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Quadrant Business Park Supplemental Final EIS 1986 l : I ~ I I II i I I I I I I , I I I I I I I I I II Quadrant Business Park- Bothell Planned Unit Development Amendment Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement QUADRANT BUSIN[SS PARK BOTH[LL ttl.%: .! ,. '"/ ~ L . ./ City of Bothell Department of Community Development November 1986 Sincerely 'f. A /- ~~-_.. .... /- . /., ,- , . "",,,.-'- .~-- / .... .~ . . '7 Go'rdon Y. E~sen, Director I' //~EPA Res~;sible Official V GYE/JS/kL-' 40l4A I I I II I I I II I I I I I I I II I I I tl~ ....\~/l :?,.. -..:" ~ , 0", w,.t;+ CITY OF BOTH ELL 18305 - JOIST. N,E, BOTHEll, WASHINGTON 98011 DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (206) 486-8152 November 26, 1986 Dear Recipients: SUBJECT: FINAL SUPPLEMENTAL EIS FOR QUADRANT BUSINESS PARK - BOTHELL PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT AMENDMENT (E2-86-126R-2) This document was prepared in accordance with WAC 197-11-600 and 620 and is supplemental to the data and analysis contained in the "Quadrant Corporate Park - Bothell Draft and Final Environmental Impact Statement" prepared by the City of Bothell in April 1982. The supplemental EIS was prepared on a proposed hotel/motel/restaurant amendment to the approved Quadrant Business Park - Bothell project because the commercial use proposed was not addressed in the original EIS. It was believed that the proposal constituted enough of a change to warrant further environmental analysis and review. A thirty day review and comment period on the draft supplemental EIS was completed on October 30, 1986. The original EIS and additional background data is available for review at the Department of Community Development, Bothell City Hall. Contact John Shively, Senior Planner, for further information (486-8152) A public hearing on the draft supplemental EIS was not held. The Planning Commission will hold a public hearing on the PUD amendment application. y -e.. -h~y,V\ -\-0 ~I('+- ~1t-- I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I FINAL SUPPLEMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR THE QUADRANT BUSINESS PARK - BDTHELL PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT AMENDMENT Cl ty of Bottle 11 Department of Communlty Development Pursuant to ttle Sta te Envlronmental Polley Act of 1984 Ctlapter 43,21,c RCW and ttle Bottlell Munlcipal Code Title 20 Date of Issue: November 26. 1986 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I FACT SHEET Project Ii tl e Quadrant Business Park - Bothell Planned Unit Development (PUD) Amendment Proposed Ac t ion The action sponsor has requested from the Cl ty of Botllell an amendment to their approved PUD to allow tile development of a hotel/motel and freestanding or attached restaurant facility in tile Quadrant Business ,Park, Botllell. The area of tile hotel/motel/ restaurant facility would be traded against an equal amount of light industrial square footage as approved in the PUD. This document supplements the EIS prepared on the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothe I 1 , which was issued in 1982. Project Location The site is located east of 1-405 and north of SR-522 in the North Creek Valley. Witnin the Quadrant Business Park, the proposed notel/motel/restaurant facility would most likely be located ln the northwest corner on those lots identified as #1 and #2 in Figure 2. The Quadrant Corporation P.O. Box 130 Bellevue, WA 98009 City of Bothell Department of Community Development JOhn Shively, Senior Planner, Department of Community Development City of Bothell 18305 - 101st Avenue N.E. Bothell, WA 98011 (206) 486-8152 Actlon Sponsor Lead Agency Contact Person Licenses and Permits Required Planned Unit Development, Amendment Approval Certificate of Zoning Compliance Building Permit Shorellne Permit All other necessary permits and approvals i Principal Contributors Date of Issue of DEIS Date Comments Due Date of Issue of FEIS Approximate Date of Final Action by Lead Agency Type of Action Location of Back~round InformatIon (inc. EIS) Cost to the Public FACT SHEET (continued) I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Shapiro and Associates, Inc. The Smith Tower, Suite 1812 506 Second Avenue Seattle, WA 98104 (206) 624-9190 The Transpo Group, Inc. - Transportation/Circulation 14715 Bel-Red Road, #100 Bellevue, WA 98007-3940 (206) 641-3881 Richard Dickens & Associates - Economics 20832 76th Avenue West Edmonds, WA 98020 (206) 382-5601 October 1, 1986 October 30, 1986 November 26, 1986 December 1986 Planning Commission Recommendation Council Approval Shapiro and Associates, Inc. Suite 1812, Smith Tower 506 Second Avenue Seattle, WA 98104 (206) 624-9190 City of Bothell, Department of Community Development 18305 - 101st N,E. Bothell, WA 98011 $5,00 ii I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I TABLE OF CONTENTS Cover Letter Fact Sheet Table of Contents List of Tables and Figures SUMMARY A. Introduction B. Description of the Proposed Action and Al ternatives C. Summary of Impacts, Mitigating Measures, and Unavoidable Adverse Impacts I. INTRODUCTION II. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES A. Introduction B, Overview and Loca ti on C. Proponent's Objectives D. Proposed Action E. Al ternative A F. No Action G. Benefits and Disadvantages of Reserving Project Implementa tion for tile Future III. AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT, SIGNIFICANT IMPACTS, MITIGATING MEASURES A. Elements of the Environment B, Built Environment 1. Land Use a. Setting b. Zoning, Plans and Policies c. Aesthetics d. Pervious Surfaces 2. Transporta ti on 3. Public Services and Utilities 4. Economics Hi Page i iii iv S-l S-1 S-1 S-2 I-I II-I II-I II-I II-4 II-4 II-5 II-5 II-6 III-l III-l lII-4 III-4 II 1-4 III-7 II 1-16 II 1-18 II 1-20 III-36 II 1-42 I TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued) I Page I IV. COMMENT LETTERS AND RESPONSES IV-l A. State Agencies I 1. Department of Game IV-3 2. Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation IV-5 I 3. Department of Ecology IV-7 4. Department of Fisheries IV-9 B. Local JuriSdictions and Agencies I 1. Municipality of Metropolitan Seattle IV-13 I 2. King County Department of Planning and IV-IS Community Development 3. City of Bothell Fire Department IV-19 C. Individuals I 1. Ann Aagaard IV-21 .1 2. Heidi Jones IV-35 V. REFERENCES V-I I V. APPENDICES A. Legal Description I B. Distribution List I L1 st of Tables I Ta b 1 e 1 North Creek Valley Development Proposals II I -20 I Table 2 1985-1986 Level of Service at Selected Intersections I II -24 Table 3 Project Trip Generation I II-27 Table 4 1990 Level of Service (LOS) - Hotel/Motel/ I II -29 I Restaurant Complex with Full Valley Development Table 5 North Creek Valley Trip Generation II 1-32 Table 6 1990 Level of Service without Hotel/Motel/ 11 1-33 Restaurant Complex I Table 7 City of Bothell 1986 Expenditures II 1-42 Table 8 City of Bottlell 1986 Revenues II 1-43 Table 9 Project Cost and Assessed Value SChedule II 1-44 I Table 10 Major Pre-Development Revenues I II -45 Table 11 Cost/Revenue Comparison 111-46 I iv I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Fi gure 5 Fi gure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued) Page List of Figures Vicinity Map Site Map Land Use Development Proposals 1985/1986 Traffic Volumes Trip Distribution 1990 Traffic Volumes with Hotel/Motel/ Restaurant Complex on Project Site 1990 Traffic Volumes with Light Industrial Uses on Project Site Il-2 Il-3 I II-5 IlI-21 II 1-23 Il 1-28 II 1- 30 II 1-34 v I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I SUMMARY A. INTRODUCTION This Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) examines the proposed amendment to the Quadrant Business Park-Bothell Planned Unit Development to allow for the development of a hotel/motel/restuarant as part of the Quadrant Business Park in Bothell, Washington, When first proposed, the Quadrant Business Park was referred to as the Quadrant Corporate Park. The project site is located in the northwest corner of the Quadrant Business Park-Bothell, which is located South and east of the Interstate 405/N.E. 195th Street interchange in Bothell. The site is bounded by North Creek Parkway on the east, N.E. 195th Street to the north, a park area and 1-405 to the west, and undeveloped lots to the south. The Koll Business Center is located immediately to the north, across N.E. 195th Street. B. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES Affected Environment The Quadrant Business Park-Bothell is in the process of being developed. The property has been cleared, the access roadways (the North Creek Parkway and 120th Avenue N.E.) have been constructed, utilities have been extended, and the structures comprising the North Creek Corporate Center have been built. Five other buildings are currently under construction with seven in the planning stages. Proposed Action The Proposed Action is an amendment to the Quadrant Business Park- Bothell's Planned Unit Development. The amendment would allow for the development of an approximately 137,OOO-square-foot hotel/motel no more than three stories in height and an approximately 8,OOO-square foot restaurant in the northwest corner of the Quadrant Business Park. The facilities most likely would be located in one or more portions of Parcels 1 and 2 (see Figure 2 on page 11-3). The square footage that would be developed for hotel/motel/restaurant use would be traded against a like amount of the 2,230,000 square feet of light industrial space that has been permitted as part of the approved Planned Unit Development. There are two alternatives to the Proposed Action discussed in the SEIS, 5-1 S-2 I I I I I I I I '. I I I I I I I I I I Alternative A Alternative A, similar to the Proposed Action, would permit development of a hotel/motel/restaurant complex in the Quadrant Business Park-Bothell; however, the location of the complex would be different. Whereas the Proposed Action would most likely be located on Parcels 1 and 2 in the northwest corner of the Park, Alternative A is a generic location that corresponds to any combination of vacant parcels in the Business Park. These parcels mayor may not be contiguous. No Action Under the No Action Alternative, there would be no Planned Unit Development amendment that would allow the development of a hotel/motel/ restaurant complex. The Business Park would develop as originally approved for light industrial uses. C. SUMMARY OF IMPACTS, MITIGATING MEASURES, AND UNAVOIDABLE ADVERSE IMPACTS Through the mandatory scoping process, four elements of the environment were identified as warranting detailed analysis in the Supplemental EIS. These elements are Land Use (including the Setting; Zoning, Plans and Policies; Aesthetics; and Pervious Surfaces), Transportation, Public Services and Utilities, and Economics. The results of these analyses are summarized below. LAND USE Setting Impacts The Proposed Action would alter the allowable land uses in the Business Park. Approximately 145,000 square feet of hotel/motel/ restaurant uses would be traded against a similar amount of light industrial uses. Mitigating Measures . None are proposed. Unavoidable Adverse Impacts . None are anticipated. I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Zoning, Plans and Policies Impacts . The proposed use is a permitted use in the mixed use zone, and is allowable under the Urban designation in the Shorelines Master Program. The Proposed Action is a PUD amendment. Development of a hotel/ motel/restaurant complex would be subject to all applicable plans and policies. Mitigating Measures . None are proposed. Unavoidable Adverse Impacts . None are anticipated. Aesthetics Impacts The Proposed Action would be compatible with light industrial uses proposed for other lots within the business park. The proposed complex would be limited to a maximum of three stories in height and, therefore, could have a lower profile than future surrounding uses. The increased landscaping area on the site (compared to the landscaping under light industrial uses) would give the site a sllghtly more landscaped appearance. Mitigating Measures . None are proposed beyond those incorporated in the project as part of the Development Standards. Unavoidable Adverse Impacts . None are anticipated. Pervious Surfaces Impacts . The Proposed Action would increase the amount of pervious surfaces on the affected site from a minimum of 27% to a minimum of 33%. Mitigating Measures . None are proposed, S-3 S-4 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Unavoidable Adverse Impacts . None are anticipated. TRANSPORTATION Impacts The Proposed Action would generate 1,520 daily trips and 150 PM peak hour trips as compared to 800 daily trips and 160 PM peak hour trips. There would be slightly fewer trips during the critical PM peak period. Of these trips, 20% would be internal to the North Creek Valley Business Park developments (compared to 2% for the trips generated by light industrial uses that the Proposed Action would replace). The hotel/motel/restaurant complex would increase in the number of trips for the overall business park by 4%. This increase would represent an increase in 1% in overall traffic in the vicinity of the business park. There are minimal differences between the light industrial uses (No Action Alternative) and the proposed hotel/motel/restaurant complex level of service analysis for the seven study area intersections. Based on the minimum parking requirements of the Bothell Municipal Code for a hotel/motel/restaurant complex, 305 parking spaces would be required as compared to 290 parking spaces for the light industrial (No Action) development. No overflow parking is anticipated. Mitigating Measures No additional mitigating measures are proposed beyond those in the approved Master Plan and those parking and access standards required by the Quadrant Business Park-Bothell Development Standards. Unavoidable Adverse Impacts There would be an increase of 4% in daily automobile trips associated with the hotel/motel/restaurant complex as compared with light industrial uses. There would be an overall increase of 1% in total traffic in the vicinity of the business park. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I PUBLIC SERVICES AND UTILITIES Fire Police Impacts Project development could result in an increase in the potential for life hazard danger in the event of fire in a hotel/motel/ restaurant complex in the business park as compared to a light industrial use. The risk of fires involving flammable or hazardous materials associated with light industrial use would be reduced; however, under fire conditions, civilians and firefighters could be exposed to the hazard posed by burning materials (e.g., plastics and synthetics). Mltigating Measures Construction would be in accordance with the most current fire control and building standards. The hotel/motel/restaurant complex could be less than three stories in height, WhiCh would facilitate service by existing fire suppression equlpment. Project development would generate additional tax revenues (compared to that associated with light industrial uses) to the City of Bothell, a portion of WhiCh could be allocated to the Fire Department. The Clty of Bothell is considering adoption of an ordinance that would lead to purChase of an aerial ladder truck. All Quadrant Business Park development, whether hotel/motel/restaurant or light industrial, would be subject to the applicable provisions of the adopted ordinance, Unavoidable Adverse Impacts There would be a greater possibility of life hazard associated with a fire call in a hotel/motel/restaurant use than a light industrial use. Impacts There would be a slight increase in the number of calls associated with the proposed hotel/motel/restaurant to WhiCh the Bothell Police Department expects to respond. A higher percentage of the calls the Police Department would respond to on the site would occur at night with the proposed hotel/motel/restaurant use as compared to the light industrlal uses. S-5 S-6 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Mitigating Measures The proposed development would generate tax revenue, part of which could be allocated to the Bothell Police Department. No other mitigation is proposed. Unavoidable Adverse Impacts . The number of calls the Bothell Police Department expects to respond to from the proposed hotel/motel/restaurant development would be slightly higher than the number associated with light industrial/office use. Maintenance Impacts There would be no change in municipal utilities and services that would be maintained by the City. Private utilities (telephone, natural gas, etc.) would be maintained by the private utility companies. The property owner would maintain storm drainage, open space, and other improvements to public rights-of-ways within the Business Park pursuant to Article 6,1 of the Declaration of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions for the Business Park, The increase in pervious surface may decrease the need for retention/detention facilities and the maintenance associated with them. Mitigating Measures The Proposed Action would generate additional tax revenues (compared to those associated with light industrial uses) that would be used by the City of Bothell, in part, to maintain local SChools, libraries, and parks. Unavoidable Adverse Impacts . None are anticipated. Communication Impacts . The proposed hotel/motel/restaurant use would require an equal or lesser amount of telephone service than a similarly sized light industrial use and would not have a significant adverse impact on demand for telephone service. Mitigating Measures . None are proposed. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Unavoidable Adverse Impacts None are anticipated. Wa ter Impacts The proposed development is not expected to generate a demand for more water service than the potential land uses that it would replace. Mitigating Measures . None are proposed. Unavoidable Adverse Impacts None are anticipated. Sewer Impacts Impacts on demand on sewage services are expected to be similar to those associated with demand for water service. The proposed hotel/motel/restaurant use would have similar demand on sewer service as would a comparably sized light industrial use. Mitigating Measures . None are proposed. Unavoidable Adverse Impacts . None are anticipated. ECONOMICS Impacts Full scale operation of the complex would generate a surplus of revenues to the City over the costs of providing municipal services. This benefit would be greater than the surplus generated by light industrial uses that the Proposed Action would replace. Mitigating Measures . None are proposed. Avoidable Adverse Impacts . None are anticipated. S-7 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Section I INTRODUCTION In 1983 the City of Bothell approved the Quadrant Corporation's Planned Unit Development for a business park located south and east of the I-40S/N.E. 19Sth Street Interchange. The proposed business park had been evaluated in detail in an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared in 1982 that had examined the impacts of a variety of possible land uses, including light industrial, and office. When first proposed, the Quadrant Business Park was referred to as the Quadrant Corporate Park. Since the time of the Bothell City Council's approval of the PUD development, the potential for development of a hotel/motel/restaurant complex has been proposed, considered, and pursued by the Quadrant Corporation. Because SUCh a land use was not considered in the original EIS, and because there could be a change in environmental impacts associated with the development of the motel/hotel/restaurant rather than the approved light industrial use, a change in the Approved Conditions for the Quadrant Business Park-Bothell must be received from the Bothell City Council. SUCh a revision necessitates the preparation of a supplement to the EIS that had been prepared earlier. This document is the Supplemental Enviromental Impact Statement (SEIS) for the proposed revision to allowable land use: the document is designed to comply with State and City of Bothell Environmental Regulations requiring the identification and evaluation of potential beneficial and adverse impacts, and mitigating measures available to alleviate significant impacts. This document is organized into five sections, of which this Introduction is the first. The second section identifies the proponent's objectives and describes the proposed action--the exchange of the hotel/ motel/restaurant land use in place of approved light industrial land use--in detail. The section also characterizes two alternatives: the siting of the proposed action at an alternative location in Quadrant Business Park-Bothell; and a no-action alternative, whereby the business park would be developed as approved, The third section of the SEIS first briefly profiles the expected environmental impacts associated with the proposed action for eaCh element of the environment. The Section then characterizes the existing conditions, potential impacts and mitigation measures for selected elements for eaCh of the three alternatives. These assessments are prepared for eaCh element of the environment identified during the scoping process as warranting detailed analysis. These elements are Land Use, Aesthetics, Pervious Surfaces, Transportation, Services and Utilities, and Economics. Section IV identifies references. Section V presents the legal description and distribution list. 1-1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Section II DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES A. INTRODUCTION This section provides an overview of the development that currently exists on the project Site, identifies the proponent's objectives for the proposed development, and describes the Proposed Action and Alternatives. This section also provides a brief comparison of the environmental impacts of alternatives to the Proposed Action and a discussion of the benefits and disadvantages of reserving implementation of the Proposed Action for the future. B. OVERVIEW AND LOCATION The project site is located in the northwest corner of the 17S-acre Quadrant Business Park-Bothell, which is located south and east of the Interstate 40S/N.E. 19Sth Street interchange in Bothell, Washington (see Figure 1). The site is bounded by North Creek Parkway on the east, N.E. 19Sth Street to the north, a park area to the west, and undeveloped lots to the SOuth. The Koll Business Center is located immediately to the north, across N.E. 195th Street (see Figure 2). A legal description of the Business Park is presented in Appendix A. The Quadrant.Business Park-Bothell was approved by the Bothell City Council as a Planned Unit Development, The approval permitted the develop- ment of 650,000 square feet of office use and 2,230,000 square feet of light industrial use, with the total not to exceed 2,750,000 square feet. Provi- sion for the exchange of some of the 650,000 square footage for additional light industrial use was incorporated into the approval. Also allowed is the development of incidental commercial uses, provided that its area does not exceed 2% (55,000 square feet) of the total maximum, nor more than 20% of the gross floor area of any single building complex. The PUD is approved subject to a series of conditions that guide development on the site. These conditions address SUCh requirements as the dedication of open space, the transfer of property for community recreation, creation of pedestrian/dralnage easeways with associated improvements, construction and maintenance of trails, the provision of services and utilities, development of a traffic and circulation plan with associated improvements, creation of off-site improvements, landscaping, signage, and environmental investigations and monitoring. The Quadrant Business Park-Bothell currently contains three buildings, as well as several undeveloped lots (see Figure 2). These three buildings, located in the north-central portion of the park, make up the North Creek Corporate Center, WhiCh opened in June 1986. Twelve other buildings are currently in the planning stages. These include the Quadrant Office Building, to be located immediately north of the existing North Creek Corporate Center; the six-building Quadrant Corporate Center,to be located immediately south of the North Creek Center; the four-building Bothell 405 11-1 Business Park to be located in the southwest corner of the park; and a Puget Power site, which is planned for the southeast corner of the park. Four other parcels of land have been dedicated to the City of Bothell as park land, and currently contain baseball/softball diamonds. North Creek Parkway South and 120th Avenue N.E. provide internal circulation within the park. Access to the park is from the north via N.E. 195th Street. Development of the Quadrant Business Park-Bothell is proceeding consistent with existing approval and permits. Improvements, including the extension of utilities, are in place. Landscaping of the business park has been incorporated. C. PROPONENT'S OBJECTIVES The proponent's objectives in proposing the amendment to the Quadrant Business Park-Bothell's Planned Unit Development are as follows: to develop a hotel/motel/restaurant complex on the site that will complement the commercial/industrial business activities on the site, and that will provide a service component to the Park and thereby increase the Business Park's viability. . to reduce the need for employee travel during the lunch hour and, thereby, reduce the perceived necessity for workers to commute in their own vehicles. D. PROPOSED ACTION The Proposed Action is an amendment to the Quadrant Business Park- Bothell's Planned Unit Development. The amendment would allow for the development of an approximately 137,OOO-square-foot hotel/motel no more than three stories in height, and an approximately 8,OOO-square-foot restaurant in the northwest corner of the Quadrant Business Park. The facilities would be located in one or more portions of Parcels 1 and 2 (see Figure 2). The square footage that would be developed for hotel/motel/restaurant use would be traded against a like amount of the 2,230,000 square feet of light industrial space that has been permitted as part of the approved Planned Unit Development. The proposed amendment would alter Approval Condition Number 24 of Resolution Number 639 to include language comparable to the following: "Notwithstanding the foregoing restrictions, one hotel/motel, which may include an attached or free-standing restaurant, may be developed on the site, If a hotel/motel with restaurant is developed, the floor area of the hotel/motel with restaurant complex shall not be included within the 55,000 square feet of commercial/retail uses permitted on the site nor shall the 20% restriction for commercial use as a percent of any building 11-4 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I III III III I I I III I I III III III III III ! II III I complex apply. However, the 2,230,OOO-square-foot allowance for light industrial uses shall be reduced by the floor area of any hotel/motel and restaurant complex constructed on the site. The total combined building area devoted to the hotel/motel and restaurant complex and commercial/retail uses shall not exceed 200,000 square feet. The hotel/motel/restaurant complex shall not exceed three stories in height." The hotel would include up to 200 rooms and possibly as much as 2,500 square feet of banquet/meeting rooms, The specific design of the hotel/motel or restaurant have not yet been determined; however, the design would be consistent with all applicable conditions established in Resolution Number 639. Primary access to the hotel/motel/restaurant complex would be from North Creek Parkway via N.E. 195th Street and/or 120th Avenue N.E. E. ALTERNATIVE A The alternative to the Proposed Action also would permit development of a hotel/motel/restaurant complex on the Quadrant Business Park-Bothell site. As is the case with the Proposed Action, this alternative would exchange the hotel/motel/restaurant square footage for a like amount of light industrial uses. The alternative is distinguished from the Proposed Action by the location of the complex in the Business Park. Whereas the Proposed Action is located on Parcels 1 and 2 in the northwest corner of the Park, Alternative A is a generic location that corresponds to any combination of vacant parcels in the Business Park. These parcels mayor may not be contiguous. F. NO ACTION Under the No Action alternative, there would be no Planned Unit Development amendment that would allow a hotel/motel/restaurant complex, The Business Park would develop as originally approved. Also under the No Action Alternative, the demand for overnight accommodations and restaurant services would have to be met on some other site(s). This could include an approved site on the Koll Business Park, a proposed site on the Truly property, and possible sites in downtown Bothell or at Canyon Park. 11-5 G. BENEFITS AND DISADVANTAGES OF RESERVING PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION FOR THE FUTURE The benefit of reserving implementation of the Proposed Action includes the near-term avoidance of any adverse environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a hotel/motel/restaurant complex. Any impacts, however, could occur to a lesser or greater degree with development under the existing PUD approval conditions. Disadvantages of delaying project implementation include loss of market opportunities that would benefit the proponent directly and indirectly, a loss of the support services to Business Park occupants and the community, and a loss of tax revenues to the City of Bothell until such time as the project is initiated. 11-6 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I III. AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT, SIGNIFICANT IMPACTS AND MITIGATING MEASURES A. ELEMENTS OF THE ENVIRONMENT Following is a list of the elements of the environment as set forth in WAC 197-11. Elements identified "reviewed" are discussed in tile following section on pages specified in the Table of Contents. Elements that are not reviewed in detail have impacts deemed to be non-significant for reasons briefly stated thereafter. Generally, environmental conditions have not changed substantially since the issuance of the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell Environmental Impact Statement in 1982. I. NATURAL ENVIRONMENT A. Earth/Soils: Further analysis specific to this proposal is not warranted. Refer to the 1982 EIS for a complete discussion of this element. B. Air Quality: The 1982 Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell EIS included an air quality analysis with calculations of annual emission levels associated with the Quadrant Business Park. The Quadrant Business Park is located in an attainment area for carbon monoxide (CO). Forecasts showed that traffic generated carbon monoxide was the major potential quantifiable air quality impact. An approval condition of the business park is the provision for annual air quality monitoring by the business park developers. This monitoring is on-going. The proposed amendment is not expected to generate any increase in potential air quality impacts. C. Water: An increase in the minimum pervious surface is not expected to have a significant impact on water quantity or quality in North Creek or the Sammamish River. No development would occur in the North Creek buffer zone. Further analysis specific to this proposal is not warranted. Refer to the 1982 EIS for a discussion of this element. D. Plants and Animals: Prior agricultural land conditions on the site have changed substantially since the issuance of the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell Environmental Impact Statement in 1982. Alternative land uses have been approved with some development constructed or planned; landscaping has been incorporated and buffer zones have been established along North Creek; further analysis specific to this proposal is not warranted. Refer to the 1982 EIS for a complete discussion of tIlis element. E. Energy and Natural Resources: Conditions have not changed substantially sInce the Issuance of the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell Environmental Impact Statement in 1982; further III-l 111-2 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I analysis specific to this proposal is not warranted. Refer to the 1982 EIS for a complete discussion of this element. II. BUILT ENVIRONMENT A. Environmental Health (Noise): The 1982 Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell EIS included a summary of the noise study conducted for the business park project. The predominant noise in the vicinity of the proposed project is traffic noise from 1-405 and N.E. 19Sth. The major Short-term noise impacts associated with the proposed hotel/motel/restaurant complex would be from construction equipment. According to the noise analysis in the 1982 EIS, the sensitive residential noise receptors are either located too far away from the site to be affected or receive significantly more noise from freeway traffic. Project related traffic and on-site activities are not expected to cause significant long-term noise impacts. Further analysis specific to this proposal is not warranted. B. Land and Shoreline Use 1. Relationship to Existing Zoning, Land Use Plans and Pollcles: ReVIewed in this document. 2. Population/Housing: Conditions have not changed substantially since the issuance of the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell Environmental Impact Statement in 1982; further analysis specific to this proposal is not warranted, Refer to the 1982 EIS for a complete discussion of this element. 3. Light and Glare: Exterior lighting of all business park uses is controlled by the business park. Development Standards and the Bothell Zoning Code are designed to control light and glare. Further analysis specific to this proposal is not warranted. Refer to the 1982 EIS for a complete discussion of this element. 4. Aesthetics: Reviewed in this document. 5. Recreation: With the exception of the ballfields built on the business park, conditions have not changed substantially since the lssuance of the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell Environmental Impact Statement in 1982; further analysis specific to this proposal is not warranted. Refer to the 1982 EIS for a complete discussion of this element. 6. Historic and Cultural Preservation: Conditions have not changed substantially since the issuance of the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell Environmental Impact Statement in 1982; further analysis specific to this proposal is not warranted. Refer to the 1982 EIS for a complete discussion of this element. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 7. Agricultural Crops: Prior agricultural land uses discussed in the Quaarant Corporate Park-Bothell Environmental Impact Statement in 1982 have been replaced by approved and pending non-agricultural uses. Further analysis specific to this proposal is not warranted. Refer to the 1982 EIS for a complete discussion of this element. 8. Pervious Surfaces: Reviewed in this document. C. Transportation 1. Transportation Systems: Reviewed in this document. 2. Vehicular Traffic: Reviewed in this document. 3. Waterborne, Rail and Air Traffic: Not reviewed; not applicable to the site. 4. Parking: Reviewed in this document. 5. Movement/Circulation of People or Goods: Reviewed in this document. 6. Traffic Hazards: Reviewed in this document. D. Public Services and Utilities 1. Fire: Reviewed in this document. 2, Police: Reviewed in this document. 3. SChools: Conditions have not changed substantially since the issuance of the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell Environmental Impact Statement in 1982; further analysis specific to this proposal is not warranted, Refer to the 1982 EIS for a complete discussion of this element. 4. Parks or Other Recreational Facilities: With the exception of the ballfields that have been built in the business park, conditions have not changed substantially since the issuance of the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell Environmental Impact Statement in 1982; further analysis specific to this proposal is not warranted. Refer to the 1982 EIS for a complete discussion of this element. 5. Maintenance: Reviewed in this document. 6. Communications: Reviewed in this document. 7. Water/Storm Water: Reviewed in this document. 8. Sewer/Solid Waste: Reviewed in this document. E. Economics: Reviewed in this document. IlI-3 LAND USE I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I B. BUILT ENVIRONMENT SETTING Affected Environment Quadrant Business Park-Bothell is located in the North Creek Valley. The Business Park is bordered by steep Slopes to the east, State Route 522 and undeveloped land to the south, Interstate 405 to the west, and the Koll Business Center to the north (see Figure 2 on page 11-3). Approximately eight acres of the Business Park are located west of 1-405, adjacent to the proposed Truly Property mixed use project. The nearest residential development, HollYhills, is on the upland plateau east of the site. Other low density residential development is located west of 1-405 along the base of the hills and on the plateau. A small commercial area is located south of SR-S22 (see Figure 3). The Quadrant property is zoned for mixed use (MU). The business park is currently in the process of development. The building sites have been prepared and several companies have or are in the process of constructing facilities on the site (see Figure 2 on page II-3) . The Koll Business Center, north of the Quadrant Business Park-Bothell, includes light industrial, business office space. As part of their planned business park facilities. The Koll Company was recently granted an approval for a proposed hotel/motel facility, The Truly property (west) has proposed a mixed use project consisting of a regional shopping center, a motor inn, professional offices, and apartments and townhouses. Impacts Proposed Action The major land use impact associated with the proposed amendment to the PUD would be a Change in the allowable development of the northwest portion of the business park from light industrial use to a hotel/motel/ restaurant complex. The current Character of the site, undeveloped land, would be altered to accommodate construction of the proposed facilities. The business park would remain similar in Character to the original proposal but offer additional services for those using the business park and adjacent business centers. There would be an increase in landscaping on this portion of the business park. A 1 terna the A Since Alternative A would differ from the Proposed Action only in the location of the hotel/motel/restaurant complex within the Quadrant Business Park, the land use impact would be similar to those associated with the Proposed Action. II 1-4 111-6 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I No Action Impacts associated with the No Action Alternative would be those associated with a business park, consisting primarily of light industrial uses. For details, refer to discussion in the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell EIS. No action would mean the demand for hotel/motel/restaurant uses would be met by proposed or future sites outside the Quadrant Business Park. One site has been approved by the Bothell City Council for the Koll Business Center immediately north of the Quadrant site. Another site has been proposed on the Truly property immediately west of 1-405. This site is involved in permit review by the Bothell City Council. Other sites have been identified, including downtown Bothell and Canyon Park; however there are no specific proposals for these locations at this time. Mitigating Measures None would be necessary beyond those incorporated in the project as part of the Development Standards. Unavoidable Adverse Impacts None are anticipated. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ZONING, PLANS AND POLICIES This section provides an overview of existing land use plans and policies, and zoning regulations. The discussions of plans and policies are excerpts of the documents that are pertinent to the proposed action. City of Bothell Comprehensive Plan The City of Bothell Comprehensive Plan, adopted in 1971, guides the City's land use decisions. In 1979, the City of Bothell revised and updated a portion of the comprehensive plan pertaining speCifically to the North Creek Valley. The Quadrant Business Park-Bothell site is located in the North Creek Valley; applicable plans and policies are contained in the "Plan for the North Creek Valley and Development Guidelines." For further discussion of the City of Bothell Comprehensive Plan, refer to the Draft EIS for the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell. North Creek Valley and Development Guidelines The North Creek Valley Plan recommends the application of a Special District designation for portions of the North Creek Valley located within the City of Bothell. Policies and development standards for the Special District are set forth in the Bothell Municipal Code, Chapter 17.25. The following goals, objectives, and poliCies are excerpts from the North Creek Valley Plan. Each is followed by a comment pertaining to the relationship of the proposed PUD amendment to the policy. I. General Goals and Objectives Goal: Recognize the North Creek Valley as a unique resource suitable for a multipliCity of uses by providing for a variety of uses which will be compatible with each other and with the setting. Objective 1: Uses within the North Creek Valley Planning Area should be regulated to preserve and improve the quality of life in Bothell. Objective 2: The upgrading of North Creek as an important fisheries resource should be given a high priority consideration. Objective 3: Uses within the North Creek Valley planning Area should make a positive contribution to housing, local employ- ment opportunity and the tax base without contributing to visual, air, light, water or noise pollution problems. Objective 4: Make a major contribution to the Open Space needs of the Northshore Community by promoting the use of land for certain agricultural, recreational and open space uses without locking the valley floor into mandatory agricul- tural use. 111-7 Objective 5: Utilize the unique setting of the North Creek Valley Planning Area to help meet the recreational needs of the Northshore Area. Objective 6: Development on the wooded slopes should be in confor- mance with the general development policies of the Bothell Comprehensive Plan with particular attention to the feathered edge concept and the retention and en- couragement of tree cover to minimize the visual impact. Objective 7: Development in upland areas should provide needed hous- ing opportunities and related neighborhood amenities while retaining the natural character of the area to the maximum extent feasible. Objective B: Streets and utilities in the planning area should be planned to support the variety of uses and should pro- vide a logical network related to all segments of the planning area and to the community at large. Objective 9: 1-405 and SR 522 should be recognized and utilized as the major transportation spines for the area, but should be acoustically and visually screened from the surroun- ding area. Objective 10: Encourage expanded public transportation throughout the planning area. II. Policies for the North Creek Planning Area A. Policies for the Valley Floor 1. All developments on the valley floor shall be subject to the Planned Unit Development process with a general set of standards developed that will be applied through this process including arChitectural and landscaping conceptual approval as part of the preliminary PUD. Comment: The Quadrant Business Park is subject to the Planned Unit Development process. Development of the proposed hotel/motel/ restaurant complex would be guided by the set of Development Standards with restrictive conditions and covenants established specifically for the Quadrant Business Park. These standards include guidelines for architecture and landscaping. 2. Open space should be encouraged to the maximum extent practical in all developments on the valley floor. If large areas of impervious surfaces are necessary, landscaping should be extenSively utilized to avoid negative visual impacts on the surrounding areas including adjacent upland and slope areas. Comment: The Quadrant Business Park includes 32 acres of open space. Landscaping and aesthetic concerns are addressed in the 111-8 I I I . . . I I .. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I . . . . I I I . I . . I I . . Development Standards for the Quadrant Business Park. The proposed PUD amendment would increase the minimum requirement for pervious surface on the affected lots and would be subject to all applicable standards for landscaping and visual impacts. 3. An impervious surface coverage allotment shall be utilized as a foundation of the plan. This gives limited development rights to property owners in the valley while providing enough control to limit negative impacts on the environment. It helps maintain open space and leaves agricultural and development choices open for future generations since land once covered by an impervious surface can not be easily returned to agricultural/ open space uses. Comment: The proposed PUD amendment would result in an increase of perviOUS surface coverage on the affected parcels. The amount of perviOUS surface/landscaped area would increase from a minimum of 27% to a minimum of 33% on the affected lots under the Proposed Action or Alternative A. The effect of the Proposed Action on pervious surfaces is discussed in detail in this SEIS. 4. The types of uses that will be encouraged subject to adequate controls to preserve and improve the quality of life in Bothell include: a. Non-polluting manufacturing b. Business-professional uses c. Educational facilities d. Recreation facilities e. Non-freeway oriented pUblic accommodations f. Retail outlets g. Hospitals, clinics, medical-professional buildings h. Multifamily residential uses Comment: The proposed hotel/motel and associated restaurant would prOVIde non-freeway oriented pUblic accommodations and a retail (restaurant) outlet. 5. The following uses are to be restricted from the valley floor: a. Single-family and mobile home residential uses b. Open storage except for certain agricultural purposes Comment: The proposed PUD amendment would not include Single-family, mobile home, or open storage uses. 6. Energy conservation should be one of the major considerations in the locations and specific siting of buildings and landscaping. Comment: Development of the Quadrant Business Park is guided by development standards with restrictive covenants and conditions. These development standards include provisions pertaining specifically to energy conservation. 111-9 B. Policies Related to North Creek 1. Surface water discharge systems entering North Creek should be designed to control the quality of water as well as the quanitity. The quality should be equal to or better than occurs naturally. Comment: The proposed hotel/motel and restaurant use of a portion of the business park site would not result in the direct disCharge of surface drainage into North Creek. 2. Surface water runoff flowing into North Creek should utilize a sewerage system if necessary to maintain established water quality and water quantity levels. It is the intention of this policy to keep pesticides and herbicides such as are utilized on ornamental plantings and agricultural crops as well as animal wastes out of North Creek. Comment: Runoff from the proposed development would not enter North Creek. The development would incorporate sewers, lot-by-lot catch basins with oil separators, and on-site retention to control the quality and quantity of storm water runoff from the site. The runoff would follow its natural course and undeveloped rate. 3. Potential flood plains along North Creek should be protected to eliminate the necessity for further channelization of the Creek for flood control purposes. a. Pending a detailed study by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers or HUD, no development should be allowed within the Shoreline Management areas of North Creek. b. Flood plain zoning should be used to protect the floodway, and zoning and flood-proofing teChniques should be used to protect the flood fringe in any floodplain. Comment: The proposed PUD amendment would not affect the status of the development relative to the flood plain, shoreline management designations, or flood plain zoning. The amendment site lies in part within juriSdiction of the Shorelines Management Act, which would apply to the light industrial uses as well as the hotel/ motel/restaurant complex. Both uses are permitted under the applicable "Urban" Shoreline designation. The Business Park includes approximately 2.3 acres of open space adjacent to North Creek, which would buffer North Creek from development of a hotel/motel/ restaurant complex. 4. North Creek should be upgraded to a major fisheries area. a. The feaSibility of meandering North Creek should be explored. If this is at all practical, the City of Bothell should work with interested state agencies in developing a plan for North Creek which could be accompliShed over time either as a pUblic works project or by private developments as they occur. III-10 . . . . . . . I I I I I I . I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I b. Short of major relocations, design standards should be developed with the appropriate agencies to allow for the ultimate upgrading of North Creek within its existing channel or for minor deviations carried out as part of private development concepts. c. The location of fish-rearing ponds and other fisheries-related facilities in the valley which could relate to North Creek should be seriously promoted. Comment: The proposed PUD amendment would exchange light industrial square footage for equal square footage to be used as hotel/motel and restaurant space. Enhancement of North Creek has already occurred, as stipulated under Quadrant Business Park Development Standards. C. Policies for Recreation and Open Space 1. A sports field complex should be developed on the valley floor designed to serve the active recreational needs of the Northshore area. 2. Commercial recreational uses of an open space nature such as golf courses and riding stables should be encouraged. 3. By purchase and easement agreements, develop the capability for a complete trail network in the North Creek Valley Planning Area. a. Trails along both sides of North Creek should be coordinated with any relocation plans for North Creek. b. Trails along North Creek should use culverts and bridges for crossing under highways and major streets to insure complete separation from vehicular traffic. c. Final development of these trails should wait for the floodplain study so grade changes, berms, walls and massive plantings can be used to partially deflect noise from 1-405 and SR-522. d. Any development whatever in the North Creek Valley Planning Area other than traditional large acreage agricultural practices should include provisions for pedestrian access. 4. Joint use of parking lots in the area should be encouraged to allow recreational users off-hours use of developed parking. 5. Provide a neighborhood recreational faCility or facilities in the Holly Hills area in accordance with the policies of the Recreational Open Space Plan. 6. Require all development proposals to indicate the nature of the open space to be left and how it is to be maintained. Open space III-ll categories may include: sports fields, natural open space, certain commercial recreation areas, semi-public passive areas or trails, pUblicly dedicated open space, agricultural space, formally landscaped areas. 7. Credit for open space requirements for private development may be transferred to other areas on the valley floor. Comment: The above policies pertaining to recreation and open space are reviewed in the Draft EIS for the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell. The proposed PUD amendment would not change the status of the relationship and consistency of the Quadrant Business Park with these policies. D. Policies Related to Streets and Utilities 1. Development of all new streets and utilities in undeveloped areas should be at private developer's expense in accordance with the patterns and standards established by the plan. 2. Encourage orderly development of property as the need arises based on the proximity of existing streets and utilities. However, in cases where development is beyond the range of existing facilities the developer should make the necessary off-site improvements and depend on late-comers fees to compensate for the additional cost. 3. Provide adequate east-west access in the planning area by establiShing a connection for N.E. 195th Street. 4. Develop a complete collector system to support the level of development allowed in the planning area. 5. Avoid long dead-end streets by providing for logical connections between areas potentially available for development. 6. Sewer lines provided in the planning area Should be sized to accommodate adjacent service areas at their appropriate density. Comment: The previous policies pertaining to streets and utilities are reviewed in the Draft EIS for the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell. The proposed PUD amendment would not change the status of the relationShip and consistency of the Corporate Business Park with these policies. E. Policies Related to 1-405 and SR-522 1. The negative visual impact of buildings with their rear elevation facing 1-405 or SR-522 shall be avoided by building orientation and design and/or effective screening and stringent control of trash receptacles and loading areas. 3. Building design and location should be planned to act as noise buffers from the freeway. 111-12 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II Comment: Proposed structures for the Quadrant Business Park would be subJect to design considerations included in the Development Standards and Declaration of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions. This document sets forth the standards for building orientation and design, landscaping, and other aesthetic considerations. 4. Commercial development in the North Creek Valley shall not include businesses which are dependent on attracting freeway motorists in order to sustain themselves. Commercial signs should not be oriented towards attracting the traveling public. The intent of this standard is to encourage a variety of businesses such as corporate offices, a convention center complex, restaurants, computer software sales, and various professional offices to locate as a group in the Valley without the economic need for freeway advertising. Comment: The proposed hotel/motel and restaurant complex would not be dependent on attracting freeway motorists in order to sustain itself. The primary intent of the complex would be to provide services for Bothell area businesses. Identification signage compatible with the business park would be proposed. Title 17 City of Bothell Zoning Code and Map The City of Bothell Zoning Code implements the goals and policies established in the Bothell and North Creek Valley Comprehensive Plans. Zoning categories speCify permitted uses, lot sizes, setback requirements, parking requirements, etc. The Quadrant Business Park-Bothell site is zoned Mixed Use (MU). The permitted uses and specifications of this zone are defined in Chapter 17.23 of the Bothell Municipal Code. The general intent of the MU zone is to: Allow a wide variety of uses which co-exist compatibly with each other and the environment. Promote land uses which make a positive contribution toward meeting housing needs, provide local employment opportunities, and contribute to the city's tax base without contributing to visual, air, light, water or noise pollution. Promote uses of land in a manner which tend to meet community open space and recreational needs by fostering agricultural, recreational, and other open space uses. Encourage development which is arChitecturally and aesthetically compatible with the surrounding environment and land uses. In 19B5, the Bothell City Council issued an administrative interpretation regarding the consistency of hotel/motel use with the objectives of the MU zone. The City Council determined that "a hotel/motel is a permitted use in a Mixed Use zone, provided that use is not carried on III-13 in a manner which is intended or has the effect of attracting freeway motorists as a substantial source of business." Chapter 17.26 of the Zoning Code establishes the requirements for Planned Unit Developments. As stated in the Draft EIS for the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell, the intent of the planned unit development is as follows: To produce a development which would be as good or better than that resulting from traditional lot-by-lot development, by permitting flexibility in use of open space and in the design and placement of buildings, circulation facilities, and off-street parking areas in order to best utilize sites characterized by special features of geography, topography, size or shape. To encourage a creative approach in the development of land which will result in an efficient, aesthetic and desirable use of land area, while at the same time maintaining substantially the same unit density and area coverage, or in the case of nonresidential, the same area coverage as that permitted on non-PUD developments in the zone in which the project is located. To avoid an overburdening of present or projected public utilities, services and roads as compared to that which would result from lot-by-lot development. To encourage developments which will provide a desirable and stable development whiCh is in harmony with surrounding land uses through implementation of the Bothell Comprehensive Plan and the provisions of this title. To avoid creation of conditions which would constitute a net impact. which, on balance, would be less desirable than that compared to the lot-by-lot development of the underlying land use and/or would detrimentally affect the enjoyment, use, and property rights of the adjoining nearby area. To implement the policies of the Bothell Comprehensive Plan. Comment: The proposed amendment is consistent with the Zoning Code. Shoreline Master Program for the City of Bothell The Bothell Shoreline Master Program, developed in accordance with the WaShington State Shoreline Management Act of 1971, establishes classifications for shoreline environments. As stated in the Draft EIS for the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell, the Bothell shoreline development concepts were designed to preserve future development options along North Creek and the Sammamish River, with emphasis on providing view corridors. The purpose of these regulations is to guarantee sufficient opportunity for public access to and enjoyment of the Shorelines and water resources within the City of Bothell. The goals and policies of the Shoreline Master Program were incorporated into the Bothell Comprehensive Plan. II 1-14 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I The Quadrant Business Park-Bothell includes about 600 feet of North Creek. The Shoreline Master Program designates the North Creek shoreline as Urban. The area within the Urban environment designation is recognized as having either existing urban-oriented uses or containing land that will be subject to urban development. This environment is designed to reflect a desire and policy of increasing the utilization and efficiency of particular areas; encourage a substantive change in use or bulk; or promote a more intense level of use via redevelopment of under-used or deteriorated areas. Comment: The proposed amendment to allow a hotel/motel/restaurant complex would be subject to the Bothell Shoreline Master Program. The Quadrant Business Park-Bothell Development Standards specifically state that "all developments located within 200 feet of the ordinary high water mark of North Creek must conform to and comply with the Bothell Shoreline Master Program and applicable sections of the Development Standards." The Quadrant Business Park-Bothell includes an open space buffer adjacent to North Creek. Public access to the creek from the development would be allowed. III-15 AESTHETICS Affected Environment The project site is located in the broad, relatively flat North Creek valley floor. The primary view of the valley is from residences on the surrounding hillsides and from 1-405, which passes along the west side of the Quadrant Business Park-Bothell and is slightly elevated. Several large projects, primarily business parks, are under development in the area and have Changed the aesthetic characteristics of the valley floor from rural to suburban industrial. Much of the valley floor is currently being developed; lots have been divided and cleared, and building construction is proceeding. In the Quadrant Business Park, the three building North Creek Corporate Center has been developed east of the site of the proposed hotel/motel/ restaurant complex. Additional buildings are under construction in the business park. The Quadrant Business Park-Bothell Development Standards include a variety of standards that govern the design and appearance of development that occurs on the site. An Architectural Control Committee has the responsibility of ensuring that any proposed designs for improvements are harmonious with other designs and surrounding development on the site, and are consistent with specific provisions of the Development Standards. In considering arChitectural plans, the Committee examines a variety of criteria, such as site coverage, building setback, landscape standards, parking and access requirements, arChitectural standards, signage, screening requirements, lighting requirements, and other elements contained in the Development Standards. Impacts Proposed Action Aesthetic impacts associated with the Proposed Action would be similar to those associated with currently approved light industrial development. The proposed amendment would increase the minimum amount of pervious surface from 27% to 33% on affected parcels. These surfaces would be landscaped, enhancing the appearance of the site. The Proposed Action would be aesthetically compatible with existing surrounding development. The proposed complex would be limited to a maximum height of three stories and, therefore, could have a lower profile than future surrounding uses. Architectural standards incorporated into the Development Standards guide the visual character of designs. The exterior materials would be consistent with the Development Standards. Any proposed development on the property must receive approval from the Architectural Control Committee prior to SUbmittal for Planning Commission approval. Alternative A Since Alternative A would differ from the Proposed Action only in the location of the hotel/motel/restaurant development within the Quadrant Business Park, the aesthetic impacts associated with Alternative A would be similar to those associated with the Proposed Action. 111-16 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I' I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I No Action Impacts associated with the No Action Alternative would be those associated with a business park consisting of light industrial, office, and commercial uses. For details, refer to discussion, 19B2 Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell EIS. Mitigating Measures None are proposed beyond those incorporated in the project as part of the Development Standards. Unavoidable Adverse Impacts None are anticipated. 111-17 III-1B I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I PERilOUS SURFACES Affected Environment The Bothell Municipal Code (Chapter 17.25) has created the North Creek Valley Special District, an overlay zoning classification, for the purpose of implementing the goals, objectives, policies and standards of the Comprehensive Plan. A cornerstone to the implementation of the Plan's goals are standards relating to the amount of allowable impervious surface. The Bothell Municipal Code (Chapter 17.25.90) defines "impervious surface" as "materials or structures placed on or above the ground which reduce the rate of water absorption at any location on the development site from that which occurred prior to development. The term imperviOUS surface includes, but is not limited to: a. Buildings, excluding roof overhangs, and balconies which project six feet or less; b. Sidewalks and other paved ways; c. Parking lots; d. Paved streets, except as otherwise provided in this chapter; e. Decks, terraces and patios; f. Incidental outside storage." The Development Standards for the approved Quadrant Business Park-Bothell prescribe that clean, light industrial use shall have a minimum of 27% of the lot area for non-impervious or landscaped areas. Office, light industrial and incidental commercial uses shall have a minimum of 33% of the lot area for non-impervious or landscaped areas. The impervious surface standard is implemented on a parcel-by-parcel basis, except for where contiguous parcels are developed as a single enti ty. The existing Quadrant Business Park-Bothell includes both pervious and impervious surfaces. The impervious surfaces include roadways, parking areas and buildings. Pervious surface includes landscaped areas, natural areas and undeveloped parcels. The configuration of roadways and buildings is shown in Figure 2, whiCh illustrates that most of the undeveloped parcels in the Corporate Park are located west of North Creek Parkway and on either side of 120th Avenue N.E. Impacts Any of the alternative actions would allow an increase in the amount of pervious surface compared to existing undeveloped conditions on vacant parcels on the site. Proposed Action The Proposed Action would increase the amount of pervious surface on the affected site from a minimum of 27% to a minimum of 33%. This I I I I I I 'I I I I I I I I I I I I I increase in pervious or landscaped area would be a visual benefit, and would also enable additional storm water to be absorbed into soils, thereby decreasing the requirements for retention/detention facilities. The hotel/motel/restaurant complex would occupy approximately 7-B acres under the Proposed Action. The 6% difference in pervious surface (33% versus 27%) would apply to the actual site used and would increase pervious surface accordingly. Alternative A The development of a hotel/motel/restaurant complex on an alternative site in the Quadrant Business Park-Bothell would have impacts on pervious surface comparable to the Proposed Action. The complex would occupy approximately eight acres. The amount of perviOUS surface on affected parcels would increase from 27% to 33%. No Action Under a No Action Alternative, there would be no change to the amount of allowed pervious surface. The minimum perviOUS surface of 27%, as established in the Development Standards, would be required on any parcels developed in clean, light industrial use(s). Mitigating Measures The required increase in pervious surfaces is a mitigating measure for both aesthetic and storm drainage considerations. No other mitigating measures are proposed. Unavoidable Adyerse Impacts None are anticipated. 111-19 I II -20 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I TRANSPORTATION The information presented in this section has been summarized from a traffic analysis prepared by The Transpo Group. The report is available for review at the City of Bothell's Department of Community Development. The focus of the current analysis for the proposed hotel/motel/ restaurant complex is to identify general changes in the transportation system that have occurred since 19B3 including new development proposals, and to determine the relative impacts of the hotel/motel/restuarant complex compared to the light industrial uses it would replace. Since completion of the 19B2 EIS, there have been a number of additional development proposals in North Creek Valley and the vicinity. The current known development proposals are listed in Table 1 and shown on Figure 4. These were considered in the analysis of impacts for this document. Table 1 NORTH CREEK VALLEY DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS Assumed Buildout Development Project Land Use Size Year Quadrant Business Park business park 2,BOO,OOO sf 1990* Koll Business Center busi ness park 1,BOO,OOO sf 1990* Truly Development mixed use 1,400,000 sf 1995 Koll North Creek II business park 700,000 sf 1995 North Creek Heights mul tifamily, 177 uni ts 1995 Single-family Victorian Village mul ti family 108 uni ts 1990 Northshore Village multifamily 108 uni ts 1990 North Creek Apartments mul tifamily 400 uni ts 1990 Hunter's Pointe (Goldberg) mul t1 family, 200 units 1995 office/retail 100,000 sf Hawks Property business park 2B acres 1995 *It should be noted that in order to present an analysis which facilitates comparison to the original EIS, the buildout year was assumed to be 1990. It appears, however, that actual buildout will be later than that identified. Source: The Transpo Group, 1986. 111-22 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT Vehicular Traffic Street Characteristics The roadway system has not significantly Changed from the discussion included in the original traffic analysis prepared in 1981 (Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell EIS) with the following exceptions: N.E. 195th Street. This roadway has been widened/reconstructed between 1-405 and 120th Avenue N.E. to provide four travel lanes with a landscaped median and left-turn channelization. Three traffic signals have been installed on N.E. 195th Street: at North Creek Parkway, 120th Avenue N.E., and at the trail crossing east of North Creek Parkway. Sidewalks are provided on both sides of the street. 120th Avenue N.E. This roadway has been widened/reconstructed between N.E. 195th Street and the King/Snohomish County line to provide three travel lanes, two southbound and one northbound, and a sidewalk on the west side of the street. This roadway has been extended south of N.E. 195th Street (four lanes plus landscaped median, left turn channelization and sidewalks) as part of the Quadrant Business Park-Bothell development and will eventually tie into 132nd Avenue N.E. as N.E. 180th Street just north of SR-522. North Creek Parkway. This is a new roadway, which provides internal circulation as part of the Koll and Quadrant Business Parks. It intersects N.E. 195th Street approximately 600 feet east of 1-405 and connects (North Creek Parkway - North) to 120th Avenue N.E. near the King/Snohomish County line and at approximately one-half mile south (North Creek Parkway - South) of N.E. 195th Street. Traffic Volumes The 1985 estimated daily and PM peak hour traffic volumes are shown in Figure 5. There have been substantial increases in traffic on the regional facilities (1-405 and SR-520) since the original traffic analysis was completed in December 1981. Conversely, there have been little or no Changes in traffic volumes on the other roadway facilities in the project vicinity. Level of Service Level of service (LOS) is a qualitative assessment of traffic flow conditions at an intersection. The categories range from A to F. LOS A describes excellent traffic operating conditions with minimal vehicle delay at all approaches. LOS F describes intersections with traffic volumes exceeding the theoretical capacity on one or more approaChes. The existing PM peak hour LOS has been estimated for seven intersections in the project viCinity using critical lane analysis. This Table 2 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I teChnique identifies the critical movement summation and compares that with a theoretical capacity to estimate volume/capacity (V/C) ratios and LOS. As Shown in Table 2, all the intersections in the project vicinity currently operate at LOS A. 19B5-19B6 LEVEL OF SERVICE AT SELECTED INTERSECTIONS Intersection LOS V/C Ratio N.E. 195th Street/Beardslee Boulevard A N/A N.E. 65th Street/I-405 Southbound Ramps A N/A N.E. 195th Street/I-405 Northbound Ramps A N/A N.E. 195th Street/North Creek Parkway A 0.12 N.E. 195th Street/120th Avenue N.E. A 0.08 N.E. 1BOth Street/132nd Avenue N.E. A N/A 240th Street S.E./39th Avenue S.E. A N/A N/A - not applicable, intersection is unsignalized. Source: The Transpo Group, 19B6. Traffic Safety Recent accident experience in the project vicinity has not changed significantly from that reported in the 1982 EIS. Accident rates are low on the arterial streets serving the project vicinity and no safety prOblems are identified. Transportation Systems Transit Current transit service in the project vicinity is limited. The only route directly serving the project site is a private van service on Route 931. This route connects Kirkland with Woodinville via Totem Lake, Bothell, North Creek Valley (along N.E. 195th Street) and Holly Hills. It operates weekdays at 90-minute intervals between B:OO AM and 5:00 PM. In February 1987, Metro will extend Route 370's servIce to Woodinville on every other trip on weekdays and Saturday. The proposed routing would operate to and from Interstate 405 and N.E. 195th Street, near the proposed project site. Metro operates a park-and-ride facility at SR-522 and Kaysner Way in Bothell, approximately one mile south and west of the project site. A second park-and-ride facility is located north of N.E. 175th Street in Woodinville, approximately 2.5 miles southeast of the proposed project site. Both Metro and Community Transit (Snohomish County) have routes serving the Bothell park-and-ride facility. 111-24 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Pedestrian and Bicycle Routes Pedestr1an and bicycle fac1l1t1es within the project area are somewhat limited. The H.E. 195th Street and 120th Avenue H.E. roadway 1mprovements include sidewalks and bicycle lanes and a pedestrian/bicycle path along North Creek as part of the Koll and Quadrant business parks. There will be tra1l system connections in the future through the proposed developments in the North Creek Valley. Related Roadway Improvements Development and growth 1n the North Creek Valley has resulted in a number of planned roadway improvements to accommodate the anticipated increase in traffic volumes. As previously discussed, some of these improvements have recently been completed in conjunction with the 1nitial development of the Koll and Quadrant business parks. These business parks also are committed to contributing to the following proposed roadway improvements: I-405/N.E. 195th Street InterChange Future improvements include widening of the overpass and the on/off ramps. The City of Bothell is proposing further study of the interChange to determine the improvements needed to accommodate full North Creek Valley development. Completion of the improvements is expected by 1990-1995. 39th Avenue S.E. to Maltby Road S.E. Snohomish County is proposing to improve 39th Avenue S.E. in three phases: Phase I - Construct a new roadway between 240th Street S.E. and 22Bth Street S.E. Construction is expected to be complete by 1990. Phase II - Realign 39th Avenue S.E. to connect with the 35th Avenue S.E./York Road S.E. corridor at Maltby Road S.E. Construction is anticipated by 1995-2000. Phase III - Widen and reconstruct 39th Avenue S.E. between 228th Street S.E. and Maltby Road S.E. Construction timing for Phase III is dependent on the availability of funding. In addition to those planned projects, the following potential roadway improvements have been identified by the City of Bothell for possible future construction depending on long-term roadway needs. The Quadrant Business Park-Bothell has agreed to participate in proportional cost Sharing of any of the following improvements as part of their master use permit: Riverside Parkway bypass as identified in the City Transportation Improvement Plan 111-25 I II -26 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I . Widening of Beardslee Boulevard between N.E. 195th Street and 110th Avenue N.E. (extended) New full or partial interChange on 1-405 at 240th Street S.E. . Widening 240th Street S.E. between 1-405 and 39th Avenue S.E. Extension of 240th Street S.E. between 1-405 and SR-527 Extension of 120th Avenue N.E. over SR-522 to 124th Avenue N.E. In addition to the above projects, the state and county are working toward the improvement of other area roads. SR-202 between N.E. 175th Street and SR-522 The intersection of SR-202 and N.E. 175th Street, as well as SR-202 between N.E. 175th Street and SR-522 and N.E. 175th Street between SR-202 and 140th Avenue N.E., are currently experiencing level-of-service problems. These locations are within unincorporated King County. The WaShington State Department of Transportation has a project scheduled for early 19B8 to widen SR-202 between N.E. 175th Street and SR-522. King County has a project scheduled (CIP 2005B2) for January 198B to build an extension of N.E. 195th Street from SR-522 to Woodinville-Duvall Road. Both of these projects will help alleviate congestion prOblems in the Woodinville-Ouvall Road corridor. Quadrant may be required to participate in the City of Bothell's Share of these improvements to replace anyone or more of the projects listed above in accordance with their master use permit. IMPACTS Proposed Action Vehicular Traffic Trip Generation. Four sources of information on trip generation rates were reviewed to identify appropriate trip generation Character- istics for the proposed hotel/motel/restaurant complex: Trip Generation Report (Institute of Transportation Engineers,1982), Trip Generation Intensity Factors (Arizona Department of Transportation, 1979), A Guide to Traffic Generation Rate (Public Works Magazine, December 1985), and Ramada Inn Traffic Study (Richard K. Hopper, 19B5). The trip rates for hotels vary from a low of 3.0 daily trips per room in the Ramada Inn study, to a high of 10.5 daily trips per room for the ITE rates (see Traffic Report available at the City of Bothell). A hotel/motel containing convention facilities and ballrooms (SUCh as those in the ITE report) show mUCh higher trip generation rates than the facility proposed by Quadrant. Therefore, the ITE and Public Works Magazine rates, whiCh include hotels with convention facilities, are inappropriate. The facilities in the Arizona Study and the Ramada Inn study more closely resemble the proposed hotel, whiCh is characterized by a suburban location of a service- oriented facility less than three I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I stories in height (rather than convention center or destination resort). There were seven site studies in the Arizona report and three site studies in the Ramada Inn report. A weighted average for the total of ten site studies would be 4.6 daily trips per room. This would be an appropriate trip rate given the intended operation of the proposed hotel. The restaurant trip rates are based on the ITE rates for a "quality" Sit-down restaurant, which is defined as a restaurant with typical turn- over rates in excess of one hour per table (see Traffic Report available at the City of Bothell). The restaurant proposed by Quadrant is intended to be a "quality" restaurant, and, therefore, the ITE trip rate of 74.9 daily trips per 1,000 square feet is appropriate. The trip generation rates were applied to the proposed project to determine daily and PM peak hour trip generation for the project site as summarized in Table 3. Table 3 PROJECT TRIP GENERATION Land Use Type Hotel (200 rooms) Restaurant (B,OOO sf) Daily Rate Trips PM Ra te Tri ps 4.6 74.9 920 600 0.5 6.1 100 50 150 Tota 1 1,520 Source: The Transpo Group, 1986. The proposed action would generate 1,520 daily trips and 150 PM peak hour trips. In comparison, the light industrial uses (under the approved project) would generate approximately BOO daily trips and 160 PM peak hour trips. Although a hotel/motel/restaurant complex would generate somewhat more daily trips than light industrial uses (an increase of 4~ for the overall business park), it would generate approximately 5% fewer trips during the critical PM peak period. Moreover, it is important to note that 20% of the hotel/motel/restaurant complex peak hour trips would remain within the Koll and Quadrant business parks. Trip Distribution. The Puget Sound Council of Governments trip tables and the intended economic market were used to estimate the trip distribution for the hotel/motel/restaurant complex. The hotel/motel is intended to serve the Quadrant Business Park and nearby High Tech Corridor businesses by providing nearby hotel/motel space. The restaurant will serve hotel/motel guests, the business parks, and area residents. The distribution pattern for the proposed hotel/motel/restaurant complex is shown in Figure 6. Approximately 20~ of the Proposed Action trips are expected to remain within the Koll and Quadrant business parks. It is estimated that 33% of the hotel/motel/restaurant traffic would originate from Snohomish County. Approximately 28% of the trips will be to/from the north (Snohomish County) on 1-405 including the Canyon Park High Tech Corridor. II I -27 II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II Traffic Forecasts. The 1990 forecasts for the proposed project were developed by subtracting the trips associated with the 145,000 square feet of light industrial, whiCh would be replaced by the hotel/motel/restaurant complex, and adding the trips for the proposed project onto the resulting traffic volumes. The forecasts were derived by incorporating Transportation System Management measures identified in the original Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell EIS. The estimated 1990 forecast for the study area with the proposed hotel/motel/restaurant complex is shown in Figure 7. A 4% increase in Quadrant Business Park trips associated with the proposed hotel/motel/ restaurant complex, compared with the light industrial alternative (No Action), results in a minimal difference (generally less than 1% in daily and PM peak hour volumes in the overall study area) between the two forecasts. There would be slightly lower peak hour traffic volumes through the I-405/N.E. 19Sth Street interchange area since employees at the Koll and Quadrant Business Parks would have an on-site "quality" restaurant for business dinners, and business people from out of town would have a convenient on-Site location to stay overnight. This would result in slightly lower traffic volumes at the interchange on/off ramps. Level of Service. The 1990 level-of-service (LOS) was estimated based on critical movement analysis for the seven study area intersections. As summarized in Table 4, there are minimal differences between the light industrial (No Action Alternative) and the proposed hotel/ motel/restaurant complex. The N.E. 195th Street/I-405 northbound ramp intersection would operate at a slightly lower V/C ratio with the hotel/motel/restaurant than with light industrial development, although they would operate at LOS F. Table 4 1990 LEVEL OF SERVICE (LOS) HOTEL/MOTEL/RESTAURANT COMPLEX WITH FULL VALLEY DEVELOPMENT Intersection LOS V/C Ratio With Hotel V/C Ratio wi th Light Industrial N.E. 19Sth Street/Beardslee Boulevard A N.E. 195th Street/I-40S Southbound Ramps F N.E. 195th Street/I-405 Northbound Ramps F N.E. 195th Street/North Creek Parkway E N.E. 195th Street/120th Avenue N.E. C N.E. IBOth Street/132nd Avenue N.E. B 240th Street S.E./39th Avenue S.E. A N/A 1.08 1.01 0.97 0.72 0.62 0.36 N/A 1.09 1.03 1.02 0.75 0.62 0.37 Note: Assumes full buildout as stated in Table 1. Actual buildout will occur at an unknown time in the future. Source: The Transpo Group, 1986. II I -29 '-- I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I It should be noted that this LOS is due to no slip ramp being assumed, and because the Truly Development to the east would add traffic to the intersection. Improvements to the interChange SCheduled for 1990-1995 (see above discussion) will benefit LOS characteristics. LOS at the North Creek Parkway/N.E. 19Sth Street intersection would improve from F to E. It is not expected that there would be significant differences in the impacts on the arterial system in Snohomish County as a result of implementation of the Proposed Action. Parking. The parking requirements (Bothell Municipal Code) for a hotel/motel/restaurant complex are: Hotel - one space per room plus one space for eaCh 100 square feet of banquet facilities Restaurant - One space per each 100 gross square feet Based on these rates, the hotel/motel/restaurant complex would be required to provide 305 parking spaces. This compares with 290 parking spaces required for light industrial (No Action Alternative) development (one space per each 500 square feet). The peak parking demand for the hotel/motel/restaurant complex would occur at noontime for the restaurant and late at night for the hotel. This may provide some opportunities for joint use of on-Site parking since the peak parking demand would not coincide. The peak parking demand on the site is estimated at 225 spaces, based on rates from the ITE Parking Generation Report (1985); thus, no overflow parking is anticipated. Traffic Safety Tne additional number of trips generated by the project would increase the exposure of drivers to accident risks. A 1 terna tive A Vehicular Traffic Under Alternative A, traffic generation, trip distribution, traffic forecasts, and parking demand and requirements would be similar to those for the Proposed Action. The primary difference with this alternative is there would be a slight increase in the number of vehicles accessing the proposed hotel/motel/restaurant complex using 120th Avenue N.E. rather than North Creek Parkway - South. However, tnere would not be any significant Change in the LOS for the intersection at N.E. 19Sth Street and 120th Avenue N.E. The proposed hotel/motel/restaurant complex would result in a slight increase in daily trips as compared with the light industrial uses; however, there would be a slight decrease in the number of trips during the critical PM peak period with the proposed hotel/motel/restaurant use (refer to Table 5). The increase in the daily trips would not result in a Change in LOS due to fewer PM peak hour trips. III-3l Table 5 NORTH CREEK VALLEY TRIP GENERATION 1990 PM Daily Trips Peak a t Full PM Pea k S Complete Hour Development Development Hour Trips in 1990 Trips Quadrant Business Park 17 , 600 2,100 100 2,100 (No Action-Light Industrial) Koll North Creek I IB,300 2,200 100 2,200 Truly Development 35,200 4,000 50 2,000 Koll North Creek II B,500 940 20 190 Victorian Village 700 70 100 70 Northshore Village 700 70 100 70 North Creek Apartments 2,600 260 100 260 Hunter's Pointe 3,390 360 65 230 Hawks Property 3,000 360 20 70 TOTAL 90,100 10,345 7,315 Note: Assumes full buildout of Quadrant Business Park in 1990. Actual buildout will occur at an unknown time in the future. Source: The Transpo Group, 1986. No Action Vehicular Traffic Trip Generation. The traffic study in the 1982 EIS prepared for the original Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell did not include the Truly Development, Koll North Creek II proposal, North Creek Heights, Victorian Village and North Creek Apartments (see Table 1). The estimated trip generation for full Valley development, as summarized in Table 5, represents an increase of 84% over the 1982 Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell EIS estimates. In order to estimate 1990 conditions, the 1990 percent complete was applied to the trip generation for eaCh development proposal. The total 1990 trips generated would be 63,300 daily trips and 7,315 PM peak hour trips. The 1990 PM peak hour trip generation estimates were used to analyze 1990 traffic operating conditions. This represents an increase of 25% as compared to the 19B2 study's 1990 PM peak hour trip generation. Trip Distribution. The updated trip distribution for the various development proposals in the North Creek Valley was estimated based on the available traffic studies and Puget Sound Council of Governments trip table information (see Figure 6). Traffic Forecast. The updated 1990 traffic forecast is a combination of increases in background traffic unrelated to North Creek Valley development and the specific Valley proposals. The general background traffic is II I -32 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II estimated to increase by 10% between 19B5 and 1990 (approximately 2% per year). The traffic associated with anticipated 1990 North Creek Valley Development was added to the background traffic forecast to produce 1990 traffic volumes as shown in Figure B. Level of Service. The LOS was estimated for the 1990 p.m. peak period without the Quadrant hotel/motel/restaurant complex based on critical lane analysis and assumed that I-405/N.E. 195th Street interChange is reconstruct- ed/widened to five lanes with corresponding lane widening of the on/off ramps, that 39th Avenues S.E. is constructed, and that 120th Avenue N.E. is connected to 132nd Avenue N.E. via N.E. 1BOth Street. In addition to the new traffic signals already in place, traffic signals are assumed to be in place at the I-40S/N.E. 19Sth Street interChange, at the N.E. 1BOth Street/132nd Avenue N.E., and 240th Street S.E./39th Avenue S.E. intersections. The estimated LOS under these conditions is shown in Table 6. The results are consistent with the 1982 EIS except for 1-405 inter- Change ramp intersections and the North Creek Parkway/N.E. 195th Street intersection. The lower LOS Shown in this analysis as compared to the previous study is due to different assumptions regarding lane configurations (no roadways wider than five lanes) and an increase in new development proposals impacting peak hour traffic. Table 6 1990 LEVEL OF SERVICE WITH PROJECT DEVELOPED AS LIGHT INDUSTRIAL Intersection LOS V/C Ratio N.E. 195th Street/Bearaslee Boulevard N.E. 19Sth Street/I-405 Southbound Ramps N.E. 195th Street/I-405 Northbound Ramps N.E. 195th Street/North Creek Parkway N.E. 19Sth Street/120th Avenue N.E. N.E. IBOth Street/132nd Avenue N.E. 240th Street S.E./39th Avenue S.E. A F F F C B A N/A 1.09 1.03 1.02 0.75 0.62 0.37 N/A - not applicable, intersection is unsignalized Source: The Transpo Group, 1986. Traffic Safety Traffic hazards are not expected to change significantly from the impacts identified in the original DEIS. 111-33 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I MITIGATING MEASURES The hotel/motel/restaurant complex should benefit the Quadrant Business Park's Transportation System Management (TSM) Plan. Providing an on-site restaurant facility will reduce the need for employees commuting off-site at midday. By providing on-site overnight accommodations for busfness park visftors, the Proposed Action reduces the number of trfps leaving the Park durfng the afternoon peak hour. Since the hotel/motel/restaurant will have less impacts on traffic operations in the PM peak hour than the light industrial uses, no additional mitigating measures are proposed beyond those in the approved Master Plan and those parking and access standards required by the Quadrant Business Park-Bothell Development Standards. UNAVOIDABLE ADVERSE IMPACTS There may be an increase of 4% in daily automobile trips associated with the business park with the hotel/motel/restaurant as compared with light industrial uses. This increase will result in an overall off-Site increase of 1% in daily traffic. 111-35 111-36 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I PUBLIC SERVICES AND UTILITIES FIRE Affected Environment Fire protection for the project area is provided by the City of Bothe 1 1 Fire Department. The project area is served by Station #42, located at 10726 Beardslee Boulevard, in Bothell. During the original permitting of the Quadrant Business Park, the Bothell Fire Department raised concerns about the ability of the Department to provide adequate service to the development due to limitations of manpower and equipment (see Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell DEIS, page 149). According to Cliff Vaniman, Deputy Chief of the Bothell Fire Department, these concerns have not yet been fully alleviated (September 19B6). Impacts Proposed Action All structures would be equipped with required fire detection and suppression devices (i.e., smOke alarms, sprinklers, and extinguiShers) as required by City of Bothell Building and Fire Codes. The amount of floor area to be served by the Bothell Fire Department would not Change for the proposed hotel/motel/restaurant use when compared to the original proposal for light industrial use. Additional impacts, therefore, would be those associated with the difference between providing fire protection to a hotel/motel/restaurant building(s) and a light industrial building. The primary difference between providing fire protection to a hotel/restaurant and a light industrial building is that there is a greater pOSSibility of life hazard danger in the event of a fire in a hotel/motel/restaurant facility. There would be people on the hotel/motel premises 24 hours per day and the majority of the people on the premises during nighttime hours would be asleep. An additional factor that would potentially increase life hazard danger is the congregation of people in a concentrated area that would occur in a restaurant and any meeting rooms attached to the hotel/motel. Under fire conditions, civilians and firefighters could be exposed to conbusting materials (e.g., plastiCS and synthetics) that could pose a life hazard. Both of these factors could increase the amount of time required to respond to life hazards on a fire call, thus delaying the Department's implementation of fire suppression measures (Vaniman, 1986). Alternative A This alternative would have similar impacts on the service requirments of the Bothell Fire Department as with the Proposed Action. The only difference under this alternative would be that response time to the project area would be slightly greater because the site would be located further away from the fire station. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I No Action Refer to the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell Draft EIS-1982, pages 149 and 150, for a discussion of this alternative's impacts on fire protect1on service. In comparison to the hotel/motel/restaurant complex, there is increased l1ke11hood that a light 1ndustrial build1ng would be of greater height and could conta1n flammable or hazardous material that could present a different type of life and/or property damage potent1al in the event of a fire. M1tigating Measures Construction would be in accordance w1th the most current fire control and building standards. Proposed hotel/motel/restaurant buildings could be less than three stories in height, whiCh would fac1litate service by existing fire suppression equipment. The proposed development would generate additional tax revenues (beyond those associated with a light industrial use) to the City of Bothell, a portion of which could be allocated to the Fire Department. The City of Bothell is considering the adoption of an ordinance that would lead to purChase of an aerial ladder truck. All Quadrant Business Park development, whether hotel/motel/restaurant or light industrial, would be subject to the applicable provisions of the adopted ordinance. Unavoidable Adverse Impacts There would be a greater possibility of life hazard associated with a fire call in a hotel/motel/restaurant use than a light industrial use. POLICE Affected Environment Police protection is currently provided by the Bothell Police Department. The Bothell Police Department's station is located at 1B304 101st N.E. The Quadrant Corporation also has contracted with a private security patrol to provide supplementary protection to the business park. Impacts Proposed Action The amount of area to be served by the Bothell Police Department would not Change for the proposed hotel/motel/restaurant use compared to the approved light industrial use. Additional impacts, therefore, would be those associated with the difference between providing police protection to a hotel/restaurant and a light industrial building. According to City of Bothell Police Chief Bernard Colligan, 1mpacts associated with the proposed change of use would be minor (September 19B6). The primary impact would be that there would be people on site 111-37 111-38 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I during nighttime hours with a hotel/motel/restaurant use, rather than during the daytime hours with light industrial use. Consequently, a higher percentage of the calls the Police Department would respond to from the site would occur at night with the proposed hotel/motel/ restaurant use. An insignificant number of calls to the Police Department could be associated with the development of a proposed restaurant facility that serves alcoholic beverages. Alternative A This alternative would have similar impacts on the service requirements of the Bothell Police Department as with the Proposed Action. No Action Refer to the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell Oraft EIS-1982, page 151, for a discussion of this alternative's impacts on police protection service. Mitigating Measures The proposed development would generate tax revenues (beyond those associated with a light industrial use), part of whiCh could be allocated to the Bothell Po}ice Department. No other mitigation is proposed. Unavoidable Adverse Impacts The number of calls the Bothell Police Department expects to respond to from the proposed hotel/motel/restaurant development would be slightly greater than those associated with a light industrial use. MAINTENANCE Affected Environment Tne site vicinity currently receives maintenance of transportation facilities, and water and sewer facilities from the City of Bothell. Drainage systems are maintained by the property owners. Impacts Proposed Action Municipal utilities within the pUblic rights-of-way and open space dedicated to the City of Bothell would be maintained by the City. Private utilities (telephone, natural gas, etc.) would be maintained by the private utility companies. Within the Business Park, the property owner would maintain storm drainage, open space, and other improvements to public rights-of-ways, pursuant to Article 6.1 of the Declaration of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions for the park. To the extent that the proposed amendment would increase pervious surfaces, the volume of storm water runoff should decrease suCh that there would be a minor decrease in the need to maintain those drainageways. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Alternative A This alternative would have similar impacts on the demand for maintenance as with the Proposed Action. No Action Refer to the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell Draft EIS-1982, page 154, for a discussion of this alternative's impacts on the demand for maintenance services. Mitigating Measures The proposed development would generate additional tax revenues that would be used by the City of Bothell, in part, to maintain local SChools, libraries, and parks (see Economics section). Unavoidable Adverse Impacts None are anticipated. COMMUNICATION Affected Environment Telephone service to the project area is provided by General Telephone Company, Inc. (GTE), via underground lines along North Creek Parkway. Telephone facilities in the project area are currently sufficient to handle the needs of the approved light industrial/ commercial land uses. Impacts Proposed Action According to Dennis Keller of GTE, the proposed hotel/motel/ restaurant use would require an equal or lesser amount of telephone service than a similarly sized light industrial use (September 1986). The proposed hotel/motel/restaurant use would not have a significant adverse impact on demand for telephone service. Alternative A This alternative would have similar impacts on the demand for telephone service as with the Proposed Action. No Action Refer to the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell Oraft EIS-1982, page 172, for a discussion of this alternative's impacts on the demand for telephone service. 111-39 111-40 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Mitigating Measures None are proposed. Unavoidable Adverse Impacts None are anticipated. WATER Affected Environment The project site is within the service area of the City of Bothell. Bothell receives its water from the City of Seattle Water Department. The Quadrant Corporation has participated in the development of a reservoir that would provide water storage for use in the Quadrant Business Park and other area developments. Impacts Proposed Action The proposed hotel/motel/restaurant complex is not expected to generate a greater demand for water service than the potential light industrial uses that it would replace (Low, 1986). No adverse impacts are expected; there could be a slight positive impact on water consumption if the demand is less for the hotel/motel/restaurant facility than the light industrial use. Alternative A This alternative would have similar impacts on the demand for water service as with the Proposed Action. No Action Refer to the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell Draft EIS-1982, pages 163-164, for a discussion of this alternative's impacts on the demand for water service. Mitigating Measures None are proposed. Unavoidable Adverse Impacts None are anticipated. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I SEWER Affected Environment The project area and the vicinity are within the City of Bothell's sewer service area. Existing sewer service to the Quadrant Business Park-Bothell is via sewer lines located beneath North Creek Parkway. These sewer lines connect to 8-inch lines along N.E. 195th Street. Sewage is conveyed to the Metro line that runs along 1-405, immediately west of the project site. The Metro Interceptor transports sewage to its West Point treatment plant. Impacts Proposed Action Impacts on demand for sewage services are expected to parallel those associated with demand for water service. The proposed hotel/ motel/restaurant use would have similar demand on sewer service as would a comparably sized light industrial use. It is pOSSible that certain types of light industrial uses would create considerably more demand for sewer services than a hotel/motel/restaurant use; however, it is not likely that a hotel/motel/restaurant use would generate significantly more demand for sewer service than a similarly sized light industrial use (Low, 1986). The proposed hotel/motel/restaurant use it is not expected to have a significant adverse impacts on demand for sewer service. Alternative A This alternative would have similar impacts on the demand for sewer service as the Proposed Action. No Action Refer to the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell Draft EIS-1982, page 167, for a discussion of this alternative's impacts on the demdnd for sewer service. Mitigating Measures None are proposed. Unavoidable Adverse Impacts None are anticipated. 111-41 ECONOMICS Affected Environment The City of Bothell provides municipal services to the Quadrant Business Park-Bothell. The City's 19B6 budget provides the basic data on expenditures and revenues for this fiscal impact analysis (see City of Bothell Final Budget, December 16, 1985). Expenditures have been classified into six basic categories: General Government, Public Safety, Public Works, Public Health and Welfare, Recreation and Culture and Debt Service. Expenditures The largest expenditure category is Public Safety, including both pOlice and fire protection services. These expenditures account for 48% of the budget items in this analysis. This expenditure is larger than might be expected because the City provides fire protection to not only its own citizens and property, but also to King County Fire District 42 and Snohomish County Fire District 10 on a contract basis. The Department estimates a population of 33,500 for this fire protection area, which is approximately 17 square miles. General Government expenditures include legislative, judicial, executive, finance, the city clerk, elections, legal, personnel, planning and facilities expenses. These functions account for 19% of the budget. Public Works includes street maintenance, engineering and building inspection, and accounts for 16% of expenditures. The next largest expense category is Debt Service, to pay the principal and interest on city bonded indebtedness. These expenses account for slightly more than B% of the budget. Recreation and Culture is for parks, recreation and library services to the community. It accounts for about 8% of the budget. The last category is Public Health and Welfare, including City contract payments for the King County Health Department, alcoholism programs and pollution control. These payments are less than 1% of the budget. Table 7 shows the expenditures areas for the City. Table 7 Public Safety General Government Public Works Debt Service Recreation and Culture Health and Welfare CITY OF BOTHELL 1986 EXPENDITURES $2,102,271 81B,682 71B,B47 372,500 337,195 37,600 48% 19% 16% B% B% 1% 100% TOTAL $4,387,095 Source: Bothell Final Budget, December 16, 1985. 111-42 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Revenues The major revenue sources for the City are intergovernmental revenues, property taxes, the retail sales tax, the utility tax, charges for services, licenses and permits, fines and forfeits, and the real estate excise tax. Intergovernmental revenues include a variety of sources suCh as payment for contract fire services, state shared and entitlement revenues, federal grants and revenue Sharing. These funds account for nearly 25% of the budget. The next largest revenue source is the property tax receipts from the regular and excess levies whose rates total $3.4701/$1,000 assessed value. Property taxes contribute 19% to the total. Retail sales tax receipts also account for nearly 19% of revenues. These are derived from the local (1%) sales and use tax in Bothell. (Bothell nets 0.87% after State handling charge and King County share.) The City's utility taxes account for over 12% of the 19B6 budget. Charges for services and licenses and permits include building permits, plan check fees, engineering fees, business licenses and other miscellaneous Charges and fees. Together these amount to over B% of the City's budget. Fines and forfeits and the .25% real estate excise tax each account for less than 2% of the City's budget. This fiscal study's revenue assumptions include both regular and special levies because of the continuing need to fund capital improvements for growth and development. The same ratio of utility tax/assessed value is used because decreases in the tax rates will be offset by higher utility costs (tax base) to businesses and consumers in future years. Table a ShOWS the composition of Bothell's revenue budget. Table B CITY OF BOTHELL 19B6 REVENUES TOTAL $ 952,900 B25,OOO 542,000 70,000 1,099,BOO 135,000 231,000 76,000 370,675 150,500 $4,4S2,B75 21% 19% 12% 2% 25% 3% 5% 2% 8% 3% 100% Property Taxes Retail Sales Taxes Utility Taxes Real Estate Excise Tax Intergovernmental Revenues Licenses and Permits Charges for Services Fines and Forfeits Beginning Fund Balances Other Revenue Source: Bothell Final Budget, December 16, 1985. 111-43 Impacts Proposed Action Construction and operation of a 200-room hotel/motel and restaurant complex would have an economic impact on the finances of the City of Bothell, Northshore SChool Oistrict and King County Library System. The City would receive several major revenues during the development application process, construction and operation of the hotel and restaurant complex at the Quadrant Business Park-Bothell. Table 9 details the project cost and assessed value for the Proposed Action and No Action Alternatives. Table 9 PROJECT COST AND ASSESSED VALUE SCHEDULE Proposed Action: Hotel/Motel/ No Action: Restaurant Light Industrial Site (7.1 acres)l $2,000,0002 $2,000,0003 Construction Cost B,999,OOO 5,655,000 Total Real Proper!y $10,999,000 $7,655,000 Personal Property 1,346,000 940,000 Total Assessed Value $12,345,000 $8,595,000 Notes: 1$6.S0/square foot (The Quadrant Corporation) 2Hotel: 200 rooms at $33,3S0/room; plus $1,503,000 meeting space, complementary facilities (lObby area, swimming pool, etc.); plus B,OOO-square-foot restaurant at $103.25/square foot (Robert Snow Means Co., 1986) 3Light industrial: 145,000 square feet at $39/square foot (Robert Snow Means Co., 19B6) . 4Equipment, fixtures at 12.3% of "real property (1986 Kfng"County Executive Proposed Budget) Source: RiChard Dickens and Associates, Inc., 1986. The major revenues during the application process would be the plan Check fee estimated at $12,700 and the building permit fee of about $19,500. During construction, a sales and use tax is payable on building activity and equipment purchases at the local rate of 1%. This revenue would net the City approximately $90,000 on a combined construction, fixtures and equipment budget of $10,345,000. Prior to operation of the facility, the city should realize $122,200. Were the property sold, the City would receive nearly $27,500 more from the .25% real estate excise tax. Combining the four major revenues, the hotel/motel/ restaurant complex would produce $52,000 more than would a light industrial development (No Action 111-44 I I I I I I I I "I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Alternative). Refer to Table 10 for a direct comparison of the pre- development revenues for the two alternatives. Table 10 MAJOR PRE-DEVELOPMENT REVENUES Proposed Action: Hotel/Motel/ Restaurant No Acti on: Light Industrial $ 8,400 12,BOO 57,400 19,100 $97,700 Plan Check Feel Building permit1 2 Sales & Use Taxes Real Estate Excise Tax3 $ 12,700 19,500 90,000 27,500 $149,700 TOTAL 1 2Based on construction cost 3Based on construction plus personal property cost Based on real property value Source: Richard Dickens and Associates, September 19B6. Full scale operation of the hotel/motel/restaurant complex would generate a surplus of revenues to the City over the costs of providing municipal services. The largest cost category would be for police and fire protection at $12,500/year. Recreation and culture costs would amount to about $10,100/year and debt service would be about $4,100/year. The total costs to serve the complex (exclusive of utilities) would be approximately $29,700/year. Operating revenues to the City include the property tax levies, retail sales taxes, utility taxes and business licenses. These revenues total $130,400/year. The largest revenue source would be from the retail sales taxes at $62,600 for hotel and restaurant taxable retail sales. The property tax would account for about $42,BOO on the estimated assessed value of $12,345,000. The utility tax would generate $24,000 and business licenses would add another $600 per year. A light industrial project on this site would generate only half the hotel and restaurant project's revenues for the City. Operation of the hotel and restaurant complex thus would result in a revenue surplus of over $100,000 to the City each year. Other local public service providers also would benefit by development of this proposal. The Northshore School District would receive nearly $37,OOO/year in property tax revenue from real and personal property used in the hotel and restaurant operations. The Emergency Medical Services fund would receive about $3,100/year and Evergreen Hospital would get about $6,300/year to help fund its operations and expansion programs. Table 11 presents a cost/revenue comparison between the hotel/motel/ restaurant complex and the light industrial use (No Action Alternative). II I -45 Table 11 COST/REVENUE COMPARISON Proposed Action: Hotel/Motel/ Restaurant No Action: Light Industrial Bothe 11 Revenues Property TaxI $42,8002 $29,BOO3 Sa 1 es Taxes 62,600 17 ,400 Uti 1 i ty Taxes~ 24,400 17,000 Business Ltc. 600 BOO Tota 1 Revenues $130,400 $65,000 Cos t of Service - 29,700 -17 ,900 Surplus Revenue 100,700 47,100 Northshore SChool District6 $37,000 $25,BOO Emergency Medical Service6 3,100 2,100 Evergreen HOSPita16 6,300 4,400 Notes: 1Levy rate: $3.4701/$1,000 assessed value; 1986 City of Bothell Annual Budget 2Taxable retail sales: $26,OOO/room, $250/square foot for restaurant; WaShington State Department of Revenue 1986, Seattle Everett Real Es ta te Research Report, 1986 3Manufacturing, wholesale, communications and utilities: $10,500 taxable retail sales per employee, WaShington State Department of 4Revenue, 1985 50.00198 x assessed value, 1986 City of Bothell Annual Budget 6City of Bothell Clerk's Office, September 1986 King County Department of Assessments, 1986 Source: Richard Dickens and Associates, September, 1986. A 1 terna tive A Impacts associated with Alternative A would be similar to those associated with the Proposed Action. Locating the proposed hotel/motel/ restaurant complex on a different site within the Quadrant Business Park would not sigificantly change the revenues generated. II I -46 . I I I I I I I . I I I . I I . I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I No Action Impacts associated with development of light industrial uses (No Action) alternative were identified in the original Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell Environmental Impact Statement published in 1982 and updated and compared to the Proposed Action as indicated in the above discussion. That discussion indicates that the No Action Alternative would provide less revenue to the City of Bothell than either the Proposed Action or A 1 terna tive A. Mitigating Measures None are proposed. Unavoidable Adverse Impacts None are anticipated. I II -47 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I Section IV COMMENT LETTERS AND RESPONSES This section contains comment letters that were received on the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement issued October 1, 1986, and responses to those comments. Letters were received from: State Agencies Department of Game Office of ArChaeology and Historic Preservation Department of Ecology Department of Fisheries Local Jurisdictions and AgenCies Municipality of Metropolitan Seattle King County Department of Planning and Community Development City of Bothell Fire Department Inaividuals Ann Aagaard Heidi Jones IV-l IV-4 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I DEPARTMENT OF GAME 1. The Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement is an analysis of a proposal to amend the Quadrant Business Park's planned unit development approval to allow a hotel/motel/restaurant complex to be constructed. The Supplemental EIS is consistent with the level of detail provided in the EIS issued in 1982. A more detailed site plan will be reviewed during the next permitting approval process (Certificate of Zoning Compliance). The detailed plan would not exceed the limits identified in the project description on pages 11-4 and 11-5. 2. Site-specific information on soils. vegetation. fish and wildlife resources was provided in the EIS for the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothe1l issued in 1982. Another supplemental EIS is not anticipated for the proposed project. 3. The approved buffer for the Quadrant Business Park is for an average of approximately 75 feet and this would be expected to be maintained. Please refer to the response to Ann Aagaard's Comment #14 on page IV-3D. Specifically. the setback along North Creek from the easterly high water mark of the creek to the easterly edge of the berm with trail is approximately 65 to 110 feet. The average setback meets the 75 feet buffer approved for the Quadrant Business Park. The proposal would conform to the existing requirements. There would not be any direct impact on existing wetlands. The drainage from the site would not be directly diSCharged into North Creek. i I P..COH THO""'...) I n"'<lu' I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I STATE Of WA'>HINGTON OFFICE OF ARCHAEOLOGY AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION , 11 \"\:e~t T\\ent\ -F,,~' ~\<'eni.Jf". kL-" . Of\mpJd. U,.'Jsh,ng(on IJHSO-l . October 6, 1986 Mr. John Shively, Senior Planner Dept. of Community Development 18305 101st Avenue N.E. Bothell, WA 98011 (10(,) REC'ElVEO OCT - 8 '986 or ti\..I' nLLI- C\i'l -v COM D'" Log Reference: 833-C-KI-04 Re: Quadrant Business Park-Bothell Planned Unit Development Amendment DSEIS Dear Mr. Shively: A staff review has been completed of your draft supplemental environ- mental impact statement. We would appreciate receiving a copy of the report on the archaeological survey that was undertaken as part of this development. dw IV-S "'....-.. ]1 IV-6 I I I . . . I I .. I I I I I I I I I . OFFICE OF ARCHAEOLOGY AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION 1. Thank you for your comment. A copy of the report on the archaeological survey has been forwarded to the state office. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I {),""'..: ""I .!.:!.:.. Ili -\! r, i\"I"i~: ~T~H or \\A~HI"CH)" DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY \ leld ,"'fIlP r\ -11 . 0/\ mpld \"\ J"hinJ,:(on fJ/{j(J.Hi-17 . (ll1tl) -I;4-6fXXJ RE'......',... ,. \.....t:., /::..0 OCT 2 9 1986 October 27, 1986 CIT"Y ()~ tv.I....:.:...l COM DEV ~lr. John Shively City of Bothell 18305 - 10lst Avenue Bothell, WA 98011 NE Dear Mr. Shively: Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the draft environ- mental impact statement (DEIS) for the Quadrant Business Park proposed by the Quadrant Corporation. From the information supplied in the DEIS, it appears that no permits/approvals are required from the Department of Ecology for this proposal and, therefore, we have no jurisdiction. 1 If you have any questions, please call me at (206) 459-6025. Sincerely, . .. ~ - _. Wjl-~-::J: .ru:t.7~ '~--V..tL._~ Barbara J. Ri tchic Environmental Review Section BJR: IV-7 IV-B I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY 1. Thank you for your comment. A Shoreline Permit would be required for development of Lots 1 and 2. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I State of Washington Department of Fisheries Bldg 4 Rm 2129 7600 Sand Point Way NE Seattle, Washington 98115 ~~YW0 ~Vl1Z)1%SWi' November 10, 1986 Mr. Gordon Y. Ericksen Department of Community Development City of Bothe 11 18305 1Dlst NE Bothell, Washington 982DI CITY Or ="J' '.,,_i_.. '-"CO"-1.. DEV Dear Mr. Ericksen: I appreciate the opportunity to comment on the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement, Quadrant Business Park. My comments are concerned mainly with further habitat enhancement in North Creek, maintenance of a riparian corridor along North Creek, and adequate detention and biofiltration of storm run-off water. North Creek is an important salmon and trout producer in the Lake Washington watershed. This stream, like many others, is suffering from the effects of increasing urbanization within the wat~rshed. One effect is the increased frequency and intensity of flooding. The fish resources in North Creek would benefit from the placement of additional in-stream habitat components, ie stumps, logs, boulder clusters, etc. These fish habitat components provide much needed cover, feeding stations, and places of refuge during high stream flows. The SEIS states that the in-stream enhancements to North Creek have already been completed. Additional enhancements are necessary. The SEIS does not dwell on the subject of stream buffer/riparian zone, except to state that there will be no further development within the buffer. However, there is a statement on pg. III-IS, "Public access to the creek from the development will be allowed". Streams and streambanks can be severely impacted even by well-meaning people. People traffic, especially to duck feeding areas, and unauthorized wading/swimming areas can result in erosion of streambanks, fish harassment, litter, and pollution. The maintenance of a stream buffer will be difficult, if not impossible, with a restaurant/hotel in close proximity. I would suggest a widening of the current buffer to a minimum of 100 feet from stream edge. The buffer boundary could be demarcated by a fence, or thick plantings of a riparian species such as Sitka spruce. When the spruce grows larger, it should also provide a significant sound and visual barrier between the development and 1-405. Heavier plantings of riparian species such as vine maple, crabapple, ninebark, etc would provide additional shade to the stream, aid in the prevention of stream bank erosion, and provide additional habitat for wildlife. The plantings already there Ere a good beginning. The public has ample opportunity to view North Creek from the 19Sth bridge, and the trail system to the north. Further public access is not needed, nor desirable. Stormwater run-off should be retained on-site, treated through biofiltration, and released to the receiving water at pre-development rates. IV-9 1 2 l3 Roofwater, which should be relatively clean, should be kept separate from parking area and road run-off. The liberal use of oil/water separators is encouraged. Further treatment through grass lined swales is necessary. Catch basins in parking areas should be located in "landscape islands". These islands are actually shallow grass lined swales with run-off coming as sheet flow off uncurbed parking areas. When done properly, grass lined swales become an attractive landscape feature as well as removing silt, metals, nutrients, etc from run-off water. If there are any questions concerning these comments, processing Hydraulics permits, etc, please contact me. Sincerely, . '...... y t:~>-/-~Y Kurt Buchanan Regional Habitat Manager-WDF 545-6582 cc WDF-Dlympia rV-1D 3 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES 1. Thank you for your comments. The in-stream enhancement to North Creek has been been completed relative to the development requirements placed upon the Quadrant Corporation and the Kol1 Company. Additional developments in the Valley could be required to contribute to additional stream enhancement. 2. The approved buffer for the Quadrant Business Park is an average of approximately 75 feet and this would be expected to be maintained. The proposal would conform to the existing requirements. Please refer to the response to the Department of Game's Comment #3 on page IV-4. and the response to Ann Aagaard's Comment #27 on page IV-33. The development of the trail and park were part of the City's conditions of approval for the Quadrant Business Park. Please refer to the response to Ann Aagaard's Comment #14 on page IV-3D. 3. Thank you for your comments. A retention system would be required on site. Please refer to the response to Ann Aagaard's Comment #30 on page IV-34. Water would not be diSCharged into North Creek. The approved Business Park drainage plan calls for storm wdter detention on the lots, release into the Business Park drainage system and eventually release into a grass-lined swale through which the water flows into the Sammamish River. IV-1l IV-12 .1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ~~mETRO ~~ Municipality of Metropolitan Seattle Exchange Building . 821 Second Ave. . Seattle, WA 98104-1598 October 16, 1986 RECE/VE:D OCT 2 iJ 1986 John Shively Department of community"Development city of Bothell 18305 101st Avenue NE Bothell, Washington 98011 eln' !JI" r.h.....:IL:...... .....)tl.:' D;:-'j Draft Environmental Impact Statement Quadrant Business Park -Bothell Planned (PUD) Amendment Dear Mr. Shively: Unit Development Metro staff has reviewed this proposal and anticipates no significant adverse impacts to its wastewater facilities. However, we want to make the following additional comments on pUblic transportation. Public Transportation Metro has two park-and-ride facilities in the project vicinity. The referenced draft EIS recognized only one park- and-ride facility. The second park-and-ride lot is located at 140th Avenue N.E., which is north of 175th Street in Woodinville, approximately 2.5 miles southeast of the proposed project site. Also, Metro is planning to add to its routes serving the facility. In February, 1987 every other trip (on weekdays and Saturday) will be extended to Woodinville on Route 307. The proposed routing would operate to and from Interstate 405 and N.E. 195th Street, near the proposed project site. 1 For questions or further information, Catherine Williams at 684-1613. please contact Thank you for the opportunity to review and comment. Sincerely, ~~ Gregory M. Bush, Manager Environmental Planning Division GMB:laa rV-13 IV-14 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I METRO 1. Thank you for your comment. The document has been Changed to reflect this information. Please refer to the Transportation section of this document, page 111-24. I I ~ ~ I King Count~. Dt"partment of rlanning and Communit~. D(>'\'("lopment 811 Alaska 8uildin~ 618 5<'cond A\'(,IHI(, Seattle. Washingtun 98104 (ZOG) 3-&4-7503 October Z9, 1986 F~ ~~. .~~. .~:. ,. I I I Mr. John Shively, Senior Planner Department of Community Development City of Bothell 18305 10lst Avenue Northeast Bothell, W A 98011 OCT 3 Ii 19HE CTY:.'" ..... r J:\:~ r:~.'.} I RE: Quadrant Business Park Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (DSEIS) Dear Mr. Shively: I I Thank you for forwarding a copy of the Quadrant Business Park DSEIS to us for our review. The document adequately addresses the significant impacts of the proposed amendment to Quadrant's Planned Unit Development (PUD). I There are several intersections and roadways in the project vicinity that will be affected by the additional traffic generated by the PUD. Most of these intersections and roadways are within the City of Bothell. We understand that as part of the original PUD approval, the developer agreed to participate in road projects in the PUD area. Some of the projects the developer will be required to contribute to are listed on pages III-Z5 of the DSEIS. We understand from discussions with Bothell Planning staff that the Bothell City Council may add to this list if additional transportation projects are necessary in the area. I I I The intersection of SR-ZOZ and Northeast 175th Street, as well as SR-ZOZ between Northeast 175th Street and SR-5Z2 and Northeast l75th Street between SR-202 and l40th Avenue Northeast, are clUTently experiencing Ievel-of-service problems. These locations are within unincorporated King County. The Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) has a project scheduled for early 1988 to widen SR-202 between Northeast 175th Street and SR-522. King County has a project scheduled (CIP 200582) for January, 1988 to build an extension of Northeast 195th Street from SR-522 to Woodinville-Duvall Road. Both of these projects will help alleviate congestion problems in the Woodinville-Duvall Road corridor. Both projects are fully funded, and we do not foresee a need for Quadrant Business Park to participate in their implementation. 1 I I I Our final comment concerns the trip generation rate used for the 200 room hotel included in the PUD amendment. The rate of 4.6 daily trips per room, used in the DSEIS, is significantly lower than the 10.5 daily trips per room presented as an average in the Institute of Transportation Engineers' (ITE) Manual for hotel/motel uses. Based on the type of hotel facility Quadrant is proposing and studies conducted by the Arizona Department of Transportation and Richard K. Hopper for similar facilities in equivalent environments, the lower trip generation rate appears acceptable for this particular case. We suggest that the conditions of approval for the PUD amendment include the statement that approval is granted based on convention facilities not being part of the hotel facility. If convention facilities 2 I I I IV-1S Mr. John Shively, Senior Planner October 29, 1986 Page Two I I I are proposed in the future, an additional traffic analysis should be conducted ] analyzing traffic impacts to roadways and intersections within the City of Bothell 2 as well as impacts to adjacent intersections and roadways within unincorporated King County. I Thank you for the opportunity to review this DSEIS. I I S~rely, :JXtJ~ Joe Nagel Director Designee I IN:LG:lh TPLG.3.12 cc: Donald J. LaBelle, Director, Department of Public Works ATTN: Louis J. Haff, P.E., County Road Engineer, Roads Division John Logan. Manager, Traffic and Planning Section Tim Krause, SEPA Coordinator, Department of Planning and Community Development Bill Jolly. Acting Manager, Planning Division ATTN: Bill Hoffman, Chief, Transportation Planning Section I I I I I I I I I I rV-16 I I I I I I I I I I I I '. I I I I I I I I KING COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 1. Thank you for your comment. Refer to Transportation section, page 111-25, of this document. In addition, Quadrant may be required by the City to participate in the City's share of the cost associated with the frontage road, N.E. 180th Street. The state project is dependent on Category C funding, which still must receive approval of funds by the state legislature. 2. Thank you for your comment. Although 2,500 square feet of meeting/banquet facilities are incorporated into the project concept, convention facilities are not proposed as part of this project. Convention facilities would require at least one additional room of approximately 12,5DD square feet seating 500, additional kitChen facilities, meeting rooms and guest rooms, as well as other support facilities. Approval of the PUD amendment will be conditioned to be the smaller sized facility. I V-17 I V-18 I I I I I I I I .1 I I I I I I I I I I I I Fire Department CITY OF BOTHELL pt:'rr.-'\ T: . . ,.._ __I v._ :_, October 23. 1986 TO: I FRO~I: I 5tiBJECT: I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I L r l' 0.., 108" ,: . I :. ~1 ..J tJ John Shively Vanimali 'fJ . ~Oiv1 [;?v. C::'f u:: t;vl".....LI.. Deputy Chief Draft EIS for Ramada Hotel (Quadrant) Regarding the above mentioned proposed project, clarification needs to be made on certain key points identified by the developer as they relate to fire service impacts. The draft EIS identifies four stories as being the critical height for Bothell Fire Department operations when, in fact, the Fire Department has stated that anything three stories and greater creates a significant adverse impact on Fire Department operations. The EIS also states that light industrial buildings would in all likelihood have a greater height than the proposed motel/hotel complex. At present all the constructed and proposed light industrial buildings in both the City of Bothell and Canyon Park business centers are one to two stories in height. Therefore, will the motel/hotel also be limited to that same height? Lastly, the EIS states that fires involving flammable or hazardous materials associated with light industrial use would be reduced. It is true that the use and storage of hazardous materials in raw form may be reduced; but the materials (plastics and synthetics) used in today's decorations and furnishings, when under fire conditions, can create no less hazard than a number of common hazardous materials. It should also be noted that hazardous materials in light industrial uses are handled by personnel familiar with the material and trained in its use as well as the fact that storage, handling and operations with such materials must meet stringent fire and life safety code requirements. The life hazard potential, firefighter or civilian, is great in any type structure fire, be it a motel/hotel or light industrial, and is in fact the first and primary concern of all Fire Department operations. Therefore, I don't feel it is appropriate for the EIS to indicate a fire in a light industrial facility would largely involve only property concerns. CRV/cb IV-19 J1 2 3 l4 J 1V-2D I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I BOTHELL FIRE DEPARTMENT 1. Thank you for your comment. Text has been revised accordingly. Please refer to Fire section, page 111-36. 2. The hotel/motel/restaurant would not exceed three stories in height. Although there have not been any buildings constructed greater than two stories in height in the business park. the Development Standards do indicate there is no building height limitation provided that for any structure "over 35 feet in height, [that building's setback] will increase by one foot for each foot of building over 35 feet." ThUS, it is possible that a future building in the Business Park could be of greater height than those already constructed. 3. Thank you for your comment. Text has been revised accordingly. Please refer to Fire Section, page 111-36. 4. Thank you for your comment. Text has been revised accordingly. Please refer to Fire Section, page 111-36. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I October 30, 1986 RECEIVED John Shively, Department of Community Development 18305 -lOlst N.E. Bothell, Wa. 98011 OCT 301986 CITY OF flUIH~Ll COM CEV. Dear Mr. Shively, The enclosed are comments on the Quadrant Business Park- Bothell PUD Amendment. As you are aware, I feel there are serious deficiencies in this DEIS and that a major rewrite will be involved before the FEIS is determined to be adequate. I would like to discuss this further with you, particularly before the department completes its review of the FEIS . I would strongly recommend that alternative sites on the Quadrant site be recommended for this specific proposal other than lots I and 2. Ann Aagaard 16524 104th N.E. Bothell, 98011 ?L--a7~ rV-2l October 28, 1986 Bothell Comrr.unity Development John Shively,Senior Planner 18305- 101st Ave. N.E. Bothell, WA 98011 I I I I RE: Quadrant Business Park- Planned Unit Development I Amendw.ent for hotel/motel complex Dear Mr. Shively, The document under review proports to be both a nonproject document, and a site specific proposal for a hotel/motel complex with a freestanding or attached restaurant facility. Under current SEPA guidelines, this procedure is inappropriate for this proposal. ] By choosing this method, this DEIS has (among other serious deficiencies) 2 failed to address the cumulative impacts of similar proposals, speci:ical the cumulative impacts of three hotel/notel/restaurant complexes all located at the 195th, 1-405 Interchange. According to news releases, and the sign located at 195bh, the Ramada Inn is going to locate on this site. The document mentions this fact, but no subsequent DEIS's . are proposed or contemplated. It is certainly appropriate to analyze both actions in a single document, but the specific proposal contenplated for the Ramada Inn requires much greater detailed analysis than that which has been provided under this amendment proposal. See WAC 197-11-060 . A similar comment is applicable to the list of required licenses and permits. The term "All other necessary permits and approvals" is inappropriate. For example, one pernit that is required is a Shoreline Permit. If the project includes a 3 story building which exceeds 35feet within the Shoreline's 200 foot jurisdiction, then the commercial development would be prohibited or a variance fron Bothell's Shoreline Master Program would be required. Just across 1-405 where another hotel/motel complex is proposed on the Dick Truly property, a similar 35' restriction and variance would be required. To allow any of these would set a precedent and involve cumulative impacts not discussed, but properly within the scope of this DEIS. All development in North Creek Valley is subject to this same provision of the Comprehensive Plan that disallows freeway oriented traffic for a substantial portion of their business. All three proposals for hotels claim that they are avoiding this provision by only serving the business parks for a substantial portion of their business. No analysis is contained in this DEIS to support that statement. If this is the position of the proponents, then adequate information to document this statement must be provided. What other hotels/motels/ restaurants now exist or are planned to serve the corridor? (This would include Bellevue where most of the workers are planning to commute from). What numbers of guests are expected or required to fill and sustain such a facilityl When would the hotel be built? Given the extremely slow pace of development in the surrounding business narks, and the "ten year glut" of office/business park developme~t on the Eastside, when would the hotel receive a substantial IV-22 I ]1 I I I 3 I I I 4 I I I 5 I )1 ::J7 I :J8 191 Comment: The first supplement to the original EIS discussed onlv the one office building which would exceed three stories. Additional requests would require additional supplements. The implications of the above statement are that more requests for exceeding the 2-3 story height limit proposed in the original EIS will be made. This statement 12 needs to be documented by additional specific information. Are more requests to adjust the height limit from the 3-story anticipated? If not, then why is this statement included in this document? As indicated earlier, three stories, which could exceed 35' are prohibited in the 200 shoreline management zone. What is the actual proposal for this ] particular project? A more specific statement regarding this proposal 13 should be included . I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I J. portion of its business from the business park? How would it attract business in the meantime? Specific comments to the document are as follows: - Page S-2. Approximately 145.000 square feet of hotel/motel restaurant uSeS would be traded against a similar amount of light industrial uses. Comment: When the Quadrant proposal was evaluated, and the restrictions placed on amounts of commercial use as a percent of any building complex with a 55,000 sq.' maximum; at the same time, bonus ~oints were awarded based on the 55,000 sq.ft. commercial development, the low profile of the light industrial Dark, and the associated traffic impacts. This PUD amendment is the second supplement to the original EIS and to the original proposal. Both changes will set precedents within this development towards higher density,~~d greater traffic impacts not anticipated in the awarding of bonus points. It appears that not only should the amount of square feet be adjusted, but also the impervious surface coverage based on the original proposal. A hotel/motel/restaurant complex is a more intense development. As such, the impervious surface should be less ;. than those granted to the "unamended development" i. e. greater than 33% pervious surface should be required for this and any further retail/commercial development. Pervious surface should be a minimum of 50% to offset the increased impacts from additional traffic and. increased length of hours it operates. In addition, the-amount of square feet should not be traded evenly for light industrial allo.tments. Based on the figures in this supplement (which I do not agree with concerning traffic impacts) this project generates 100% more traffic. Therefore, the 145,OOOsq.ft. should be doubled to 290,000 sq. feet and subtracted from the allowed light industrial uses. -S-3 The proposed complex would be limited to a maximum of three stories in height and, therefore, could have a lower profile than future surrounding uses. ----- -S-3 The proposed use is a permitted use in the mixed use, and is allowable under the Urban designation in the Shorelines Master Program. J } 11 Comment: See earlier comments. on the 35' height limitation. Commercial developments within the shoreline area have other requirements under the Shoreline ~aster program. For example, there is a required 15foot public way. What is the current width of the "public way" in the 14 open space? Other requirements concern parking areas, conditional uses for non-water related uses (which this is), and related policies nnn r~Gu)ations in Chater III. Section D. and Chaoter Iv and Chapter VI IV-23 ~ . of the Shoreline Master Program for Bothell. In particular, commercial uses that do not impact the views (which this would apparently do if allowed to be 3 stories) and are dependent on water for their locations are encouraged (this is not water-oriented). A complete discussion of the impacts related to the Shoreline must be included, as well as an evaluation of this specific proposal. -S-4 Transportation. The propos~ed Action would generate 1,520 daily tripS and 150 PM peak hour trips as compared to 800 daily trips and 160 PM peak hour trips. ....There would be an increase of 4% daily automobile trips as compared with light industrial uses. An increase of 1% in total traffic in the vicinity of the business park. These comments also cover sections III 20-33. Comment: (1) The traffic analysis done by the Transpo Group contains numerous deficiencies and needs to be completely re-evaluated in the FEIS. The traffic study begins on section 111-22 with an=alysis of 1985 estimated daily and PN daily pea;; hour traffic volumes shown on Figure 5. Comparing these traffic volumes to the adopted FEIS for the Truly property which used daily traffic counts from 1983-1984 the figures are not at all ....6'- fC c:.'~ comparable. For example, Truly snows 2480 as the peak hour traffic in 1983-84 and 2.4,800 as the ADT. . This document, two years later estimates less traffic 2220 and 24,700. I do not there is any evidence to support the assumption that traffic is decreasing oJ(522. D~screpancies exist on all the esti8ated daily traffic counts and peak hour counts. A~ a minim~~~'the~ current traffic counts should be based on accurate figures. (2) Table 2. This table has selected various intersections, including those that do not even exist(240th S.E./39thS.E. is a .dead end street) y.,,~-t of these center around 1-405. . other more significant intersections are and will be impacted by this development and should be included in this table. Example, Beardslee Blvd.~+ 104th N.E.' Kaysner Way/Valley View Road; SR522 and SR527 since these raod' are carrying 20% of the traffic to the proposed development. I J: I I - I I 11 I -. I - 16 I - (3) Pedestrian and Bicycle Routes, it is correct, are limited . ] II because the path on the Quadrant.park does not extend past 1-405 1'- and is of therefore limited use. (4) The discussion on related Roadway Improvements is overly ~ II optomistic and needs to be clearly qualified. Completion of improvements to 1-4-5 and N.E. 195th Interchange by 1990-1995 11 when the DOT clearly indicated that no state money is available is not an accurate expectation. No other developer is currently paying to design the intersection. - The improvements to 39th Ave. S.E. to Maltby Road S.E. are Planned"J I but according to the statement by Snohomish County Public Works per30nnel at the Koll scoping meeting this summer, nO money is 1. allocated, and none will be until the developers agree to fund this . improvement. Quadrants share in this improvement whould have to be recalculated. Similar conunents to the very "iffy" projects exist for all the [)otential roadway improvements listed in 111-25. IV-24 J2' I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 4. (5) Proposed Action. Since no details are included in this or any other EIS regarding the specific hotel/motel/ restaurant complex the basic assumption that this proposed facility will have lower trip generation rates is without any validity. Until and unless Quadrant provides specific information and details, this section is meaningless for the purposes of evaluation to meet the SEPA requirements. 21 It is not appropriate to use Public Works Magazine rates, or Ramada Inn studies from Arizona to estimate the trip generation for a purely hypothetical proposal. More detailed information on the specifics of this proposal, and on the assumptions of the sources would have to be included. The only valid information would be the 1.0.5 accepted by the ITE rates. 22 on (6) The trip distribution is . an ~ttempt to show that the hotel/motel is not "freeway" oriented. Indeed, it shows just the opposite. Almost 80% of the trip generation will travel 1-405. Certainly, the complex will then be dependent on the freeway to sustain its business. The trip distribution studies need to be revised with appropriate information regarding specific times for construction,. completion of the specific proposal. As noted in Table 1 and Table 5 the buildout times of the various developments, particularly those associated with .the high-tech corridor are much later than identified. Until that time, and certainly in the near future, any motel/ hotel/ restaurant would be dependent on attracting freeway traffic. According to these trip distribution figures, 20% would come from Quadrant and Koll. This figure is not supported even by common sense. This would require over 300 people daily to frequent the restaurant/hotel/ motel. :r~ ~"~. ..^,~,.J;~"L ,",,,'possible employee would have to be eating in the restuarant ...-,~.. every day and have an overnight guest every night. What would be the impact of the restaurant on the business district, especially established businesses in the food business in Bothell? The BDMA is counting on business from the high- tech corridor to establish "quality" restaurants in the downtown Bothell area to maintain a strong CBD. If all employees are eating at Quadrant, they can't also be going into Bothell. 23 (9) Traffic Forecasts were "derived by incorporating TSM measures identified in the original FEIS." These figures should not be used in the projections.. First, the TSM are not, and probably will not ever be used~~ '~u~~rant,in particular, has built most of the projects with 100% more parking than that 24 which is recommended in the BMe. The former planning director and staff recognize that this actively discourages the effective working of any TSM. Until Quadrant commits to severely limiting the parking of its developments, TSM should not be assumed. (i) What numbers of "business people finding a convenient on-site. J25 location"will be expected from the business parks in order to sustain the hotel/motel/restaurant? (~) Table 4, the Level of Service for 1990 needs to be recalculated inCluding other intersections and also including accura te 26 counts for the noted intersections. In the Truly EIS, 3-83, the intersection at Beardslee Blvd. and N.E. 195th is shown at level E with Koll, Quadrant. and Truly (not counting the other developments included in this study). This study is for 1995. IV-2S 5. However, with even more development. and without full development of Koll and Quadrant, Table 4 predicts LOS A for the same intersection. This is impossible. The same basic data should be used and correlated for these related, and in some case the same developments, and give similar results. Instead, they are reaching exactly opposite conclusions. Since the City has already accepted the Truly FEIS, then if different data , conclusions and results are reached here they need.to be fully explained. (7) 111-31 NO Action. The method to arrive at the estimated 1990 triip generations needs to be more clearly outlined. -111-1 "No development would occur in the North Creek buffer zone." Comment: What is considered the buffer zone in this document? - When the Shoreline designation on the Quadrant property was changed from rural to urban, a condition was imposed by the Department of Ecology that no development would occur within 75' of North Creek. However, a precedent has been set on the Koll property and .Is. supported by ~.~as well on this section of North Creek to have a buffer of 100'average o'r' along both sides of North Creek. Given the increased intensity of development. the additional setback is a reasonable expectation. - -111-2 Light and Glare: The development standards and BZC are designed to control light and glare. Comment: The development standards were approved with the expectation that this PUD would include a very limited amount of commercial/retail development. In light of the longer hours, change in square footage, and more intense development, these sections of the development stardards should be reviewed to provide greater control over the potential impacts from the increased light and glare. -111-10 The proposed PUD amendment would not affect the status of the development relative to the. flood plain, shoreline management designation, or flood plain zoning. This statement is in reference to the policy statements in the North Creek Comprehensive Plan regarding protecting potential flood plains along North Creek. Comment: At the time the original EIS was written for the PUD, a - FEMA study indicating the floodway and flood plain based on approximately 634 cfs as the 100 year flow velocity was used. Since that time. and particularly as was evidenced by the January 18th flood when flows of approximately 1200 cfs were unofficially reported on the gauge stations on North Creek, the "potential flood plain" along North Creek may be considerably changed when new data currently being developed by USGS for flow readings in western Washington is adopted. FE~~ should submit a letter for this document indicating the approximate time table for conducting new surveys for the North Creek basin based on new data for the 100 year storm. Until the new studies based on correct data are completed, "no development should be allowed within the Shoreline Management areas of North Creek." as required by the North Creek Comprehensive Plan. - IV-26 I I I I 261 - I I I 27 I I }: I I I 29- I - I I 6. I -111-1 C. Water: An increase in the minimum pervious surface is not expected to have a significant impact on water quantity or quality in North Creek or the Sammamish River. No development would occur in the North Creek buffer zone. Further analysis specific to this proposal is not warranted. Refer to the 1982 EIS for a discussion of this element. I I Comment: The increase in traffic, and intensity of development can only be offset by significantly increasing the pervious surface to at least 50% and further reducing the square footage of clean light industrial.development to 290,000 sq.'. Increasing the s ". " . f d 1 . d 1 .. h ~ ammam1., l.ntens1.ty 0 eve opment, W1.ll ecrease water qua l.ty l.n Nort ~reeK 30 from increased.traffic and public contact unless a wider buffer strip (at least 100') is provided and unless more efficient storm detention systems with required clean-out provisions for traps and filters are provided. I I I A number of comments in the 1982 document are not consistent with the actual conditions on the site. These changes should. be discussed in this document. I Water, page 4, mitigating measures. This system and lot development would improve on-site drainage. Standing and ponded water areas would largely be eliminated. .....Reduction in flood hazard to lowlying areas through development would occur. I In fact, on site visit during the week of October 26-30 indicate that the opposite is true. The ~anding and ponded water areas had increased. In fact, the wetlands site (five acre sensitive wetlands previously in King County) has been consistly a ponded area even after filling. It would be appropriate in this EIS and FEIS to address the ponding problem, particularly tecause of the increase from cumulative impacts. 31 I I I I Natural resources This is also relative to soils. Will their ] be a greater loss of sand, gravel, peat, and prime agricultural soils? Building a hotelj motel complex with separate or standing restaurant 32 may require considerably different construction materials and more fill than the light industrial complex. ) -111-41-44 ECONOMICS "The total costs to serve the complex (exclusive of utilities) to the City of Bothell would be approximately$29,700jyea I Comment: What factors were assumed in arriving at this figure? What factors were assumed in budgeting the police and fire at $12,500, the recreation at $10,000 and debt service? Where do the major .differences come between this and the light industrial? I I Table 11 Cost/Revenue Comparison. What does the sales taxes at$62,600 involve and what assumptions are made regarding timing and capacity, etc? This amount in sales taxes would also mean that equal amounts were being lost from other restaurants already in existence in the CBD in Bothell. What would be the net increase in sales taxes? 3: I I Table 9. Notes: 2 $1,503,000 meeting space and complementary ] facilities is noted. If this is not a conference hotel, what is the meeting spac":! for? \~hat is included in complementary facilities? 3' I IV-27 ANN AAGAARD I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1. Please refer to the Department of Game, Comment #1 and response on page IV-4. A more detailed site plan would be reviewed and approved during the next permitting process (Certificate of Zoning Compliance) as spelled out in the approval of the original PUD. The level of detail is consistent with the level of detail in the original EIS. The cumulative impacts of the proposed hotel/motel/restaurant complex were examined. For example. in the Transportation section (page 111-20) the information currently available regarding traffic volumes resulting from the Ko11 and Truly developments was factored into the analysis in addition to the new traffic generation numbers for the proposed Quadrant Business Park-Bothel1 PUD amendment. 2. The environmental analysis of the Koll hotel/motel evaluated what was analyzed in the Koll EIS and what was originally approved by the City Council. There was no increase in traffic to be generated by the hotel/motel over what was in the Ko1l EIS. The TrulY development hotel/motel complex includes convention facilities. A market analysis has been determined not to be a part of the required SEPA analysis (WAC 197-11-448). 3. SEPA review is required. is an If approved, any subsequent specific consistency with the environmental conditi ons as part of the Certifi ca te The Proposed Action, for which amendment to the approved PUD. proposal would be reviewed for documents and the PUD approval of Zoning Compliance process. The hotel/motel/restaurant facility has been examined for maximum probable impacts, as required by SEPA. Although the Ramada Corporation is currently the probable future hotel firm. which will locate at this site, the maximum impacts were considered for hotels of this type in general to ensure evaluation would cover any similar hotels, i.e. bUSiness-oriented. should a different company ultimately develop the complex. The project description (page 11-4) limits the development to a hote1/ motel facility of approximately 137,000 square feet, no more than three stories in height, and a restaurant approximately 8,000 square feet. 4. A shoreline permit would be required if development occurs on Lots I and 2 and thi s has been noted on the fact sneet, page (1). It is correct to say tha t "all necessary permits and 11 censes woul d be required." 5. A1 though many of the hotel/motel guests would arrive at the business park via 1-405, the hotel/motel would not rely on freeway-oriented business. This would mean the hotel/motel would not rely on people destined for other areas, or people passing by the site, for a substantial portion of their business. The Quadrant hotel/motel would principally serve businesses throughout the TeChnology Corridor and residents and businesses in the Bothe1l area. IV-28 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 6. In the immediate vicinity, other hotels/motels planned to serve the Technology Corridor and adjacent areas include those to be constructed in the Koll and Truly complexes. These were considered in the analysis (please refer to the response to Comment '2, above). Bellevue hotel/motels are not considered convenient by businesses in the Technology Corridor. 7. The complex would be expected to have an average occupancy of 60% or about 1.2 persons per room based on Ramada's experience with other similar complexes. About 82% of the occupied rooms would have guests primarily on business-related travel; therefore, these rooms would average one occupant. 8. Construction of the hotel/motel/restaurant complex is anticipated by the proponent to begin in 1987. 9. Market trends (Ramada Corporation, 1986) indicate there is sufficient existing demand to support upon completion a complex similar to the one proposed. Lower occupancy rates would be expected in the first year after the facility is opened. The current and perspective tenants of the business park have also expressed to the proponent a desire to have a nearby hotel/motel/ restaurant facility. 10. The pervious surface requirement, as discussed in this document, is a minimum of 27% landscaped area for light industrial uses. Under the approved PUD and the Proposed Action, pervious surface requirements for commercial uses on affected parcels would be a minimum of 33%. This will result in an increase in the amount of pervious surface in the Quadrant Business Park. A detailed site plan will be presented for Planning Commission review and Certificate of Zoning Compliance approval, at which time the pervious surface area may possibly be greater than 33%. The traffic analysis and the roadway improvements were based on peaK hour conditions. The peak hour conditions were slightly improved with the hotel/motel/restaurant facility. 11. The daily traffic generated by the hotel/motel/restaurant complex would be I,S2D trips as compared to 800 trips for light industrial uses, an increase of 90%. However, during the critical PM peak period, in which the heaviest traffic congestion would occur, the hotel/motel/restaurant would generate 150 trips as compared to 160 for light industrial use a decrease of 6%. PM peak hour trips are commonly used to determine the necessary road improvements, as was the case for determinin9 road improvement associated with the approved PUD. In addition, 20% of the daily hotel/motel/restaurant trips as compared to 2% of the daily trips for light industrial uses would be internalized to the Ko1l/Quadrant business parks. 12. The last sentence in the Addendum to the Final EIS for the Quadrant Corporate Park-Bothell (April 1982) indicates "the final EIS for the Quadrant Corporate Park must be supplemented prior to the approval of any additional buildings over three stories in height." IV-29 IV-3D I I I I I I I I .1 I I I I I I I I I I Please refer to the City of Bothe11 Fire Department Comment #2 and response on page IV-2D. There are no proposals to adjust the height limitations. This statement reflects the fact tnat the proposed complex would be limited to a maximum of three stories in height and, therefore, lower in height than the potential maximum allowed for other buildings in the approved PUD. 13. Please refer to the project description in this document on page II-4. The project description states "the amendment would allow for the development of an approximately 137,DDD-square-foot hotel/motel no more than three stories in height, and an approximately 8,ODD-square-foot restaurant in the northwest corner of the Quadrant Business Park. It goes on to state on page II-5: "the hotel would include up to 200 rooms and pOSSibly as much as 2,500 square feet of meeting/banquet rooms. The specific design of the hotel/motel or restaurant have not yet been determined; however, the design would be consistent with all applicable conditions established in Resolution Number 639." 14. As part of the Quadrant Business Park-Bothe1l approved PUD and Shoreline Permit. there is a ten-foot pUblic pathway which has been constructed between the site and North Creek in the adjoining open space. All Shoreline Guidelines would be followed for the proposed use. For discussion of the Shoreline Guidelines, please refer to the Plans and Policies section, page 111-7. With respect to overall views of North Creek, because of the flat nature of the immediate surrounding area and the existing park separating North Creek from the proposed site, no significant impacts on the views of the waterway are anticipated. North Creek is currently visible from the adjoining N.E. 195th Street Bridge, the trail and park constructed in the Quadrant Business Park and from property to the west of the creek. The proposed action would not interrupt these views and would not have a significantly different impact than already permitted with light industrial/office use. Water-dependent uses are encouraged, not required. The North Creek Park and stream buffer were created as part of the approved PUD, in part, to separate uses from the creek and discourage interdependence between the two. Please refer to the Department of Game Comment #3 and response on page IV-4. 15. Traffic volumes as shown on Figure 5 were obtained from the 1985 Annual Traffic Report (WaShington State Department of Transportation-Planning Research and Public Transportation Division), and from data collected by the Transpo Group in 1985 and 1986. Traffic counts since 1980 on SR-522 west of 1-405, from the WSOOT report. are 21,500 (1980), 22,100 (1981), 23,300 (1982), 23,200 (1984), 24,000 (1984) and 24,700 (1985). 16. In traffic engineering terms, the point at which 24Dth Street S.E. and 39th Avenue S.E. meet is called a "T" intersection. An extension of 39th Avenue S.E. is planned by Snohomish County north of 24Dth Street S.E. by 1990. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I The study area and intersections selected for analysis were chosen because previous analysis had shown these to be the location of any probable significant impacts. The difference in PM peak period traffic generated by the hotel/motel/restaurant and the light industrial uses is minimal, and as Shown in Figure 6 on page 111-28, the trip distribution to the west of 1-405 is similar (under both cases, 20~ of the trips are to the west). The resulting Change in level-of-service (LOS) between the two cases at any of the intersections cited (Beardslee Bou1evard/1D4th Avenue N.E., Kaysner Way/Valley View Road, SR-522/SR-527) would be negligible. 17. Thank you for your comment. While bicycle routes are somewhat limited at the present time, there will be trail system connections in the future through proposed developments in the North Creek Valley. The Transportation section, page 111-25, has been Changed to provide additional clarification. 18. The improvements to the 1-40S/N.E. 195th Street interChange are expected to be completed by 1990-1995. The improvements were determined to be necessary based on traffic studies using the PM peak hour volumes as the determining factor. Please refer to the response to Comment #11. Funding will be provided from a number sources other than WSDOT, including participation by the Ko11 Company and the Quadrant Corporation. Koll and Quadrant have a WSDDT approved design for the interchange. The Truly project is in the review process, and, if approved, will be responsible for partial funding of interChange construction. The timing of any construction will be keyed to the level of service per Ko11 and Quadrant approval conditions. 19. The construction of 39th Avenue S.E. between 24Dth Street S.E. and 228th Street S.E. is scheduled for completion by 1990. The County is proceeding on SChedule with the right-of-way plans and acquistion. The Quadrant Corporation has an agreement with Snohomish County to contribute $IDO,ODD to this project. The proposed PUD amendment is not expected to increase peak hour traffic from the Quadrant project. 20. As noted, the other projects listed will require additional study. They are included in the City's Transportation Improvement Plan as the first step toward implementation, and have been placed on the City's Six-Year Transportation Improvement Program. In addition to the projects Shown in the Transportation section (please refer to page 111-25), there are improvements scheduled for construction on SR-2D2 and on N.E. 19Sth Street in the Woodinville area (see King County Department of Planning and Community Development Letter and responses, page IV-17). 21. The project definition contains sufficient detail to enable an assessment of impacts on scoped elements to be prepared and, therefore, is adequate for analytical and decision-making purposes. IV-3l IV-32 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I The hotel/motel/restaurant would include up to 200 rooms and an 8,OOD-square-foot restaurant. The proposed facility would not include convention facilities, although meeting/banquet rooms up to a total of 2,500 square feet would be available. In discussions with representatives of Ramada Inn (1986), a small/meeting banquet room totaling 2,500 square feet and a maximum room numoer of 200 would not be sufficient for convention facilities. A banquet room, for example, would only be able to seat about 100 for local events SUCh as a Rotary luncheon or business meeting. A convention center would require at least one room seating a minimum of 500 people. The complex would also require more support facilities SUCh as additional kitchen space and increased number of guest and meeting rooms. Refer to the project description on page IV-4 and the response to Comment #3, above. 22. The sources for the trip generation rates are noted in the traffic analysis on page 111-27. The Arizona DOT Trip Generation Report is a compilation of studies from various portions of the country similar to the methodology used in compiling the ITE Trip Generation Report. When the Arizona ODT Trip Generation Report is able to provlde more precise information, trafflc analysts use it as an acceptable alternative resource. The Arizona report used a larger sample size (7 studies as compared to 5 studies for ITE), and separated the information into hotels/motels with convention facilities and those without convention facilities. The ITE report defines a hotel/motel as inclUding convention facilities and other retail and service ShOps. The ITE rates are, therefore. not appropriate for this site. The King County Department of Planning and Community Development has also commented on the trip generation rates used in the traffic analysis (refer to the comment letter on page IV-1S). Their comments conclude that "the lower trip generation rate appears accetable for this particular case." 23. Figure 6 ShOWS 48% of the trips associated with the hotel/motel/ restaurant assigned to 1-405. This includes trips to the high tech corridor in Canyon Park. An additional 16% may use 1-405 to and from SR-522. The trip distribution Shown is the percentage of trips to and from the project site, not the number of persons or on-site population. The total of 300 daily trips between the hotel/motel/restaurant complex and the Ko11 and Quadrant business parks includes trips to the restaurant, the notel, and trips between the restaurant and the hotel. It is equivalent to 35% of the hotel rooms being occupied by businesspeople associ a ted with tenants of the Koll or Quadrant business parks, and 25$ of the restaurant business being related to either the hotel or adjacent business parks. Given the intended market for the project, these estimated percentages are expected to be lower than may actually occur. See also paragraph 2 of response to Comment #33, below. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 24. The City of Bothe11 is requiring the Ko1l Company and the Quadrant Corporation to implement TSM measures. The City is working with the proponent to monitor the progress of implementation, and will be reporting periodically to the City Council. The Proposed Action will serve as a TSM measure by reducing the number of trips off site for additional services SUCh as a restaurant or hotel room. In addition, a major goal of the TSM program is to reduce the number of peak hour trips, which the proposal is anticipated to do. For additional discussion refer to the 1982 OEIS and page III-31 in this SEIS. 25. Please refer to Comment # 9, above. 26. The Beardslee Boulevard/N.E. 195th Street intersection has been reconstructed/realigned which results in significant improvements in level of service as compared to the previous configuration. This latest information was factored in the analysis; therefore, the 1eve1-of-service improvements are included. The estimated traffic volumes used in the level of service analysis are for 1990 as noted in Figure 7 on page III-3D, and Table 4 on page 111-29, and include full development of the Kol1 and Quadrant business parks. Truly traffic was estimated to be 50~ of full development by 1990. This situation results in the better level of service at the Beardslee B- oulevard/ N.E. 195th Street intersection than with full Truly development identified in the Truly EIS. 27. The 75-foot buffer zone on the Quadrant property is an approved shoreline condition for the business park, and the City does not anticipate Changing this as part of the PUD amendment. For aaditional discussion, please refer to the Department of FiSheries Comment #1 and response on page IV-II and response #3, above. 28. The established standards for light and glare are applicable to this proposal, as well as the business park as a whole. The standards control the intensity and light "spillage" off the site. The valley, prior to development, had very limited nighttime lighting. The development of the valley increases the nighttime lighting in constrast to the past conditions. This difference is viewed as significant. Although there would be more intense 24-hour use under the Proposed Action, there would, under any alternative, be nighttime lighting on the site. Nighttime lighting is required, at a minimum, under all alternatives for security. 29. The proposed PUO amendment would not affect the status of the development relative to the flood plain, shoreline management designations, or flood plain zoning. The amendment site lies in part within jurisdiction of the Shorelines Management Act, which would apply to the light industrial uses as well as the hotel/motel/restaurant complex. Both uses are permitted under the applicable "Urban" Snore1ine designation. FEMA is reworking flood calculations for western WaShington and will produce new flood mapping. This information will be reviewed by the City when released by FEMA. IV-33 IV-34 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 30. The development standards for the Business Park require "proper installation, operation and maintenance [of a retention system] by the Owner/Developer." Thi s requirement is designed to avoid degradation of water quality regardless of the size of the project. This requirement is applicable with any type of development. 31. The site is not fully developed. The standing water areas reflect the nature of a flat site containing recently compacted structural fill. As building sites develop the completed storm drainage system would address drainage issues as required in the approved PUD. 32. Sand, gravel, peat and prime agricultural soils would be lost regardless of the alternative Chosen. The grading reguirements and construction materials would not be significantly different from the EIS issued in 19B2. 33. The "Employment Anticipation" methodology was used to derive the costs of service to the hotel/motel/restaurant. This is a statistical approach that reflects the experience of other growing U.S. cities of Bothel1's size. The system takes the type of project into account (commercial or industrial), employment of the project, population of the city, whether the city is growing, stable or declining, and the particular budget of the subject city (Bothell). This methodology disaggregates the costs into the functional categories of public safety (police and fire), general government, PUblic works, debt service, recreation and culture and health and welfare, again based on other similar cities' experience. Commercial development is shown to be more expensive to serve than industrial development (per employee) and, thus, has different cost factors. However, commercial development with substantial retail sales also generate much higher revenues to cover those costs. The underlying assumptions of these revenue estimates are Shown in the notes to Table II, page 111-46. Taxable retail sales are derived from full operational sales at the hotel and restaurants in this proposal. The sales per room were based on reports of activity in the Department of Revenue, Quarterly Business Review for 19B5, for units in Bellevue, Kirkland and Issaquah, divided by the average number of rooms inventories in the Seattle/Everett Real Estate Research Report for 19B5. Sales effiCiency for the restaurant are based on $25D/square foot or $2 million in total. The business generated would be new to the area, primarily derived from hotel guests and business park employees and customers. The restaurant would also serve people in the Bothe1l area. However, some people with Business Park-related business would use the nearby restaurant services in Bothe11. Therefore, a loss of revenue to Bothe11 area business would not be expected as a result of additional services at the Business Park. 34. The meeting space is oriented toward occupants and customers visiting the business parks in the Bothe1l area. The hotel/motel/ restaurant complex is not proposed to have adequate facilities for major conferences. Complementary facilities could, for example, include lObby area, swimming pool, lounge, 2,500 square feet of meeting rooms, coffee bar and sauna. Please refer to response #21, above. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Heidi Jones 9408 NE 188th Bothell, Washington 98011 r,'ECT1Vt ij OCT 2!J 1986 October 28, 1986 CITY :..J" i.>v I '.'C~.t_ '~0v [;~V "r. Bordon Y. Ericksen City of Bothell 18305 101st St. NE Bothell, Washington 98011 Dear "r. Ericksen: Subject: Draft Suppleaental EIS for Quadrant Business Park Bothell Planned Unit Developaent Aaendaent. On page 111-42 of this suppleaental DEIS, titled Econoaics, it is stated that "This fiscal study's revenue assuaptions include both regular and special levies because of the continuino need to fund capital iaorovements for orowth and develooment." Below is a list of towns in this region and their regular and special levy rates for coaparison: Reoul ar Levy Special Levv Total Renton 3.03012 1.24566 4.27578 Bothell 2.31704 1.16490 3.48194 Everet t 2.85900 0.11500 2.97400 Auburn 2.58284 0.32542 2.90826 Tukwila 2.70973 0.15518 2.86491 Lk.Forest Park 2.10000 0.49571 2.59571 Kent 2.50314 0.06229 2.56543 North Bend 2.33857 O. 17525 2.51382 Issaquah 1.51771 0.96461 2.48232 Lynwood 2.21700 0.22400 2.44100 Bellevue 1.90183 0.48866 2.39049 Redaond 1.66910 0.49571 2.16481 Kirkland 1. 70574 0.45873 2.16447 Edllonds 1.91000 NONE 1.91000 The above towns are in various stages of developaent. Bothell's tax rates are the second highest. The arguaent aade by the proponents of development in the Valley was that Bothell needed a broader tax base, which would generate additional incoae over and above the services needed by developaent. The co.aunity was promised relief from special levies. These questions arise: 1. Why is Bothell's tax rate the second highest in the area? .::J 1 2. Why does the DEIS assuae that the special levies aust be continued? ~ 2 IV-3S 3. What are the capital i.prove.ents to be funded for "growth and develop.ent"? 4. Why should the ho.eowner pay taxes for "growth and develop.ent. instead of those who benefit directly fro. develop.ent, for instance, through a B'O tax levied on non-retail businesses? 5. When will special levies be re.oved altogether so that the ho.eowner will realize the pro.ised benefits? 6. If special levies cannot be re.oved altogether, when can we expect to see a drop in the rate? Sincerely yours, , . , ( ,.. ~ . - .,' I '- '--, (..'-1 (' , 'tvt"--J Heidi Jones Bothell Neighborhoods Association IV-36 J3 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I J4 J5 J6 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I HEIDI JONES 1. Levy rates reflect the level of public services demanded by the community relative to the amount of tax base that the community has available to fund those services. The City's tax rate is 3.48194. This includes the levies of 0.30450 for Fire Station 80nds (terminates in 1997); 0.86040 for Street Construction bonds (terminates in 1990); and 2.31704 for the General City Levy. The Fire Station and the Street Construction bonds were voted for by the citizens of Bothell. From the tax base side, the City of Bothel1 has one of the lower assessed values per capita compared with other local cities. Bothell has a per capita assessed value of $31,000, while Redmond is $64.000, Kirkland is $54,000, and Be11evue is $6I,ODD. Increased tax base from the Quadrant Business Park can theoretically allow lower property tax rates because of its favorable revenue/expense balance; however, the actual tax rates would be determined through the budgeting process, as influenced by the level of services demanded in the community. 2. Special levies are assumed to continue. The tax rate of $3.48194/$1,000 assessed value is assumed to continue because this document presents a conservative analysis. There is a tendency for taxes to remain high if the community continues to demand higher levels of services from the city through the budget process and votes to tax themselves for those services. As an example, the Northshore School District levy is also one of the higher levies in King County; this reflects the community's willingness to tax itself to have the high level of education that it wants. 3. None are identified; however, the community's needs tend to grow and are expressed in the budget and levies that voters approve. 4. The Quadrant Business Park would improve the assessed value/capita rate and thus allow lower levies for the City unless community demands grow as they have in the past. 5. Removal of special levies depends upon the outcome of the budgetary process and level of community demands for services in the future; however, many current bonds are scheduled to be retired in the near future (please refer to Comment #1, above). 6. Please refer to Comments #l and #5, above. Special levy rates drop from year to year as the City's assessed valuation increases. When the street construction levy was approved by the voters, it was anticipated to be 2.00000. This has dropped to 0.86040 in 1986 and is estimated by the Finance Department to be 0.72000 in 1987. The fire station levy is estimated to be 0.25000 in 1987. IV-37 Section V REFERENCES City of Bothe11, 1986. Bothe11 Municipal Code. Title 17, Zoning. ,1979. Plan for the North Creek Valley, City of Bothe1l. ,1979. Shoreline Master Program. Colligan, Bernard, 1986. Personal Communication. Bothe1l Police Department, Chief of Police, Bothel1, Washsington. Hupt, Mike, 1986. Personal Communication. General Telephone, Bel1evue, Washington. Keller, Dennis, 1986. Personal Communication. General Telephone, Bel1evue, Washington. Low, Eddie, 1986. Personal Communication. Bothe1l Department of Engineering, Bothell, Washington. Quadrant Corporation, 1985. Quadrant Business Park Bothel1: Development Standards and Declaration of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions. Quadrant Corporate Park Bothe1l, Draft EIS, 1982. Shapiro and Associates, Inc. City of Bothe11, Truly Property, Annexation and Development Plan, and King County Department of Planning annd URS Corporation. Vaniman, Cliff, 1986. Personal Communication. Bothell Fire Department, Bothel1, WaShington. 1985. City of Bothell Community Development, 1 ~IXA I I LE<W..~t'1 0\1 1-36 QUADRANT BUSINESS PARK-BOTHELl as recorded wtth the King County auditor Volume 131 of Plats, pages 87-91. I Legal Description - Northern Portion of Quadrant Property Parcel A I That portion of the north half of the southwest quarter of Section 4, Township 26 North, Range 5 East, W.H., in ling COunty, Washington, lying westerly of the following described line: I Beginning at a point on the north line of said subdivision 687.04 feet east of the northwest corner I thence south 9.51' east 1,209 feetl thence south 12.42' west 132.4 feet more or less to the south line of said subdivision and the terminus of said line. I Except that portion conveyed to ICing County for N.E. 195th Street under auditor's file No. 137263, and except that portion as condemned in ICing County Superior Court Cause No. 667064, for primary State Highway No.1. I .1 Parcel B I That portion of the north half of the southwest quarter of Section 4, Township 26 North, Range 5 East, in Xing County, Washington, lying easterly of the following described line: I Beginning at a point on the north line of said subdivision 687;04 feet east of the northwest corner I thence south 9.51' east 1,209 feetl then south 12.42" west 132.4 feet more or less to the south line of said subdivision and the terminus of said line, and lying westerly of the following described line: I Beginning at a point on the north line of said subdivision 669.50 feet west of the northeast corner I thence south 1.02'20" east 658.98 feet; ~~ence south 28.41'20" east 748.82 feet more or less to the south line of said subdivision and the terminus of said line. I I Except portion within the right-of-way for road 24 feet in width running north and south through the center of the northeast quarter of the southwest quarter of Section 4, Township 26 North, Range 5 East, W.H., in ICing County, Washington, granted November 21, 1913, by George R. Wilson, a bachelor, to C.C. Graham I recorded November 22, 1913, in volume 862 of deeds, page 350, under auditor's file No. 901014, records of ICing County, Washington. I I Except that portion conveyed to ICing County for N.E. 195th Street, under auditor's file No. 137263, and except that portion as condemned in King County Superior Court cause No. 667064, for primary State Highway No.1. I I I I I Parcel C The east 453.5 feet of the east half of the southeast quarter of Sec- tion 5, Township 26, North, Range 5 East, W.M., in King County, Washington: I Except that portion conveyed to King County for N.E. 195th Street by deed recorded under auditor's file No. 137263, and except that por- tion condemned in King County Superior Court Cause No. 667064, for primary State Highway No.1. I I Leaal Description - Southern portion of Quadrant prooerty I That portion of the northwest quarter of the northwest quarter of Section 9, Township 26 North, Range 5 East, W.M., in King County, washing- ton, lying northerly and easterly of line 2 of primary State Highway No. 1 as described in judgement and decree of appropriation in King County Superior Court cause no. 6653741 except that portion thereof conveyed to the State of Washington by deed recorded under file No. 48291341 also that por- tion of said northwest quarter of the northwest quarter lying westerly of line 1 of said primary State Highway No. 1 as described in said judgement and decree of appropriation, andl I I I The south half of the southwest quarter of Section 4, Township 26 North, Range 5 East, W.M., in King County, Washington; except that portion lying within 150 feet on either side of the L line survey of primary State Highway No.1, as defined in King County Superior Court Cause No. 665374. I Together with an easement for roadway over a strip of land 24 feet in width extending north and south through the center of the northeast quarter of the southwest quarter of the said Section 4, to the south line of county road, as granted by instrument recorded under auditor's file No. 901014, records of said county. I I I I I I I I I 2 FEDERAL AGENCIES STATE AGENCIES LOCAL GOVERNMENT JURISDICTIONS AND AGENCIES OTHERS Appendix B DISTRIBUTION LIST U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Federal Emergency Management Agency Washington State Department of Ecology (2 copies) Washington State Department of Fisheries Washi ngton State Department of Commerce and Economic Development Washington State Department of Transportation Washington State Department of Social and Health Services Washington State Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation Washington State Department of Game Washington State Planning and Community Affairs Agency Puget Sound Air Pollution Control Agency puget Sound Council of Governments Municipality of Metropolitan Seattle (2 copies) Community Transit (SCPTBAC) King County Building and Land Division King County Planning and Community Development Environmental Review Snohomish County Planning Department Snohomish County Department of Public Works puget Sound Power and Light Company South Snohomish County Homeowners Muckleshoot Indian Tribal Council S.A.V.E. Bothe1l Neighborhood Association The Koll Company The Quadrant Corporation Bothell Chamber of Commerce Bothell Downtown Management Association Snoqualmie Tribe Woodinvi1le Chamber of Commerce Seattle Post Inte11igencer Northshore Citizen Woodinvi11e Weekley!North1ake News The Seattle Times Bellevue Journal American The Herald Daily Journal of Commerce Bothel1 BranCh, King County Public Library (5 copies) University of WaShington Library Shorewood High SChool, Library Notice of this Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement availability was given to property owners within 300 feet of the Quadrant Business Park-Bothell. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I