these volumes should not be factored by the assumed growth rate to develop future year volumes as this would significantly over-estimate the projected background traffic. The trips generated by these specific developments are not going to increase at a rate of 2.5 percent a year; they are a fixed-trip volume based on the trip generation rates. However, the background traffic which cannot be associated with specific developments were factored by the 2.5 percent annual rate to reflect the background growth. The procedure gained a more accurate estimate of future volumes. a. The North Creek Comprehensive Plan Amendment - Canyon Park Area (HNTB, 1989) identified improvements that could increase the LOS at the SR 527/1-405 NB ramp intersection to C. This LOS calculation includes trips generated by the proposed Business Park Alternative. b. Refer to response to Comment #6, below. 5 - 19 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 7. c. The SR 522/SR 202 interchange will operate at LOS D for both the Business Park and No-Change Alternatives. The 4 percent of site traffic which uses these intersec- tions does not significantly impact the level of service. d. The SR 527/228th Street intersection has been addressed by the 1986 amendment to the Alderwood Area Comprehensive Plan. This amendment provides for conditions to go to LOS D, which is met under the Business Park Alternative; also, the project would direct less than 10 percent of its traffic to this intersection. 6. Problems in this corridor already are the subject of an interagency study. It is not possible or appropriate for the rezone proponent to identify a solution for what is a regional problem requiring regional study. The DEIS has not suggested that because a regional problem exists, the proponent is not responsible for helping mitigate the problem. Because of the many agencies involved in the North Creek area, and because there is not a clear consensus as to what the solution should be, it would not be appropriate for a single project to develop the solution as part of the EIS process. The recently completed Snohomish County Interstate Freeway System Study (SCIFFS) presented a number of different improvements that should receive further study. These include a new interchange between 236th and 240th, complete re-design of the 195th Street interchange, ramp metering, additional general traffic lanes and HOV lanes on 1-405, and collector-distributor roads in the NE 195th Street area. WSDOT is well aware of the regional impacts of these types of improvements and the time and effort required to arrive at a solution agreeable to all agencies involved. It would be inappropriate for each new EIS to try to address this major design issue and arrive at their own solution. The design process needs to be a regional effort that arrives at a mutually agreeable solution. The costs should be shared on a proportionate basis and the proponent will be required to fund a portion of the improvements, based on impacts of and benefits to the project. Many of the studies cited on pages 3-107 and 3-108 of the DEIS identify possible mitigation for traffic problems in the North Creek area. There is not a consensus between the studies as to what improvements should be made along the 195th Street corridor and the 1-405/195th Street intersection. Please refer to response to Comment /6, above, for an appropriate approach to mitigating the major traffic issues in this area. As stated therein, the proponent is committed to its fair share of the mitigation process. In addition, the proponent is negotiating a 5 - 20 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I mitigation agreement with the city of Bothell which, among other elements, will address traffic mitigation for the 195th/I-405 interchange and the 195th street corridor. 5 - 21 I BOARD OF DIRECTORS I CHARLES e. BeTTS ....-... RO'f YATES VaPresldenl I SUE .... COOPER EARl. E. DUTTON SHIRLEY VANOERMEER I OR. PAUL s..nJNNESEN -- I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Letter No.5 EVERETT SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2 Educa tional Service Center BOX 2088 . 4t730 COLBY AVENUE. EVERETT. WASHINGTON 88203 . 12061339.4200 August 21, 1990 RECEIVED ! AUG 22 1JS'J ~!<; co. PLANNING 01V1SION Snohomish County Planning Dept. 5th Floor County Administration Building Everett, W A 98201 Re: Draft EIS, 1-405/County Line North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan Amendment and Quadrant Monte Villa Center Region Gentlemen: The Nonh Creek watershed and water quality issues are of interest to the Everett School District. Our district's Lively Environmental Center operates a salmon hatchery lhat annually releases a combined total of 50,000 coho into Little Nickel (Lively) and Penny Creeks. We have documented returns of adult coho to the hatchery stream and successful spawning activity. Our facility on Little Nickel Creek is visited annually by thousands of elementary students. We are interested in assuring the quality of the watershed for future generations. It is hoped that planners analyzing provisions of the Draft EIS carefully protect the stream and water quality characteristics vital to both downstream fry and upstream migrant adults. As noted in the EIS Draft pages 3-26 and 27, the water quality in Nonh Creek and in the small tributaries upstream is currently excellent Additional large scale development and paving activities increase concerns about parking lot contaminants (oil, anti-freeze, gasoline, diesel) and landscaping chemicals (herbicides, pesticides, fertilizers, etc.) entering the watershed. The environmental issues would be essentially the same whether the developments were residential or a business park. The water quality concerns are generally addressed in pages 3-47,48,49,50,51 and 52. Assurances and monitoring accountability should be built into the plan so that any activities resulting from the rezone do not adversely affect water quality or downstream spawning habitats of migrant and resident fish. The Washington Depanment of Fisheries and Department of Wildlife are agencies that review stream quality issues and any development plans. Sign-off approval of these agency representatives would be adequate assurance that our stream quality issues have been addressed. 1 2 Vd:; JP~ Dr. La~. Torgerson, EdD Supervisor of Science and Outdoor Education 339-4307 LOT:bks cc: Chuck Patton Paul Sjunnesen An Equ.1 Opportunity I Afflrm.tive Action Employer I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 2. RESPONSE TO LETTER #5 EVERETT SCHOOL DISTRICT 1. Comment acknowledged. See responses to Department of Fisheries letter regarding water quality. Development under the proposed rezone would provide water quality protections in the form of siltation ponds, silt fences, rock dams in temporary drainage courses, permanent grassy swales, and oil traps. These features would be outlined in temporary erosion and sediment control (TESCP) plans prepared for all construction in compliance with all applicable standards. In the long term, proper maintenance of the stormwater facilities would be ensured through a Declaration of Covenants, Conditions, Easements and Restrictions (CC&Rs) which will govern all use and future development of the property pursuant to the rezone. 5 - 23 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I RECEIVED AUG :101990 1/-- . . - Letter No.6 ~ Northshore School District Facilities Planning Department cu. PLANNING LlI vISION August 28, 1990 \SSIO 98th Ave. NE BochcD. W A 98011 (206) 48S-Q29\ Snohomish County Planning Department County Administration Building Everett, WA 98201 Attention: Greg Williams, Director Re: I-405/County Line North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan Amendment and Quadrant Monte Villa Center Rezone Gentlemen: I have reviewed the DEIS for the referenced proposal and I make the following comments. Since the school district provided the EIS author with information about our capital expansion program, we have experienced further growth and consequently have determined the need to expand our construction program to include additional elementary schools and another junior high school through 1996. Furthermore, the school district has found it necessary to purchase 54 new portable classrooms in the last five years, and we anticipate the need for several more through 1996. The necessity for more classroom space, coupled with limitations in state funding support for school construction, have resulted in an increasing financial hardship for the district and our taxpayers. Consequently, there is an urgent need to limit growth and to mitigate growth impacts. For that reason, the school district favors the proposed action and the preferred rezone, because they would result in the minimum impacts on schools. 1 Newly-passed state legislation and a pending county ordinance are expected to lead to impact mitigations needed by the school district. Meanwhile, we have been asking developers, under RCW 82.02.020, voluntarily to mitigate the impacts of their developments. Since some of the identified alternatives include residential housing units, if those alternates should be implemented, the school district requests this same mitigation from the future housing developer(s), subject to revision to comply with the 2 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Snohomish County Planning Department August 28, 1990 Page 2 anticipated Snohomish County development impact mitigation ordinance. J 2 At this time, the school district has established the mitigation for each single-family housing unit at $1,373; for multi-family housing units, $516. These figures are based on the costs of providing portables at the impacted schools and transporting students to those schools. and Thank you for providing us the opportunity to comment. HJS : j 0 \ro~ Herbert J. S~hwarz ~ \ I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 2. RESPONSE TO LETTER #6 NORTHSHORE SCHOOL DISTRICT 1. Comment acknowledged. Please note that the proposed actions provide for business park comprehensive plan and zoning designations and that the rezone sponsor is not proposing a residential development project. The single-family and multifamily alternatives in the EIS are for comparison and analysis purposes only. Comment acknowledged; refer to response to Comment #1, above. 5 - 26 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I -. ,- ". " ~~H">>, ... 3. '\ .I,. ~ ~\ ;.:...;7 g--. \r' .~L-L ----.;... ~. - IZJ 's":~/R ':f>-. ~r..J " ....' 0,.. w,..o; Letter No.7 CITY OF BOTHELL 18305 -lOIST. AVE. N.E. BOTHELL, WASHINGTON 98011 September 10, 1990 RECEIVED Mr. Greg Williams, Director Snohomish County Planning Department County Administration Building Everett, WA 98201 SEP 17 1990 co. l'!..A~:~l~.;ti 1..:1 \' i:;.~ON Dear Mr. Williams: SUBJECT: DRAFT EIS FOR 1-40S/COUNTY LINE NORTH CREEK AREA COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT AND QUADRANT MONTE VILLA CENTER REZONE On behalf of the city of Bothell, thank you for the opportunity to comment on the subject draft environmental impact statement. We appreciate your courtesy in granting an extension to the comment deadline. We have reviewed the DEIS for impacts to the City and 1 its planning area. This property is adjacent to the City in the North Creek Valley and is part of the City'S North Creek Valley Comprehensive Plan area. For your information, after several discussions of a technical nature with Quadrant and their consultants, the City of Bothell and Quadrant Corporation have committed to the completion of a Mitigation Agreement, mutually acceptable to both Quadrant and the City of Bothell, by the time of the publication of the FEIS for the Quadrant Monte Villa Center. As of this date, we have agreed upon a list of topics that will be included in the Agreement. Other topics may be added if deemed to be appropriate during the remainder of the negotiations. The list now includes: Open space Traffic/Transportation System Mitigation Parks and Recreation Historic Preservation Public Safety Utilities Storm Drainage Miscellaneous (daycare, recycling, fill, mitigation) Technical comments on the DEIS, in particular with regard to transportation and drainage, are attached with the hope that they will be of assistance to Snohomish County in preparing the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and which should be addressed school City Manager, City Clerk, Finance Depl- (206) 486-3256 . Utility Billing - (206) 486-6250 Community Development. Parks - (206) 486-8152 . Public Works, Building, Engineering - (206) 486-2768 FAJ<(206)487-1204 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I as Snohomish County completes its deliberations. We have also recently reviewed the University of Washington DEIS for the same site. The City requests that Snohomish County work with the City of Bothell to jointly plan the regional transportation facilities and to address the drainage issues that impact heavily both Snohomish County and the City of Bothell. with a 50 percent increase in stream flow in North Creek in recent years, it is becoming obvious that development upstream is having an impact on the amount of water as well as the quality of the water flowing in North Creek. Performance standards for development in the drainage basin are urgently needed to address these concerns. I was glad to note that the Quadrant Corporation and Snohomish County obviously had reviewed the city of Bothell comments on the previous DEC proposal in detail and have addressed most of those topics in this DEIS. I would like to compliment Snohomish County on the thoroughness and quality of the DEIS. Our staff found it very well organized, greatly detailed and easier to review than many of the others we see. Again, thank you for the opportunity to comment. If you have any questions regarding our comments, please feel free to telephone Ms. Barbara Grace of our Community Development Department at 486-8152 or Mr. Eddie Low of our Public Works Department at 486-2768. 2 3 a::~ Anne L. Pflug City Manager ALP/BJG/bjg Attachment cc: Gordon Ericksen, Bothell Community Development Department Warren Gray, Public Works Department George Sherwin, Quadrant Corp. John Wallace, city Attorney Joe Brawley, University of Washington Fire District #10 Commissioners Bothell Planning Commissioners Snohomish County Planning Commissioners Bothell city Council Snohomish county Councilmembers Mike Deller, Technology Corridor Robert Bernstein, 507 - 18th Ave E, Seattle, 98112 Snohomish County EDC H:EIS\QDMTVEIS.LTR I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I CITY OF BOTHELL COMMENTS ON 1-405/COUNTY LINE NORTH CREEK AREA COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT AND QUADRANT MONTE VILLA CENTER REZONE Of all potential environmental impacts from this project, water quality, wetland and drainage issues, and transportation appear to have the most severe and/or unavoidable impacts which must be thoroughly mitigated before development is allowed to proceed. Other sections such as air quality, noise, etc., which are not specifically responded to in the following paragraphs, have been reviewed and appear to be generally consistent with City of Bothell policies. TRANSPORTATION In general, the proposed business park will generate more trips than either residential uses or a University of Washington branch campus. Of major concern is the fact that primary access to the site is via 39th Avenue SE (120th Avenue NE). Proposed connections of 39th SE to 120th NE and 120th NE to NE 180th st. will create a major arterial serving the technology corridor. Joint resolution of the issues created in this instance will be very important. Specific comments are listed below: . Page 3-101, 2nd paragraph: wording is confusing where the second sentence reads "The eight-lane ...". 1-405 varies in width and south of its intersection with SR 527 is a four-lane roadway, two in each direction. Please clarify. . Page 3-141, 2nd paragraph under 2., 2nd sentence: "A survey performed in 1988 at the driveways of these developments showed a 13 percent reduction in the number of vehicle due to ridesharing ("North Creek Valley Traffic Projections", TDA, Inc./Entranco Engineers, Inc., June 1988). From what does the 13 percent represent a reduction? Please clarify. ] 4 5 . Furthermore, the traffic analysis correctly uses a conservative assumption that TSM will not reduce traffic generation estimates. However, in a discussion of TSM in the general mitigating measures section (III.A.2., page 3-141), the DEIS states that a series of TSM strategies could be used to reduce the p.m. peak hour demand by 10-20%. This is misleading, because most of this reduction is already inherent in the pm peak hour traffic volume estimates. The traffic volumes estimated by using the ITE Trip Generation Manual's vehicle-trip generation data and data collected locally have already incorporated a "baseline" amount of transit usage and ridesharing because both of these data sources are based on actual vehicle ingress/egress counts; obviously, trips being made on transit or as an auto passenger have already reduced the actual vehicle counts made as noted above. 6 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I . The specific sources of each of the traffic volumes reported in the DEIS should be documented. ] 7 . The DEIS should document the importance and impact of the 120th NEjNE 180th connection, and not just assume that the project will be completed. Even though this street connection is not expected to carry a large percentage of site access traffic, the lack of a connection would divert this site-access traffic onto other, more heavily congested streets and through existing neighborhoods. The DEIS discusses issues related to 1-405 in a very cursory manner. Even though 1-405 represents a regional transportation link and, as stated in the DEIS, problems with that roadway must be solved on a regional basis, the affects of and impacts on 1-405 should be quantified and discussed in detail in the FEIS. For example, 9 8 . No volumes are shown for 1-405 or its ramps at the 195th and SR-527 interchanges. Impacts of site-generated traffic on 1-405 and impacts of 1-405 congestion on site access traffic patterns are important enough to necessitate the presentation of 1-405 volume data in the DEIS. The DEIS mentions serious congestion on 1-405, but does not discuss the effects of this congestion on the distribution of trips in the vicinity of the site. JlO The DEIS does not discuss the impacts of the proposed 240th arterial connection from 27th across 1-405 to SR-527 and the proposed 1-405j240th (or 236th) interchange. Both projects are recommended by the Eastside Transportation Program and the Snohomish Interstate Freeway System study. The Snohomish Interstate Freeway System study recommends that a ramp metering system be installed on 1-405. The affect of ramp metering on site access traffic patterns should be discussed. 11 The Snohomish Interstate Freeway system Study also identifies serious congestion problems on 1-405 in the NE 195th st. - SR-522 vicinity, and recommends freeway improvements (including collector-distributor roadways). The impacts of the congestion and the recommended improvements on site access should be discussed. . Also, the Snohomish County Interstate Freeway System Study (PSCOG, 1990) should be included in the list of reports and findings in Section I.E. on pages 3-107 - 3-108. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I . Table 26 on page 3-105 reports an existing LOS of "C" at the 195th/I-405 ramp intersections. The University of Washington Branch Campus DEIS reports existing LOS to be "F." Please clarify. . Year 2000 traffic volumes on the site vicinity street network should not be estimated by projecting existing traffic at an estimated average growth rate that is uniform over the entire street system. Future traffic flows and patterns are greatly affected by specific developments, specific street improvements, and specific new street segments. Application of a universal traffic growth rate cannot account for the unique and non-uniform changes that will occur over a 10-year period. Year 2000 background traffic estimates should be produced in a manner that is consistent with other traffic studies conducted in the area and region. In particular, trip tables and/or traffic assignments produced by PSCOG, Snohomish County, or King county should be used. Like the existing traffic volumes, the future background traffic volumes reported in the DEIS at several key locations are different than the volumes reported in the University of Washington Branch Campus DEIS. These differences do not result in the prediction of significantly different LOS at the intersections, but further documentation is needed to explain these differences for the record. . . A few questionable assumptions and the LOS analysis methodologies. procedures resul t in better LOSs approaches, and therefore they will procedures were made in These assumptions and than more conservative underestimate impacts. Platoon Factor. The intersection analyses employed a high platoon factor where a coordinated signal system was assumed to exist. This factor reduces the estimate of delay at an intersection, reflecting the effects of signal progression. (Progression reduces stops and slowdowns for red signals by creating platoons of vehicles that arrive at signals during the green phase.) On arterials like 195th east of 1-405, however, there is little platooning of traffic due to the high percentages of turns onto and off of the arterial. As a result, a coordinated signal system can not be expected to significantly reduce delays on 195th, and use of a high platoon factor in the intersection analysis will underestimate delay (and overestimate LOS). Peak Hour Factor. The peak hour factor accounts for concentrations of traffic within an hour. A peak hour factor of 0.95 was used for the intersection analyses; this represents fairly even traffic flow over the course of the hour. In the immediate vicinity of an employment center such as North Creek, however, large numbers of ]12 13 14 15 16 I I I I I I I I I I i I I I I j I I I employees getting off work simultaneously can result in concentration of traffic over short periods. Unless specific data can be cited, a peak hour factor of 0.90 should be used. (This will raise by 6% the volumes on which the intersection analysis is based.) Left turns into refuge lane. The analysis of the unsignalized intersections on 228th assumed that the existence of a refuge lane for left turns onto 228th at T intersections eliminates the need to analyze the capacity affects of the through traffic approaching the left-turning vehicle from its right. This is incorrect. The refuge lane does not eliminate either approaching through traffic flow as a capacity factor; the refuge lane simply allows sidestreet left-turning traffic to cross one main street traffic flow and enter the other in two separate maneuvers, rather than in a single maneuver. J 16 17 The proper analysis procedure, then, is to apply the unsignalized intersection analysis procedure twice: once with zero volume approaching from the right, and once with zero volume approaching from the left. The DEIS traffic analysis did not do the latter analysis, and as a result may have overstated the LOS. (In several cases, the LOS for the merge from the refuge lane may be worse than the LOS for the turn across on-coming traffic into the refuge lane.) DRAINAGE SYSTEMS . Language regarding the "slight increase[s] in flow... of its [North Creek's] high water elevation" ignores the cumulative effects on southern areas of development in the northern reaches of the Valley. Drainage issues are a basin wide issue, but this DEIS does not adequately address such cumulative impacts on the quality of the water in North Creek which may result from individually minor but collectively significant cumulative impacts relevant to this project. North Creek has experienced a 50 percent increase in stream flow as well as variations in temperature and water quality in recent years, principally as a result of increased inputs from upstream. The role of this project and other projects in the basin need to be addressed more thoroughly. 18 H:EIS\QDMTVEIS.LTR I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 3. 4. 5. RESPONSE TO LETTER #7 CITY OF BOTH ELL 1. Comment acknowledged. The Quadrant Corporation has committed to entering into a Mitigation Agreement with the city of Bothell to mitigate environmental impacts of its proposed development within the City of Bothell. The subject areas to be covered in the Mitigation Agreement include Open Space, Traffic/Transportation System Mitigation, Parks and Recreation, Historic Preservation, Public Safety, utilities, and Storm Drainage. The Mitigation Agreement will be entered into by Quadrant and the City of Bothell before any development of the subject property is undertaken. 2. Snohomish County's Department of Public Works (Storm Water Management Division) is presently conducting a study of the entire North Creek stream basin, including the lower reaches of the Creek past the site and into the City of Bothell. The City of Bothell has been invited to participate in this basin study. The study is a cumulative analysis, with assumptions made about overall growth and development of the area (including the Monte Villa site), land uses, hydraulic characteristics and basin shapes. The goal of the study is to determine what regional detention facilities or other stormwater management system will be necessary to handle increased flows through the Creek. The final analysis has not been completed. The storm system concept for the proposed rezone, as presented in the DEIS (on pg. 3-22 to 3- 28) has centered around attempting to minimize any impacts on North Creek conditions. Past conditions have been modeled and compared to those which have been forecast to exist after development. It was concluded that a quick direct release of stormwater from this site would raise water surface levels downstream by imperceptible amounts and occur prior to the arrival of peak flow from upstream; (this design assumption is called 'beat the peak'). Delaying discharge from the site would require discharge into peak stream flow periods, thereby exacerbating peak flood levels downstream. The quick discharge, as well as proposed water quality treatment to all waters discharged into North Creek and other on-site areas, mitigates the cumulative impacts from this development on downstream areas. Thank you for your comments. See response to Comment #3, Letter No.4, Washington Department of Transportation; the erroneous EIS language is revised in Chapter 4, Errata #7. The survey referred to in the text consisted of vehicle counts at each of the driveways and sample vehicle occupancy 5 - 33 I I I I I I I I I I I I t I I I I I I counts taken on the same day as the vehicle counts. Based on this information, there was a 13 percent reduction in vehicle trips compared to the scenario where all employees would be in single occupancy vehicle. The traffic study points out that the observed vehicle occu- pancy rate of 1.15 persons per vehicle (equivalent to a 13 percent reduction in vehicles) is somewhat higher than the North King County average of 1.10 persons per vehicle. It is agreed that the majority of the vehicle occupancy rate is accounted for in the ITE trip generation rates. However, the current Transportation System and Demand Management Plan for the North Creek Valley has helped raise the vehicle occupancy rate above the area average. It is not the study's intent to imply that the current TSM measures were responsible for the full 13 percent reduction in vehicle traffic. 6. The intent of the traffic study was to suggest that a further reduction of 10 to 20 percent in the p.m. peak-hour vehicle volumes could be achieved through an aggressive TSM program. These efforts would have to be supported by improved transit access in the North Creek area. Such reductions are ambitious but achievable. What the traffic study points out is that even with an aggressive TSM program that achieves an optimistic 20 percent reduction, the intersections on NE 195th Street would continue to operate at LOS F with their current configurations. The proponent is committed to implement a well-defined TSM program, but is also committed to participating in the necessary improvements on NE 195th Street to achieve an acceptable level of service. 7. A revised version of Draft EIS Figure 25 with a footnote indicating the year of traffic counts is provided in Chapter 4, Errata #8. 8. A new figure, Figure 31A is provided in Chapter 4, Errata #9. In the new Figure, the trip distribution is illustrated with the 120th Avenue NE/NE 180th Street extension not constructed. The four percent of traffic previously assigned to this route is primarily destined for the Woodinville area. without the extension, it is estimated that two percent would use 1-405/SR 522 to access the Woodinville area, one percent would use NE 95th Street through the Hollywood Hills area, and the remaining one percent would filter through to the northwest via 39th Avenue and 228th Street. The major impact of the 120th Avenue NE/NE 180th Street extension not being built is that the NE 195th Street corridor would be further congested with additional improvements possibly required. While the additional impact on NE 195th Street of the Monte Villa project is not significant, the cumulative effect of all developments in the area would require substantial 5 - 34 I I I I I I I I I I I I I il I I- I J I additional funds being committed to the NE 19Sth street corridor. Greater benefits would be achieved through the construction of the 180th street extension, combined with the 39th Avenue extension project, to create a continuous route parallel to the 1-40S facility. This would not only provide improved traffic access but also additional transit route alternatives. The proponent will be required to contribute its fair share to the existing improvements to the eastern 1,785 feet of NE 180th street (beginning at 132nd Avenue NE) and the 39th Avenue extension project. 9. The volumes for the 1-40S mainline and the ramps at NE 19Sth street are shown in the revised Figures 29, 32, 33, 34, and 3S provided in Chapter 4, Errata #10. Draft EIS Tables 28 and 32 also have been updated to provide an assessment of impacts on 1-40S congestion; see Errata #10. 10. If the required mitigation for the NE 19Sth Street/I-40S corridor is not constructed, then diversion of trips will likely occur. The most significant diversion of trips would likely be to the north along the various residential streets and eventually to SR 527 and the 1-405 interchange. However, it is inappropriate to assume diversion of trips from NE 19Sth street will occur due to congestion because that assumption fails to adequately define the demand on NE 195th street and, therefore, underestimates the required mitigation in this corridor. The design study for the eventual improvements to the NE 19Sth Street/I-405 corridor should address the needs for the actual demand along this corridor without any diversions assumed. 11. The Snohomish County Interstate Freeway System Study (SCIFSS) was published in May of 1990, after the DEIS was submitted for review in September 1989. Therefore, it was not included in the list of reports. However, reference to the on-going study was duly noted in the DEIS. The SCIFFS report presents a list of recommendations for governing agencies in the area. Among the recommendations are a new interchange at 236th Street, freeway ramp metering, and collector-distributor roadways. While all of these measures, as well as others not mentioned in the SCIFFs, could provide part of the ultimate solution in this corridor, the agencies involved have not officially adopted these improvement recommendations. None of these measures are funded at this time, and most of them will require extensive additional feasibility analysis before a proposed physical configuration can be developed. The DEIS analysis was based on known projects that are included in existing capital improvement programs, most of which have the funding already identified. 12. The level of service identified at the NE 19Sth Street/I-40S ramp intersections was based on turning movement counts S - 3S I I I I I , I I I I J I I I I I I I I 13. 14. taken in 1988 as were most of the other intersections in the DEIS. The LOS reported in the University of Washington Branch Campus DEIS was based on a 1990 count. There was an increase in traffic volumes at these intersections during this time period which has caused these stop-sign controlled intersections to deteriorate to LOS F. Refer to response to Comment #4, Letter No.4, Department of Transportation. There can be several reasons for differences in future traffic volumes and levels of service between the two studies: o The base year traffic counts were taken on different days which can result in some variation of traffic volumes. When projected forward to future years, these differences will be compounded and result in different volumes as well as levels of service. o When levels of service are calculated for a signalized intersection using the operational method, a small difference in volumes can result in different levels of service values if the delay value is on the borderline between two levels. For example, a delay value of 25 seconds will be a LOS C, whereas a delay value of 26 seconds will be a LOS D. The values of delay are also affected by the assignment of green time to each movement which may vary between studies. For this as well as other assumptions in the Level of Service analysis procedure, there are no hard and fast rules, rather an application of engineering judgment. o The assumptions made for distribution of traffic from other approved projects in the immediate study area could be different. o The application of growth factors to existing traffic may have been performed differently. This is particularly possible in the NE 195th Street corridor where the existing traffic volumes include trips from the partially developed Koll and Quadrant North Creek Business Parks. The portion of the exiting trips generated by these adjacent developments should not be factored by the assumed growth rate to develop future year volumes as this would significantly over-estimate the projected background traffic. The trips generated by these specific developments are not going to increase at a rate of 2.5 percent a year; however, the background traffic which cannot be associated with specific developments should be factored by the 2.5 percent annual rate to reflect the background growth. It appears that the University of Washington DEIS has 5 - 36 I I I I I I I , I I J I I I I I I I I factored all existing trips which has resulted in a significantly higher background volume. 15. Implementation of a coordinated signal system along NE 195th street between the 1-405 ramps and 120th Avenue is essential to providing maximum capacity along this arterial and minimizing backups of traffic between intersections. other locations very similar to this arterial are under coordi- nated control and total breakdown of operations occurs with the loss of coordination. While it is true that there are many turns onto and off of this arterial, there are very significant through movements which should be coordinated. In addition, some of the significantly heavy turn movements can also be accommodated by the signal coordination to increase capacity. The high platoon factors were applied only to those movements where platooning would occur and not to every movement at the intersection. 16. The peak-hour factor used should reflect the expected operating conditions at an intersection. A higher factor was used at those locations where high volumes and inadequate capacity would cause the spreading out of a peak period. As an intersection becomes more congested, vehicles will be forced into adjacent time periods and thus even out the peak across the whole analysis period (usually one hour). At an isolated employment center, a very sharp peak would be expected. However, with a high concentration of employment and many different employers, the natural conse- quence of high congestion is that the trips will be more evenly dispersed throughout the time period. 17. After further study it was not demonstrated that a refuge lane would offer improvement of levels of service at unsignalized intersections on 228th street. 18. Refer to response to Comment #2, above. 5 - 37 PiliCEIVED I ~ I 1 I J I I I a I I I t I I I t.",\\.' UfFICES Letter No.8 AUG :101990 (' 13~ co. 1'l-r\l'<:--:INLi 1JI \ I:;ION IRNCROSS, RAGEN & HEMPELMANN ^ rRUfES:'1i ~ SERVlCE CORN..1RA~ 'fOnt flOOR. COLLt}.tBlA CE!\.'TER. 701 AFTH A\'El\:UE SEAlTLE. \t:.\SHlt-.'GT()N 98104-i014 (1061 SBj.OiOO DONALD E, MARCY TUlX: 49).8803 FAX' 12(6) 58HlO8 August 29, 1990 Snohomish County Planning Department 4th Floor, County Administration Bldg. Everett, WA 98201 Re: Draft EIS: 1-405/County Line North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan Amendment and Quadrant Monte Villa Center Rezone Ladies and Gentlemen: This letter is submitted on behalf of The Koll Company who has developed a business park known as Koll North Creek immediately south of the property that is subject to the Draft EIS for the 1-40S/County Line North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan ~~endment and Quadrant Monte Villa Center Rezone ("Draft EIS.). The Draft EIS does a good job of providing information about the proposed comprehensive plan amendment and rezone (the .Proposals.) and describing the impacts associated with the Proposals. However, the Draft EIS should be further clarified to describe more completely the impacts associated with storm water drainage and traffic. A. Storm Water Drainacre. Obviously, the Proposals' storm water drainage and its impacts are of concern to The Koll Company since their business park is immediately south of the site of the Proposals. Although much information is provided regarding storm water runoff from the Proposals, there is no definitive storm water drainage design as of this time. Without this information, it is difficult to assess with certainty the potential storm water impacts of the Proposals. With this information, a more complete analysis could be prepared which would be appropriate given the existing flooding that occurs on the site as well as the potential for increased flooding as a result of additional development in the North Creek drainage basin. Some specific statements and comments regarding the discussion of storm water drainage are as follows: Pacre 3-22--North Creek was not moved from its original course by The Koll Company. When North Creek was relocated during the development of Koll North Creek, the stream was returned to approximately its original course. The straight line 1 l 2 I I I I I t , I I , I I I I I I I I I Snohomish County Planning Department August 29, 1990 Page 2 channel that the stream had occupied prior to the relocation by J The Koll Company was the result of channelization activities 2 performed to accommodate agricultural uses on the property. Also, as noted above, there is no definitive storm water drainage design at this time. There should be some confirmation of the fact that there will be no increase in surface water flow through the dikes on the north side of Koll 3 North Creek. An increase in the storm water drainage could cause the storm water detention pond at Koll North Creek to overflow if the pond were required to accommodate the increased storm water runoff associated with development of the Proposals. Paaes 3-24 - 26--The discussion of flooding should be expanded to discuss and confirm whether the flow of North Creek will increase as a result of the Proposals. The flow of North Creek cannot be increased without the potential for flooding 4 impacts to Koll North Creek. The data used to confirm the flow of North Creek and changes likely to occur as a result of the Proposals should be recent data. B. Traffic. Although the traffic analysis in the Draft EIS does a good job of describing the impacts of the Proposals, further clarifications should occur. Paae 3-101--The Draft EIS states that the ultimate configuration of 120th Avenue N.E. is to be five lanes. What is the source of this statement regarding the final configuration of l20th Avenue N.E.? Presently, 120th Avenue N.E. is designed to 5 be four lanes, three of which have been constructed. The Proposals should be required to ~ontribute to the improvements that have already been made to 120th Avenue N.E. as well as the construction of additional lanes when required in the future. paae 3-107--The Draft EIS lists a number of transportation studies and design studies that have been conducted within the study area of the Draft EIS. The list does not contain the traffic studies that were performed for the 6 environmental impact statements prepared for Koll North Creek and Quadrant Corporate Park--Bothe1l or the traffic study prepared by TDA and Entranco for the North Creek area. Paae 3-109--The trip generation estimates utilized in the Draft EIS are based on an employee population of 2,480 persons. Statements contained at page 3-81 of the Draft EIS 7 indicate that this employee projection was provided by the proponent. It is not evident in the Draft EIS how the projection of 2,480 employees was derived. Further justification for this I , II I I I , I I I , I I I I I I I I I Snohomish County Planning Department August 29, 1990 Page 3 projection should be provided since the employee projection is the source of the traffic generation estimates for the Proposals. paae 3-112. Paae 3-120 - 121--The trip distribution analysis at page 3-112 and the impacts described at pages 3-120- 121 assume that a relatively small proportion of the traffic from the Proposals will utilize the N.E. 180th Street/132nd Avenue N.E. intersection and the SR-202/SR-522 interchange. This distribution may not account appropriately for the diversion of traffic from the N.E. 19Sth Street/I-40S interchange. The Draft EIS discloses that the level of service on N.E. 19Sth Street west of 120th Avenue N.E. will be at F. Such congestion is likely to cause traffic to divert to other less congested routes. The N.E. 180th Street/132nd Avenue N.E. intersection as well as the SR-202/SR-S22 interchange are such a less congested route. paae 3-140--The mitigating measures required for the N.E. 19Sth Street corridor are woefully inadequate. Certainly there needs to be additional study of methods to increase the capacity of I-40S. However, the Proposals should be required to contribute to the cost of the improvements on N.E. 19Sth Street and 120th Avenue N.E. that have been provided by The Koll Company and The Quadrant Corporation. Without those improvements, the traffic from the Proposals could not be accommodated. In particular, the Proposals should be required to participate in the improvement of the N.E. 19Sth Street/I-40S interchange. That improvement is required by the City of Bothell to occur when level of service at the interchange reaches D. The interchange improvements are critical to accommodate traffic generated by the Proposals. It is inequitable and unreasonable for the Proposals not to participate in the required improvement of the N.E. 19Sth Street/I-40S interchange. In addition, the proponent should be required to participate in the cost of improving the N.E. 180th Street/132nd Avenue N.E. intersection as well as the SR-202/SR-S22 interchange. As discussed above, the distribution of traffic to these intersections is probably underestimated by the Draft EIS. Inasmuch as the Proposals are supposed to distribute most of their traffic to the south, these two intersections which constitute one of only two routes to the south should be paid for in part by the proponent of the Proposals. The Koll Company contributed money to Snohomish County to mitigate traffic impacts from Koll North Creek. It is only appropriate that the Proposals should be required to help fund traffic improvements in the City of Bothell and King County that accommodate the traffic generated by the Proposals. J7 8 9 10 J 11 I I I I I I I I I , I I I I I I I I I Snohomish County Planning Department August 29, 1990 Page 4 Aooendix F. paaes 1-2. The trip distribution for the Proposals assumes that most of the traffic will go to the south. This is based upon a zip code study performed at the business parks developed by The Koll Company and The Quadrant Corporation in Bothell. Although that zip code data may be correct today, in the next few years, the data may change. Page 3-93 of the Draft EIS notes that the North Creek Planning Area is one of the fastest growing areas in Snohomish County. As this area grows, it is likely that more of the traffic from the Proposals will go north rather than south. Further consideration and discussion of this issue should occur. 12 Although The Koll Company believes there should be certain clarifications and refinements for the Draft EIS as well as additional mitigation for the Proposals, The Koll Company supports the requests to amend the North Creek Area Comprehensive plan and to rezone the Monte Villa Farm property for business park uses. However, The Koll Company's concerns regarding storm water drainage and traffic should be addressed. The Koll Company will not support the Proposals if there are storm water drainage impacts to Koll North Creek or if the Proposals are not required to participate in funding the transportation improvements that have been made and will occur in the future as discussed above. Thank you for this opportunity to comment on the Draft EIS. 13 Very truly yours, D~ ~~'!!7 ell- DEM:clb cc: Mr. James C. Mueller The Koll Company Ms. Susan Heikkala The Quadrant Corporation 156003.1124 I I I I I I I ! I I , I I I I I I I I 'I 1. 2. 3. RESPONSE TO LETTER #8 CAIRNCROSS, RAGEN AND HEMPELMANN Comment acknowledged. Through scientific modeling of stormwater runoff and the stream, engineers are able to accurately predict the impacts of development and identify necessary mitigation measures without preparing an actual design of the mitigating facilities. Such modeling has been completed for the proposed business park. Modeling results demonstrate that the designed project would have a negligible effect (i.e., an increase of less than 0.1 foot of change in the water elevation upstream or downstream; ref. DEIS p. 3-33) on flooding at the site or in the basin. A detailed design will accompany the final site plan and subsequent building permit plans submittals. Comment acknowledged. As noted on DEIS p. 3-33 (b. Flooding), Quadrant has presented proposals that would reduce the water surface elevation along the north dike of the Koll North Creek development. Analysis shows that existing conditions without development on the Quadrant site have permitted the overcapacity of the Koll North Creek storm system. The study modeling of the Quadrant storm system includes a dike to prevent future backflow to areas behind the dikes along the Koll North Creek site, thereby minimizing increases in water surface elevations in the North Creek channel as it passes through the Koll site and reducing flows into the Koll storm detention system. A detailed, engineered design for the system would be required to accompany any building permit applications. 4. As noted on DEIS p. 3-26, the most current storm design information available through Snohomish County, the u.S. Army Corps of Engineers, FEMA, and the city of Bothell, were used for models prepared for this DEIS. As was shown in the DEIS, the water surface elevation of North Creek south of the Quadrant site would remain virtually unchanged by this development as proposed. without a change in water surface elevation, there would be no increased flooding downstream. 5. Presently, 120th Avenue NE (39th Avenue SE in Snohomish County) is developed as follows: to 2 lanes between 240th Street SE and the County line; to 3 lanes between the County line and NE 195th Street; and to 5 lanes south of NE 195th street. During the preliminary scoping process, the City of Bothell requested that the design south of 39th Avenue SE between 240th street SE and the county line be expanded to match the existing configuration south of the County line. The proposal is to widen this segment on the west side by one lane and to construct a 2-way left-turn lane in the 5 - 42 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I middle lane. As development occurs along this street, the number of left turns into developments will require a center left-turn lane. The street should be constructed as three lanes now and widened by property owners on the east side of 39th Avenue SE as necessary as development occurs on the east side of the street. Upon development of Quadrant Monte Villa Center, the proponent will be obligated through a latecomers agreement to participate in the existing street improvements constructed by Koll North Creek and Quadrant Business Center Bothell. Quadrant Monte Villa Center may participate in the construction of the additional widening of 120th Avenue NE (between 195th street and the County line) if identified in a latecomers process and constructed by Koll North Creek and other property owners. 6. Comment acknowledged; see Chapter 4, Errata #11 for a discussion of the additional studies. 7. The number of employees was based on 950,000 gross square feet of development with 60 percent being light industrial and 40 percent office. The number of employees per 1,000 square feet was assumed to be 2.61 (950,000 x 2.61 - 2,480) which was derived from the populations of similar business parks developed by the rezone proponent. The 2.61 employees per 1,000 square feet is consistent with assumptions used in other studies which show 4 employees per gross 1,000 square feet for office space and 1.33 for industrial. When these are combined into a weighted average rate for the mixed use, it results in 2.39 employees per 1,000 square feet. Therefore, the rate used in this study is slightly higher and the results of the analysis are thus conservative. 8. The percentage of traffic assigned to the NE 180th street extension was based on the zip code survey performed at the existing business park in North Creek. The percentage of employees residing in the area accessible from NE 180th street was very small. Therefore, the 4 percent was assigned to this route. Refer to response to Comment #10, Letter No.7, City of Bothell for a discussion of congestion-related traffic diversion. 9. The proponent will be participating in the cost of these improvements. 10. The intersections mentioned will operate at LOS D with or without the project. The contribution of traffic to these two intersections is very low (4 percent) and, therefore, requiring the rezone proponent's participation in improvement to these intersections may not be called for. The proponent is discussing the need for impact mitigation at these locations with the City of Bothell. 5 - 43 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 11. The rezone proponent has committed to negotiating a mitigation agreement with the city of Bothell as conditions of approval. The agreement will include participation in the existing street improvements already constructed by Koll North Creek and Quadrant Business Park Bothell. 12. Figures 27 and 31 in the draft EIS present the trip distribution for the Comprehensive Plan Amendment and the Rezone. As shown in these two figures, the north-south split changes from 19 percent-81 percent in 1994 to 26 percent-74 percent in 2000, which reflects the gradual residential relocation described in the comment. 13. Comments acknowledged. 5 - 44 I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Letter No.9 Debbie Abrahamsen 413 22lst Street Southeast Bothell, Washington 98021 RECEl V ~D September 10, 1990 SED 1 'J 1';'" . ...... ,.I...J Klaus Schilde County Planning Division County Administration Building Everett, WA 98201 CO.I"LANN1NU U1VIS10N Re: Quadrant Monte Villa Center Draft Environmental Impact Statement Dear Mr. Schilde: I have reviewed the above-mentioned DEIS and have the following comments: I. On page I-IS, the Rezone Alternative Site Plan says it has the same impacts as the Preferred Sit Plan, yet farm building are retained in the Preferred Alternative but not in the Alternative Alternative. Is this correct? 2. Also on page I-IS, the DEIS says that BP is compatible with surrounding uses (which are predominantly low density residential), yet the low density residential alternative says it is "less compatible" with business park uses to the south. Does this mean that low density residential is incompatible with business park? If so, what about the areas to the north and east of the Monte Villa Farm...is the business park alternative incompatible with them? Also, how can business park on the site be more compatible with the predominantly residential nature of the area, than the residential alternatives? 3. Also on page 1-15, the land use impact described for the "No Rezone" alternative is irrelevant. It should state that there is no negative impact from the No Rezone alternative, since the valley to the north and hills to the east and west are all primarily residentially zoned, and the existing uses are large lot residential or rural uses. (See maps on page 3-65 and 3- 70.) 4. On page 1-16, the DEIS states that the preferred site plan contributes to area demand for multiple family dwellings, yet the map on 3-70 shows no available multiple family zoned property, or even small lot zoned single family in the area. Where will these people live? What land in the immediate area will be redesignated to allow multiple family development? We have this same problem with the existing business park developments. Shouldn't this site provide additional housing units for the area I s existing business parks in order to reduce commuting requirements and aid traffic management alternatives? ] 1 2 3 4 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Klaus Schilde september 10, 1990 Page 2 5. On page l-17, why does the No Change alternative say no open space would be required? Won't the wetlands and North Creek still require open space buffers? The WSS area totals 27 acres. . . wouldn't this be required to be retained as open space under any alternative? 6. All through the DEIS, why does the comprehensive plan No Change alternative have 191 units while the No Rezone alternative has 52 units? Is there a need to evaluate the alternative of rezoning under No Change to the comprehensive plan? I found the lower density unit calculation confusing. 7. On page 1-20, the Alternative Site Plan say it has the same employment impacts as business park. How can multiple family development on this site create 7,200 jobs? 8. On page 1-21, the major problem with this plan is highlighted. Since there must be a population to support the jobs created by business park development, and since there are not enough housing units in the immediate area to accomodate that need, employees will have to commute, adding to our region's traffic mess. The DEIS should analyze the possibility of relating jobs and housing in such a manner that commutes are reduced. In particular, the need for additional housing to supply the existing business park needs should be addressed. 9. On page 1-22, how can the Alternative Site Plan have the same housing impact as the Preferred Site Plan? 10. Why can't the farm buildings be retained under all alternatives? If retention is desirable or necessary for business park development, isn't it also desirable or necessary for housing? II. In order to retain any of the historical or cultural heritage of this site, additional land should be set aside along wi th the farm buildings. Lots 12, 13, 16 (east of 3lst), and lots 18, 19 and 20 should also be restricted from building in order to preserve the scenic vista from 1-405. This view is without doubt the most pleasant scenic vista on all of 1-405. It should not be allowed to be dominated by concrete buildings and flat roofs and parking lots. 12. On page l-25 the DEIS states that impacts on 228th will not be mitigated by the Preferred Alternative since less than lOt of its trips use 228th. Shouldn't the EIS still address what mitigation could take place, even if the developer cannot be required to fund it? In this case, mitigation may be needed, and the extent of mitigation necessary should be analyzed regardless of who is obligated to fund it. The purpose of an EIS is to identify impacts and their possible solutions, not simply to interpret Title 26B mitigation requirements. ] 5 ] 6 ] 7 8 ] 9 J10 11 12 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Klaus Schilde september lO, 1990 Page 3 13. On page 1-25, the DEIS says that no mitigation will be required on 228th under Title 26B. On page 3-103, 228th is identified as the only road analyzed that had a significantly higher accident rate than average. Under Title 26B, this could be interpreted as a safety problem. The DEIS should identify possible improvements to alleviate this safety problem. 14. On page 1-26, 39th a . sidewalk on one side. road? If it's urban, sidewalks and bike lanes is planned to be widened to 3 lanes with Is this road an urban road or a rural shouldn't it be required to provide on both sides? 15. On page 1-26, the No Change alternative is poorly written. It implies that road improvements would be greater under No Change than if either business park or high urban were allowed. This is crazy. The DEIS should look at the total road mitigation dollars required, rather than number of roads or intersections affected. Again, if all impacts were analyzed, rather than just those subject to Title 26B, it is clear that the business park or high urban uses require the most road improvements. 16. On page 1-32, the need for sewer and water extensions are discussed. Are the 42" sewer line and l2" water lines needed to serve all three alternatives, or are the bigger extensions needed to serve only one or two of the alternatives? 17. On page 2-2, the DEIS states that greater than basic density would be granted to the business park because, among other things, it ha.a transportation access to major arterials or highways. This site does not access 1-405, as the DEIS states, unless new ramps are built at 240th. Being adjacent to a freeway does not constitute "access" to a freeway. In fact, the access is to three roads.. .3lst Avenue SE, 240th Street SE and 39th Avenue SEe How does access to these streets fit the greater than basic density criteria? What are the classifications for these roads? 18 On page 2-5, how does the high urban alternative get greater than basic density? It doesn't qualify for t3 (no more than 10% poorly drained soil). Aren't there 27 acres of Wss land, or 32%? Also, some of the northwest section which is not wetlands is identified as hav~soil problems. 19. On page 2-6, the No Change alternative wouldn't get greater than basic density either, would it? 20. Lots 7 and 8 should not be allowed to be built...they are in the flood plain. 21. On page 2-l4, the DEIs states that postponement may move business park to less suitable sites in other areas. Couldn't it also move the business park to more suitable sites? Is this even relevant? 13 }4 15 ] 16 17 }a ] 19 ] 20 ] 21 I I I I I I I 'I I I I I I I I I I I I Klaus Schilde september 10, Page 4 1990 3-9, the business park alternative is said to result grading, and conversion to impervious surface of 70% How is this possible when 32% of the site is WSS, additional landscaping requirements in the business 22. On page in clearing, of the site. and there are park zone? 23. On page 3-51, item t9 should be changed to read .Expansion of selected on-site wetlands -would- be done...", and .The enhancement/creation plan objectives would include..... Item tlO should be changed to read "The created wetlands would be planted...". 24. 24. On page 3-65, the existing land use map highlights that the area is predominantly rural or low density residential, not dominated by the business parks to the south and at Canyon Park. 25. On page 3-66, the DEIS states that the Technology Corridor's desire to expand is a factor in bringing about this proposed plan change. Have the Technology Corridor' s expansion plans been documented, and do they include this site? What other sites are also planned for expansion? Has the County endorsed these plans? 26. On page 3-74 the DEIs states that low density residential is not compatible with Koll to the south. Didn't Koll's EIS claim that it was compatible with residential uses to the north and east? Why is it now incompatible? What would keep Quadrant from similar claims of compatibility in its EIS, only to find in five to ten years that it's incompatible. 27. On page 3-116 the DEIS cites less than lOt of the business park ~ would use 228th. Based on the connection of 39th Avenue SE and the potential addition of a new north/south,road at canyon Park Business Center, I find this hard to believe. It would be helpful to see specific information developed to support this claim, as it seems intuitively unbelievable. 28. On page 3-l40, the DEIS refers to a design report for 1- 405 interchange improvements. Since the interchange at 195th is projected at LOS F, shouldn't this design report be required prior to approving additional impacts in this area? 29. On page 3-14l, there is a weak reference ~ TSM measures. How would these be required, how could they be implemented, and what would the projected reductions in traffic be? 30. What are the actual vanpool/carpool statistics for the existing business parks in the area? ]22 ]n ] 24 J~ 26 27 ]28 ] 29 ] 30 I I I I I I I !I I I I I I I I I I I I Klaus Schilde September 10, 1990 Page 5 31. On page 3-142, three intersections along NE 195th Street are shown at LOS F. will development be allowed to proceed even at this LOS? 32. On page B-I, the DEIS says there are more people in the planning area than assumed by the 1977 NCACP. How many more? Are they in the vicinity of this subarea, or in the Mill Creek area? 33. On page B-I, the DEIS shows three intersections on 195th at LOS F. What planned improvements bring it above F? Does the capacity from planned improvements to 39th and 195th serve existing development 7 and create addi tional capaci ty for additional development. Is excess capacity being created by these planned improvements or do they just correct existing deficiencies or deficiencies projected from presently allowed development. 34. On page B-3, the DEIS uses standard business park zone requirements to buffer adjacent uses. Are these adequate, given that the DEIS states that business park uses to the south are now incompatible with adjacent residential uses? 35. On page B-4 the DEIS states that utility construction will be allowed in the buffers. What utility construction is anticipated? I've too often seen utility construction render buffers useless as they are stripped of all vegetation. 36. On page B-4, the DEIS limits the sf of building "approximately 950,000 sf". Why is this approximate? upper limit be defined? Is approximately 950,000 960,000, or 975,000 or l,OOO,OOO? space Can't equal to an to 37. On page B-4, the last paragraph should be changed to read "The site should be developed in phases and mitigation of impacts should be required...". 38. On page C-6, doesn I t the preferred alternative violate #7 since many area road improvements are not yet funded? Who will pay for the sewer and water extensions? Is an LID needed, and will other property owners besides Quadrant be expected to pay? 39. On page C-6, the DEIS states that business park doesn't have "poor transportation linkages", but it does, since there is no direct access to 1-405, and the indirect access is through three intersections on NE 195th projected to be at LOS F. J 31 ] 32 33 ] 34 ] 35 ] 36 ] 37 ] 38 ]39 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Klaus Schilde September lO, 1990 Page 6 40. On page C-6, the DEIS should identify the nature and extent of public services needed for the high urban alternative. 41. How can the "transportation impacts.. .be greater.. .in the County" with high urban than with the business park?, ~ 42. On page C-8, the Preferred Alternative states that NCACP residential policies don't apply, yet since the business park use takes away available residential land, they should apply. What is the effect of these pOlicies on the proposed business park? Is it compatible with these policies? If the proponent can argue that high urban and no change alternatives are incompatible with the industrial policies of the NCACP, then the business park use is probably ...l.~ incompatible with the residential policies of the NCACP. I.lew".se 43. Again, on page C-ll, the site does not have access directly to 1-405 simply because it is adjacent to 1-405. Every property on the west side of 27th could argue they have access to 1- 405 because they, too, are adjacent. Clearly this is stretching the definition of "access". 44. On page C-12, why is No Rezone not simply N/A rather than inconsistent with industrial policies? 45. According the environmental management policy t5, industrial development should be prevented in areas having soils with high water tables or subject to flooding (#l6). How is the preferred alternative consistent with these goals? 46. On page C-l6, why isn't all sediment and other pollutants trapped prior to stormwater discharge rather than simply "most". How much is "most"? 47. On required setbacks page C-l6, the last paragraph should also identify the 25 I setbacks. from the wetlands. Also, should these be changed due'the Aquatic Resource Protection Program? 48. On page C-l7, what does "generally retained" mean with regard to wetlands? Are they retained or not? 49. Again on page C-l7, what is "generally direct access" to 1- 405? There is a significant barrier to access from this site...LOS F at NE 195th. anT 50. On page C-l7 the preferred alternative utilized 5.98 acres of WSS land, yet claims less than 1 acre of wetland filled. Is this correct? What other WSS land is utilized? ] 40 ] 41 42 ] 43 ] 44 ] 45 1'46 ] 47 ] 48 ] 49 ] 50 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Klaus Schilde September 10, 1990 Page 7 51. Again at the bottom of page C-17, there is not II immediate access to 1-405 from the site", unless ramps are built at 240th. 52. On page C-18, the No Rezone alternative is identified as not compatible with the "Development Areas Model". Please explain why not. 53. On page C-18, t4 states that scenic and historic sites should be protected and preserved to the maximum extent feasible. The preferred plan does not preserve the scenic value of this property as it obscures the view from 1-405 with a business park building. 54. On page C-19, isn't il violated by the preferred alternative? There is a significant backlog of transportation facilities needed just to serve existing uses in this area, not including providing excess capacity for new development. Simply mitigating traffic impacts under Title 26B does not necessarily meet "demand" for transportation facilities. What is the backlog of improvements for this area? How much money needed for backlogs in other parts of the county would be diverted to this location in order to meet the demands of the preferred alternative? 55. On page C-20, why does NO CHANGE not contribute to the need for additional transportation facilities, yet the NO REZONE alternative requires transportation facilities similar to the preferred alternative? 56. On page C-20, contributing a fair share of the costs of improvements which would benefit the business park's employees is too narrow a definition. What about mitigating the fair share of costs to benefit the employers, or contributing a fair share of the cost to mitigate the adverse impact on the community? 57. Is the current design for 228th from SR527 to 39th Ave SE adequate to accomodate the traffic from this proposal? If not, what improvements are needed? 58. On page C-20, road improvements to 39th and 240th are identified. These appear to be less than urban standards for these roads. Yet they provide the "direct access" to 1-405. Is this consistent? 59. "on page C-22, under "PREFERRED AND ALTERNATIVE REZONE SITE PLAN~ ' could should be changed to would in "Catch basins in the park1ng lots would cleanse the runoff...". ] 51 ] 52 ] 53 54 }5 ] 56 ] 57 ] 58 ] 59 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Klaus Schilde September 10, 1990 Page 8. 60. On page C-25, the same buffer width (30 feet) is provided along 240th and 39th which abutt residential uses, as is provided on the south which is adjacent to business park. Shouldn't greater buffers be required adjacent to residential uses? 61. On page C-33, the DEIS refers to dike and fill. Where on the site wil1 this occur? 62. On page C-34, the DEIS refers as though it were quite near. business park? Isn't it separated to Canyon Park Business Center How many mile north is this by rural uses? 63. On page C-36, additional policy guidance should be added to ensure development takes place outside the wetland areas for all three alternatives...not just "generally outside". 64. According to the Building and Industrial Land Survey, supply exceeds demand through the year 2000. Wouldn't this development violate the first and fifth criteria for designating new business park land? What existing Light/Heavy Industry designations are available that would be suitable for business park uses? 65. On page C-40, aren't the high urban and no alternatives merely irrelevant to this survey rather inconsistent with it? If they are inconsistent, then residential development approved in this county is inconsistent. Does this make any sense? change than every also 66. On page C-44, how can traffic from 950,000 SF of business park be equivalent to 52 units of single family development? The DEIS says that there are 32,547 DT with business park, versus 22,850 DT without. Is this no significant difference? I found this DEIS very disappointing. The traffic analysis was too limited, ignoring impacts on 228th and passing off impacts on 195th and 1-405 as needing "regional" solutions beyond the scope of the EIS. These severely congested traffic areas deserve to be more closely analyzed prior to approving significant business development. In addition, any employment centers should be asked to carefully and completely analyze demand management possibilities. In the 1990's, we should not be continuing the sprawling, traffic inducing business park development of the 1980' s without incorporating transit, carpooling and demand management requirements. J60 ] 61 ] 62 ] 63 ]~ ]~ ] 66 67 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Klaus Schilde September 10, 1990 Page 9 Regarding 228th in particular, the DEIS should consider the impact of the proposed north/south road at Canyon Park Business Center, and the extension of 39th would create easier opportunities and incentives for Monte Villa Center traffic to use 228th, especially if 195th is at LOS F as projected. There should be a cooperative effort, perhaps led by Technology Corridor, to plan for traffic in this area, particularly if the main purpose of this rezone is to allow expansion of Technology Corridor. 68 I also hope the applicant will be required to preserve more of the farm compound, not merely save historic buildings on regular business park lots among other regular business park buildings. These farm buildings and the land around them are the most scenic view on 1-405. Surely a better job of maintaining this piece of community atmosphere could be designed. The County should use every means available to it to see that the aesthetics of this site are considered, including acquisition as a park using newly available park funds. 69 Thank you for the opportunity to respond to this DEIS. Given the negative impacts of the preferred alternative, I hope the County will take whatever steps are necessary to preserve something of the character of this beautiful area. Very truly yours, ~e~.t-~ Debbie Abrahamsen Brentwood Neighborhood Association 413-22lst Street SE Bothell, WA 98021 481-7767 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 2. 3. 4. RESPONSE TO LETTER #9 MS. DEBBIE ABRAHAMSEN 1. Although the proposed and alternative rezone site plans differ in regard to retention of the barn structures, overall land use impacts would be basically the same because the projected uses and square footage would be equivalent; refer to Historic Preservation element for discussion of impacts on historic resources. The EIS states that the Business Park (BP) would be compatible with other existing business parks, and although the site also is located adjacent to residential areas, development standards will be applied to increase compatibility with the residential neighborhoods. Under the No-Change Comprehensive Plan for LAND USE, this paragraph states that the NO-Change would be compatible with the existing neighborhoods north and east, but less compatible with the existing business parks located immediately south of the site. Intervening streets on the east and north sides of the site provide a buffer between the site and the residential uses to the north and east that does not exist along the south property line; thus, a break in land use could be achieved with less incompatibility along the north property line than the south property line of the site. The DEIS comment referenced is that single-family development on the site would not be compatible with the business and office development trend in the North Creek Valley. Single-family development of the site (52 homes) would have impacts (see WATER, PUBLIC SERVICES, and TRANSPORTATION sections of the DEIS). The map on DEIS p. 3-70 focuses on a very small area. The Business Park Alternative could produce a maximum increase in housing demand for 6,2l3 housing units. Of these, 5,592 would be located within 0 to 35 minutes of commuting distance (see DEIS Figure 23 for a geographic distribution of housing supply relative to this site). By the year 2000, this would be only one percent of the total housing units expected to be available within this commuter range. No land in the immediate vicinity is anticipated to require redesignation to meet housing demand because housing demand is likely to be met within a fairly large area of existing residential uses (see Figure 23). The proposed business park will provide employment opportunities for some residents already residing in the area, and new multifamily residential development is occurring in the immediate vicinity of the proposal including King County and Bothell. Both of these conditions will help to reduce commuting requirements. 5 - 54 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 5. All development alternatives on this property would have the same WSS set aside which is based on site characteristics, not site plans. On DEIS page 1-17, the No-Change Alternative for the Comprehensive Plan Amendment refers to Common open space not being included. Common open spaces refer to the large areas of undeveloped land typically required for development of office parks and PROs (see the High Urban Alternative on the same page) where a subdivision is also proposed. Where land division is not proposed, environmentally sensitive features are typically protected by Native Growth Protection Areas that are binding per an approved site development plan. 6. The DEIS is required to analyze the potential maximum residential units allowable under both the existing Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives and the existing zoning which, in this case, carry different density limits. The current North Creek Comprehensive Plan land use designations of Watershed-site Sensitive and Suburban would, at maximum allowable densities under the greater-than-basic development criteria, result in 195 single-family residential units. But the zoning code designations of Rural Conservation and Residential 9600 are more restrictive and would govern actual development: the current zoning would allow only 52 homes to be developed on the site. Because this EIS is for two distinct proposed actions, a comprehensive plan amendment and a rezone, it must consider both development potentials. However, only the 52 units could actually be constructed under the existing zoning classification. 7. As stated in the first paragraph on page 2-14 of the DEIS, the Alternative Rezone site Plan proposes basically the same type of business park development as the Preferred site Plan in terms of building square footage, height, parking, and uses. Therefore, employment impacts would be the same. Potential multiple family development is discussed under the High Urban Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternative. 8. Refer to response to Comment #4, above. It is desirable to reduce commute distances overall. As shown on DEIS Figure 23, and discussed in the DEIS HOUSING section, there is adequate housing supply within a reasonable commute distance of the site, even if the commute pattern shifts over time. There are still ample housing opportunities within a relatively short commute distance. Also, increasing employee density in this area, which is located next to a major freeway, could help in meeting trip reduction goals through ridesharing and public transportation. 9. Refer to response to Comment #7, above. 10. Under the Alternative Rezone site Plan, it was assumed that there would be no fill of existing floodplain in Lot #7. In 5 - 55 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I order to achieve a comparable level of development and thus be a reasonable alternative, the area currently supporting the major farm buildings would be used for new structures under the Alternative Rezone site Plan. As stated in the DEIS (pages 3-99 and 3-100), HISTORIC AND CULTURAL PRESERVATION Section, under the High Urban and No Change Comprehensive Plan Amendment Alternatives, the property is assumed to be developed to the highest densities allowed without preservation of the existing structures for a worst- case impact analysis. Refer to the proposed Comprehensive PIan text in Chapter 6, which states that the farm buildings should be retained. 11. The commentor's preferences are acknowledged; see response to Comment #10, above. 12. The EIS completed for the Canyon Park rezone (ref. North Creek Comprehensive Plan Amendment Canvon Park Area, HNTB, 1989)) addressed the impacts on 228th Street SE in a cumulative analysis which included projected traffic from the proposed rezone development. Mitigation identified in that EIS recognizes the traffic from all the projects affecting it. This mitigation program is consistent with the one developed by the County for 228th Street SE and includes two to four travel lanes and one center turn lane. 13. The statement made on DEIS p. 3-103 about a higher than average accident rate refers specifically to the intersection of SR 527 and 228th Street and not to the entire length of 228th street. This intersection has recently undergone improvements that have increased its capacity and safety and is currently undergoing construction to its ultimate design. While its accident rate is higher than the other intersections in the study area, it is not abnormal for a signalized intersection with high traffic volumes. 14. The section of 39th Avenue between the Snohomish County line and 240th Street is currently a two-lane roadway. While the street is within the urban boundary which requires sidewalks on both sides, the mitigation proposed is to widen this section to three lanes to match the existing cross section south of the Snohomish County line. The ultimate intent of the city of Bothell is that this street would be widened by property owners on the east side of the street when the property on the east side of the street is developed. When this occurs, a sidewalk would be included on the east side. Bike lanes are not included in the requirements for all urban roadways. The Snohomish County Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan (1986) has designated where bike lanes should exist and 39th Avenue has not been included. As part of the Preferred site Plan, a bikeway will be constructed along the east side of North Creek. 5 - 56 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I , II I I I I 15. The reasons for the greater impact are primarily due'to the higher percentage of traffic distributed to the north. The higher percentage of trips to the north is based on the site having multiple access points, including one or more on 240th street, and the fact that the site would be residential as opposed to business park. This distribution would result in a slight increase in actual vehicle trips on the residential streets of 27th Avenue and 35th Avenue. On 228th street, the Business Park Alternative would generate only slightly higher traffic volumes than the No-Change Alternative (see Figure 29). Therefore, the actual impacts by traffic to the north are almost identical between the two alternatives. Under the old version of Title 26B to which this project is subject, Snohomish County adopted and used in the past as a standard for requiring mitigation, the Business Park Alternative would not be required to study and provide mitigation at every intersection in the study area. As shown in revised Table 28, the intersections north of the site that would operate below LOS Care SR 527/228th Street (LOS D) and the SR 527/1-405 NB ramp (LOS F), 228th Street/27th Avenue (LOS E), 228th Street/31st Avenue (LOS D) and 228th Street/35th Avenue (LOS D). The North Creek Comprehensive Plan Amendment - Canyon Park area traffic analysis (HNTB, 1989) identified improvements that could increase the LOS at the SR 527/1-405 ramp intersection to C. The SR 527/228th Street intersection has been addressed by the 1986 amendment to the Alderwood Area Comprehensive Plan. This amendment allows for LOS D which is met under both the Business Park and No-Change Alternatives; also, the project would direct less than 10 percent of its traffic to this intersection or to the interchange. Of the intersections along 228th street SE, only the 35th Avenue intersection is subject to old Title 26B standards. This intersection cannot meet old Title 26B standards unless the 39th Avenue extension is built, in which case less than 10 percent of the project's trips would impact the intersection. 16. The 42-inch sanitary sewer is already proposed for construction by the Alderwood Sewer and Water District and will be completed in the 42-inch configuration whether any of the proposals are built or not. The 12-inch water main extension down 39th Avenue SE is a part of the Alderwood Sewer and Water District's comprehensive plan and would be constructed as a portion of total development of 39th Avenue SE between 228th and 240th Streets SE, in order to provide better service to an area presently subject to lower water pressures and flows, not due to the proposed Comprehensive Plan Amendment or Rezone. 17. It is true that because no direct access to a "highway or major arterial" is provided by the proposal, criterion (e) (listed for greater than basic development in WSS areas (page 51, plan text)) and criterion (d) (listed for greater 5 - 57 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I than basic development in upland plateau areas (page 45, plan text)) are not met in a very literal interpretation. However, three of the five criteria for greater than basic devlopment can be met for WSS, and five of the six criteria can be met for Upland Plateau. Even though the above referenced criteria are not all met, the level of site utilization proposed by the preferred alternative remains consistent with that allowed by greater than basic development models (see page 3-76 of the Draft EIS and Errata #13 for further description and analysis). 18. Of the 27 acres of WSS area, only a small portion (less than 10 percent of the site) is comprised of poorly-draining soils (primarily peat; see DEIS Figure 4; also see response to Comment #7, Letter No.2, Department of Ecology for additional features qualifying for WSS protection); the area referenced in the northwest section of the site is designated WSS because it has slopes greater than 15 percent. The alternatives were developed to make a worst- case analysis possible. Generally speaking, they meet several criteria for greater than basic development. However, if multifamily development was proposed, a more detailed analysis of the criteria would be done. If the criteria were not all met, there would be an incremental reduction in the maximum allowed density. 19. If the development proposed within the WSS areas met the same criteria as discussed for the High Urban Alternative, it too could qualify for greater than basic density. As with the High Urban Alternative, the No-Change would be allowed an incremental density increase based on the degree to which an actual site plan met the criteria. 20. The North Creek Comprehensive Plan permits industrial development in WSS areas including floodplains. However, the Plan recognizes that development in sensitive areas should be more limited than in other areas. Development within floodplains that is permitted must not result in more than one foot of increase in flood elevation in the water body and must elevate the finished floor of all structures one foot above the base flood elevation. Please also refer to response to Comment #45. 21. The point here is that not many large, unified properties are available in this region to be used as alternate sites for meeting the current demand for business park space. Refer to response to Comment #9, Letter No.2, Department of Ecology. 22. Comment acknowledged; the reference on p. 3-9 to 70 percent impervious coverage is in error and the amount should be 60 percent. See Chapter 4, Errata #5. 23. Comment acknowledged; see Chapter 4, Errata #6. 5 - 58 I I I I I I I I I 'I I I I I I I ,I I I 24. The map on DEIS Figure 20 shows a mixed land use pattern typical of an urbanizing area. High density residential is located west of 1-405; business parks are located to the south and northwest. This figure also illustrates that the site abuts the industrial area for its entire southern frontage. 25. The EIS does not state that technology corridor expansion is a factor specifically bringing about this project. The corridor is a cooperative effort of industrial land developers to identify areas that might be attractive to high-tech industrial development and create a minimum density of commuter population in order to produce effective transportation solutions. The corridor is a private-sector effort to achieve these goals. 26. Refer to responses to Comments #2 and #3 of this letter. 27. The distribution used for the Business Park Alternative is the same as was used for the Digital Equipment Corporation DEIS for the same site. This distribution corresponds closely with a 1989 zip code survey of employees at the two business parks immediately south of the proposed site. See responses to Comment #13, Letter No.7 (City of Bothell), and Comment #8, Letter No.8, cairncross, Ragen & Hempelmann) for further discussion on how the original distribution was determined. 28. The 1-405 interchange at 195th is within the City of Bothell's jurisdiction; Snohomish County does not have an inter local agreement with Bothell to apply the provisions of Title 26B in Bothell. However, Bothell has indicated that they will consider the mitigation goals of Title 26B in the design study. Snohomish County relies on the thresholds and standards of the jurisdiction affected by the impacts of a development within Snohomish County. In the case of the 195th interchange, those jurisdictions are the City of Bothell and the Washington state Department of Transporta- tion. The rezone proponent wil1 be required to contribute its fair share to 1-405 interchange improvements based on project impacts and benefits received. 29. The rezone approval process will include a requirement that the proponent comply with Bothell's Transportation System and Demand Management Plan for the North Creek Valley. This Plan requires implementation of specific TSM measures. Increased transit availability in the area will be essential to a successful TSM program. The addition of the proposed business park to this area will expand the existing employment center which may stimulate an improvement in the level of transit service. The projected reductions in traffic as noted in the report could be in the range of 10 percent to 20 percent. A reduction of greater than 15 5 - 59 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 31. 32. percent would require a very aggressive program and increased transit availability. The response to Comment #5, Letter No.7, City of Bothell, describes the observed traffic reductions due to TSM measures at Quadrant Business Park Bothel1. 30. Additional information on vanpools or other modes is available in the report referenced in the DEIS, "Alternative Access Modes Database Project, "PSCOG, May 1986. This report discusses the findings of a study conducted at 47 non-CBD sites in the puget Sound area. While two of the sites were in the Canyon Park area of Bothell,there were no North Creek area sites involved. The study concluded there was not a statistically significant difference between geographic regions with respect to ridesharing character- istics. The study also concluded that the overall average vehicle occupancy rate was 1.10 persons per vehicle for work-to-home trips. In addition, the following results were reported for the region: Percent of people arriving by: Single Occupancy Vehicles: Two person Vehicles: Three + person Vehicles: Walk/Bus: 82.5% 12.5% 3.0% 2.0% The only information known to be available for the existing business parks in the North Creek area is the data referred to on page 3-141 of the DEIS which is taken from "North Creek Valley Traffic Projections", TDA, Inc./Entranco Engineers, Inc., June 1988. This study cites the results of a survey which showed an average vehicle occupancy rate of 1.15 persons per vehicle during the p.m. peak hour. This value falls at the high end of the range of rates found in the previously referenced PSCOG study. The TDA/Entranco study did not attempt to collect data on the percent of employees arriving by mode of transportation (e.g., carpool, single occupancy vehicle) and these values cannot be inferred from the driveway counts and surveys taken as part of the study. Therefore, the best available data is what has been reported in the 1986 PSCOG study. See response to Comment #5, Letter No.7, City of Bothell. The rezone proponent will be required to contribute its fair share to NE 195th street improvements when they are properly identified. A separate mitigation agreement is being negotiated between the proponent and the City of Bothell which will cover transportation, as well as other elements. The required improvements are highly dependent on the 1-405 interchange mitigation. As stated on DEIS p. 3-90, the County's 1988 forecast of 1990 population was 59,641, and its 1977 forecast of 1990 5 - 60 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I population was 48,300, for an approximately 20 percent underestimation of 11,341 persons. These population figures are for the North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan, which includes the Mill Creek area. Even with the increase, however, adequate land should still be available in the North Creek Plan area to accommodate the population because only 25 to 40 percent of the land studied in the 1977 Plan was necessary to house the lesser population. 33. In general, new roadways are designed to accommodate future growth of traffic based on the current land use and zoning. As zoning changes, a traffic analysis is required to demonstrate whether the street network can accommodate the zoning change. with regard to NE 195th Street and the 1-405 interchange, the traffic forecasts show that the ramp inter- sections will operate at LOS F in 1996 with completion of the currently approved developments. Draft EIS Appendices, page B-1 refers to planned improvements at the 1-405 interchange. These improvements are part of a binding agreement with the current business park developers to participate in the reconstruction of the interchange. The exact configuration has not been determined. It is essential that a design report be initiated which addresses the area as a whole with all of its potential development. The design should not be based on the impacts of a single project. 34. The discussion on DEIS Appendices page B-5 pertains to design controls in the BP zone that would ensure compatibility of the proposed business park with adjacent residential neighborhoods; it does not discuss the compatibility of business parks further south with the residential neighborhoods. The design controls specifically discussed are providing setbacks from the north and east property lines, minimizing building heights to minimize view impacts, landscaping parking areas; the discussion goes on to address wetlands and other issues. 35. The utility construction proposed would be for grass-lined swales and swale outlets for storm drainage treatment. 36. The figure of 950,000 square feet is the maximum amount of floor area that would be developed under the proposed comprehensive plan amendment and zoning category; this figure also forms the basis for analysis of the Comprehensive Plan Amendment and Business Park Rezone. Please see Chapter 6 for revised text which eliminates the word "approximately". 37. See Chapter 6 for revised comprehensive plan text regarding phased development and impact mitigation. 38. The City of Bothell and Snohomish County have mechanisms implemented which commit developers to participate in the 5 - 61 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I funding of specific projects. Also, these agencies have, when necessary, placed restrictions on the expansion of existing developments until roadway and other improvements have been constructed. In this case, road and services improvements are existing or planned for the area. See response to Comment 16, Letter No.4, Department of Transportation, for a description of the area-wide studies currently underway. Sources of funding for the 39th Avenue SE extension have not yet been identified; the proponent will be required to participate in the funding of programmed improvements. The necessary sewer service would be provided by the Alderwood Water District planned extension across the site which is currently under final design. The costs to construct this extension will be paid from the Alderwood Water District's capital improvement fund which is funded through connection charges. Water service is also available from the District and Bothell in adequate quantities; no major upgrade is necessary to meet the demands of the project. 39. Refer to the response to Comment 117 in this letter. 40. High Urban utility impacts will be the same as the Business Park Alternative for storm water, water usage and most other utilities except for sanitary sewer, which should be designed for slightly higher flows. 41. See response to Comment #4 in this letter. Based on the distribution of traffic and the location of site access points, the High Urban Alternative will result in higher volumes to the north (see DEIS Figure 29) than the No-Change Alternative. 42. The proposal was not evaluated against the residential policies because it entails business park development. However, there is a relationship between business park uses and residential uses; see the Draft EIS sections on Employment, Population and Housing. 43. See the response to Comment #13 in this letter. 44. Single-family development (no Rezone) would not be subject to the Industrial policies. These policies are addressed for those actions (i.e., proposed actions and the Alternative Rezone) that could entail industrial uses. 45. The policies of this element seek to regulate development through zoning and other regulations to preserve and improve the environmental quality of the planning area. In the case of the Monte villa Center site, the Plan, the Snohomish County Zoning Code, and the Snohomish County Shoreline Master Program regulate new development. Specifically, the Watershed-site Sensitive (WSS) designation of the Plan governs development in the areas noted in the comment. 5 - 62 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Industrial development is allowed by the Plan in areas designated WSS. However, the Plan recognizes that development should be more limited in these sensitive areas than in the upland areas (Plan text, policy 16) and delineates an appropriate level of development intensity for such uses in the Development Areas Model of the Environmental Management element of the Plan. A basic level of development (10 percent utilitization) is specified in WSS areas by the model, with a greater development potential (up to 55 percent) achievable when certain development criteria can be met (see discussion on DEIS p. 2-2, and Chapter 4, Errata 113). The preferred rezone alternative entails a WSS utilization factor of 22 percent, which is consistent with that allowed by the WSS development model as interpreted and applied to individual projects in the planning area by the Planning Department and the Hearing Examiner. The proposed filling of Lots 7 and 8 has been factored into hydraulic modeling for the Creek. The modeling shows no significant impact on the hydrology of North Creek. 46. At present, engineers use and specify those types of treatment and construction which will minimize pollution potential using best available technology and methods recommended by the relevant state and Federal agencies, which maximize sediment and other pollutant removal in a feasible manner. 47. Although an average of 25 feet is required, the setbacks in the proposal would likely average closer to 50 feet. Setbacks are shown or can be scaled on DEIS Figure 5. The Aquatic Resource Protection Ordinance was repealed in the November general election. 48. As shown on DEIS p. 2-7 and elsewhere throughout the document, wetland fill of less than one acre would occur; hence use of the term "generally retained". 49. See response to Comment #17 in this letter. 50. See response to Comment #4, Letter No. 2 for a description of what is included in the WSS classification. As a reminder, not all WSS lands are solely wetlands; and as described above in response to Comment #48, less than one acre of wetland would actually be filled. 51. See response to Comment 117 in this letter. 52. The Development Areas Model does not apply to the No Rezone Alternative because development density under the existing zoning would be regulated by the 2.3 acre minimum lot size requirement rather than the model. See Chapter 4, Errata #14 for corretion of text. 5 - 63 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 53. Existing views of the site from 1-405 are presently obscured by rows of poplar trees along the western (and a portion of the southern) property lines. The Preferred Rezone site Plan would preserve the site's most significant historic and scenic resources including the farm buildings, poplar trees, and the Creek corridor. The cited policy states that existing views should be preserved to "the maximum extent feasible", not that every view should be maintained. Moreover, views of these features may not be significantly obscured, depending on the final site development. 54. Meeting demand for transportation facilities is the responsibility of state and local governments. Project developers contribute dollars to meeting demand, in the case of Snohomish County, through the mechanism of Title 26B. The proponent will be required to participate in the funding of roadway improvements such as the 39th Avenue extension, allowing public funds to be used in other areas needing attention. This, in addition to committing funds for improvements such as the 1-405 interchange at 195th street contribute significantly to achieving Policy 11. 55. Comment acknowledged. The statement on page C-20 is in error; see Chapter 4, Errata 115. 56. The intent of the statement is to demonstrate the proponent's willingness to comply with transportation goal 12 which is to help provide a transportation system that meets the travel demands created by the planned development. The degree of impact attributable to a specific project and the effectiveness in reducing its impacts, are two factors the jurisdictions take into account when determining the appropriateness of actual mitigating measures. The term "benefit to employees" refers to effectiveness in reducing traffic or other impacts. Mitigation benefits the community at large. 57. The planned improvements to 228th street, which consist of two traffic lanes and one center turn lane, are expected to be adequate to accommodate the traffic from this proposal. The only issue in question is whether the left-turn movements from the side streets at 27th, 31st and 35th will be at an acceptable level of service. Using currently accepted traffic analysis techniques, left-turning traffic will have the same level of service with or without the proposal. These levels of service range from C to E (see Table 32). Note that Table 32 has been revised to indicate that the addition of a refuge lane on 228th will not necessarily result in an improved LOS for left-turn movements from side streets. (See Errata 110, p. 4-11). However, traffic volumes at these intersections are low. It is possible to mitigate these conditions with an all-way stop, but this would increase overall intersection delay. It is unlikely that signal warrants would be met in the year 5 - 64 I I i I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 2000. No changes are proposed at the present time; however, the developer of this site will have to demonstrate at the rezone stage that traffic impacts resulting from development can meet Title 26B requirements. This may require phasing of development to allow completion of necessary road improvement projects concurrent with the development of this site. 58. Direct access to 1-405 is provided on NE 195th street. 59. Comment acknowledgedj see Chapter 4, Errata 116. 60. See Chapter 4, Errata 117. 61. The proposed fill would be placed on Lots 7 and 8. The fill on Lot 7 would serve as a dike, as discussed under Rezone Alternative on p. C-33. See DEIS Figure 17 for proposed and optional fill configurations. 62. The Canyon Park Business Center is located within 2-1/2 miles of the Monte Villa site. Intervening land is developed with urban and rural density residential, commercial, and agricultural uses. 63. The Aquatic Resource Protection Motion (87-039) directs the County to protect wetlands and carefully review development proposals that may affect wetlands, which is actually what the County is doing in this EIS. As noted earlier, less than one acre of wetland fill is proposed under the preferred rezone; compensatory wetland creation of two acres and enhancement of existing wetlands is proposed to ensure protection of remaining wetlands. The Aquatic Resource Protection motion was repealed in the November 1990 general election. 64. See the analysis of these criteria on pp. C-39 and C-40. 65. Comment acknowledged. Consistency in this case is discussed in relation to the proposed business park. The survey does not apply specifically to the High Urban and No Change Alternatives. 66. See Chapter 4, Errata #19. 67. Comments acknowledged. 68. Refer to response to Comment 157, above, for a discussion about impacts on and improvements to 228th street. Cooperative efforts are underway to solve existing traffic problems in the area, such as congestion in the 1-405 corridor. Operators of business parks, as well as Snohomish County, will continue with endeavors to solve these problems. 5 - 65 I I 69. Comments acknowledged. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 5 - 66 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I .a.;'L.A.:J-~~;L--Y-~ - AUG :: 01990 Letter No. 10 Snohomish County Planning Dept. 4th. Floor, County Administration Bldg Everett, WA. 98201 (v. 1'~"i,,"Nu ,,,.. ..vl)i.u ust 29, 1990 Klaus Schilde, Planner Re: 1-405!County Line North Creek Area Compo Plan Amendment and Quandrant Monte Villa Center Rezone I regret that I cannot respond to the full DEIS due to the limdted time I had to review it. Following are a few concerns I have with the development. 1. Bothell has indicated this area as one to be annexed into their city. What significance will this have on the project? The DEIS states that funding is not yet in place for the extension of 39th.S.E. Any development at this site should be delayed until the extension and full improvements are made to 39th! The existing 39th.SE is very narrow with open ditches and little or no shoulders. It's straight road~y with no stops encour- ages speeding. Children ~lk and ride bike sand horses on this road. Also a new Jr. High will be opening in 1992 on 35th.S.E., this too will add to an already dangerous condition. Has the County acquired all the necessary right- of ~y for the road? 2. 3. 4. Does the decision on the SR527 moratorium affect this development? What types of industry can locate in a Light Industry Zone? Is this a com- patible zone in an area heavily populated with residential to the North and East? Throughout the DEIS it refers to the Alternative as the Business Park alternative, but the proposal contains more Light Industrial than BP. Given the congested roads in the area, ",",uldn"t "BP" be a better consideration and a more reason~ able extension of the existing "BP" adjacent to it? In the DEIS. appendix B-2. paragraph 3, it states strong objections by residents to Light Industrial or Community Business alternatives on that site and further states that based on that imput those designations were deleted from consideration. Why the change? Are there other Light Industrial zones in the immediate vicinity? 5. In the DEIS for the North Creek Area Compo Plan Ammendment Study (I405!228th.SE) pg. 119, Table 16, shows the existmg LOS for 228th.SE/31st. SE to be LOS"C" now and LOS"B" for 228th.!35th. yet the DEIS for the 1-405!County Line Ammendment and Quadrant rezone states a LOS "B" at 31st.!228th. and at 35th/228th. The impli- cation is that this would be a LOS to be anticipated not existing currently. How can the results be different at the same intersections? 6. What improvements are planned for 240th.? Fitzgerald Rd.? 85th.S.E.? Routing additional traffic onto these roads demands improvements for local residents' safety. 7. The DEIS implies that the majority of the traffic will go South, however with the extension of 39th. north~rd those seeking the freeway to go north may well chose to escape the free~y congestion altogether and use 39th. to 35th.S~. As congestion has increased over the years on the free~y'and their access points we in the area have experienced an increase in traffic on our neighborhood roads. 8. Will the quality of the trail be required to the same standard as that existing immediately to the South? ] 1. 2 ::r 3 4 5 J6 J7 ] 8 I I I I, I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I PAGE 2 9. What is the present condition of North Creek? What effects have been realized on the creek since the construction of the present business park? Has there been an increase or decrease in the fish population? I have heard that the temp- erature has increased in the summertime to an almost fatal level, is this true? 9 How could the unavoidable pollution of the wetlands and North Creek as noted on page 1-11 of the DEIS, be prevented? What mitigation is offered during constru- ction and most importantly after development? 10. If the Alternative Rezone Site Plan was selected over the Preferred Site plan, ] 10 what improvements would be required to 27th.? Given the prognosis of more congestion on our already overburdened roads,and free- ] ways unable to cope with the tremendous strain of more vehicles the solutions are 11 difficult especially when the bottom line is more important tha~ the quality of living! Thank you for this opportunity to respond to this DEIS. Sincerely, ~(U~_.~ n Elaine cr;;;;o-:;:r~ South County Homeowners 3333-218th. SE Bethell, WA. 98021 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1. 2. 3. RESPONSE TO LETTER NO. 10 ELAINE CRAWFORD The city of Bothell has not proposed to annex the site. If annexation is proposed in the future, however, it is not expected that there would be any significant impacts to the proposed project. In any event, any significant change, together with impacts of annexation, would be addressed in environmental documentation. The developer of this site will have to demonstrate at the rezone stage that traffic impacts resulting from site development can meet Title 26B requirements. This may require phasing of development to allow completion of necessary road improvement projects concurrent with the development of this site. As part of the proposed action, the section of 39th Avenue SE south of 240th Street will be improved by the proponent to match the three-lane roadway section in Bothell. The design will include a sidewalk on the west side of the street. The proponent will dedicate 10 feet of right-of-way along the property frontage for one additional lane on the west side of 39th. The SR 527 Long-Range Traffic Impact Mitigation Policy does not affect the proposed plan amendment and rezone because less than 10 percent of traffic from the preferred rezone alternative would use SR 527 between the 1-405 and 164th Street SE intersection. Projections for other alternatives show more than 10 percent of their traffic going through this intersection. 4. The proposal is for a Business Park designation. The proposed development includes offices, research and development, light manufacturing, electronic assembly, and a small amount of retail uses. The site plan has been designed in a manner that will allow access to the site only from 39th Avenue. The intent of the action is to discourage traffic from using the residential streets of 27th Avenue and 35th Avenue. The 228th Street improvements will provide a refuge lane on 228th Street as well as left-turn pockets on these side streets for easier access onto 228th Street. These design features will improve the safety for local residents. 5. The level of service reported at the intersections along 228th Street differs between the two studies due to the methodology used to analyze these T-intersections. Page 1 of Appendix F of the DEIS presents the methodology used in this EIS. Note, however, that in Table 32 as revised, the 1996 projected LOS for these two intersections under the 5 - 69 I. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I proposed action is the same as the LOS projected in the DEIS for North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan Amendment Studv in the 1-405/228th SE Subarea. (Table 32 has been revised to indicate that the addition of a refuge lane on 228th will not necessarily result in an improved LOS for left-turn movements from side streets. See Errata #10). 6. The site plan has been designed in a manner that will allow access to the site only from 39th Avenue. The intent of the action is to discourage traffic from using 240th and the residential streets of 27th Avenue, 35th Avenue, and Fitzgerald Road. Therefore, the increase in traffic on Fitzgerald Road and other residential streets would be minimal. 7. The proponent is committed to participating in the necessary improvements along the 195th Street corridor and the 39th Avenue extension that will minimize congestion and make these routes more attractive than alternative routes through residential areas. 8. The trail will be improved to a comparable level of quality. 9. DEIS pages 3-26 to 3-28 give a detailed description of the current state of North Creek. On DEIS pages 3-44 and 3-45, the existing fish habitat and numbers are discussed. The creek by all analysis is a well-functioning habitat for numerous fish species. The water temperature peak of 19.1 degrees centigrade noted on DEIS page 3-28 was a peak reading taken during the hottest month of the year and is not indicative of the normal creek temperature. There have been no recorded fish kills in North Creak due to stream temperature. As noted in the DEIS, erosion and sedimenta- tion control measures will be put in place during construction and biofiltration and other water quality treatment measures will be built into the final site plan in order to limit adverse impacts from runoff and to meet State Department of Ecology standards. 10. The Alternative Rezone site Plan has a single access point onto 240th Street. Only a small section of the total site would be serviced by the 240th Street access. Therefore, the increase in traffic on Fitzgerald Road would be minimal. The 27th Avenue/228th Street intersection would probably drop below LOS C and an all-way stop may be required. The two lane roadway would be able to accommodate the increased volume of traffic, but there would be some environmental impact on the local residents along this street. 11. Comment acknowledged. The proponent's stated objective in designing the business park was to balance the need for economic development with maintaining the unique environment and quality of life in the area. By geographically concentrating business park developments such as those 5 - 70 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I around Monte Villa Center, a critical density of potential commuters can develop such that an improved level of public transit service is warranted. 5 - 7l I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Letter No. 11 DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ~f.ATTL~ DI$TllIeT. COAl'S O. I!:NGIN21!:A9 P.O. IOOX .378" SE"TTI..E, WASHINaTON ... ZC.2ZS~ 1r"""'1l .,...'....H ,,-~ RECE!\.IF.!J :5::'. ": ....00 ~ 1_, . ;~.. Regulatory Sranch SEP 'r i\:):;Li Hr. Greg Williams SnohomistJ County Plaru1iIig Department 4th Floor, County !\dmin Building Everett, Washington 98201 Reference: Cet;l' !1r. .~~"j ]11.!\I1l$ : We recently :received a copy of the following lrlfor'P.ation f:roin Sn"homish .i:01:,,tv concerning your proposed project. ( ) Determlnatlc, on ~~signlficance ( ) Shoreline Permit ( ) Erwirorv!'.entlll Ci-leckl!st (x) Other: Drqft EIS Your project may require sutl'lOrization from the Corps of Englnee~'s under tr~ following regulations. ( } Section 10 of the Rivers and Harocrs Act (xl Se::ticn 404 of the Clean Water Act A Section 10 permit 1s required fer construction work in or over w'y navigable waters of the L~ited States. A Sect!on 404 permit is required fet the placement of dredgeo or fill material in waters of the united States, including wetlancs. The term wetlands me~~s tnose areas that are inundated or saturated by surface or ground water at D frequency and duration sufficient to S'.;pport, end tl,st un~r normal circumstances de support, a prevalence of vegetation typically adapteo for life 1n saturated soil .conditions. 1 Please conta::t ~~lffy ~~alk~r ,<;elepnone (206) 764-'49.5, c::;nce::n!.ng specific p~rmit r~~~irements. Enclosed for yOWl use 1s our permit pamphlet and necessary 3ppllcati~1 m~terials. Sincerilly, CCpj'" furnishee.: ~;(~ QU"'ldnil!t Corpor~tion P.O. llox 130 Ilel1evue, h8Shil"lgt(;n 98009 Ann R. Ul,rich Acting Chief, Environmental ~~d Processing Secti~, Enclosvres I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1. REPONSE TO LETTER #11 DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS Comment acknowledged. 5 - 73 I ~n I I I I I I I I I I I I I ! I I I I I .,";~ -:-;~~"..' ~~'.: 1i.\~~",~:-';:~:<:-?~~ 1:'~lff.~ !.< ~;:~"""'.":-..~"r:, ;,' . ~1~.<v,,-"i~ -;..'.. :;ij(.{~"" ;1: .' ......,~.--.ilt.: '..<....." .....J..o::lo Letter No. 12 S.!'IOHOMISH- COUNT_Y 014 J] 2320 California St., Everett, Washington 98201 258-8211 Mailing Address: P. O. Box 1107, Everett, Washington 98206 PUBLIC UTILITY DISTRICT NO.1 ,"'~ :-'::~~!:}5~~~~.,;!F;",.':..' !'~::'."~'; ::".:. August 30, 1990 RECEIVED AUG 311990 CO.I'LANNINU Ul',.>iON Snohomish County Planning Department 5th Floor, County Administration Bldg. Everett, Washington 9820l Gentlemen: QUADRANT VILLA CENTER The District presently has sufficient capacity to serve the proposed development. For information about the electrical service requirements this project, please call Bob Holt at the District's Customer Engineering Office, South County, at 670-3205. 1 for Very truly yours, GWS:bg cc: Bob Holt - SC ~ -i!. ~e;~::: General Engineering I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1. RESPONSE TO LETTER #12 SNOHOMISH COUNTY P.U.D. Comment acknowledged. Mr. Holt will be contacted for service requirements while building permits are pending. 5 - 75 II ! I I I I :1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I DRAFT TEXT CHANGES FOR BUSINESS PARK COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Chapter 6 DRAFT TEXT CHANGES FOR BUSINESS PARK COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT This Chapter revises the Draft Comprehensive Plan language provided in Appendix B of the Draft EIS. New or revised language is underlined; deleted language is lined through. North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan Amendment 1. Introduction The county periodically reviews its comprehensive plans to assure that plan assumptions are still valid in the face of changing conditions and shifts in community attitudes. There were several factors contributing to the decision to study this southern portion of the North Creek Planning Area. First, population in the planning area has grown at a faster rate than anticipated in 1977 when the North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan was adopted. Current projections estimate that more people will reside in the planning area in 1990 than assumed by the current comprehensive plan. Second, the plan assumed that the planning area would not be a primary employment center due to the fact that such centers were already established elsewhere in the County. However, there has been a substantial increase in the development of commercial and business park uses directly south of the site in Bothell and north of the area at Canyon Park. At Canyon Park, 235 acres have been developed or planned for business park uses since 1983 in addition to the 240 acres designated in the 1977 plan. The City of Bothell has revised its comprehensive plan for the North Creek valley to allow substantial business park and mixed use development. There are 380 acres of property south of the site in Bothell that have been developed or are planned for such uses. Third, road improvements are planned in the area that will improve circulation and access. The extension of 39th Avenue SE between 240th Street SE and 228th Street SE, will provide an additional north-south arterial. Road wideninq is planned for 228th Street SE between SR 527 and 39th Avenue SEe In addition, improvements at the NE 195th Street/I-405 interchange to the south are scheduled to be constructed as traffic levels increase, resulting in improved access to the regional network. Fourth, the property owner and applicant as well as several previous developers have applied for consideration of an amendment to the comprehensive plan for this site to allow development similar to adjacent development to the south and north in the "Technology Corridor". The study area encompasses 6 - 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I the last large vacant parcel under one ownership in the lower North Creek Valley. Following the Planning Commission's decision in early 1986 to rank this plan amendment study as a high priority, the Commission held a hearing in May of 1986 to determine the study area boundaries for the amendment study. In July, 1986, the Planning Division conducted a public workshop to inform area residents of the plan alternatives, receive comments, and conduct a public scoping meeting for the preparation of the EIS. A range of plan amendment alternatives for the site were discussed at the workshop including Business Park, High Urban Residential, Light Industrial, Community Business and No Change (maintaining the existing comprehensive plan designation). The greatest amount of support was expressed for the No Change and Business Park alternatives. In addition, the High Urban Residential received some support. Concerns were raised that if Business Park or High Urban Residential densities were considered, traffic, surface water drainage, flooding and North Creek impacts should be adequately considered and investigated. An important consideration for any change to the comprehensive plan was providing adequate transition and buffers to adjoining single-family residential areas. Participants had strong objections to the light industrial and community business plan alternatives. Based on this workshop and further evaluation, the light industrial and community alternatives were deleted; this EIS analyzes and compares the Business Park, High Urban and No Change plan alternatives. The recommended plan amendment alternative is for Business Park. The Planning Commission and County Council may choose to adopt portions or all of these comprehensive plan amendment alternatives. Changes would then be made to the North Creek Area Comprehensive Plan map and text as directed by the adopted plan amendment. Proposed text changes for the preferred plan amendment area were included in ~ni~ a~~eftdix~ Appendix B of the Draft EIS and have been revised in response to comments as described below. enaft~e~-made-~e-~ne-~referred-~iaft-ameftdmeft~-by ~ne The Planning Commission~ recommendations or the County council's decision may require additional or revised changes. 2. List of North Creek Comprehensive Plan Textual Changes Page 39: Amend the three sentences at the end of the second paragraph under Industrial Land Use to read: Eight sites have been shown on the plan for Business Park use. These sites comprise approximately 835 acres of the 23,500 acres in the study area. Each site is identified as follows: Page 41: Add the following paragraphs at the end of the Industrial Land Use section to read: 6 - 2 I. I I I I I I I I I I I I I . I I I I o Northeast corner of I-405 and county line. The %989t98 1991 plan amendment in this area redesignated the area bounded by I-405, Fitzgerald Road, 240th street SE, 39th Avenue SE and the County line as Business Park with a Watershed-site Sensitive overlay. The overlay designation applies to those areas which consist of either floodplains, peat soils, wetlands, stream corridors or slopes in excess of 15 percent. It is consistent with the identification criteria specified by the Development Areas Model of the plan. Areas outside the Watershed-site Sensitive designation are upland areas which can be developed according to the Upland Plateau criteria of the Environmental Management section. The following discussion contains recommendations and policy direction which are intended to have the weight of plan policies. Rather than listing them as separate plan policies under each element of the comprehensive plan, they have been included here in one place as they related specifically to the plan amendment area. These policies provide guidance in addition to the policies which have been part of the comprehensive plan for some time. The Business Park designation was provided because of the County-wide demand for high quality Business Park land projected by the year 2000, recent and planned Business Park developments immediately to the south and at Canyon Park Business Center, proximity to freeway interchanges, and projected road improvements in the area. The Business Park zone will implement the comprehensive plan in the amendment area. The development design controls of the Business Park (BP) zone will provide, in part, the landscaping and building setbacks necessary for a transition between adjacent single-family residential dwellings and the business park. In addition, the effect of building heights on the view of the valley from adjacent properties should be minimized by increasing the setbacks of buildings fronting 39th Avenue SE and 240th Street SE as much as possible, by placing buildings at lower elevations and/or locating parking areas between the road right-of-way and buildings. Roof eauipment should be screened from view. Parking areas should be landscaped to minimize light and noise impacts on adjacent residential properties. These construction techniques and BP zone design controls would constitute the appropriate bUffer/transition area necessary between the Business Park and adjacent residential uses. Site development should avoid any wetland areas except for the filling of less than one acre of wetlands. Any disturbed wetlands should be replaced at a ratio of not less than two to one. An average buffer of 25 feet should be maintained along wetland edges. Wetland mitigation should strive to create wetland classes which are currently absent on the site 6 - 3 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I in order to increase the overall habitat value of the wetlands. Veqetation on the site should be maintained and enhanced especiallv alonq North Creek to provide a mosaic of habitat types and habitats uniaue to the area. A wetlands enhancement/creation plan should be submitted and approved prior to development. Its obiectives should be the maintenance and enhancement of functional wetland values. A minimum setback and buffer area of 100 feet on either side of North Creek should be maintained consistent with the requirements of the Shoreline Management Master Program and other policies of the North Creek area Comprehensive Plan. Only pedestrian and bicycle trail and utility construction should be allowed within the creek corridor. Road construction should only be allowed where necessary to cross North Creek. Stormwater runoff from the site should be cleaned in catch basins, grass swales with a lenqth of at least 200 feet and oil/water separators before discharge into the creek and/or wetlands. The wetlands should be maintained and, where feasible, enhanced in their current configuration, except for filling of less than one acre of wetlands. The two primarv barns and main house now existing farm b~iidift~~ on the site should be retained. A coordinated recvclinq proqram should be established. site development should be limited to not more than a~~rexima~eiy 950,000 gross square feet of floor area on the entire site. This was the maximum build-out assumed for the traffic impact analysis which was performed as part of the comprehensive plan amendment study. Any development exceeding this limit would have unknown traffic impacts which would require additional analysis and further amendment of the comprehensive plan. Larger floor areas would also most likely have additional aesthetic impacts and impacts on the creek, soils and wetlands which have not been analyzed. Access to the site should be limited to 39th Avenue SE to minimize traffic impacts on the residential area north of 240th street SE. No access should be allowed from 240th Street SE except for emergency access. Riqhts-of-wav should be reserved for emerqencv access includinq one riqht-of-wav for emerqencv access aliqned with 35th Avenue SE. 31st Avenue SE should be vacated prior to the site development west of North Creek. Internal circulation should minimize roads on peat soils and avoid infringing on wetlands to the greatest extent possible. North Creek crossings should be limited to one. As part of the internal circulation plan and 6 - 4 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I consistent with the County's park and Recreation Plan, the developer of this site should be required to extend the public pedestrian/bicycle trail abutting the south property line along North Creek to the northwest corner of the plan amendment area. ~ne-reeefte-eeft~rae~ ~ne~id-iftei~de-~revi~ieft~-fer-ride~narift~ aftd-vaft-~eei-~re~am~-vnien-ve~id-red~ee-~raffie-aftd-air q~aii~y-im~ae~~~ The developer should develop a trip reduction proqram which should be approved bv the countv planninq and public works directors prior to rezone approval. Such a proqram should evaluate and include appropriate measures to reduce trip qeneration. such as: Transportation coordination. parkinq manaqement. bicycle parkinq and trails. ridesharinq. van pools. commuter information. monitorinq and reportinq of transportation characteristics. custom bus service. mixed land use to the extent allowed bv the Business Park zone. subsidY of transit passes. formation of a Transportation Manaqement Association and use of the Guide to Land Use and Public Transportation for Snohomish County. Washinqton. 1989 (prepared bv the Snohomish County Transportation Authoritv). The development should also be subiect to other applicable transportation demand manaqement plans and policies such as the City of Bothell's North Creek Transportation System and Demand Manaqement Plan. ~ne-~i~e-ee~id-be-deveie~ed-ift-~na~e~-aftd-mi~i~a~ieft-ef im~ae~~-ee~id-be-re~ired-~e-eee~r-a~-eaen-~na~e-i~ deveie~ed~ The traffic analysis for the comprehensive plan alternative indicated that traffic impacts can be mitiqated bv the year 2000 if 228th street SE is improved. if 39th Avenue SE is extended between 240th and 228th streets SE as planned and if the site's developer participates in the improvement proqrams of the city of Bothell. The traffic analysis for the rezone proposal indicated that prior to the year 1996, there may be traffic impacts which cannot be mitigated as required under the e~rreft~ version of Title 26B SCC in effect prior to Februarv 9. 1991. if 39th Avenue SE is not extended and 228th street SE is not improved. However, other mitigation such as aggressive car or vanpooling programs, better access to public transit, additional road capacity or enaft~e~-ift the application of Title 26B effective since February 9, 1991 may result in lesser road impacts or different standards and make the mitigation of impacts possible. Therefore. concurrently with a rezone to Business Park on this site, a rezone eeft~rae~ aqreement ee~id should be required which defines the responsibilities of a future developer for ~na~ed mitigation and/or further analysis and the county's right to withhold fiftai-si~e-~iaft approval if impacts cannot be mitigated under e~rreft~iy applicable 6 - 5 II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I standards and codes. The site may have to be developed in phases so that mitiqation of impacts can occur as each phase is developed. The rezone and mitiqation aqreement should reauire a fair share contribution bv the developer to the construction of the 39th Avenue SE extension. the completion of a traffic mitiqation aqreement with the city of Bothell. and should take into account the completion schedule for 228th street SE. 39th Avenue SE extension and city of Bothell road improvements. The above mentioned road improvements should occur concurrent Iv with Business Park development so that levels of service at affected intersections will not be lower than allowed. (~ni~-iaft~a~e-viii-be-refifted-a~-~ar~-ef ~ne-eem~reneft~ive-~iaft-ameftdmeft~-~reee~~~) The above-mentioned mitiqation aqreement with Bothell should also address open space. parks and recreation. historic preservation. public safety. utilities and storm drainaqe. 6 - 6