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Agenda Pkt 02042020BOTHELL CITY COUNCIL MEETING February 4, 2020 BOTHELL CITY HALL 18415 101st AVE NE BOTHELL, WA 98011 MEMBERS OF THE CITY COUNCIL Mayor Liam Olsen Deputy Mayor Jeanne Zornes Councilmember Tom Agnew Councilmember Davina Duerr Councilmember Rosemary McAuliffe Councilmember James McNeal Councilmember Mason Thompson _____________________________________________________________________________________ REGULAR SESSION Call to Order Pledge of Allegiance 1.Meeting Agenda Approval During this item, the City Council may identify agenda items to be continued, withdrawn, or added. 2.Presentations, Reports, & Briefings A.Public Engagement Opportunities B.Proclamations -None at this time C.Special Presentations -None at this time D.Staff Briefing on the Emergency Management Program - Jennifer Warmke E.City Manager Reports F.Council Committee Reports 3.Visitor Comment During this item, the Mayor will invite visitor comment. Each speaker will be granted 3 minutes. When appropriate, the Mayor may direct City Staff to respond with statements of factual information or existing city policy. 4.Consent Agenda All items under this section will be passed with a single motion and vote. These items are of a routine nature. Prior to approval, City Council may request items be withdrawn from the consent agenda for separate discussion. Approval of the consent agenda authorizes the City Manager to implement each item in accordance with the staff recommendation. A.Approval of City Council Meeting Minutes: January 7 and 21, 2020 Recommended Action: Approve the meeting minutes as presented. B. AB # 20-012 – Consider Approval of December 2019 Payroll and Benefit Transactions Recommended Action: Approve payroll and benefit transactions for December 1 – 31, 2019. C.AB # 20-013 – Consideration of a Parks Property Tax Agreement between King County and the City of Bothell Recommended Action: Authorize the City Manager to execute the Parks Property Tax Agreement between King County and City of Bothell. 5.Public Hearings None at this time. 6.Ordinances & Resolutions A. AB # 20-014 – Consideration of a Resolution to Adopt the 2020 Parks, Recreation, and Open Space (PROS) Plan Recommended Action: Approve the Resolution adopting the 2020 Parks, Recreation, and Open Space (PROS) Plan 7.Contracts and Agreements None at this time. 8.Other Items A.AB # 20-015 - Consideration of Suspending the Rules of Recording for Board and Commission Interviews Recommended Action: Provide direction to staff regarding recording of the February 11, 2020 Board and Commission Interviews. 9.Study Session/Update/Discussion Items A.AB # 20-016 – Consideration of 2020 Planning Docket Recommended Action: Approve Option 1 for staffing resources and the corresponding proposed 2020 priority tasks; and share the costs of amendments between the city and either type of developer. B.AB # 20-017 – Special Event Permit Process Recommended Action: Provide staff with direction on Special Event Permit process updates. 10.Council Conversations During this item, Council members have the opportunity to informally discuss topics of city interest. Pgs. 5-10 Pgs. 11-12 Pgs. 13-38 Pgs. 39-318 Pgs. 319-322 Pgs. 323-334 Pgs. 335-358 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 2 of 358 11.Executive Session/Closed Session None at this time. Pursuant to the Washington Open Public Meetings Act, Title 42, Chapter 30, Revised Code of Washington, Sec. 42.30.110 (1), Executive Sessions or Closed Sessions may be held, under certain exceptions, at any time during the meeting that a need arises for the City Council to seek advice from the City Attorney as to the posted subject matter of this City Council meeting. 12.Adjourn CERTIFICATE I hereby certify that the above agenda was posted on this the 30th day of January, 2020, by 5:00 P.M., on the official website and bulletin board at Bothell City Hall, 18415 101st Avenue NE, Bothell, WA, 98011, in accordance with RCW 42.30.077, at least 24 hours in advance of the published start time of the meeting. Laura Hathaway, City Clerk SPECIAL ACCOMODATIONS: The City of Bothell strives to provide accessible meetings for people with disabilities. If special accommodations are required, please contact the ADA Coordinator at (425) 806- 6151 at least one day prior to the meeting. Copies of agenda bills and attachments listed in this agenda may be obtained from the City Clerk's Office the Friday before the meeting. Bothell City Council meetings are aired live on Bothell Community Television (BCTV) Channel 21/26 (Comcast/Verizon) (available to Comcast and Verizon Cable customers within Bothell City limits). Meetings are generally replayed according to the following schedule (subject to change): Wednesday following the meeting at 10 a.m.; Friday, Saturday and Sunday following the meeting at 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. City Council and Planning C ommission meetings and the BCTV schedule are viewable online at www.bothellwa.gov February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 3 of 358 (This page intentionally left blank) February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 4 of 358 City Council Regular Meeting Minutes Tuesday, January 7, 2020 6:00 PM Members of the City Council: Mayor Liam Olsen, Deputy Mayor Jeanne Zornes, Councilmember Tom Agnew, Councilmember Rosemary McAuliffe, Councilmember James McNeal, Councilmember Davina Duerr, Councilmember Mason Thompson ____________________________________________________________________________ City Clerk Laura Hathaway called the meeting to order and led the Pledge of Allegiance. 1. Meeting Agenda Approval Council Conversations was added to the end of the meeting. 2. Presentations, Reports, & Briefings A. Special Presentation - Oaths of Office for Councilmembers Thompson, McNeal and Duerr Bothell Municipal Court Judge Mara Rozzano administered the Oaths of Office for Councilmembers Thompson, McNeal and Duerr. 3. Visitor Comment Julie Rodwell – spoke regarding the gateway development (Block D). Tom Chrobak – spoke regarding city planning. 4. Other Items A. AB # 20-001 – Elections of Mayor and Deputy Mayor Recommended Action: Conduct the Election of the Mayor and Deputy Mayor for 2-year terms in accordance with RCW 35A 13.030 and 13.035 and the City Council Protocol Manual Section 2.05. City Clerk Laura Hathaway read the process for conducting elections for the Mayor and Deputy Mayor into the record and called for nominations for Mayor. • Councilmember Duerr nominated Councilmember Olsen. • Councilmember McAuliffe nominated Councilmember Agnew. • Councilmember Agnew nominated Councilmember McNeal. Councilmember McNeal thanked Councilmember Agnew for the nomination but declined. Each Councilmember filled out a written ballot which was read into the record: • Councilmembers McAuliffe, McNeal and Agnew voted for Councilmember Agnew. • Councilmembers Thompson, Zornes, Olsen and Duerr voted for Councilmember Olsen. By a 4-3 vote Councilmember Liam Olsen was elected to a two-year term as Mayor. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 5 of 358 City Council Regular Meeting Minutes January 7, 2020 Page 2 of 2 Ms. Hathaway turned the meeting over to Mayor Olsen who conducted the election for Deputy Mayor using the same process. Mayor Olsen called for nominations for Deputy Mayor: • Councilmember Thompson nominated Councilmember Zornes. • Councilmember McAuliffe nominated Councilmember McNeal. • Councilmember McNeal nominated Councilmember Agnew. Each Councilmember filled out a written ballot which was read into the record: • Councilmembers Zornes, Thompson, Olsen and Duerr voted for Councilmember Zornes. • Councilmembers McNeal and Agnew voted for Councilmember Agnew. • Councilmember McAuliffe voted for Councilmember McNeal. By a 4-2-1 vote Councilmember Zornes was elected to a two-year term as Deputy Mayor. B. AB # 20-002 - Council Committee Assignments (2020-2021) Recommended Action: Assign, by consensus, the 2020-2021 internal and regional committee assignments. Mayor Olsen led the process for Council Committee assignments for 2020-2021, which were agreed upon by consensus. C. Added Item: Council Conversations: Councilmember Duerr reported provided an update on a recent meeting with Sound Transit, in relation to the comments made by them at the December 3rd Council meeting. They conveyed that I-405 funding is not at risk from the State. A transit-orientated development (TOD) solution would require legislative funding, as the Park-and-Ride at Canyon Park is run by WSDOT but owned by Sound Transit. Sound Transit is 6 months behind and that some of their challenges are that not all costs are budgeted, such as 100M for a Brickyard Road Inline Station and the 10-20M for the 522/405 meet up/overpass project. She also learned that Northshore School District had no interest in having a parking garage at Pop Keeney. This decision was made 2 months and she raised concern of where it will be now and what impacts it will have. She stated the need for a mechanism of knowing information and decisions made by the regional agencies so Council is aware of these decisions. Other topics included a discussion on the proposal to add youth members to the Parks Board and Arts Commissions, having a better process for reporting back to the rest of Council regarding regional committee activities and whether or not to continue the Council Liaison structure for our internal Boards and Commissions. 5. Adjourn The meeting was adjourned at 6:58 PM followed by a brief reception to welcome the newly elected/re-elected officials. Submitted for approval on 2/4/2020 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 6 of 358 City Council Regular Meeting Minutes Tuesday, January 21, 2020 6:00 PM Members of the City Council: Mayor Liam Olsen, Deputy Mayor Jeanne Zornes, Councilmember Tom Agnew, Councilmember Rosemary McAuliffe, Councilmember James McNeal, Councilmember Davina Duerr, Councilmember Mason Thompson Mayor Olsen called the meeting to order at 6:00 PM and led the Pledge of Allegiance. All Councilmembers present with the exception of Councilmember Agnew who was absent and excused. 1. Meeting Agenda Approval The Northshore report will be tabled until the presenter arrives. 2. Presentations, Reports, & Briefings a. Northshore School District – School Development Best Practices – tabled until presenter arrives. b. Jeanne Zornes recapped the discussions at the last Lodging Tax Advisory Committee (LTAC) Meeting; she announced the Bothell-Kenmore Chamber of Commerce will be now be open on Saturdays. c. McAuliffe – also reported on LTAC and complimented staff member DeNae McGee. 3. Visitor Comment Bob Baldridge – spoke regarding the development across from the Boulevard Place. Evette Ivanov – spoke regarding the ban on single-use plastics and single-use Styrofoam. 4. Consent Agenda a. Approval of City Council Meeting Minutes: November 12 & 19 and December 3, 10 & 17, 2019 Recommended Action: Approve the meeting minutes as presented. b. AB # 20-003 - Consideration of Supplemental Agreement No. 3 with Otak, Inc. for Construction Engineering for the NE 188th Non-Motorized Improvements, and Related Budget Amendment. Recommended Action: Authorize the City Manager to enter into Supplemental Agreement No. 3, in substantially the same form as presented, with Otak, Inc., in the amount of $54,485 for construction engineering services for the NE 188th Street Non- Motorized Improvements project and approve the Budget Amendment Ordinance. MOTION: Councilmember Duerr moved approval of the Consent Agenda. Deputy Mayor Zornes second. The motion carried 6-0 with Councilmember Agnew absent and excused. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 7 of 358 City Council Regular Meeting Minutes January 21, 2020 Page 2 of 4 5. Public Hearings a. AB # 20-004 – Continuation of a Public Hearing on 2019 Plan and Code Amendments to the Capital Facilities Element and Establishing Minimum Density and Intensity with the Canyon Park and North Creek / NE 195th Street Activity Centers Recommended Action: Move to continue the public hearing to February 18, 2020. Community Development Director Michael Kattermann stated they are still in discussions with the SEPA appellant and asked for the hearing to be continued in order for more time to work towards a resolution. MOTION: Councilmember Duerr moved approval of the recommended action. Councilmember McAuliffe second. The motion carried 6-0 with Councilmember Agnew absent and excused. 6. Executive/Closed Session Council adjourned to an Executive Session and Closed Session at 6:10 PM to discuss the following: Potential Litigation pursuant to RCW 42.30.110(1)(i) and Labor Negotiations pursuant to RCW 42.30.140(4)(a), anticipated to last 40 minutes with action expected. Council reconvened to Regular Session at 6:50 PM. 7. Contracts and Agreements a. AB # 20-005 – Consideration of Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) with AFSCME Council 2, Local 3845 for 2020-2022 Recommended Action: Allow the City Manager to execute the 2020-2022 Collective Bargaining Agreement with AFSCME Council 2, Local 3845. MOTION: Councilmember Duerr moved approval of the recommended action. Councilmember Thompson second. The motion carried 6-0 with Councilmember Agnew absent and excused. 8. Ordinances & Resolutions a. AB # 20-006 - Consideration of an Ordinance Granting a Small Wireless Facilities Franchise Agreement to New Cingular Wireless, aka AT&T – 5 minutes Recommended Action: Adopt the proposed Ordinance granting a Small Wireless Facility Franchise to New Cingular Wireless PSC, LLC City Attorney Paul Byrne introduced Elana Zana of Ogden Murphy Wallace, who presented items 20-006 and 20-007 together, and entertained Council questions. MOTION: Councilmember Duerr moved approval of the recommended action. Councilmember Thompson second. The motion carried 6-0 with Councilmember Agnew absent and excused. b. AB # 20-007 – Consideration of an Ordinance Granting a Small Wireless Facilities Franchise Agreement to Seattle SMSA Limited Partnership, dba Verizon Wireless – 5 minutes Recommended Action: Adopt the proposed Ordinance granting a Small Wireless Facility Franchise to Seattle SMSA Limited Partnership, dba Verizon Wireless February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 8 of 358 City Council Regular Meeting Minutes January 21, 2020 Page 3 of 4 MOTION: Councilmember Duerr moved approval of the recommended action. Councilmember Thompson second. The motion carried 6-0 with Councilmember Agnew absent and excused. c. AB # 20-008 – Consideration of an Ordinance to Amend Chapters 2.44 and 2.45 Expanding Membership of the Parks & Recreation Board and Bothell Arts Commission to Include Youth Members – 15 minutes Recommended Action: Approve the Ordinance to amend Chapters 2.44 and 2.45, expanding membership of the Parks & Recreation Board and Bothell Arts commission to include youth members. Assistant City Manager Kellye Mazzoli presented the item and entertained Council questions. Discussion ensued. MOTION: Councilmember McAuliffe moved approval of the recommended action. Councilmember McNeal second. The motion carried 6-0 with Councilmember Agnew absent and excused. d. AB # 20-009 – Consideration of a Resolution Approving Fall 2019 ARCH Housing Trust Fund Recommendations – 10 minutes Recommended Action: Adopt the proposed Resolution to approve the 2019 Fall Housing Trust Fund recommendations in the amount of $88,970 to be drawn from previously committed funds by the City of Bothell to the ARCH Housing Trust Fund. Lindsay Masters, Executive Manager and Klaas Nijhuis, Senior Planner for A Regional Coalition for Housing (ARCH) presented items 20-009 and 20-010 together, and entertained Council questions. MOTION: Deputy Mayor Zornes moved approval of the recommended action. Councilmember Duerr second. The motion carried 6-0 with Councilmember Agnew absent and excused. e. AB # 20-010 – Consideration of a Resolution Approving 2020 ARCH Work Program and Funding – 30 minutes Recommended Action: Approve the proposed Resolution to adopt the ARCH 2020 Work Program and Budget, and authorizing payment of City funds for ARCH 2020 membership dues and a housing trust contribution in the amounts of $89,384 and $33,616, respectively. MOTION: Councilmember Duerr moved approval of the recommended action. Councilmember McAuliffe second. The motion carried 6-0 with Councilmember Agnew absent and excused. 9. Other Items Item # 2a. Presentation: Community Development Director Michael Kattermann introduced Northshore School Districts Chief Operations Officer John Paperman, who recapped recent and current district projects, recent amendments to King County Countywide Planning Policies (Best Practices) and ongoing coordination and next steps. Together they entertained Council questions. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 9 of 358 City Council Regular Meeting Minutes January 21, 2020 Page 4 of 4 10. Study Session/Update/Discussion Items A. AB # 20-011 – Consideration of Establishing a Multi-Family Tax Exemption Program Recommended Action: No formal action is required at this time. Council is asked to provide policy direction to staff to inform further development of the MFTE program. A Regional Coalition for Community Housing (ARCH) Senior Planner Mike Stanger presented. Community Development Director Michael Kattermann asked Council for policy direction regarding target area criteria, target income levels, the length of tax exemption, affordability duration and interaction with mandatory program. Councilmembers concurred with staff’s suggested direction on the analysis with two additions: • The target area criteria to include the BRT Lines • Look at housing ownership options 11. Council Conversations Councilmember Duerr asked if Council was open to the idea of locating the Sound Transit (ST) parking garage at the current Park & Ride site on Kaysner Way as an alternative to ST’s preferred site at near Pop Keeney. Discussion ensued. Council concurred with this alternative proposal. Councilmember Duerr will convey this alternative back to the Elected Leadership Group. Councilmember McNeal stated he would like to stay on as the Sound Cities Association Public Issues Committee Representative and stated that Councilmember Thomspon is okay with being an alternate (referring to the Council Committee assignments on January 7, 2020). Councilmember Thompson concurred but stated he wanted to make sure that Councilmember Agnew was okay with him being the alternate, as Councilmember Agnew (who is absent this evening) was appointed as the alternate to this committee on January 7th. Other topics included changes to the protocol manual to allow for expanded call-in attendance. 12. Adjourn Mayor Olsen adjourned the meeting at 7:38 PM Submitted for approval on 2/4/2020 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 10 of 358 City Council Agenda Bill AB # 20-012 TO: Mayor Olsen and Members of the Bothell City Council FROM: Chris Bothwell, Finance Director DATE: February 4, 2020 SUBJECT: Consider Approval of December 2019 Payroll and Benefit Transactions POLICY CONSIDERATION: This item asks the City Council to consider approval of payroll and benefit transactions for the period of December 1 – 31, 2019 totaling $4,541,502.35 that were approved and paid by the City Auditor. Direct deposit transactions #2000128832 - #2000129571 totaling $2,032.759.94. Payroll and benefit checks #38947 - #38996, plus wire benefit payments #662 -#673 totaling $2,508.742.41. HISTORY: DATE ACTION JUNE 5, 2000 Ordinance 1810 appointed Finance Director/City Treasurer as City Auditor In accordance with state statues, vouchers approved by the City Auditor are required to be ratified by City Council and notated in the minutes. DISCUSSION: N/A FISCAL IMPACTS: Funding for salaries and benefits are included in the Adopted 2019-2020 Budget. ATTACHMENTS: Att 1. December 2019 Payroll and Benefit Transactions (For Council distribution only. Check listings are available for review in the Finance Department.) RECOMMENDED ACTION: Approve payroll and benefit transactions for December 1 – 31, 2019. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 11 of 358 (This page intentionally left blank) February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 12 of 358 City Council Agenda Bill AB # 20-013 TO: Mayor Olsen and Members of the Bothell City Council FROM: Nik Stroup, Director of Department Tracey Perkosky, Parks & Recreation (Presenter) DATE: February 4, 2020 SUBJECT: Consideration of a Parks Property Tax Agreement between King County and the City of Bothell POLICY CONSIDERATION: This item asks the City Council to consider if the City should continue to participate in the Parks Property Tax Agreement with King County, in order for the City to receive the per capita funds from the 2020 King County Park Levy. These funds can be used for parks capital projects, major maintenance or repair, and land acquisition. If Council does not authorize this agreement, the City will not receive these funds from the County. HISTORY: JULY 1, 2008 Council approves Special Property Tax Levy Agreement between King County and the City of Bothell APRIL 22, 2014 Council approves Parks Property Tax Levy Agreement between King County and the City of Bothell Every six years, King County has submitted a levy request to the voters to fund parks in the unincorporated areas of the County. In 2008, a provision was added to help fund special projects and small per capita allocations for cities’ parks projects. This provision also occurred in the 2014 and 2020 levies. During the 2014 levy, funds were allocated toward the Park at Bothell Landing Pedestrian Bridge replacement. DISCUSSION: In order for cities to receive the funds for the per capita allocations, an agreement must be in place between the City and County. A new agreement is required for each levy term. This currently proposed Parks Property Tax Agreement covers the period from 2020 through 2025. The allocations are codified by King County in Ordinance 18890 (Attachment 2) and the full bill details can be accessed online at February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 13 of 358 City Council Agenda Bill AB # 20-013 https://mkcclegisearch.kingcounty.gov/ LegislationDetail.aspx?ID=3867884&GUID=13C753D1-9525-4158-B534- 5771CB1C66FF. Based on extensive community engagement of local parks and recreation needs and an acknowledgement that King County is changing, the 2020 program will fund a broader array of local projects than in previous years. The funds can be used for the implementation of capital improvement projects; major maintenance repair or replacement projects to parks or recreation infrastructure; and the acquisition, conservation, and stewardship of additional natural areas, resource or ecological lands, rights-of-way for regional trails, and urban green spaces. Funds are deposited quarterly with the City and can be used immediately or accumulated to fund a more expensive project. Funds are based on actual receipts to the County; the estimated revenue should be used only as a planning guide. The City programs the King County levy funds during the Capital Facilities Plan (CFP) process. An annual report is required that lists either the planned projects for the funds or the eligible project expenditures. FISCAL IMPACTS: By executing the agreement, the City is eligible to receive revenues from the King County Parks Levy, which is dependent on actual property tax receipts. It is estimated that the City of Bothell could realize up to $169,000 annually or $845,000 over the agreement term. This revenue was anticipated for 2020 and was included in the adopted budget. ATTACHMENTS: Att-1. Proposed Parks Property Tax Levy Agreement between King County and City of Bothell (2020-2026) Att-2. King County Ordinance 18890 RECOMMENDED ACTION: Authorize the City Manager to execute the Parks Property Tax Agreement between King County and City of Bothell. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 14 of 358 PARKS PROPERTY TAX LEVY AGREEMENT between KING COUNTY & (CITY) City of Bothell This Parks Property Tax Levy Agreement (the “Agreement”) is made and entered into as of this ____ day of ____________, 2020, by and between KING COUNTY, a political subdivision of the state of Washington (the “County”) and the City of Bothell, a State of Washington municipal corporation ("CITY”). RECITALS A.The County owns and operates a park system with over twenty-eight thousand (28,000) acres of regional parks and open spaces, over one-hundred-seventy-five (175) miles of regional trails, and two-hundred-fifteen (215) miles of backcountry trails. In addition, the County is the provider of local parks in the rural area and is the transitional provider of local parks in the urban incorporated areas. B.Since 2003, on recommendation of the Metropolitan Parks Task Force and direction from the County Executive and County Council, the County's Parks and Recreation Division has focused on managing a system of regional parks, open spaces and trails and a limited set of regional active recreation assets. Consistent with its role as a regional and local rural service provider under Countywide Planning Policies and the State Growth Management Act, the County has divested itself of local parks and facilities in urban unincorporated areas as these areas incorporate or annex to cities. C.On April 17, 2019, the King County Council adopted Ordinance 18890 which called for a special election in accordance with RCW 29A.04.321 to authorize a property tax levy in excess of the levy limitation contained in 84.55 RCW for a period of six (6) years for specified park purposes. D.On August 6, 2019, King County voters approved Proposition No. 1 Parks Levy that authorized an additional six year property tax levy at a rate of $0.1832 in the first year, with subsequent levies adjusted by inflation for the purpose of: maintaining and operating King County’s open space system; improving parks, recreation, access, and mobility in the King County open space system by acquiring lands and continuing to develop regional trails; improving parks and trails in and acquiring lands by metropolitan parks districts, towns, and cities in King County; funding environmental education, maintenance, and conservation programs at the Woodland Park Zoo; finding capital construction at the Seattle Aquarium; and funding for capital improvements at publicly owned pools, for all King County residents. NOW, THEREFORE, in consideration of the mutual promises and undertakings hereinafter set forth and for other good and valuable consideration, the receipt and sufficiency of which are hereby acknowledged, the parties hereby agree as follows: Att-1 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 15 of 358 King County Parks Property Tax Levy 2020-2025 Agreement Page 2 of 7 AGREEMENT 1.Definitions. As used in this Agreement, the following terms shall have the following meanings: A.“Annual Report” shall mean the annual report prepared by the CITY and provided to the County annually by May 31st beginning in 2021 setting forth a summary of CITY Projects for the preceding year, along with a complete financial accounting for the use of the CITY’S Share, and a listing of all capital investments made at the CITY funded in whole or in part by County Levy Proceeds, and for the 2020 annual report the CITY shall identify the dollar amount of the CITY's Existing Funds. B. “CITY” shall mean the City of Bothell , State of Washington, and all of its boards, commissions, departments, agencies and other subdivisions. C.“CITY Parks System” shall mean any building or other structure related to parks or recreation, parks, trails, open space, such as natural areas and resource or ecological lands and other parks or recreation property owned or otherwise under the jurisdiction of the CITY. D."City Proceeds" shall mean eight percent (8%) of the total County Levy Proceeds collected by King County, net the amounts specified and allocated in Ordinance 18890 Sections 4A-D, and any interest earnings on these funds. E."CITY Projects" shall mean CITY Parks System operations and capital improvement projects consistent with Ordinance 18890. F.“CITY’S Share” shall mean the CITY’s proportionate share of the City Proceeds as authorized by Ordinance 18890, subject to County Council appropriation. G.“County” shall mean King County, State of Washington, and all of its boards, commissions, departments, agencies and other subdivisions. H.“County Council” shall mean the County Council of King County, State of Washington. I.“County Levy” means the annual King County property tax levy for park purposes imposed by the King County Council and authorized by Proposition No. 1 Parks Levy that was approved by the County voters on August 6, 2019 and replaced a levy expiring at the end of 2019. J.“County Levy Proceeds” shall mean the principal amount of the County Levy collected by the County. K.“Executive” shall mean the King County Executive or his or her functional successor. L."Existing funds" shall have the meaning, as defined by RCW 84.55.050. Att-1 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 16 of 358 King County Parks Property Tax Levy 2020-2025 Agreement Page 3 of 7 2.Term of Agreement. The term of this Agreement (the “Term”) shall be for a period commencing upon signature by both parties (the “Commencement Date”), and expiring on December 31, 2025 (the “Termination Date”). 3.Receipt of County Levy Proceeds. A.General Distribution. Each year the County shall distribute the CITY's Share to the CITY as authorized by Ordinance 18890, subject to County Council appropriation. B.Receipt and Distribution of Levy Proceeds. 1.Payment Schedule. Beginning in 2020 and through 2025, the County shall transfer the CITY’s Share to the CITY on a semi-annual basis, generally in the months of May and November. The annual amounts transferred shall never exceed the CITY's proportionate share of the CITY Proceeds actually collected and appropriated by King County. 2.Administrative Fee. The Parties agree that the County has authority to deduct a portion from City Proceeds for eligible expenditures related to the administration of the distribution of County Levy Proceeds, consistent with Ordinance 18890. 4.Use of County Levy Proceeds. The CITY shall only use the transferred CITY’S Share for its CITY Projects. On or before May 31st of each year throughout the Term of this Agreement, the CITY shall provide the County with a copy of the Annual Report and provide any further documentation showing that the CITY’S Share was expended on CITY Projects. The CITY shall maintain financial records to account separately for the CITY’S Share. 5.Representations and Warranties. The CITY represents and warrants that all of the CITY’S Share received by the CITY shall be used only for specific CITY Projects as defined in this Agreement and that such funds shall not be used to supplant Existing Funds. The CITY represents and warrants that all CITY Projects shall be consistent with the requirements in King County Ordinance 18890. The CITY represents and warrants that in addition to the CITY'S Share, the CITY shall annually expend on CITY Projects an amount equal to the CITY's Existing Funds. 6.Title to Improvements. All appurtenances, fixtures, improvements, equipment, additions and other property attached to or installed in the CITY Park System during the Term shall be and remain the properties of CITY and shall not be deemed property of the County under any circumstances. 7.Notices. All notices required to be given hereunder shall be in writing and either delivered personally or sent by certified mail to the appropriate address listed below, or at such other address as shall be provided by written notice. Notice shall be deemed communicated upon actual receipt. For convenience of the parties, copies of notices may also be given be other means; however, neither party may give official or binding notice except by personal delivery or by certified mail. Att-1 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 17 of 358 King County Parks Property Tax Levy 2020-2025 Agreement Page 4 of 7 If to the CITY: CITY’s Contact and Title: Nik Stroup, Parks & Recreation Director City Name: Mailing Address1: Mailing Address2: City, State, Zip Code: City of Bothell 21233 20th Ave SE Bothell, WA 98021 If to King County: Warren Jimenez, Division Director King County Parks and Recreation Division Department of Natural Resources and Parks 201 South Jackson Street Mailstop: KSC-NR-0700 Seattle, WA 98104 8.Compliance with Laws. The CITY shall comply and conform with all applicable laws and all governmental regulations, rules, and orders. 9.CITY Agreement to Comply with Audit Finding or Repay. The CITY agrees that it is financially responsible for the lawful use of the levy funds distributed under this contract. The CITY agrees that if the State Auditor makes an audit finding that the levy funds have not been spent properly, the CITY shall comply with the State Auditor’s audit finding and correct any improper expenditure or, at the sole discretion of the County, repay any indicated amounts to the County. This duty to comply with the audit finding or repay shall not be diminished or extinguished by the prior termination of this Agreement and shall survive the termination of this Agreement. 10.Miscellaneous. A.Liability of the County. The County’s obligations to the CITY under this Agreement shall be limited to the terms and conditions set forth herein. Notwithstanding any other provision in this Agreement to the contrary, in no event shall the County be liable, regardless of whether any claim is based on contract or tort, for any special, consequential, indirect or incidental damages, including without limitation lost profits, arising out of or in connection with this Agreement or the services performed in connection with this Agreement. B.Dispute Resolution. In the event of a dispute between the CITY and the County regarding any term of this Agreement, the parties shall attempt to resolve the matter informally through the following mechanism: the CITY (reps.) or their respective designee(s), shall meet with County (reps) or their respective designee(s) to review and discuss the matter(s) in dispute; if the CITY (representatives) and County (representatives) are unable to reach a mutual resolution, the Executive and the mayor, or their respective Att-1 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 18 of 358 King County Parks Property Tax Levy 2020-2025 Agreement Page 5 of 7 designee(s) shall meet to review and discuss the matter(s) in dispute. If such persons are unable to resolve the matter informally, either party may submit the matter to a non- binding, structured mediation procedure fashioned by persons or organizations experienced in alternative dispute resolution ("ADR") procedures. The mediation may be requested by any party and shall be initiated within thirty (30) days from the date of the request unless extended by agreement of both parties. The alternative dispute resolution procedures utilized for the mediation shall include the exchange of written claims and responses, with supporting information, at least seven (7) days prior to the actual mediation. The positions expressed and mediator's recommendations shall not be admissible as evidence in any subsequent ADR or legal proceeding. If the matter is submitted to mediation and the matter is not resolved, an affected party shall be entitled to pursue any legal remedy available. Any disputes involving the lawful expenditure of levy proceeds shall be resolved by King County Superior Court if the parties cannot agree. C.No Implied Waiver. No failure by either party hereto to insist upon the strict performance of any obligation of the other party under this Agreement or to exercise any right, power or remedy arising out of a breach thereof, irrespective of the length of time for which such failure continues (except in cases where this Agreement expressly limits the time for exercising rights or remedies arising out of a breach), shall constitute a waiver of such breach or of that party’s right to demand strict compliance such term, covenant or condition or operate as a surrender of this Agreement. No waiver of any default or the performance of any provision hereof shall affect any other default or performance, or cover any other period of time, other than the default, performance or period of time specified in such express waiver. One or more written waivers of a default or the performance of any provision hereof shall not be deemed to be a waiver of a subsequent default or performance. The consent of either party hereto given in any instance under the terms of this Agreement shall not relieve the other party of any obligation to secure the consent of the other party in any other or future instance under the terms of this Agreement. D.Headings and Subheadings. The captions preceding the articles and sections of this Agreement and in the table of contents have been inserted for convenience of reference and such captions in no way define or limit the scope or intent of any provision of this Agreement. E.Successors and Assigns. The terms, covenants, and conditions contained in this Agreement shall bind and inure to the benefit of the County and the CITY and, except as otherwise provided herein, their personal representatives and successors and assigns. There are no third party beneficiaries to this Agreement. F.Agreement made in Washington. This Agreement shall be deemed to be made in and shall be construed in accordance with the laws of the State of Washington. Venue of any action brought by one party against the other to enforce or arising out of this Agreement shall be in King County Superior Court. Att-1 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 19 of 358 King County Parks Property Tax Levy 2020-2025 Agreement Page 6 of 7 G.Integrated Agreement; Modification. This Agreement contains all the agreements of the parties hereto relating to the subject matter addressed herein, and cannot be amended or modified except by a written agreement approved by the King County Council and mutually executed between each of the parties hereto. H.Counterparts. This Agreement may be executed in two or more counterparts, each of which shall be deemed an original, but all of which taken together shall constitute one and the same instrument. I.Time of Essence. Time is of the essence of each provision of this Agreement. J.Signage. For each capital project funded with County Levy Proceeds, the CITY shall provide a sign including the following language: This project was funded (or as applicable, funded in part) with proceeds from the Proposition No. 1 Parks Levy approved by King County voters in August 2019 under an Agreement with King County Parks and Recreation Division. K.Reporting. As set forth in King County Council Motion 15378, section C, for each capital project funded with County Levy Proceeds, the CITY shall report to King County Parks and the King County Council major milestones, such as groundbreakings and opening dates, thirty (30) days prior to such milestone. The CITY shall mail or deliver reports to both King County Parks and the current King County Council councilmembers at: Warren Jimenez, Division Director King County Parks and Recreation Division Department of Natural Resources and Parks 201 South Jackson Street Mailstop: KSC-NR-0700 Seattle, WA 98104 Councilmembers: ____________________ (please list all 9 councilmembers) In care of King County Council Clerk 516 3rd Avenue Seattle, WA 98104 [ SIGNATURE PAGE FOLLOWS ] Att-1 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 20 of 358 King County Parks Property Tax Levy 2020-2025 Agreement Page 7 of 7 DATED this ____ day of ____________, 2020. KING COUNTY, a Washington municipal corporation By _________________________________ Its _________________________________ By authority of Ordinance No. 18890 CITY OF _________________________, a Washington municipal corporation By Jennifer Phillips Its City Manager Att-1 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 21 of 358 (This page intentionally left blank) February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 22 of 358 KING COUNTY Klqgrf,a*rty Signature Report Ordinance 18890 Proposed No.2019-0084.2 Sponsors Balducci, von Reichbauer, Kohl- Welles, McDermott and Dembowski 1 AN ORDINANCE providing for the submission to the z qualified electors of King County at a special election to be 3 held in King County on August 6,2019, of a proposition 4 authorizing a property tax levy in excess of the levy 5 limitation contained in chapter 84.55 RCW for a period of 6 six consecutive years, at atotal rate of not more than 7 $0.1832 per one thousand dollars of assessed valuation in 8 the first year and limiting annual levy increases by the King 9 County inflation plus population index published by the 10 King County office of economic and financial analysis, or t7 the chapter 84.55 RCW limitation, whichever is greater in t2 years two through six for the purpose of maintaining and 13 operating King County's open space system; improving 74 parks, recreation, access and mobility in the King County 15 open space system by acquiring lands and continuing to 16 develop regional trails; improving parks and trails in and t7 acquiring lands by metropolitan parks districts, towns and 18 cities in King County; funding environmental education, 19' maintenance and conservation programs at the Woodland 1200 King County Courthouse 5 16 Third Avenue Seattle, WA 98104 T Att-2 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 23 of 358 Ordinance 18890 ParkZoo; funding capital construction at the Seattle Aquarium; and funding for capital improvements at publicly owned pools, for all King County residents. STATEMENT OF FACTS: 1. King County owns'and operates a system of regional and local parks and trails that consists of twenty-eight thousand acres of parklands and more than one hundred seventy-five miles of regional trails. The county provides regional trails, regional recreational facilities, regional natural areas, regional parks and local parks in unincorporated areas. Examples of regional county parks and trails include Marymoor park, Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland park, the Weyerhaeuser King County Aquatic Center and the Sammamish River trail. 2. Parks, natural areas and trails contribute to a high quality of life. A robust system of parks and trails provides physical, social and mental health benefits to individuals; economic opportunity through recreation and tourism; economic growth for private businesses that must attract and retain skilled workers; and environmental benefits and cultural resource protection through open space conservation. King County's open space system provides all these benefits to King County residents and businesses. 3. The 2002Parks Business Transition Plan, adopted by the King County council and enacted by Ordinance 14509, became the blueprint for establishing the regional open space system we have today. Building on 2 Att-2 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 24 of 358 Ordinance 18890 that blueprint, the county has adopted open space plans, which have provided the framework guiding King County in the acquisition, planning, development, stewardship, maintenance and management of its complex system ofparks, regional trails and acres ofopen space. The latest open space plan was updated in20l6 and adopted by Ordinance 18309. 4. In implementing the open space plan, the parks and recreation division of the department of natural resources and parks has successfully focused its lines of business on regional parks and trails, backcountry trails, natural lands and local parks in unincorporated King County and has implemented business practices that generate revenue from park system assets by implementing or increasing user fees and establishing corporate and community partnerships that enhance park amenities and leverage public and private dollars to improve parks and increase access to parks. 5. Consistent with the recommendations of past parks-related task forces, the county has sought voter-approved levies on three prior occasions: in 2003, enacted by Ordinance 14586, to provide maintenance and operating funding for the parks and recreation division fot 2004 through 2007; in 2007, enacted by ordinance 15759, to provide funding for maintenance and operations as well as funding for open space acquisition, regional trail development, the Woodland ParkZoo and for King County towns and cities for use in their open space acquisition and trail projects for 2008 through 2013; and in 2013, enacted by Ordinance 17568, to provide funding for maintenance and operations as well as for open space 3 Att-2 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 25 of 358 Ordinance 18890 acquisition, asset maintenance and improvement, parks and trails projects, the Woodland Park Zoo and for King County towns and cities to use for their parks and recreation for 2014 through2019. Voters approved the funding measures on all three occasions that they were on the ballot. The voter-approved levies have helped keep the open space system "l.un, ,uf" and open. 6. The 2014 through2019 voter-approved parks, trails and open space replacement levy provides approximately eighty percent of the operating budget of the parks and recreation division, with approximately thirteen percent generated through business activities and entrepreneurial efforts. King County general fund support to the parks and recreation division was eliminated as of 201 1. 7. The community partnerships and grants program enacted by Ordinance 14509 enhances parks amenities by partnering with parks and recreation organizations. Since the inception of the community partnership and grant program in2003, more than sixty projects representing more than sixty million dollars'worth of new, enhanced, or preserved public recreation facilities have been completed, with only eighteen million dollars of King County capital investment. 8. The Woodland ParkZoo received distributions from the past two voter- approved levies to supplement zoo operating revenue for education and conservation programs, horticulture and maintenance and capital improvements. Levy proceeds distributed to the zoo provided 4 Att-2 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 26 of 358 Ordinance 18890 environmental education, programming and transportation focusing on accessibility for underserved areas, supported thousands of students annually and benefitted residents throughout King County. Levy proceeds also provided conservation and animal care for threatened Pacific Northwest species. 9. King County towns and cities received funding from the past two voter-approved levies. In 2008 through 2013, towns and cities could use levy proceeds for open space and natural lands acquisition and development of town or city trail projects that supported connections to the regional trail system with distributions being contingent upon an equal or greater contribution of matching moneys from the recipient town or city for the same project. In the2014 through 2019levy, types of uses for the distribution to King County towns and cities were broadened to provide flexibility and better meet the parks and recreation needs of cities. 10. Parks levy oversight committees were established to monitor the expenditures of the proceeds from the 2004 through2007,2008 through 2013 and20l4 through2}l9levies. Annual committee review has concluded that the county has complied with all levy requirements. 1 1. King County is growing rapidly as a region. ln20l7, King County's population increased by close to fifty thousand people; and over the next ten years, the region is expected to grow by another one hundred eighty thousand people. Recent surveys have indicated that since 2008, the number of people who hike in natural area parks has doubled. More and 5 Att-2 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 27 of 358 Ordinance 18890 tL2 113 r1.4 L15 tr6 tL7 118 Lt9 120 tzL L22 t23 L24 L25 126 L27 128 L29 130 L3L 132 L33 134 more people are using the King County parks and trails, which puts greater pressure on an aging system. As development increases to accommodate population growth, the risk of losing natural lands and green spaces throughout the county grows. Those valuable lands contribute to King County residents'high quality of life. The cost of land to accommodate this growth and preserve open spaces is also increasing. Today is the opportune time to address future needs of residents by investing in our parks and trails and accelerating conservation of open space. 12. InKing County, many communities have experienced a history of inequitable and limited regional investments in parks, recreation and open space, limiting the ability of residents to lead healthy lives. Five hundred thousand King County residents live without ready access to, parks, recreation and open spaces. There is a need to address disparities in access to parks, recreation and open space for underserved areas and communities, including people with disabilities. This proposal provides an opportunity to address parks and recreation needs ofthese underserved areas and communities. 13. Recognizing growth in population, increased use of parks and trails and the need to address disparities in preparation for the 2020 through 2025levy, the parks and recreation division conducted outreach to obtain feedback on the current park system and future parks and recreation needs for all King County residents. From August through November 2018, 5 Att-2 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 28 of 358 Ordinance 18890 parks and recreation division staff conducted fifty-four in-person engagement meetings with groups representing all geographic areas of the county including towns and cities, business, recreation, community and environmental interests. An online survey was also conducted from November to December 2018, and received one thousand nine hundred thirty-four responses from the public, representing all geographic areas of the county. 14. The feedback from the engagement meetings and online survey showed support for the King County open space system. Engagement findings showed support for maintenance and operations of the open space system, as well as critical infrastructure repair and replacement, and the acquisition, conservation and stewardship of open space, as such lands can provide for passive or active recreation opportunities and protection of habitat and water quality, and the development of and improvements on regional trail corridors. Feedback supported funding for King County towns' and cities'parks and recreation programs; the Woodland Park Zoological Society education and conservation programs and horticulture, maintenance and capital improvements; and recognized the Seattle Aquarium as a regional asset. 15. The King County executive took into consideration information obtained from this outreach, the region's growing population, increased use of parks and trails across King County, and the lack of parks, recreation and open space in some communities, and has put forth this 7 Att-2 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 29 of 358 Ordinance 18890 158 159 160 1,61, L62 163 L64 165 166 L67 168 169 L70 17t 172 L73 174 L75 L76 177 178 L79 180 proposal which acknowledges the changing landscape and the need to grow the open space system to keep up with demand from the region. This proposal is also consistent with the goals and priorities of past levy task forces. 16. This proposal would exempt low-income senior citizens, disabled veterans and other people with disabilities from the regular property tax increase on their residences resulting from a levy authorized by this ordinance, if they have been approved for an exemption under RCW 84.36.381. BE IT ORDAINED BY THE COLINCIL OF KING COIJNTY: l. Definitions. The definitions in this section apply throughout thisS ordinance unless the context clearly requires otherwise. A. "Community partnerships and grants program" means the program through which King County provides moneys to recreation-oriented groups, sports associations and community-based organizations to undertake any combination of developing, operating or maintaining a recreation facility or public park in unincorporated King County and King County towns and cities for public benefit. B. "Integrated floodplain management, means habitat restoration, open space acquisition or recreational opportunities that are integrated with preventive and corrective measures to reduce the risk of flooding. C. "Levy" means the levy of regular property taxes, for the specific purposes and term provided in this ordinance and authorizedby the electorate in accordance with state law. 8 Att-2 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 30 of 358 181 182 Ordinance 18890 D. "Levy proceeds" means the principal amount of moneys raised by the levy, any interest earnings on the moneys and the proceeds of any interim financing following authorization of the levy. E. "Limit factor" means the most recent published King County office of economic and financial analysis King County inflation plus population index, or the limitation contained in chapter 84.55 RCW, whichever is greater. F. "Open space system" means the system that includes parks, trails, natural areas, resource lands and structures or buildings owned or otherwise under the jurisdiction of the parks and recreation division of the department of natural resources and parks. For the purposes of this ordinance, with reference to King County, the term "open space lands" shall collectively refer to natural areas and resource lands. G. "Targeted equity grant program" means the program through which King County provides moneys in order to achieve equitable opportunities and access to parks and recreation for underserved areas and communities, including people with disabilities, located in unincorporated King County and King County towns and cities. H. "Town or city parks system" means any building or other structure related to parks or recreation, parks, trails, open space such as natural areas and resource or ecological lands and other parks or recreation property owned or otherwise under the jurisdiction of a town or city within King County. SECTION 2. Levy submittal to voters. To provide necessary moneys for the pulposes identified in section 4 of this ordinance, the King County council shall submit to the qualified electors of the county a proposition authorizing a regular property tax levy in excsss of the levy limitation contained in chapter 84.55 RCW for six consecutive 183 L84 185 186 r87 188 r.89 190 T9I L92 193 t94 195 L96 t97 198 L99 200 20r 202 203 I Att-2 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 31 of 358 Ordinance 18890 204 years, with collection commencing in 2020, at a rate not to exceed $0.1 832 per one 2o5 thousand dollars of assessed value in the first year of the levy period. The dollar amount 206 of the levy in the first year shall be the base upon which the levy amounts in year two 2o7 through six shall be calculated. In accordance with RCW 84.55.050, this levy shall be a 2O8 regular property tax levy subject to the limit factor. 2o9 SECTION 3. Deposit of lery proceeds. The levy proceeds shall be deposited 2to into a dedicated subfund ofthe parks and recreation fund, or its successor. 2LI SECTION 4. Eligible expenditures. If approved by the qualified electors of the 212 county, levy proceeds shall be used for the following purposes: 2L3 A. Costs incurred by the county that are attributable to the special election called 2L4 for in section 5 of this ordinance. 2I5 B. Up to eight million dollars to the Seattle Aquarium from the first four years of 2L6 the levy. Levy proceeds for the Seattle Aquarium shall solely be for capital costs for the 2I7 Ocean Pavilion project, except as provided in subsection E.5. of this section. 218 C. Up to forty-four million dollars to publicly owned pools for: capital 2tg improvement projects, including planning, feasibility studies, preconstruction and design, 22O construction; and major maintenance repair or replacement projects. 22L D. Up to twenty-two million dollars to habitat restoration, open space acquisition 222 or recreational opportunities, or any combination thereof, associated with integrated 223 floodplain management capital improvement projects and to outreach and education 224 related to the benefits of integrated floodplain management projects. 22s E. The remainder of levy proceeds shall be used for the following purposes: 226 1. Forty percent of levy proceeds for maintenance and operations of King 10 Att-2 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 32 of 358 Ordinance 18890 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 County's open space system and the targeted equity grant program, but no more than ten million dollars may be used for the targeted equity grant program; 2. Forty-seven percent oflevy proceeds for: a. acquisition, conservation and stewardship of additional open space lands, natural areas, resource or ecological lands, rights of way for regional trails and urban green spaces; b. acquisition of rights of way for and development of regional and other public trails; c. capital improvement projects and major maintenance repair or replacement of open space system infrastructure; d. community partnerships and grants program; and e. capital improvement projects and major maintenance repair or replacement of parks or recreation infrastructure in metropolitan park districts, towns or cities; 3. Eight percent of levy proceeds for distribution to towns and cities in King County for their town or city parks system operations and capital improvement projects, of which amount: a. twenty-five thousand dollars shall be distributed annually to each town and city; b. an additional seventy-five thousand dollars shall be distributed annually to cities with a population greater than four thousand; c. of the remainder, fifty percent shall be distributed in proportion to each town or city's population and fifty percent shall be distributed in proportion to the assessed value of parcels within each town or city; IL Att-2 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 33 of 358 Ordinance 18890 25o 4. Five percent of levy proceeds for distribution to the Woodland Park 25L Zoological Society shall be used solely for: environmental education with an emphasis on 252 accessibility to traditionally underserved populations throughout the county; horticulture 253 and maintenance of buildings and grounds; conservation of threatened species; and 254 development of conservation and education strategies to mitigate impacts to animals and 255 habitats from climate change; and 256 5. Of the levy proceeds in subsections B., C., D.,8.2.e., E.3. and E.4. of this 257 section, a portion shall be retained by the county to be used for expenditures related to 258 administration of the distribution of levy proceeds. Eligible administrative expenditures 259 shall include all costs and charges to the parks and recreation division or the county 260 associated with or attributable to the purposes listed in subsections B., C., D., E.2.e.,8.3. 261 and E.4. of this section as well as sections 6 and 7 of this ordinance. Consistent with 262 RCW 84.55.050, as it may be amended, levy proceeds may not supplant existing funding. 263 SECTION 5. Call for special election. In accordance with RCW 29A.04.321, 264 the King County council hereby calls for a special election to be held in conjunction with 265 the primary election on August 6,2019, to consider a proposition authorizing a regular 266 property tax levy for the purposes described in this ordinance. The King County director 267 of elections shall cause notice to be given of this ordinance in accordance with the state 269 constitution and general law and to submit to the qualified electors of the county, at the 269 said special county election, the proposition hereinafter set forth. The clerk of the council 27O shall certify that proposition to the King County director of elections in substantially the 27t following form, with such additions, deletions or modifications as may be required for 272 the proposition listed below by the prosecuting attorney: t2 Att-2 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 34 of 358 Ordinance 18890 273 The King County council passed Ordinance _ concerning replacement 274 of an expiring parks levy. If approved, this proposition would provide 275 funding for county, town, city and park district parks, and for open space, 276 trails, recreation, public pools, zoo operations and an aquarium capital 277 project. It would authorize an additional six-year property tax beginning 278 in 2020 at $0. I 832 per $ 1 ,000 of assessed valuation with the 2020 levy 279 amount being the base for calculating annual increases in202l - 2025 by 28o the King County inflation plus population index or the 84.55 RCW 28L limitation, whichever is greater. Should this proposition be: 282 Approved?_ 283 Rejected? _ 284 SECTION 6. Distributions. Each distribution of levy proceeds to a King County 285 town or city, the Woodland Park Zoological Society or its successor, or the Seattle 286 Aquarium or its successor, for the eligible pulposes identified in section 4 of this 287 ordinance shall be subject to the execution of a contract between the county and each 288 entity for the same purposes. Distribution of levy proceeds shall be subject to the 28g execution of a contract for: the targeted equity grant program; publicly owned pool 29o capital improvement projects and major maintenance repair or replacement projects; 291, integrated floodplain management capital improvement projects and outreach and 292 education; capital improvement projects and major maintenance repair or replacement 293 projects to parks or recreation infrastructure in metropolitan park districts, towns or 2g4 cities; and acquisition, conservation and stewardship of additional natural areas, resource 295 or ecological lands, rights of way for regional trails and urban green spaces. L3 Att-2 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 35 of 358 Ordinance 18890 296 SECTION 7. Parks levy oversight board established. 297 A. If the proposition in section 5 of this ordinance is approved by the qualified 298 electors of King County, a parks levy oversight board shall be appointed by the 299 executive. The board shall consist of nine members. Each councilmember shall 3oo nominate a candidate for the board who resides in the councilmember's district no later 3Oi. than March 31,2020. If the executive does not appoint by May 3I,2020, the person 3O2 nominated by a councilmember, the executive must request that the councilmember 303 should by June 30,2020, nominate another candidate for appointment. Members shall be 304 confirmed by the council. Members may not be elected or appointed officials of any unit 305 of government, except that individuals serving in a civic capacity on a local board or 306 commission would be eligible to serve on the parks levy oversight board. 307 B. The board shall review the allocation of levy proceeds and progress on 308 achieving the purposes of this proposition. On or before December 31,202I, the board 309 shall review and report to the King County executive, the King County council and the 310 regional policy committee on the expenditure of levy proceeds for 2020. Thereafter, the gn board shall review and report to the King County executive, the King County council and 3Lz the regional policy committee annually. Any report to the King County council under 3i.3 this section shall be made in the form of a paper original and an electronic copy with the 314 clerk of the council, who shall retain the original and provide an electronic copy to all 315 councilmembers. The board expires December 3I,2026. 316 SECTION 8. Exemption. The additional regular property taxes authorized by 3L7 this ordinance shall be included in any real property tax exemption authorizedby RCW 318 84.36.381. L4 Att-2 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 36 of 358 3L9 320 32L Ordinance 18890 SECTION 9. Ratification. Certification of the proposition by the clerk of the King County council to the director of elections in accordance with law before the election on August 6,2019, and any other acts consistent with the authority and before the effective date of this ordinance are hereby ratified and confirmed.322 15 Att-2 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 37 of 358 323 324 325 326 Ordinance 18890 SECTION 10. Severability. If any provision of this ordinance or its application to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the remainder of the ordinance or the application of the provision to other persons or circumstances is not affected. Ordinance 18890 was introduced on and hearing held/closed and passed by the Metropolitan King County Council on 411712019, by the following vote: Yes: 8 - Mr. von Reichbauer, Mr. Gossett, Ms. Lambert, Mr. McDermott, Mr. Dembowski, Mr. Upthegrove, Ms. Kohl-Welles and Ms. Balducci No: 1-Mr.Dunn KING COUNTY COUNCIL KING COUNTY, WASHINGTON Rod Dembowski, Chair Melani Pedroza, Clerk of the APPROVED this L day of A 2019 I t\t i;.- - ,'<]r I \/<') n F{ -\LoI c3\.4 :t; r,l:} Cfi -<'lJ:{c? I Attachments: None T6 Dow Constantine, County Executive Att-2 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 38 of 358 City Council Agenda Bill AB # 20-014 TO: Mayor Olsen and Members of the Bothell City Council FROM: Nik Stroup, Parks & Recreation Director Tracey Perkosky, Parks & Recreation (Presenter) DATE: February 4, 2020 SUBJECT: Consideration of a Resolution to Adopt the 2020 Parks, Recreation, and Open Space (PROS) Plan POLICY CONSIDERATION: The policy consideration is to adopt a Parks, Recreation, and Open Space (PROS) Plan for the community. This PROS Plan is a guiding document for the Parks and Recreation Department to provide park amenities and programs and to acquire new park land from 2020 to 2026. The PROS Plan and the breadth of policies in the elements of the plan have implications for a number of Council Goals: •Parks/Recreation/Open Space Partnerships; •Community Connections; •Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability; and •Fiscal Responsibility and Stability HISTORY: DATE ACTION JANUARY 24, 2014 City Council passed Resolution 1306 adopting the Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Action Program (PROSAP) APRIL 16, 2019 City Council received a staff briefing on the 2020 PROS Plan JUNE 11, 2019 City Council held a study session NOVEMBER 12, 2019 City Council held a study session DISCUSSION: Every six years, the City Council adopts an update to the existing PROS Plan as required to maintain grant eligibility for the State of Washington’s Recreation and Conservation Office (RCO) grant program. The PROS Plan is a guiding document for the City’s Parks Department as it is a community-driven approach February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 39 of 358 City Council Agenda Bill AB # 20-014 to existing park amenities and recreation programs and provides a 6-10 year plan for potential changes to the Department’s offerings. This plan was previously known by a few other names such as the Parks, Recreation and Open Space Action Plan (PROSAP) and the Parks & Recreation Long Range Plan. The last update was in 2014. At a June 2019 City Council study session, staff presented information on parks acreage and types of usage, such as passive versus active, recreation class registrations and event participation, such as from Music in the Park. To fully engage the community and “meet people where they are,” staff has led 18 community outreach events, a mailed survey, an online survey, a dog park survey, a teen-focused survey, and a public workshop about community values to help shape the project lists. This is exponentially higher than most communities who host 2-3 events for the community. The events were selected to reach a broad cross section of park and recreation users and non-users. They included events at the University of Washington at Bothell, in coordination with the Bothell-Kenmore Chamber of Commerce, at various parks and sports fields, and a cross section of community events. The result of this effort was a community survey with 1,241 responses from both a mail-in and online survey, over 1,400 responses to the dog park online survey, and a teen-focused survey. Overall, this process has given a good representation of the community’s feedback. Community Survey Results For the primary community survey, a paper copy was mailed to about 2,500 residential addresses and then the online survey was open to anyone. 381 surveys were received from the mail-in group, which is a 15% response rate. The paper copy serves as a “test” of the online results to help determine the source of any inconsistencies in the data. The responses were kept separate and the results were similar. •Over 97% of the respondents feel that parks and recreation are essential or important to the community. The majority of park users go for trails (73.3%) and relaxation (54.3%) with fitness, playgrounds, and wildlife- viewing rounding out the top 5 reasons for using a Bothell park. •When asked about which amenities have more than enough, about the right number, and not enough, “walking/biking trails” topped out the list with just under half (48%) of the respondents indicating that Bothell does February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 40 of 358 City Council Agenda Bill AB # 20-014 not have enough walking and biking trails. Developing new parks amenities was the highest single priority (27%), with expanding the trail network and acquiring land for future parks highlighting the top 3. •There was high support (70% or better) for lower cost park improvements, such as trails, all-inclusive play equipment, off-leash dog opportunities, community gardens, and picnic shelters/gathering spaces. For high cost amenities, there was strong support for river access and splash pads with less support for skateboard/bmx park, artificial turf fields, and a cricket field. •Slight majorities support increasing taxes to provide a community center (56%) and splash pad (52%). For classes and programs, there was great interest in adult enrichment classes (67%) and volunteer opportunities (69%). The survey results said that needs are not met for youth and teen programs, as well as adult sports. However, the respondents also indicated that they did not know what recreation opportunities are available, so there could some correlation or it could be that the City’s offerings are not aligning with community needs. The majority of survey respondents did not have children in their homes with 56% of the households having zero children under 18. Households with 1 child represented 16% of the responses, 23% had 2 or more children and 5% had 3 or more. The largest age group to respond was 25% from 35 to 44; 4% of the respondents were younger than 20 and the remaining divided fairly evenly between 20 to 34, 45 to 54, 55 to 64, and 65+. Dog Park Survey Results The dog park survey and the high usage of the “pop-up” dog park shows a need for one or more places for off-leash parks for dogs in the City. Almost 97% of the respondents said that an off-leash dog park was definitely or probably needed, with 90.75% responding “definitely need.” 83.82% of the respondents are Bothell residents. While most people had no concerns regarding a permanent dog park, the largest concerns were excess dog waste (11.10%), animal vaccinations/illness/diseases (10.71%), and safety (7.85%). The most important dog park amenities were drinking water for dogs, shade for dogs and humans, double gate entry, and a space for smaller/shy dogs. Five potential locations were listed for a permanent site – Park at Bothell Landing, East Norway Hill Park, Blyth Park, Cedar Grove Park, and William Penn Park – and all ranked about equal February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 41 of 358 City Council Agenda Bill AB # 20-014 for location with a slight majority preferring the Park at Bothell Landing as their top choice. Teen Survey Results A short, five-question survey was circulated through Inglemoor and Bothell High Schools and was available online for a two-week period. The most popular activities for teens include hanging out with friends (79%), watching movies (60%), sports (55%), going to the beach (47%) and hiking (47%). The top amenities teens would like to see in Bothell are a hangout space and walking trails. Both the teen survey and the Community Survey showed a high interest in trails in Bothell. Based on survey responses, teens are more interested in events than amenities, with the exception of a hangout space. The top event types that teens would attend include movies in the park (79%), food truck nights (71%), teen concerts (70%), and festivals or special events for teens (62%). Capital Projects In this PROS Plan update, projects will not be ranked as most important to least important, as was historical practice but rather based on a matrix of balancing criteria: •Community Need (survey and other feedback); •Safety and Security (providing safe spaces accessible to all); •Usage/Resident Benefit (park improvements to heavily used areas or where few City facilities exist whereby the cost is evaluated against the volume of usage/resident benefit); •Location/Geography (supporting equity and access to parks and facilities across the City); •Local/Regional Significance (destinations for large number of residents and/or where significant programming and space already exists); and •Ability to Leverage Funding (for grants, foundation and charitable giving). The final projects listed in the PROS Plan are not guaranteed for completion, but become the basis for future Capital Facilities Plan (CFP) budget requests and a focus for grant applications. RCO has several required elements of a PROS Plan in order to be eligible for recreation and conservation grants. These include clear goals and objectives; a park inventory; public involvement; a demand and need analysis; Capital Improvement Program; and formal adoption of the Plan by the governing body. The 2020 PROS Plan was developed to meet these criteria. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 42 of 358 City Council Agenda Bill AB # 20-014 Throughout the Plan development, staff and the consultant team heard several core themes. Foremost, there is a desire for “Parks and Programming for All.” This includes connecting and expanding the trail system, a permanent dog park, new park amenities, creating inclusive parks and events, continuing to host and possibly adding new community events, concerts and gatherings, and creating special events for teens such as concerts, food truck nights and movies in the park. Secondly, the community would like us to “Take Care of What We Have.” This includes upgrading and improving existing parks, installing wayfinding and interpretative signage systems, focusing on Americans with Disability Act (ADA) compliance and barrier removal, and completing minor park repairs and renovations. Using the community feedback from over 18 engagement events, direction provided by City Council and the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board, as well as the previous work from the PROSAP, Imagine Bothell… Comprehensive Plan, the Shoreline Management Plan, and similar guiding documents, the 2020 PROS Plan contains six (6) updated goals. They are: •Provide an inclusive, diversified system of parks, trails, and open spaces that deliver a variety of active and passive recreational opportunities that maintains the high quality of life for residents and reflect the community’s changing needs. •Develop a network of shared-use trails and bicycle/pedestrian corridors to enable connectivity between parks, neighborhoods, commercial areas, and other destinations. •Facilitate and promote a range of recreational and special event opportunities for the community. •Maintain and operate a modern, efficient park system that provides a high level of user comfort, safety, and aesthetic quality, and protects capital investments. •Pursue and maintain effective partnerships and provide volunteer opportunities to support the parks and recreation system. •Provide leadership and fiscal responsibility in the management of the park, recreation, and open space system. The Capital Projects lists were developed from the PROSAP, Council direction, community feedback, and an assessment of the current conditions. The final proposed projects are broken down into Safety and Maintenance projects, a near-term focus which is through 2026, a long-term focus which is beyond 2026, and a category called Future Projects. This latter category are typically more expensive capital investments that will require more than General Funds and grant dollars, namely a voter-approved contribution such as a bond or a levy. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 43 of 358 City Council Agenda Bill AB # 20-014 FISCAL IMPACTS: ATTACHMENTS: RECOMMENDED ACTION: The Parks and Recreation Board unanimously voted on December 12, 2019, to approve the draft 2020 PROS Plan and have staff transmit it to City Council with some minor edits and updates. Those edits are included in the final plan. Parks and Recreation staff, working with the Planning Commission and Community Development staff, will update the Imagine Bothell… Comprehensive Plan’s Parks and Recreation Element based on the adopted 2020 PROS Plan. This will be completed by the end of the calendar year. There is no fiscal impact associated with the adoption of this Plan. However, the lack of an adopted plan will disqualify the City from new grants from RCO. Att-1. Resolution to Adopt the 2020 Parks, Recreation and Open Space (PROS) Plan Approve the Resolution adopting the 2020 Parks, Recreation, and Open Space (PROS) Plan. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 44 of 358 Att-1 Page 1 of 3 RESOLUTION NO. (2020) A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF BOTHELL, WASHINGTON ADOPTING THE 2020 PARKS, RECREATION, AND OPEN SPACE (PROS) PLAN. WHEREAS, the City of Bothell performs comprehensive park and open space planning in order to guide and support future park and recreation programming and parks capital improvement budgets and to maintain eligibility of grant through the Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office (RCO); and WHEREAS, the RCO requires that the City’s long-range parks, recreation, and open space plan be updated every six years to maintain state and federal grant eligibility; and WHEREAS, the existing Parks, Recreation and Open Space Action Program (PROSAP) was adopted on January 24, 2014, and therefore needs to be updated; and the City Council received a staff briefing on January 24, 2014, and Study Sessions were held on June 11, 2019, and November 12, 2019, and WHEREAS, in order for the 2020 PROS Plan to reflect public input, the City has provided over 18 community engagement opportunities through meetings, pop-up park events, online engagement, and survey formats, including a community-wide survey conducted via mail and online submission and specialized surveys were conducted focused on teens and on dog parks; and WHEREAS, at several publicly noticed meetings, both the City Council and the Parks and Recreation Board have been briefed by the Parks Department or held study sessions on the 2020 PROS Plan; and WHEREAS, on December 12, 2019, the Parks and Recreation Board unanimously recommended that the draft PROS Plan be forwarded to Council for adoption; and WHEREAS, the City has satisfied the RCO’s planning requirements in drafting the proposed 2020 PROS Plan update, consistent with WAC 286-13-035, and passage of this resolution shall provide evidence that the plan has been formally adopted; and February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 45 of 358 Att-1 Page 2 of 3 WHEREAS, the 2020 PROS Plan meets the Council’s objective of fiscal responsibility and sustainability, and the Plan is beneficial to the city as a whole and to the health, safety, and welfare of its residents and visitors. NOW , THEREFORE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF BOTHELL, WASHINGTON, DOES RESOLVE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. The proposed 2020 Parks, Recreation, Open Space (PROS) Plan, dated January 2020 and attached as Exhibit A, is hereby adopted as the Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Plan of the City of Bothell. Section 2. The Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Plan will be incorporated in the Imagine Bothell. . . Comprehensive Plan with the 2020 amendments. Section 3. The City Clerk is authorized to make necessary corrections to this resolution including, but not limited to, the correction of scrivener’s/clerical errors, references, resolution numbering, section/subsection numbers, and any references thereto. PASSED this ___________ day of ______________________, 2020. APPROVED: LIAM OLSEN MAYOR ATTEST/AUTHENTICATED: LAURA HATHAWAY CITY CLERK FILED WITH THE CITY CLERK: PASSED BY THE CITY COUNCIL: RESOLUTION NO.: (2020) February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 46 of 358 B othell P arks , r ecreation & B othell P arks , r ecreation & o P en s Pace (P ros ) P lanoPen s Pace (P ros ) P lan DRAFT - January 2020February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 47 of 358 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS City Council 2020 Liam Olsen, Mayor Jeanne Zornes, Deputy Mayor Mason Thompson, Council Member Rosemary McAuliffe, Council Member James McNeal, Council Member Davina Duerr, Council Member Tom Agnew, Council Member Parks & Recreation Board Mason Thompson Kailash Mandal Adam Stacey Jennifer Lutz Manny Ocampo Janet Braham City Staff Nik Stroup, Parks & Recreation Director Tracey Perkosky, Parks Planning & Grants Program Manager Scott Purdy, Parks Operations Manager Consultants 2019 Andy Rheaume, Mayor Davina Duerr, Deputy Mayor Jeanne Zornes, Council Member Rosemary McAuliffe, Council Member James McNeal, Council Member Liam Olsen, Council Member Tom Agnew, Council Member February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 48 of 358 TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction & Overview ..........................................................1 Community Profile.....................................................................7 Goals & Objectives ...................................................................13 Community Engagement ........................................................21 Classifications & Inventory .....................................................27 Needs Assessment ....................................................................65 Capital Planning .......................................................................99 Implementation ....................................................................105 Appendix A: Survey Summary ............................................111 Appendix B: Teen Survey .....................................................175 Appendix C: Dog Park Survey .............................................181 Appendix D: Public Meeting Summaries ...........................215 Appendix E: Stakeholder Summaries .................................227 Appendix F: Recreation Trends ...........................................235 Appendix G: Implementation Tools & Tactics ..................247 Appendix H: Other Community Plans ...............................263 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 49 of 358 Physical Activity Benefits Residents in communities with increased access to parks, recreation, natural areas and trails have more opportunities for physical activity, both through recreation and active transportation. By participating in physical activity, residents can reduce their risk of being or becoming over- weight or obese, decrease their likelihood of suffering from chronic diseases, such as heart disease and type-2 diabetes, and improve their levels of stress and anxiety. Nearby access to parks has been shown to increase levels of physical activity. Accord- ing to studies cited in a 2010 report by the National Park and Recreation Association, the majority of people of all ages who visit parks are physically active during their visit. Also, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that greater access to parks leads to 25% more people exercising three or more days per week. A number of organizations and non-profits have documented the overall health and wellness benefits provided by parks, open space and trails. The Trust for Public Land published a report in 2005 called The Benefits of Parks: Why America Needs More City Parks and Open Space. This report makes the following obser- vations about the health, economic, environmental and social benefits of parks and open space: „Physical activity makes people healthier. „Physical activity increases with access to parks. „Contact with the natural world improves physical and physiological health. „Value is added to community and economic development sustainability. „Benefits of tourism are enhanced. „Trees are effective in improving air quality and assisting with stormwater control. „Recreational opportunities for all ages are provided. BENEFITS OF PARKS, RECREATION & OPEN SPACE Social & Community Benefits Park and recreation facilities provide op- portunities to engage with family, friends, and neighbors, thereby increasing social capital and community cohesion, which can improve residents’ mental health and overall well-being. People who feel that they are connected to their community and those who participate in recreational, com- munity and other activities are more likely to have better mental and physical health and to live longer lives. Access to parks and recreational facilities has also been linked to reductions in crime, particularly juvenile delinquency. Economic Benefits Parks and recreation facilities can bring positive economic impacts through in- creased property values, increased attrac- tiveness for businesses and workers (qual- ity of life), and through direct increases in employment opportunities. In Washington, outdoor recreation gener- ates $26.2 billion in consumer spend- ing annually, $7.6 billion in wages and salaries and $2.3 billion in state and local tax revenue. Preserving access to outdoor recreation protects the economy, the busi- nesses, the communities and the people who depend on the ability to play outside. According to the Outdoor Recreation Economy Report published by the Outdoor Industry Association, outdoor recreation can grow jobs and drive the economy through management and investment in parks, waters and trails as an interconnect- ed system designed to sustain economic dividends for citizens. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 50 of 358 1 PURPOSE OF THE PLAN The citywide Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan, or PROS Plan for short, is an update to the 2014 Parks, Recreation & Open Space Action Program, builds on the recreation planning foundation provided in that plan, and incorporates the diverse feedback from an extensive community engagement program conducted for this plan update. This Plan creates a vision for an innovative, inclusive and interconnected system of parks, trails and open spaces that promotes recreation, health, environmental conservation and fiscal responsibility as integral elements of a thriving, livable Bothell. The Plan will provide a blueprint for the growth, enhancement and management of Bothell’s park and recreation system. The PROS Plan is a document that will guide City elected and appointed officials, management and staff when making decisions or taking actions regarding planning, acquiring, developing or implementing parks, open space or recreational facilities and programs. The PROS Plan is part of the City’s broader Comprehensive Plan and is consistent with the guidelines established by the Growth Management Act (GMA). The PROS Plan must be updated every six years for Bothell to retain eligibility for state grants through the Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office (RCO), which administers a variety of outdoor recreation and conservation grant programs. The 2020 PROS Plan considers the park and recreation needs of residents citywide and establishes a path forward for enabling, maintaining and enhancing high quality parks, trails, open spaces and recreational opportunities. It provides updated inventories, demographic conditions, needs analysis, management considerations and capital project phasing. It updates the City’s policies, practices and projects and sets a long-range vision for the City with clear i ntroduction & o verviewintroduction & o verview 11 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 51 of 358 2 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 action items and strategies for implementation for the next 6-10 years. The recommendations in this Plan are based on community input, evaluations of the existing park system, and needs for acquisition, site development and operations and fiscal considerations. The Plan is intended to be updated periodically to remain current with local interests and maintain eligibility for state-based grants. PLANNING PROCESS This Parks, Recreation and Open Space (PROS) Plan represents the culmination of a year- long planning effort to define the community’s needs for parks, recreation facilities and programs, and trails over the next ten years. The PROS Plan reflects the community’s interests and needs for park and recreational facilities, trails and programming - balanced with the realities of budgets. The planning process encouraged and enabled public engagement in the choices, priorities and future direction of the City’s park and recreation system. The Plan project team conducted a variety of public outreach activities. Community members expressed their interests through an online and mail survey, intercept surveys, pop-up and open house meetings, stakeholder discussions, online engagement, and Parks and Recreation Board meetings. In addition to community engagement, the actions identified in this Plan are based on: „An inventory and assessment of the City’s existing park and recreation facilities to establish the current performance of the system and to identify needed maintenance and capital repair and replacement projects, „A level of service and walkability assessment to quantify the system’s ability to serve both current and future residents. The Plan’s capital facilities section and accompanying implementation and funding strategies are intended to move the City toward the community’s park and recreation goals, while recognizing operational realities. FISCAL CHALLENGES For the past several years, one of the City Council’s goals is Fiscal Responsibility and Sustainability. Previous iterations of the Parks, Recreation and Open Space Plan often featured potential projects or project ideas that had very high projected costs and did not include a realistic funding package. The 2020 PROS Plan is structured with Council’s goal in mind and includes only those projects that are reasonably likely to be funded. This includes a determination of potential project’s ability to leverage other funding sources, consideration of future maintenance and operations and potential development costs of land. Staff recognizes that there is tremendous pressure on capital and operating funding sources, the result of which results in significant competition for project funding. To help illustrate the City’s commitments to a diverse array of capital projects, Figure 1 shows the current capital spending for 2019 to 2025. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 52 of 358 3 VISION, MISSION, VALUES Guided by Values    From the 2015 Imagine Bothell… Comprehensive Plan, the City laid out a 19-point vision statement based on a set of core community values. Nine of the statements in the vision pertain to parks, recreation, trails or the natural environment. City Council goals for 2019 place additional emphasis on the importance of parks and recreation through their intent to guide the City’s focus on parks, recreation and open space partnerships. Council goals also include fiscal responsibility and stability. Parks & recreation DePartment mission statement The Parks & Recreation Department enhances the quality of life for the Bothell community by providing high quality parks, natural spaces, trails, community gathering places, recreation programs and events with a strong emphasis on customer service and safety. PARK SYSTEM MANAGEMENT The Bothell Parks & Recreation Department was created in 2015 by City Council. The Department provides a broad range of leisure experiences and manages a park system of 26 parks that include 182 acres of active use parks and 221 acres of open space. The Department has 16 full-time employees in three areas of focus including Parks Maintenance, Parks For the past several years, one of the City Council’s goals is Fiscal Responsibility and Sustainability.  Previous iterations of the Parks, Recreation and Open Space Plans, often featured potential projects or project ideas that had very high projected costs and did not include a realistic funding package.   This Plan is structured with Council’s goal in mind and includes only those projects that are reasonably likely to be funded. This includes a determination of potential project’s ability to leverage other funding sources, consideration of future maintenance and operations and potential development costs of land.  Staff recognizes that there is tremendous pressure on capital and operating funding sources, the result of which results in significant competition for project funding.    Figure 1. City of Bothell Capital Program Budget for 2019-2025 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 53 of 358 4 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Planning/Park Development/Administration, and Recreation Programs and Special Events. „Parks Planning/Park Development focuses on acquisition and development of park facilities, the development of park master plans, implementation of asset replacement projects and grant applications. Administration provides overall support for the Department in areas of budgeting, communications, customer service, contracts and capital projects administration, among others. „Park Maintenance maintains city park and open space properties, in addition to the grounds for City Hall, emergency services buildings, courthouse, downtown properties owned by the City and streetscapes along Main Street. Responsibilities include landscaping, ballfield preparation and maintenance, playground and sports court safety inspections and repair, trail maintenance and daily maintenance. „Recreation Programs and Special Events provides a broad range of services including personal enrichment, physical fitness, competitive sports and after-school opportunities (provided via contractors). Staff are responsible for the rental and management of the City’s sports fields, picnic shelters, the Lytle House and North Creek School House. Annual special events include the Freedom Festival, Safe Halloween, Community Campout, Arbor Day and Concerts in the Park. Additionally, the efforts of the Department are guided by the Parks & Recreation Board, a seven-member advisory group to the City Council, that provides direction regarding the expansion and operation of the City’s Parks & Recreation facilities and programs, including comprehensive planning and the Capital Facilities Plan (CFP). accomPlishments since 2014 Plan The 2014 PROSAP Plan guided City officials, management and staff in making decisions about planning, acquiring, developing and implementing parks, recreation programs and recreation facilities. The following represents a short list of the major accomplishments realized following the adoption of the previous plan. „Formed new Parks & Recreation Department in 2015 to focus and strengthen City efforts „Acquired the former Wayne Golf Course „Acquired the North Creek Forest „Completed the transfer of Gateway Park to the City „Added new playground equipment Volunteer Park „Completed renovations of ballfield infields; added new synthetic turf around the bases at all North Creek Sportfields „Organized and coordinated community events and launched new children’s concert series „Completed master plan for East Norway Hill Park „Installed art sculpture at Red Brick Road Park February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 54 of 358 5 GUIDING DOCUMENTS This PROS Plan is one of several documents that comprise Bothell’s long-range planning and policy framework. Past community plans and other relevant documents were reviewed for policy direction and goals as they pertain to the provision and planning for parks, recreation, arts and trails opportunities across Bothell. The development of each plan or study involved public input and adoption by their respective responsible legislative body. The following list of plans was reviewed, and summaries for each appear in Appendix H. „City of Bothell Comprehensive Plan (2015) „Parks, Recreation & Open Space Action Program (2014) „Bothell Shoreline Master Program Update (2012) „The City of Bothell 2017-2023 Capital Facilities Plan „City of Bothell 2019-2020 Biennial Budget „City of Bothell 2017-2018 Biennial Budget „City of Bothell Citizen Survey (2015) „Canyon Park Vision Report „Snohomish County Park and Recreation Plans (2015) „Northshore Aquatics Needs Analysis & Location Study (2008) „Anderson School Public Benefits Agreement (2012) CONTENTS OF THE PLAN The remainder of the Bothell PROS Plan is organized as follows: „Chapter 2: Community Profile – provides an overview of the City of Bothell and its demographics. „Chapter 3: Community Engagement – highlights the methods used to engage the Bothell community in the development of the Plan. „Chapter 4: Goals & Objectives – provides a policy framework for the parks and recreation system grouped by major functional or program area. „Chapter 5: Classifications & Inventory – describes the existing park and recreation system. „Chapters 6: Needs Assessment – discusses survey results, stakeholder feedback and other recreation trend data and provides context to the identification of potential park and recreation system enhancements. „Chapter 7: Capital Planning – details a 6-year program for addressing park and recreation facility enhancement, maintenance or expansion projects. „Chapter 8: Implementation Strategies – describes a range of strategies and alternatives to consider in the implementation of the Plan. „Appendices: Provides technical or supporting information to the planning effort and includes a summary of the community survey, stakeholder notes, funding options, among others. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 55 of 358 6 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Page Left Intentionally Blank February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 56 of 358 7 Located northeast of Lake Washington, the City of Bothell straddles both King and Snohomish Counties and covers over 14 square miles. Originally populated by the Native American Sammamish people, the City of Bothell was incorporated in 1909, and for many years was a center for the logging industry, then a farming community, and then a bedroom suburb for people working in the greater Seattle region. Bothell grew slowly through the first half of the twentieth century, then expanded after the construction of I-405 made the area easily accessible to Seattle and surrounding cities. Today, the city has a population of nearly 47,000 and ranks as the 26th largest city in the State of Washington. Bothell is an affluent community with an above-average median family income and an above- average median home value. Bothell has a vibrant and rapidly expanding local economy and has large working-age population, as well many families with children. Due to the City’s central proximity to Seattle, Everett and Eastside cities (Bellevue, Kirkland and Redmond), Bothell has become increasingly desirable to homebuyers and renters, as well as a hub for biotech and biomedical firms and other commercial development. Bothell also offers opportunities in higher education, with the University of Washington and Cascadia College sharing a common campus in Bothell’s historic downtown. PoPulation The City of Bothell, incorporated in 1909, has grown significantly over the past 25 years – from just over 12,000 people in 1990 to nearly 47,000 today (see Figure 2). The city is currently home to approximately 46,750 residents and its population is expected grow by approximately 21% by 2030, to 56,600 people. c ommunity P rofilecommunity P rofile 22 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 57 of 358 8 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Bothell experienced strong growth in the 1950s and 1960s and again between 1990 and 2000, when the City annexed the Canyon Park area and large business centers opened in the city. Annual population growth in the 1990s was approximately 14% per year. Growth has slowed in more recent decades, to less than 5% annually. Bothell currently makes up about 1.5% of the combined population of King and Snohomish Counties. Table 2. Population Characteristics: Bothell, King County, Snohomish County and Washington Figure 3. Population – Actual and Projected: 2000-2030  Demographics Bothell King County Snohomish  County Washington Population Characteristics Population (2019)46,750 2,226,300 818,700 7,546,410 Population (2010)33,505 1,931,249 713,335 6,724,540 Population (2000)30,150 1,737,034 606,024 5,894,121 Percent Change (2000‐19)55.1% 28.2% 35.1% 28.0% Persons w/ Disabilities under age 65 5.7% 5.6% 7.6% 7.7% Household Characteristics (2013‐17) Households 16,813 851,077 284,477 2,755,697 Percent with children 35.2% 29.2% 33.7% 30.9% Median Household Income $89,477 $83,571 $78,020 $66,174 Average Household Size 2.58 2.45 2.68 2.55 Average Family Size 3.07 3.06 3.18 3.10 Owner Occupancy Rate 66.1% 57.4% 66.6% 62.7% Age Groups (2013‐2017) Median Age 37.1 37.2 37.8 37.6 Population < 5 years of age 7.0% 6.0% 6.3% 6.3% Population < 18 years of age 22.7% 20.7% 23.0% 22.5% Population 18 ‐ 64 years of age 64.4% 66.8% 64.7% 63.1% Population > 65 years of age 12.9% 12.5% 12.3% 14.4% Sources: Washington Office of Financial Management Population Estimates, 2019 U.S. Census, 2000 Census, 2010 Census, 2013‐2017 American Community Survey 30,150 33,505 46,750 56,600 0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 2000 2010 2019 2030February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 58 of 358 9 age grouP Distribution Bothell’s population has a median age of 37.1 (2017), and a relatively high population of families with children (34%). This has important implications for park and recreation needs. Adults between 30 to 49 years old make up the city’s largest 20-year population group, comprising 30% of the overall population in 2017. „Youth under 5 years of age make up 7% of Bothell’s population (see Figure 4). This group represents users of preschool and tot programs and facilities, and as trails and open space users, are often in strollers. These individuals are the future participants in youth activities. „Children 5 to 14 years make up current youth program participants. Approximately 12% of the city’s population falls into this age range. „Teens and young adults, age 15 to 24 years, are in transition from youth program to adult programs and participate in teen/young adult programs where available. Members of this age group are often seasonal employment seekers. About 12% percent of Bothell’s residents are teens and young adults. While approximately 31 percent of Bothell residents are youth and young adults up to 24 years of age, 45% are 25 to 54 year olds, and 24% are 55 and older. „Adults ages 25 to 34 years are users of adult programs. Approximately 15% of residents are in this age category. These residents may be entering long-term relationships and establishing families. Over one-third of Bothell’s households are families with children. „ Adults between 35 and 54 years of age represent users of a wide range of adult programs and park facilities. Their characteristics extend from having children using preschool and youth programs to becoming empty nesters. This age group makes up 29% of Bothell’s population. „ Older adults, ages 55 years plus, make up approximately 24% of Bothell’s population. This group represents users of adult and senior programs. These residents may be approaching retirement or already retired and may be spending time with grandchildren. This group also ranges from very healthy, active seniors to more physically inactive seniors. The city’s median age (37.1) has remained relatively constant over the past two decades and is on par with that of King County (37.2), Snohomish County (37.8) and Washington (37.6). Figure 4. Age Group Distributions: 2010 & 2019 13% 12% 14% 15% 15% 12% 12% 7% 4% 7% 18% 22% 11% 10% 20% 8% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 65 and older 55 to 65 Years 45 to 54 Years 35 to 44 Years 25 to 34 Years 15 to 24 Years 5 to 14 Years Under 5 Years 2000 2019 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 59 of 358 10 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 race & ethnicity According to the 2017 American Community Survey, Bothell was 72% White, 14% Asian, 2.3% African American, 0.5% American Indian or Alaskan Native, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 4.4% other race, and 6.7% from two or more races, see Figure 3. Nearly 11% of people identified as Hispanic or Latino of any race. This represents an increase of 14% in the communities of color since 2000. In 2017, approximately 25% of Bothell’s population speaks a language other than English at home, and 8% speak English less than very well. This is a higher percentage of people who speak a language other than English at home than in Washington as a whole (19%). The City should consider how it could best provide recreational opportunities, programs, and information that are accessible to, and meet the needs of, all community members. householD characteristics The 2017 average household size in Bothell was 2.58 people, higher than the state (2.55) average. Average household size has increased since 2010 (2.46). The average family size in Bothell is larger, at 3.07 people. Of the 16,813 households in the city, 68% were families, including 34% with children under 18, and 24% were individuals living alone. The number of households in Bothell is anticipated to grow to 23,124 by 2035, an increase of 6,311 households. emPloyment & eDucation The 2017 work force population (16 years and over) of Bothell was 35,212 (80%). Of this population, over two-thirds (70%) is in the labor force, 3.9% is unemployed, and 30% is not in the labor force. Bothell’s economy centers on high-tech industries, including biotechnology, computer technology, telecommunications, engineering, and health services. Half of residents work in a management, business, science or arts occupation, with one in five working in the education or health care industry. Retail trade and the manufacturing sector also employ a large percentage of local workers (approximately 12% each) and contribute significantly to the local economy. According to the 2017 American Community Survey, approximately 50% of Bothell residents have a Bachelor’s degree or higher, and 77% have at least some college education. This level of education attainment is on par with that of King County (77%) and much higher than Snohomish County and the state (in which 68% of residents have some college). Additionally, 94% of City residents have a high school degree or higher, approximately 4 percentage points higher than the statewide average. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 60 of 358 11 income & Poverty A community’s level of household income can impact the types of recreational services prioritized by community members as well as their willingness and ability to pay for recreational services. Perhaps more importantly, household income is also closely linked with levels of physical activity. Low-income households are three times more likely to live a sedentary lifestyle than middle and upper-income households, according to an analysis of national data by the Active Living by Design organization. In 2017, the median household income in Bothell was $89,477. This income level was over $23,300 (35%) higher than the median income for Washington households and slightly higher than that of King County ($83,571) and Snohomish County ($78,020) households. At the lower end of the household income scale, approximately 10% percent of Bothell households earn less than $25,000 annually, relatively less than households in King and Snohomish Counties (13%), the State of Washington (17%), and across the United States (23%). In 2017, 3% of Bothell’s families were living below the poverty level. The poverty threshold was an income of $24,600 for a family of four. This percentage is significantly lower than the countywide (approximately 6%) and statewide (8%) levels. Poverty affects 5.5% of youth under 18 and 5% of those 65 and older. Lower-income residents can face a number of barriers to physical activity including poor access to parks and recreational facilities, a lack of transportation options, a lack of time, and poor health. Low-income residents may also be less able financially able to afford recreational service fees or to pay for services, like childcare, that can make physical activity possible. Higher income households have an increased ability and willingness to pay for recreation and leisure services, and often face fewer barriers to participation. Approximately 45% percent of city households have household incomes in the higher income brackets ($100,000 and greater), significantly more than across the state (30%). Persons with Disabilities The 2017 American Community Survey reported 9.7% (4,283 persons) of Bothell’s population 5 years and older as having a disability that interferes with life activities. This is lower than county and state averages (both approximately 12%). Approximately 8% of residents between 18 and 64 have or live with a disability. Among residents 65 and older, the percentage rises to 33%, which is par with percentages found in the general senior population of the State of Washington (36%). It signals a potential need to design inclusive parks, recreational facilities, and programs. Planning, designing, and operating a park system that facilitates participation by residents of all abilities will also help ensure compliance with Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act. health status Residents of the Bothell/Woodinville area tend to be in better health than residents of King County and Washington state, according to the King County City Health Profile, developed by Seattle/King County Public Health in 2016. City residents have high life expectancies (83.4 years) and fewer residents experience poor mental or physical health as compared to February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 61 of 358 12 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 the county and state. Local residents also have lower prevalence of many health risk factors, including obesity, lack of exercise, diabetes, asthma, and hypertension, as compared to King County residents, who themselves have fewer risk factors than residents of Washington as a whole. In addition, King and Snohomish County residents rank as some of the healthiest residents in Washington (2nd and 4th out of 39 counties, respectively), according to the County Health Rankings. Approximately 22% of King County and 29% of Snohomish County adults are overweight or obese, compared to 27% of Washington adults. Approximately 15% of King County adults (19% of Snohomish County adults) age 20 and older report getting no leisure-time physical activity – on par with the statewide average of 18%. This may be due, in part, to the large number of places to participate in physical activity, including parks and public or private community centers, gyms or other recreational facilities. Over 95% of residents have access to adequate physical activity opportunities, which is slightly higher than the 88% average for all Washington residents. According to the County Health Rankings, King and Snohomish Counties also ranks in the top tier of Washington counties for health outcomes, including length and quality of life, and health factors (such as health behaviors, clinical care, social and economic factors, and the physical environment). From the winter 2015 issue of the National Association of Realtors (NAR) magazine, the direct link between how communities are built and grow is tied to health and quality of life. More walkable and bike-able environments with better access to nature and parks have become essential for personal well-being and needs to be integrated into community planning. The NAR articles identify walkable communities as a prescription for better health. Even the U.S. Surgeon General sounded a call to action challenging communities become more walkable to allow more Americans to increase their physical activity through walking. The Center for Disease Control and its Healthy Community Design Initiative focuses on walkability and the need to better integrate into transportation planning. The NAR magazine issue also reported on the value of bicycle- friendly communities and the direct tie to healthy and sustainable living. Access to healthy, locally-grown food choices is reported with the value of community gardens and urban food hubs for healthy diets, as well as connection to community engagement. Realtors have long been aware that housing near a good system of parks and trails will hold strong appeal to buyers. The winter NAR issue illustrates the recognition that community design for healthy living goes beyond the single house location. People want choices, and these healthy community design traits of walking, biking, trails and parks all play an important role in housing prices, sales and re-sales. HEALTHY COMMUNITIES on common groundREALTORS® & Smart Growth WINTER 2016 Bicycle Friendly Places The Healthy Food Movement Reconnecting with Nature February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 62 of 358 13 The goals and objectives described in this chapter define the park and recreation services that Bothell aims to provide. These goals and objectives were derived from input received throughout the planning process, from city staff, and the Parks and Recreation Board. goals & objectives The Growth Management Act (GMA) adopted by the Washington State Legislature in 1990 provided a new foundation for land use planning in selected cities and counties throughout the state, including King and Snohomish Counties and the City of Bothell. The GMA’s purpose is to help communities deal efficiently with the challenges of growth to ensure their long-term sustainability and high quality of life. It identifies 14 planning goals to guide the development of comprehensive plans and development regulations (codified in Chapter 36.70A of the Revised Code of Washington). Four of these goals directly affect the development and implementation of this plan. „“Encourage the retention of open space and development of recreational opportunities, conserve fish and wildlife habitat, increase access to natural resource lands and water, and develop parks.” RCW 36.70A.020(9) „“Protect the environment and enhance the state’s high quality of life, including air and water quality, and the availability of water.” RCW 36.70A.020(10) „“Identify and encourage the preservation of lands, sites, and structures, that have historical or archaeological significance.” RCW 36.70A.020(13) „“Carry-out the goals of the Shoreline Management Act with regards to shorelines and critical areas.” RCW 36.70A.020(14) Furthermore, the Imagine Bothell... Comprehensive Plan, the previous parks and recreation system plan and county-wide planning policies provide a framework for this PROS Plan. G oals & o B jectivesGoals & o B jectives 33 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 63 of 358 14 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 A goal is a general statement describing an outcome the City wishes to provide. Goals typically do not change over time unless community values shift. Objectives are more specific, measurable statements that describe a means to achieving the stated goals. Objectives may change over time. Recommendations are specific actions intended to implement and achieve the goals and objectives and are contained in Needs Assessment and Capital Planning chapters of the Plan. The Plan’s goals align with the National Recreation and Parks Association’s Three Pillars, which are foundational concepts adopted by the national organization in 2012. These core values (below) are crucial to improving the quality of life for all Americans by inspiring the protection of natural resources, increasing opportunities for physical activity and healthy eating, and empowering citizens to improve the livability of their communities. „Conservation – Public parks are critical to preserving our communities’ natural resources and wildlife habitats, which offer significant social and economic benefits. Local park and recreation agencies are leaders in protecting our open space, connecting children to nature and providing education and programs that engage communities in conservation. „Health and Wellness – Park and recreation departments lead the nation in improving the overall health and wellness of citizens, and fighting obesity. From fitness programs, to well-maintained, accessible, walking paths and trails, to nutrition programs for underserved youth and adults, our work is at the forefront of providing solutions to these challenges. „Social Equity – We believe universal access to public parks and recreation is fundamental to all, not just a privilege for a few. Every day, our members work hard to ensure all people have access to resources and programs that connect citizens, and in turn, make our communities more livable and desirable. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 64 of 358 15 PARKS & OPEN SPACE Goal 1: Provide an inclusive, diversified system of parks, trails and open spaces that delivers a variety of active and passive recreational opportunities that maintains the high quality of life for residents and reflects the community’s changing needs. Objectives 1.1 As funding allows, pursue acquisition and development of sites for passive and active, formal and informal recreation opportunities that accommodate activities to appeal to various age groups, ethnic backgrounds and those with special needs. 1.2 Consider identified community needs and current recreation trends in the design and development of new parks and in the enhancement of existing parks, as funding allows and with a focus on safety. 1.3 Explore options to upgrade and expand athletic fields and park amenities to provide extended year-round use. 1.4 As suitable land and funding becomes available, secure locations for new parks and open spaces, with a focus on underserved areas of the City. 1.4A Provide a foundational service standard of 3.2 acres per 1,000 persons for core parks. 1.4B Continue to explore how to provide a distributed network of parks, such that all residents live within a ½-mile of a park, trail or open space. 1.5 Identify and prioritize lands for inclusion in the parks and open space system based on factors such as contribution to level of service, connectivity, preservation and scenic or recreational opportunities for residents. 1.6 Continue to provide appropriate public access (e.g. trails, viewpoints and wildlife viewing areas) within natural areas to support passive recreation and environmental education. 1.7 Periodically coordinate with King County, Snohomish County and adjacent cities to strategize for the acquisition of parks and open spaces within or in close proximity to the Bothell urban growth boundary. 1.8 Design and maintain parks and facilities as funding allows to ensure universal accessibility for residents of all physical capabilities, skill levels and age as appropriate; assess planned and existing parks and trails for compliance with the adopted Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Standards for Accessible Design. 1.9 Partner with internal city departments and outside agencies to identify opportunities to coordinate and accommodate dual use of lands associated with parks, public utilities, green infrastructure, stormwater and active transportation projects. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 65 of 358 16 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 TRAILS Goal 2: Develop a network of shared-use trails and bicycle/ pedestrian corridors to enable connectivity between parks, neighborhoods, commercial areas and other destinations. Objectives 2.1 Connect the existing trail network to link and complete the city-wide regional trail system and to maximize pedestrian and bicycle access to the community, as funding allows. 2.2 Continue to coordinate with nearby cities, King County and Snohomish County to support a connected trail network that provide continuous walking and biking access between parks and other key destinations. 2.3 Integrate the siting of proposed trail segments into the development review process; require development projects along designated trail routes to be designed to incorporate trail segments as part of the project. 2.4 Work with local agencies, utilities and private landholders to secure trail access and rights-of- way for open space for trail connections. 2.5 Provide trailhead accommodations, especially along major trail and walking routes, to include parking, wayfinding signage, benches, restrooms and other amenities. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 66 of 358 17 RECREATION & EVENTS Goal 3: Facilitate and promote a range of recreational and special event opportunities for the community. Objectives 3.1 Promote, sponsor and/or partner for community events, family programs, educational activities, and other social events that serve general and special populations of the community and foster civic pride. 3.2 Leverage City resources by forming and maintaining partnerships with other public, non-profit and private recreation providers to deliver recreation and cultural services and secure access to existing facilities for community recreation. 3.3 Provide recreation programs that complement services provided by other organizations, such that unfulfilled needs are met in a self-sustaining and fiscally-responsible manner. 3.4 Develop and implement a Special Event Permit Process to assist local groups in hosting events in Bothell 3.5 Participate in organizing and promoting a centralized list of recreation programs offered to Bothell residents by both City and other agency or organization providers. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 67 of 358 18 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 MAINTENANCE & OPERATIONS Goal 4: Maintain and operate a modern, efficient park system that provides a high level of user comfort, safety and aesthetic quality, and protects capital investments. Objectives 4.1 Enhance maintenance programs that protect public property, preserve its value, and ensure its intended function or use, life expectancy, safety, security and appearance. 4.2 Maintain parks, recreation and open space facilities according to best practice and promotes community pride. 4.3 When developing new facilities or redeveloping existing facilities, review and consider the projected maintenance and operations costs prior to and as part of initiating design development. 4.4 Incorporate sustainable development and green building practices into park design and construction, including green demolition and disposal practices, use of local and recycled products when feasible, and incorporation of low-impact development techniques. 4.5 Maintain an inventory of assets and their condition; update the inventory as assets are added, updated or removed from the system and periodically assess the condition of park and recreation facilities and infrastructure. 4.6 Establish and monitor procedures to document the costs of maintaining City-owned facilities by their function, including public buildings, infrastructure, parks, trails, natural areas and public art pieces. 4.7 Develop a revolving replacement fund for capital repairs and replacements over time. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 68 of 358 19 PARTNERSHIPS Goal 5: Pursue and maintain effective partnerships and provide volunteer opportunities to support the parks and recreation system. Objectives 5.1 Seek public/private agreements to help offset operations and maintenance of park system facilities or the operational cost of providing recreational programs, where appropriate. 5.2 Continue to partner with public, private and non-profit providers, such as organized sports leagues, to plan for projects and expand specialized facilities. 5.3 Develop public/private partnerships with commercial businesses to operate within city parks, where appropriate, to provide services such as concessions or equipment rentals. 3.4 Support volunteer and interjurisdictional efforts for restoration efforts within the major creek watersheds in Bothell, including invasive species removal, planting of native species, and the restoration of urban forests, creeks, wetlands and other habitat. 5.5 Encourage citizen volunteers to recommend a location for an off-leash dog area and to achieve development through fundraising. 5.6 Create a Volunteer Program to encourage community and business participation in the beautification of parks and open spaces or assisting with recreational programs or special events. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 69 of 358 20 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 ADMINISTRATION & MANAGEMENT Goal 6: Provide leadership and fiscal responsibility in the management of the park, recreation and open space system. Objectives 6.1 As the park system expands, provide sufficient financial and staff resources to maintain the overall parks and recreation system to high standards. 6.2 Collect user fees to offset parks maintenance and recreational programs, while maintaining a competitive, reasonable cost to the public. 6.3 Update fees and charges periodically for park facilities and recreation programs. 6.4 Periodically review and update growth impact-related fees and assessment methodologies to finance projects. 6.5 Pursue alternative funding options and dedicated revenues for the acquisition and development of parks and facilities, such as private donation, sponsorships, partnerships, state and federal grant sources, among others. 6.6 Update and adopt a six-year Capital Facilities Plan (CFP) every two years to remain current with local recreational interests and account for the capital needs of the parks and recreation system. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 70 of 358 21 Community engagement and input played a crucial role in establishing a clear planning framework that reflects current community priorities. Most residents care deeply about the future of park and recreation opportunities in Bothell and appreciated the opportunity to offer feedback in the development of this Plan. Public outreach methods were varied and extensive, including: „Meetings with Park and Recreation Board and City Council „Group meetings and individual interviews with key stakeholders „Workshop meeting for general public participation „Community-wide survey „Teen survey „Dog park survey „Pop-up workshops at community events „Bothell City website with plan information and contact opportunities community survey A community-wide, mail and online survey was conducted to assess the recreational needs and priorities of Bothell residents in the summer of 2019. Overall, 381 responses were completed from the print version mail survey, and 860 responses were generated via the online link published on the City’s website. In total, 1,241 survey responses were recorded. The survey measured current levels of satisfaction and which facilities were more used by residents. Residents were asked about future improvements and the types of recreational amenities they’d like to see added to the park system. c ommunity e n G a G ementcommunity e n G a G ement 44 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 71 of 358 22 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Major Findings Most significantly, Bothell residents expressed their overall satisfaction with existing parks and recreation facilities and how much they strongly value these facilities. When asked which improvements they would like to see the City focus on, residents gave the highest priority to expanding the recreational trail network and acquiring land for future parks. Respondents supported adding all-inclusive playground equipment, splash pads, and river access. Residents expressed concern about the pace of development in Bothell, want the City to protect access to nature, trees, and open space for both people and wildlife, and are particularly interested in the future of places like Shelton View and North Creek Forest. Other residents are eager to see improvements to Bothell’s park system, particularly to the former Wayne Golf Course, or would like to see particular facilities added, such as off-leash dog parks, trails, pickleball courts, botanical gardens, and disc golf. A discussion of community survey responses appears in the Needs Assessment chapter, and the complete survey summary is provided in Appendix A. suPPlemental surveys Teen Survey A second survey was focused toward the needs and insights of Bothell’s teens. A short, five-question survey was circulated through Inglemoor and Bothell High Schools and was available online. The survey was conducted between mid-October and early November, and 159 responses were collected. A summary of survey findings is provided in Appendix B. Dog Park Survey A third survey was administered to gain insights on the topic of dog parks. An online-only, 10-question survey was used to gauge the interest in and need for a permanent dog park. City staff promoted the survey during two on-site events, via social media (Twitter, Instagram & Facebook), City’s website, and posted at the dog park itself. It was also promoted by KING5 during an interview with Police Department staff. The timing of the survey aligned with a “pop-up” or temporary dog park located at the Park at Bothell Landing. The survey collected 1,405 responses, of which 1,203 self-identified as residents. A summary of survey findings is provided in Appendix C. stakeholDer Discussions Sports Leagues A group of key stakeholders representing different youth sports leagues were individually interviewed over the phone to share information and ideas about their programs, current concerns and future facility needs. Participating representatives came from Northshore Lacrosse Club (NLC), Northshore Girls SlowPitch Softball Association (NGSSA), and Northshore Youth Soccer Association (NYSA). February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 72 of 358 23 These stakeholders were asked a series of questions about the trends in their sports league participation, shortages (if any) with their facility scheduling, and what future improvements they would prioritize to accommodate their programs continued success. Highlights from these interviews include: „The North Creek sportfields provide exceptional facilities and are in high demand. Parks does a fair and equitable job of allocating days and times based on very straightforward criteria. „ As each league continues to grow, time allocations for sports fields can limit their potential for practices, games and tournaments. More all-weather fields are in high demand and all stakeholders suggested the improvement of both North Creek field #3 and the Doug Allen fields to conversion into synthetic fields. „ To relieve some of the pressure on available field times, the recommendation to negotiate earlier starting times for the shared parking with the adjacent business park. Shifting from the 5:30 pm allowed time to 4:00 pm would increase the field capacity significantly. Theoretically, without too much loss of parking to office uses. „ If other sports field providers (UW Bothell & Pop Keeney) could open up their facilities for community use, more recreational programs could grow to meet the local and regional needs for sports activities. „ Converting some of the school district’s fields to synthetic turf would also increase the potential available facilities for sports programming. Environmental Organizations A group stakeholder meeting was conducted with representatives from the Parks Foundation, Friends of North Creek Forest, One Bothell and Shelton View Forest Stewardship Association to discuss the environmental approach to Bothell’s open space and conservation lands. In general, the group discussion covered the need to balance growth with preservation and ensure that connections across the city can link open spaces, parks and people to integrate lands on both sides of the Sammamish River. Beyond specific attention to the places they represented, focus was directed towards the north end of the city where there is growth and the need for more parks, trail and open spaces. The stakeholders placed high value on the role of volunteers in maintaining the City’s natural open spaces without adding undue burden to the park’s budget and manpower resources. community workshoP Workshop style events allow for a more flexible and engaging dialogue with and between participants to share ideas and explore future prospects for the park system. A community workshop was conducted on October 10, 2019 at Bothell City Hall. The project team prepared informational displays and a presentation to share with attendees. The presentation offered an overview of the planning process and timeline, along with information about the City’s park and recreation system, along with a summary of recent community survey results. Approximately 35 people attended the meeting to review materials and provide 234 unique comments. Following the presentation, attendees were asked to work in small groups to discuss project ideas and prioritize ideas by ‘voting’ with dots for their top interests for park system needs and for recreation program and events. The following two questions sought to identify priorities: February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 73 of 358 24 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 1.Thinking of the City’s parks, trails & open spaces, what improvements to the Bothell system would add the greatest value for your use and enjoyment? 2.Thinking of the events, programs and venues, is anything missing or needs to be added / expanded to improve local options for recreation programs, events and activities? Responses were collected and counted to rate the uppermost improvement ideas, and key findings include the following. Top Parks, Trails and Open Space Improvement Ideas „Trails „Natural Areas/open space „River Access „Dog park „Water Play „Nature / Education Top Recreation Programming Ideas „Events „Community/indoor centers „Recreation programming „Farmers Market „Nature education/programming „Park at Bothell Landing A third exercise explored the concept for balancing community needs for projects with limited resources revealing the need to focus on projects that have been identified through the PROS Plan and the need to leverage funding to create the needed financial resources to achieve the proposed improvements. PoP-uP sessions at community events Recognizing that past, traditional-style public meetings or forums have not attracted a varied cross-section of the Bothell community, a significant effort was put forth to reach out with residents during a selection of community events and gatherings. In all, 18 unique pop-up sessions were conducted between April and October 2019 to share information about the PROS Plan and gather insights about priorities, preferences and ideas for parks, recreation, trails and open spaces in Bothell. The following is a list of pop-up events conducted by City staff. April 25th – Canyon Park Open House May 22nd – UW at Bothell, Guest Lecture May 29th – UW at Bothell, Residence Hall May 30th – Bothell Kenmore Chamber of Commerce General Membership Meeting June 1st – Pop-up at North Creek Fields June 20th – Bothell Historical Society Lecture at King County Library (Bothell Branch) June 25th – Bothell Kenmore Chamber of Commerce Birthday & Open House at Cascadia College July 12th – Friday Market February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 74 of 358 25 July 20th – Pop-up at Park at Bothell Landing July 26th – Pop-up at Music in the Park August 1st – All day Pop-up at Park at Bothell Landing (Pop-up Dog Park Opening Day) August 3rd – Pop-up at Capes for Courage 5k August 9th – Friday Market August 16th – Pop-up at Music in the Park August 18th – Pop-up at Park at Bothell Landing August 21st – Pop-up at Just Kidding Around Concert October 10th – PROS Workshop October 16th – Inglemoor High School Park anD recreation boarD meetings The Bothell Park and Recreation Board is actively engaged in providing feedback on the current and future policies for the community’s park and recreation system as it is an advisory board. At its May 2019 meeting, the Park Board shared their thoughts on the current state of parks and recreation in Bothell and ideas for key projects without regard to cost. The Board targeted planning for more downtown events and activities as the Park at Bothell Landing improvements are completed. Family-oriented gathering spaces and more opportunities for active use parks and special events was voiced as a priority. Key Project Ideas from the Park and Recreation Board „ Complete Park at Bothell Landing „ Splash pad „ Skatepark „ Trails – connect parks, multi-use trails for hiking/biking „ Adventure park (i.e., Everett) ropes course, climbing, etc. „ Community center – for classes, programs, meetings „ Dog park „ Pump track „ Water access at river – for drop-in stand up paddle boarding; have a pull-out site „ Need all-inclusive playground „ Develop more passive space with trails The Board also cited the importance of developing and maintaining partnerships with other providers, such as UW Bothell as well as the need to reach out to businesses to convey volunteer opportunities to help with park projects. city council work sessions The park planning effort was presented at two City Council work sessions to explore Council members’ thoughts and directions for the parks, recreation and open space system. During the first meeting which sought to learn Council’s goals and values for the PROS Plan update and for the Parks and Recreation Department, the Council offered ideas for adding to the February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 75 of 358 26 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 diversity of existing parks, notably a splash pad/water park and skate park. Members were particularly focused on the future improvements for the former Wayne Golf Course and expressed ideas for activating its spaces and seeking some partnerships to explore revenue generation for helping to maintain the property. Park land and future park and recreation improvements were mentioned as important for the Snohomish County section of the City especially for active recreation. The need for spaces and amenities that target teens was noted as well. Council members expressed the need to ensure that proposed improvements were realistic in terms of available funding and operational resources. During the second study session, Council was presented with a review of key metrics on parks acreage and amenities as well as recreation and special event information. Council also reviewed the results of the Community, Teen Survey, and Dog Park Surveys; and potential capital projects and timing. Council members expressed the need to be cognizant of fiscal challenges and ensure fiscal stability in the future. As such, they expressed the need to put safety and maintenance projects first with consideration towards ADA projects and inclusivity for all persons. The construction of a permanent dog park is valued. Park land acquisition may be considered if unique opportunities arise to add to the park system especially in underserved areas of the City. Larger potential projects including Community/Aquatic Center or large land acquisition such as Shelton View Forest will require an additional funding source, e.g. voter approved bonds. other outreach In addition to the direct outreach opportunities described above, the Bothell community was informed about the planning process through a variety of media platforms. The following methods were used to share information about the project and provide opportunities to participate and offer their comments: „City website home page „Project website „Email blasts „Social media: Twitter, Instagram & Facebook February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 76 of 358 27 This chapter is segmented into two sections. The first section defines the various facility classifications in use in Bothell, and the second is an inventory of existing facilities. PARK CLASSIFICATIONS Parkland is classified to assist in planning for the community’s recreational needs. The Bothell park system is composed of a hierarchy of various park types, each offering recreation and/ or natural area opportunities. Separately, each park type may serve only one function, but collectively the system will serve the full range of community needs. Classifying parkland by function allows the City to evaluate its needs and to plan for an efficient, cost effective and usable park system that minimizes conflicts between park users and adjacent uses. The classification characteristics are meant as general guidelines addressing the intended size and use of each park type. The following seven outdoor recreation classifications are in effect in Bothell and are defined as follows. „Community Parks „Neighborhood Parks „Mini Parks „Athletic Fields „Special Use Facilities „Open Space „Trails & Walking Routes c lassifications & i nventoryclassifications & i nventory 55 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 77 of 358 28 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 community Parks Community parks are larger sites (10 acres or more) developed for organized play, containing a wider array of facilities and, as a result, appealing to a more diverse group of users. They serve a broader service area of 2-5 miles and generally are planned to provide active and structured recreation opportunities, as well as passive and non-organized opportunities for individual and family activities. Conservation easements or other restrictions may impact or limit the extent of site development or range of improvements provided. Community parks can also serve as local neighborhood parks for their immediate areas, and they may be connected to schools or other community facilities. Community parks are generally located on or adjoining a collector street and may also be connected with a trail system. In general, community park facilities are designed for organized or intensive recreational activities and sports, although passive components such as pathways, picnic areas and natural areas are highly encouraged and complementary to active use facilities. Since community parks serve a larger area and offer more facilities than neighborhood parks, parking and restroom facilities should be provided. neighborhooD Parks Neighborhood parks are generally developed for a range of activities meant to be within walking distance of residential neighborhoods. They are small park areas designed for unstructured, non-organized play and limited active and passive recreation. They are generally 2-10 acres in size, depending on a variety of factors including neighborhood need, physical location and opportunity. Neighborhood parks are intended to serve residential areas within close proximity (generally up to ½-mile walking or biking distance) of the park and should be geographically distributed throughout the community. Access to neighborhood parks is mostly pedestrian, and park sites should be located such that people living within the service area can reach the park safely and conveniently. Park siting and design should ensure pedestrians do not have to cross a major arterial street or other significant natural or man-made barrier to get to the site, unless safe crossings are provided. Neighborhood parks should be located along road frontages to improve visual access and community awareness of the sites. Connecting and frontage streets should include sidewalks or other safe pedestrian access. Additionally, street plans should encourage maximum connectivity and public access to park sites. Generally, developed neighborhood parks typically include amenities such as pedestrian paths, picnic tables, benches, play equipment, a multi-use open field for informal play, sport courts or multi-purpose paved areas and landscaping. Restrooms may be provided where feasible. Since neighborhood parks are meant to be within walking distance, parking is not always provided; however, on-street, ADA-accessible parking stall(s) may be available. mini Parks Mini parks are small parks, less than one acre and are often designed as play lots to serve nearby young children and their parents. Mini parks are the smallest park classification and are used to address limited or isolated recreational needs. These parks serve a limited radius February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 78 of 358 29 (generally up to ¼-mile) from the site and provide passive and play-oriented recreational opportunities. Amenities are usually limited to small playground facilities, small open grass areas, and minimal site furnishings. Passive uses may include picnic areas and sitting areas. Parking is not typically provided at mini parks. athletic FielDs Athletic fields are provided for youth and adult league requirements and usually include single-purpose recreational areas. This classification may include regional sports field complexes or smaller sports fields and may also be provided within a park of another classification. Athletic fields may include other recreational amenities found in other park facilities. Athletic fields are generally located along collector streets or arterials for greater accessibility. sPecial use Facilities Special use facilities (formerly ‘regional facilities’ from the 2014 PROSAP Plan) include single- purpose recreational areas or stand-alone sites designed to support a specific, specialized use. This classification may include stand-alone dog parks, aquatic facilities, community centers, golf courses, sites of historical or cultural significance, such as museums or landmarks. Specialized facilities may also be provided within a park of another classification. oPen sPace Open Spaces are usually owned or managed by a governmental agency or non-profit conservation organization and may or may not have public access. This type of conserved land often includes wetlands, wildlife corridors, shorelines, rivers, steep hillsides or other natural or environmentally sensitive spaces. Open spaces may serve as trail corridors, and low-impact or passive activities, such as walking, nature observation and fishing may be allowed, where appropriate. Open spaces may be public or private and may not always be “protected” through regulations or other property mechanisms and may not provide for public access. trails & walking routes Trails are non-motorized recreation and transportation networks ideally separated from roadways. Trails can be developed to accommodate multiple or shared uses, such as pedestrians and bicyclists, or a single use. Walking routes may combine off-road and on-road facilities. Recreation trail alignments aim to link to natural systems, public and civic activity centers, neighborhoods, schools and commercial centers. The City provides a trail network comprised of local trails and connections to regional trails provided by others. These interconnected linkages enable recreational trail users to create loops or individualized routes depending on desired travel distances or specific destinations. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 79 of 358 30 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 FACILITY INVENTORY The park and open space inventory identifies the recreational assets within Bothell. The City provides over 400 acres of public parks and recreation facilities distributed among 26 sites, plus additional open space parcels. The following list depicts the available parkland inventory in Bothell. Figure 5. Existing Inventory: City-owned Park Lands  Park  Classification Acreage Blyth Park Community 38.39 Park at Bothell Landing Community 13.37 Cedar Grove Park Community/Athletic Fields 12.83 Centennial Park Community/Open Space 46.50 East Norway Hill Community/Athletic Fields 25.13 Doug Allen Sportsfields Athletic Fields 7.61 North Creek Sportsfield 1 Athletic Fields 4.66 North Creek Sportsfield 2 Athletic Fields 3.71 North Creek Sportsfield 3 Athletic Fields 3.94 North Creek Sportsfield 4 Athletic Fields 4.58 Subtotal 160.72 Brickyard Road Park Neighborhood 3.45 Conifer View Park Neighborhood 1.50 Madrazo Neighborhood 4.04 Royal Oaks Park Neighborhood 2.24 Stipek Park Neighborhood 3.73 William Penn Park Neighborhood 2.27 Subtotal 17.23 Bloomberg Hill Park Mini 1.03 Brackett's Landing Mini 0.55 Horse Creek Plaza Mini 0.53 Red Brick Road Mini 0.39 Tall Tree Park Mini 1.08 Volunteer Park Mini 0.22 Subtotal 3.80 former Wayne Golf Course Open Space 89.00 Haynes Open Space Open Space 4.70 North Creek Forest Open Space 63.41 Pioneer Cemetery Open Space 4.72 Swedish Cemetery Open Space 0.58 Sammamish River Park Open Space 54.89 Other Open Space Open Space 4.04 Subtotal 221.34 Total City Acreage 403.09 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 80 of 358 31 Additionally, other public and private parks and open space tracts contribute significantly to the overall park system in Bothell. The private parks and open space tracts complement the collection of existing City-owned public parklands. In total, over 782 acres of private open space have been set aside to date, comprising approximately 65% of the open space within the Bothell urban growth area. In total, over 1,400 acres of public and private lands exist within the Bothell urban growth area, which include City properties, other public lands, private parks and private open spaces. Figure 6. Public & Private Parklands by Type Community/Athletic Fields City‐owned 160.72 King County 3.21 Snohomish County 13.49 Subtotal 177.42 Neighborhood Parks City‐owned 17.23 Snohomish County 12.20 Subtotal 29.43 Mini Parks City‐owned 3.80 Private HOA Park 14.46 Subtotal 18.26 Open Space City‐owned 221.34 King County 61.51 Snohomish County 14.29 Washington State 43.29 Private Open Space / Common Areas 782.10 Private Open Space (Devel Rights Owned) 79.65 Subtotal 1,202.18 Total Acreage 1,427.29 The following map shows the location of existing parks and recreation areas within and around the City. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 81 of 358 32 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Page Left Intentionally Blank February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 82 of 358 Logan Parks Forsgren Park Swamp Creek Park Locust Way UW Bothell/Cascadia College Open Space Miner's Corner 1st Lt. Nicholas Madrazo Memorial Park East Norway Hill Doug Allen Sportsfields Bloomberg Hill Park Red Brick Road Pioneer Cemetery William Penn Park Royal Oaks Park Blyth Park Stipek Park Brickyard Road Park Tall Tree Park Conifer View Park Haynes Open Space Horse Creek Plaza North Creek Sportsfield 4 Park at Bothell Landing Centennial Park Cedar Grove Park Volunteer Park North Creek Forest Sammamish River Parkformer Wayne Golf Course 240 ST SE CAMPU S WAY NE 83 PL NEFILBERT DRNE 175 ST73 AVE NE196 ST SW (SR 524)9 AVE SE22 DR SELARCH WAY NE 181 S T NE 160 ST 131AVE NE112 AVE NEJUANITA-WOODINVILLEWAY NEI- 4 0 5 208 ST SE (SR 524)BOTHELL-EVERETTHWY (SR 527)130AVE NE26 AVE SE WOO D I N V I L L E DR ( S R 5 2 2 )NE 203 ST NE 180 ST 228 ST SW SIMONDS RD N E YORKRDNE BO T H E L L W A Y ( S R 5 2 2 )DAMSON RDNE 144 STBOTHELL-EVERETT HWYMALTBY R D ( S R 5 2 4) B O T H E L L W A Y N E WO O D I N V I L L E DR SR 20239 AVE SE FI L B E R T R D ( S R 52 4 )27 AVE SE(FITZGERALDRD)100 AVE NEBOTHELL WAYNE (SR 522)68 AVE NENE 177 P L NE 185 ST 120 AVE NE242 ST S E 228 ST SE 132 AVE NEJUANITA DR NE186 PL SE 212 ST SE JUANITAWOODINVILLEWAY NENE 195 ST NE 1 9 1 S T 214 ST SE N DAMSON RD PrivateRoad124 AVE NENE 190 ST 197 PL SE NE 145 ST 220 ST S E 35 AVE SEBEARDSLEE BLVD110AVE NESR 522102 AVE NENORTH RD17 AVE SEPrivate R d NE 188 ST 26 PL SENORTH CREEK PKWY S20 AVE SENORTH CREEK PKWY N29 DR SENORTH CREEK PKWY§¨¦405 §¨¦405 §¨¦405 0 0.5 1 1.5 20.25 Miles Legend City Limits Planning Area Bothell Parks (Active Use) Bothell Open Space HOA Private Parks State owned County Parks (King,Snohomish) Private Open Space School District Lands County Line Streets Water ¹ Service Areas & Access Points City Parks Map 1: Existing Parks & Open Spaces February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 83 of 358 Page Left Intentionally Blank 34 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 84 of 358 35 Park conDitions assessment The condition of park infrastructure and amenities is a measure of park adequacy and a required assurance of public safety. General park infrastructure may include walkways, parking lots, park furniture, drainage and irrigation, lighting systems and vegetation. Deferred maintenance over a long period can result in unusable amenities when perceived as unsafe or undesirable by park patrons. The existing conditions within parks were assessed to identify issues and concerns and opportunities for future improvements. The condition assessment matrix shown on the below summarizes the results of these assessments and can be used to help prioritize needed park improvements. The matrix uses a rating system that ranks the condition of the park element based on the following scale: „1 – Good Condition: In general, amenities in good condition offer full functionality and do not need repairs. Good facilities have playable sports surfaces and equipment, working fixtures, and fully intact safety features (railings, fences, etc.). Good facilities may have minor cosmetic defects. Good facilities encourage area residents to use the park. „2 – Fair : In general, amenities in fair condition are largely functional but need minor or moderate repairs. Fair facilities have play surfaces, equipment, fixtures, and safety features that are operational and allow play, but have deficiencies or time periods where they are unusable. Fair facilities remain important amenities for the neighborhood but may slightly discourage use of the park by residents. „3 – Poor: In general, amenities in poor condition are largely or completely unusable. They need major repairs to be functional. Poor facilities are park features that have deteriorated to the point where they are barely usable. Fields are too uneven for ball games, safety features are irreparably broken, buildings need structural retrofitting, etc. Poor facilities discourage residents from using the park. Generally a feature with a rating of “3” should have higher priority for resolution through maintenance, capital repairs or as a new capital project. Park amenity conditions were also averaged across park elements to indicate which types of elements are in greater need for significant upgrades, renovations or overall improvements. Based on this assessment, the City’s sport courts, baseball/softball fields, site furnishings, and natural area vegetation are in the greatest need of rehabilitation or repair. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 85 of 358 36 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Page Left Intentionally Blank February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 86 of 358 ADA Park NamePPaarrkk  TTyyppeeTToottaall  AAccrreessDeveloped AcresUndeveloped AcresOpen Space AcresPlaygroundsPaved Courts: BasketballSoccer FieldsBaseball / Softball FieldsSport CourtSynthetic TurfOpen Playfield/LawnPathways/TrailsOther Rec Element Site Furnishings Lighting (Y/N) Signage Parking Areas Public Art Restrooms Picnic Shelters Amphitheater/Stage Turf Park Trees Landscaped Beds Natural Areas Compliance*CommentsBloomberg Hill ParkM 0.70.722‐‐‐‐‐2‐1N1‐‐‐‐‐11‐‐2Basketball court needs painted play lines. Path has pavement cracks. Play equipment should be replaced soon. Add entry from uphill sidewalk for better ADA access.Blyth ParkC 40.8 19.5 21.3 1‐‐‐‐‐1111N11‐11‐11‐11Add backstops to horseshoe pit. Add shade structure to play equipment. Volleyball court needs more sand & pole replacement.Bracket's LandingM 0.50.5‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐1N1‐‐‐‐‐11‐‐3No universal access to picnic tables or waterfront edge.Brickyard RoadN 3.53.512‐‐2‐12‐2N1‐‐‐‐‐111‐2Picnic tables have no paved pathway for ADA access. Site furnishings need resurfacing. Sport court developing cracks.Cedar Grove ParkC 13.8 7.06.8 1 1‐ ‐ ‐ ‐12‐1N11‐11‐11112Pavement cracks and boardwalks need repairs. Some shade should be added to playground area. Equipment gets too hot on sunny days.Centennial ParkC/OS 54.0 7.0 5.5 41.5‐‐‐‐‐‐‐111N11‐11‐11111Improved trail pathways could encourage increased use. Connect to utility corridor pathway as well.Conifer View ParkN 1.51.51‐‐‐1‐12‐1N1‐‐‐‐‐11‐‐Sport court could use fresh painted lines. South side entry could use improved pathway.Doug Allen SportsfieldsA 7.6‐‐11‐‐1‐‐1N1‐‐1‐‐11‐‐3No ADA accommodations. One dugout without protective roof. East Norway Hill ParkC 25.1 2.7 22.4‐‐‐‐‐‐‐2‐1N12‐‐‐‐‐‐‐13Informal path system could be improved. Park needs to implement its master development plan.Horse Creek PlazaM 0.5‐‐‐‐‐‐‐1‐‐Y1‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐11Section of parcel is under construction.Madrazo ParkC 2.6 2.5 ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐N‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐Undeveloped field at King County wastewater treatment site.North Creek Forest Open SpaceOS 41.7 41.6‐‐‐‐‐‐‐2‐‐N‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐1‐North Creek SportsfieldsA 14.0 14.0‐ ‐ 1 1 ‐ 1 ‐ 1 ‐ 1 Y 1 ‐ ‐ 1 ‐ ‐1111‐Park at Bothell LandingC 14.0 5.9 3.6 4.6 1‐‐‐‐‐12‐1Y11‐11112111Picnic tables along river need new lumber, parts of asphalt pathways cracking, shade trees along entry drive showing stress, boardwalk decking aging.Red Brick RoadM 0.50.5‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐1N111‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐Provide at least one H/C parking space. Replace wood on picnic table soon.Royal Oaks ParkN 2.32.311‐‐1‐‐2‐1‐1‐‐‐‐‐111‐‐Pavement cracks developing in park paths ‐ repair needed. Re‐paint lines on basketball court. Add park ID signs at side entrances.Sammamish River Park/TrailOS 31.6 6.4 3.0 22.2‐‐‐‐‐‐‐1‐‐N11‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐Stipek ParkN 3.6 3.61 1 ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐1211N1‐ ‐11‐11112Playground & swing set areas need better ADA access. Pavement cracks from tree root upheavals should be addressed. Trim encroaching vegetation from path in natural area.Tall Tree ParkM 1.01.01‐‐‐‐‐‐1‐1N1‐‐‐‐‐11112Provide accessible route to one picnic table or add ADA‐compliant table near path. Improve path connection (tread surface) to Conifer View Park.Volunteer ParkM 0.20.211‐‐‐‐‐1‐1N1‐‐‐‐‐11‐‐2Provide accessible route to one picnic table. Repair barrier/gap at playground ramp.William Penn ParkN 2.72.71‐‐‐1‐12‐1N12‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐Restripe parking area. Add net to Pickleball/sport court. Replace or remove former restroom building. Repair pavement cracks. Re‐design play amenities for ADA access.1.09 1.33 1 1 1.25 1 1 1.59 1 1.06 ‐ 1 1.25111111.07 1 1 1.92NOTESRatings: 1= good; 2=fair; 3=poor (see reverse side for descriptions)Park Types: M= Mini Park; N= Neighborhood; C= Community; OS= Open SpaceOpen Space sites: Haynes, Swedish & Pioneer cemeteries were not assessed during this review.VegetationAverage ratingAcreageRecreation AmenitiesSite Amenities Structures Figure 7: Conditions AssessmentFebruary 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 87 of 358 Park & Facility Condition Assessment Playgrounds:Pathways / Trails: 1 In good condition: no drainage issues; 0‐10% material deterioration safety surfacing with a border at the  site.1 In good condition: surface generally smooth and even; proper width and material for type of pathway;  proper clearances; minimal drainage issues. 2 In fair condition: drainage issues; 10‐25% material deterioration; some small compliance issues that could  be spot fixed.2 In fair condition: uneven surfaces in places; some drainage issues; some cracking; narrow widths in some  places. 3 In poor condition: drainage issues; 25% or greater material deterioration; needs repair or replacement (but workable).3 In poor condition: uneven surfaces; inadequate width; significant cracking or heaving; clearance issues. Paved Courts:Turf: 1 In good condition: no cracks in surfacing; fencing is functional, free of protrusions, and free of  holes/passages; painting and striping are appropriately located, whole, and uniform in color.1 In good condition: lush and full, few weeds, no drainage problems. 2 In fair condition: hairline cracks to ¼”, surfacing required; fencing has minor protrusions, or  holes/passages that do not affect game play; painting and striping have flaking or color fading.2 In fair condition: some bare spots, some drainage problems. 3 In poor condition: horizontal cracks more than ½” wide, surfacing required; fencing has large protrusions,  holes/passages or defects; painting and striping are patchy and color has faded dramatically.3 In poor condition: irrigation problems, bare spots, weeds, soil compacted. Signage:Site Furnishings: 1 In good condition: a signage system for the site, appropriate signs, no damaged signs.1 In good condition; not damaged; free of peeling or chipped paint; consistent throughout park. Trash  receptacles, drinking fountain, picnic tables, benches on paved surface. 2 In fair condition; multiple signage system within one site, a few damaged signs (0‐10%), need  maintenance.2 In fair condition; 0‐20% furnishings are damaged and require replacing parts; some peeling or chipped  paint; furnishings are not consistent, but are operational. 3 In poor condition; multiple signage systems within one site, signs that are not legible from a reasonable  distance, some damaged signs (10‐25%), old logos, deteriorated materials, no signage.3 In poor condition; 20% or more are damaged and require replacing parts; significant peeling or chipped  paint; multiple styles within park site require different maintenance. Public Art:Parking Areas: 1 In good condition: no vandalism; no signs of weathering.1 In good condition: paving and drainage do not need repair; pavement markings clear; pathway  connection provided to facility; proper layout. 2 In fair condition: minor signs of weathering or wear.2 In fair condition: paving needs patching or has some drainage problems; has wheel stops and curbs. 3 In poor condition: metal leaching/concrete efflorescence/paint peeling/wood chipped or carved into or  warping; vandalized.3 In poor condition: surfaces (gravel, asphalt, or concrete) needs repair; uneven grading; limited signage; no  delineation for vehicles. Park Structures (Restrooms, Picnic Shelters, Concession Building):Natural Areas: 1 In good condition: roof has no leaks; floor shows little sign of wear; finishes are fresh with no graffiti or  vandalism; all elements are in working order.1 In good condition: barely noticeable invasives, high species diversity, healthy plants. 2 In fair condition: roof shows signs of wear but is structurally sound; floor shows some wear; finishes show  some wear with some marks or blemishes.2 In fair conditions: Noticeable invasives, fewer species but still healthy. 3 In poor condition: roof leaks or otherwise needs repair; floor show significant wear and is difficult to  maintain; finishes are dull or discolored, have graffiti, or are not easily maintained; some elements not  working or in need of repair (e.g., non‐functioning sink). 3 In poor condition: Invasives have taken over, low diversity, unhealthy plants. Park Trees:Amphitheater/Stage: 1 In good condition: trees overall have good form and spacing; no topping; free of disease or pest  infestation; no vandalism; no hazard trees.1 In good condition: paving, stage and stair materials have little to no cracking or peeling; vegetation that is  present is healthy; seating and other furnishings show modest signs of wear; views to stage from all  seating vantage points. 2 In fair condition; some crowding may exist but overall health is good; less than 5% of trees show signs of  topping, disease or pest infestation; vandalism has not impacted tree health (graffiti, not girdling).2 In fair condition: paving, stage and stair materials have some cracking or peeling; vegetation that is  present is healthy, but some soil compaction might be present; seating and other furnishings show signs  of wear, but are still usable; stage orientation not be ideal for all viewers. 3 In poor condition; Form or spacing issues may exist; evidence of disease or pests; vandalism affecting tree  health; some hazard trees or trees in danger of becoming hazard trees.3 In poor condition: paving, stage and stair materials have significant cracking or peeling; vegetation is  unhealthy (pests, disease, topped trees), compacted soil; seating and other furnishings need repair or  replacement; redesign of space is needed for proper viewing and access. ADA Compliance:Landscaped Beds: 1 Appears to comply with ADA standards.1 In good condition: few weeds; no bare or worn areas; plants appear healthy with no signs of pest or  disease infestation. 2 Some items appear to not comply, but could be fixed by replacing with relative ease.2 In fair condition: some weeds present; some bare or worn spots; plants are still generally healthy. 3 A number of park assets appear not to comply, including large‐scale items like regrading.3 In poor condition: many weeds present; large bare or worn areas; plants show signs of pests or disease;  compacted soils. Sports Fields: 1 In good condition: thick grass with few bare spots; few depressions; no noticeable drainage issues, proper  slope and layout; fencing if present is functional, free of protrusions, and free of holes. 2 In fair condition: grass with bare turf areas in high‐use locations, some drainage issues in overuse areas,  slope is within one percent of proper field slope, infields have grading problems (bump) at transition to  grass and have no additive, may not have proper layout and/or orientation, fencing if present has minor  protrusions, or holes/passages that do not affect game play. 3 In poor condition: bare areas throughout the year, uneven playing surface that holds water in certain  places, drainage issues, slopes not uniform and/or more than one percent from proper field slope,  improper layout and/or orientation; fencing has large protrusions, holes/passages or defects. RATING SCALE February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 88 of 358 39 Detailed inventories and assessments for each individual park are located on the following pages; however, the following summary offers a composite from on-site observations and recommendations that will contribute to the enhancement of the City’s park system, character and sustainability. Wayfinding, Identity & Signage As part of the overall park and trail system, there were opportunities to help navigate visitors and inform them about the public spaces they were entering. A clear need was identified by the use of small park identification signs at side entrances. A good wayfinding system can provide a consistent identity and display effective and accessible information to orient the user. This guidance system ensures efficient use of the trail, park or other public space and conveys safety to the user by translating the environment into a known geography. Signs, symbols, mapping, color, standardized site amenities combined with good design of the physical environment (i.e., trail or park) helps the user navigate the space and stay comfortably oriented. Bothell could expand its wayfinding program to include both visual graphic standards and site furnishing standards. The use of consistent graphics and a coordinated hierarchy of sign types and sizes can provide park and trail users with wayfinding information to enhance their access and knowledge of the recreational system available for their enjoyment. A good wayfinding system applies the “simpler is better” concept. ADA Accessibility and Compliance As with many older parks, some architectural barriers were present in the park system. Updating and providing ADA accessibility and compliance with federal guidelines should be part of a regular capital repair schedule to ensure the reasonable access on older pavements, parking, playgrounds, picnic amenities, restrooms and recreational elements. The Bothell Park system has some ADA compliance issues with park access at parking areas, barriers to access into playground areas as well as non-complaint benches and picnic tables lacking accessible routes. The City will want to develop an ADA Compliance Checklist to identify and prioritize these deficiencies and develop a methodology for bringing all their parks into compliance. Site Furnishings Standards for park furnishing such as benches, picnic tables, drinking fountains, bike racks, trash receptacles and other common amenities used throughout the park system can be instrumental in assuring consistent ADA compliance and streamlined maintenance and repairs. Picnic tables did not provide for wheelchair seating and many tables were located in grass areas with no accessible route from the park paved paths. Park benches should have backs and armrests and be located along accessible routes with adjacent wheelchair spaces at one end of the bench pad. Choosing a consistent style and installation design could help simplify park development and future maintenance for site furnishings. Many picnic tables were ready for refinishing or replacement of their wood tops and seats. Bollards at trail entries are valuable for discouraging unauthorized vehicles from entering park and trails. However, several parks use dark-colored bollards for this purpose. Dark bollards tend to become invisible to cyclists in low light conditions and can become a hazard. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 89 of 358 40 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 At a minimum, some reflective material should be applied to enhance visibility or the bollards switched out with a lighter color. Playgrounds The majority of playground equipment was in good condition, and the replacement of play equipment at Bloomberg Hill Park is planned for the near future. A regular schedule of playground equipment inspections should continue to be incorporated into the park maintenance routine to ensure continual play-safe structures. Access to playground areas was not always barrier-free. Several parks were noted to lack any ramps or provisions to transfer from park pathway pavement to the lower surfacing of the playground. The drop-off edges varied from 3-6 inches, far exceeding the maximum ½ inch tolerance. Play equipment, particularly slides, was noticeably hot on sunny days – too hot for safe or comfortable use. Incorporating shade structures that cut the number of hours and angle of direct sunlight on play equipment can enhance the park user experience and extend the amount of play value provided at many parks, including Bloomberg Hill, Blyth, Cedar Grove, Stipek, Volunteer, and William Penn Park. Turf Management Grass playing fields for organized sports require a higher level of maintenance and expected quality to ensure safe and continual team play during the baseball, softball, soccer and lacrosse seasons. Typically these athletic fields with natural grass must be fertilized and mowed more often than typical open grass areas in public parks. Field areas that have significant clover coverage that can reduce the durability of field play and allow for uneven and eroded surfaces in the field of play. The higher level of required maintenance can be subsidized by reservation and use fees for organizations that regularly schedule those fields for the season. Park standards can be established that specifically identify the tolerance for weed growth within natural grass sports fields and the approved methods for weed control in the public arena. Timing and notification methods should also be incorporated into adopted park standards to ensure safe application and public use. Additionally, identifying the intentional irrigated grass areas with their associated higher levels of maintenance and the unirrigated grass zones can help with turf grass management expectations and anticipated schedules for mowing and fertilizing. Safety Much of the park layouts and landscapes seemed to meet the basic CPTED (crime prevention through environmental design) principles of good visibility and overall positive perceptions of public safety. Park safety conditions were generally good throughout the park system, and areas for improvements were shared with management staff. Detectible (tactile) warning strips were missing at some junctions were park pathways intersected with parking lots or traffic lanes. As part of an ADA transition plan, the City should schedule the addition of warning strips in locations where they are missing. The black bollard locations, as noted under Site Furnishings above, were also a concern. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 90 of 358 41 Buildings and Structures Bothell Parks contain a variety of structures with variable ages. Restrooms, picnic shelters and gazebos compose the building mix in most parks. In general, the structures were in good repair. Of note, the restroom building at William Penn Park is closed and should be removed. The boardwalk at the Park at Bothell Landing is due for repairs or replacement decking. The boardwalk at Cedar Grove is in need of repair or replacement. The bridge at the Park at Bothell Landing is already planned for replacement. Annual inspections should occur to ensure continual integrity of any buildings, structures, and retaining walls. Trails and Pavement Pavement maintenance should address cracks and root upheavals as well as seams where different pavement types meet (curbs, bridges, sidewalk-to-trail, boardwalks, path to play areas, etc.) and have a tendency to settle at different rates to create architectural barriers to universal access. Many paved park paths have been subject to root upheavals causing pavement cracks that need to be addressed. Sport courts and parking should have regularly scheduled repainting to ensure retention of functional court play and identified parking stalls. The basketball sport courts at Bloomberg Hill, Brickyard Road, Cedar Grove, Conifer View, Royal Oaks, and Volunteer Parks should have free throw, etc. lines painted. Some cracks were noted in several sports courts (including Brickyard Road and Conifer View Parks) and should be monitored to anticipate the eventual need for resurfacing. Trails through natural areas should undergo regular inspections to ensure the identification of potential erosion and surface wear. Common challenges to natural area trails such as root upheavals, cracking, slumping and eroded edges can sometimes be addressed more readily if treated early. Vegetation control through brushing back is important along natural trails to keep trail corridors open from encroachment. Trees and Landscape Maintenance In general, the trees and landscapes in Bothell parks were in good condition. Turf grass management appears to well executed. In a few parks, additional attention may be warranted for shade trees under stress. Ensuring that park trees do not have grass growing at the base of their trunks can help to protect their trunks and roots from mower damage. Several parks could benefit from additional tree planting to provide more extensive shade for park users and tree canopy for environmental benefit. Playground and picnic areas would benefit from more shade trees to provide comfort during sunny days when play equipment can easily heat up to be unusable. Bloomberg Hill, Centennial, Conifer View, Stipek, Volunteer, and William Penn Parks could all be destinations for additional tree plantings. Bothell should continue its involvement in the Tree City, USA program, which demonstrates the City’s commitment to the value of trees for protecting creeks and water quality, cleaning air and adding beauty to streets, parks and neighborhoods. In addition, the City could consider establishing a tree canopy replacement plan for its parks and provide a capital pruning schedule to ensure proper attention and longevity. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 91 of 358 42 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Natural Areas and Open Space In general, Bothell’s parks did not appear to have severe problems with noxious or invasive plant species. However, larger open spaces including North Creek Forest, Cedar Grove, Wayne Golf Course and Centennial Park, had significant areas covered with Himalayan blackberry and Scotch Broom that should be targeted for control and removal. Regular inspections of rough mown and natural areas should include identification of noxious weeds and initiate control measures to prevent noxious weed takeovers. Undeveloped Parkland A number of park sites were partially or mostly undeveloped and had the potential to add more value to Bothell’s park system. Park site master plans should be developed as funding allows, in phases and/or re-evaluated for design changes to reduce operational costs. Parks for Health Parks are an important destination for people engaging in outdoor physical activity. Physical activity is one of the most important behaviors that reduces chronic diseases and improves health incomes for all age groups. Numerous studies have demonstrated that public parks contribute to health even beyond physical activity. The NRPA report Quantifying the Contribution of Public Parks to Physical Activity and Health outlines several variables for parks’ role in improving both community and individual health. An important variable for promoting community health is the provision of parks which are accessible through safe walking routes and contain elements that create an attractive destination. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 92 of 358 43 Amenities „Playground „Basketball sport court „Paved path „Open grass „Shade trees „Benches „Picnic table „Park sign „Trash receptacle bloomberg hill Park 1.03 acres Holly Hills Drive NE Mini Park Design Opportunities as Funding Allows „Adding additional paved path from sidewalk at west end of park will enhance ADA access to play amenities. „Additional shade trees and/or a shade structure for the play equipment will enhance park user comfort. „Basketball court could have play lines painted on pavement to enhance play activity. „Playground is missing element (stand remains). February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 93 of 358 44 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Amenities „Playground & swings (accessible) „Picnic shelters (1 large & 1 small) „Restrooms „Parking „Sand volleyball „Disc golf course (10-hole) „Horseshoe pit „Drinking fountains „Picnic tables & grills „Paved pathways „Regional trail access „Riverfront & natural area „Interpretive signs blyth Park 38.39 acres West Riverside Drive Community Park Design Opportunities as Funding Allows „Playground has no shade. Some structure for shading sliding board would be an improvement. „Horseshoe pit could have backboards added for safer play. „Integrating connection to adjacent former golf course will greatly enhance the open space and recreational opportunities. However, some re-routing of disc golf course hole alignment should be anticipated to avoid risk of conflict with pathway users. This section of the former golf course has very limited opportunities as it is designated salmon habitat by conservation easement. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 94 of 358 45 Amenities „Picnic tables & grills „Benches „Waterfront Access „Historic sign „On-street parking „Trash receptacle brackett’s lanDing 0.5 acres NE 174th Street, along Sammamish River Mini Park Design Opportunities as Funding Allows „Steep slope limits accessibility. Gradual path leads to benches but no ADA access is provided to picnic tables. Consider adding pathway to tables and extending existing pathway to at least one bench. „Future street tree replacements should focus on use of native tree species rather than Norway maples (undesirable invasive) whose seeds can readily spread downriver. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 95 of 358 46 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Amenities „Basketball & pickleball court „Playground, swings & sandbox „Paved pathways „Open grass lawn „Shade trees/landscaped areas „Benches „Picnic tables & grills „Trash receptacles „Park signs brickyarD roaD Park 3.45 acres Corner of NE 169th Street & Brickyard Road Neighborhood Park Design Opportunities as Funding Allows „Consider adding a smaller park identification sign at side entry along upper end of Brickyard Road pathway access as well as from NE 168th Place entry. „Low area within grove of western cedars being used as nature play area. This area could be enhanced as “official” nature play site. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 96 of 358 47 Amenities „Playground, swings „Ballfield „Basketball ½ court „Restrooms „Parking „Picnic shelter „Picnic tables & grills „Benches „Paved pathway loop trail „Drinking fountains „Natural area w/ stream & boardwalk „Caretaker’s house & service garage „Bike rack „Trash receptacles „Park signs ceDar grove Park 12.83 acres 9th Avenue SE Community Park Design Opportunities as Funding Allows „Playground area could use shade structure. Equipment gets too hot for use on a sunny day. Parents watch from shade cast by dugout roof. Additional shade needed. „Side entries (pedestrian paths) into park could benefit by small park identification signs. „Replace or add railings to existing bleachers. „Directional arrows in parking area and at entrance could clarify vehicular movements. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 97 of 358 48 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Amenities „Picnic shelter „Parking „Restrooms „Historic house/Meeting room „Trails „Benches „Picnic tables „BBQ Grills „Drinking fountains „Trash & recycling receptacles „Deck overlook „Climbing rock play area centennial Park 46.5 acres 208 Street SE (SR 524) Community Park Design Opportunities as Funding Allows „Consider re-aligning benches that face small wetland basin behind schoolhouse to face the open slopes to the south. „Locating a more formal trail connection to the utility corridor trail could be beneficial. Tread surface improvements and expanded options could improve the existing natural pathways. „Permeable parking area with green stormwater practices could be focus of interpretive signs about environmental benefits. „Himalayan blackberries and Scotch broom (noxious invasive plant species) in forest and natural area edges should be targets for vegetation management control. „Observation deck behind schoolhouse should have some vegetation control to allow for some viewing into the wetland basin. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 98 of 358 49 Amenities „Playground „Sport court „Open grass lawn area „Shade trees „Picnic tables & grill „Bench „Informal connection to Tall Tree Park coniFer view Park 1.5 acres NE 195th Street Neighborhood Park Design Opportunities as Funding Allows „More shade trees could benefit playground area in south section of park. „North connection to Tall Tree Park could be more formalized with pathway improvements and signage communicating the connection. „Park could benefit from creation of a loop trail that connects to all four potential entry accesses into park. „Side entries could use small park identification signs to clarify public access and provider information. „Consider resurfacing the sport courts in the next 5 years. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 99 of 358 50 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Amenities „Open grass sports fields „Backstop with dugouts „Restrooms „On-street parking „Perimeter chain link fencing „Park ID sign „Perimeter shade trees „Bleachers „Equipment storage containers „Sand bin for turf repairs „Trash receptacles „Bench Doug allen sPortFielDs 7.6 acres 88 Avenue NE Athletic Fields Design Opportunities as Funding Allows „Neighboring LDS Church may allow shared parking for game events. „One dugout does not have roof to offer protection from balls, rain or sun. „Replace or add railings to existing bleachers February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 100 of 358 51 Amenities „Open grass area „Natural area „Hiking trails „Picnic tables „Benches „Trash receptacles „Park identification sign „Trail along utility corridor east norway hill Park 25.1 acres NE 155 Street Community Park Design Opportunities as Funding Allows „Adjacent to school property and its sports fields. Trail system could have more developed tread definition and extend better into natural area and utility corridor trail. „A master plan has been designed to guide future development of the park. Access should be planned to accommodate park users of all abilities (ADA compliance). Park needs future designated parking area. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 101 of 358 52 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Amenities „Day-lighted stream corridor „Habitat conservation area „Lighting „Paved walkways „Native vegetation & stream „Directional signs „Street trees „Dog waste bag dispensers „Decorative fencing „Stream crossings horse creek Plaza 0.5 acres Thorsk Street and Pop Keeney Way Mini Park Design Opportunities as Funding Allows „Additional seating locations are currently being considered; project is under construction. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 102 of 358 53 Amenities „Natural area with hiking trails „Stairway with railing „Sign identifying natural area „Entrance sign „Restoration areas north creek Forest oPen sPace 63.41 acres Entrance from 112th Avenue NE Open Space Design Opportunities as Funding Allows „The trail system could use better alignment to avoid seeps and wet areas, improved drainage crossings, tread hardening and vegetation control to keep trail space open. „A wayfinding system could provide information for trail users about directional paths, connections, distances, and help hikers navigate the forest better. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 103 of 358 54 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Amenities „Multiple sport fields „All-weather turf playing surfaces „Restrooms „Shared parking „Field identification signs „Bleachers „Dugouts, backstops, etc. „Lighting „Paved pathway system along channelized stream „Drinking fountains „Picnic tables north creek sPortFielDs 16.89 acres Along North Creek Parkway Athletic Fields Design Opportunities as Funding Allows „No roofs on dugouts on Sportfields #3. Consider adding protective cover. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 104 of 358 55 Amenities „Bothell Historical Museum „Historic schoolhouse & cabin „Playground & swings „Parking „Amphitheater „Event rental space (Lytle House) „Trailhead to Sammamish River Trail „Bridge crossing to Sammamish River Trail (to be replaced) „Picnic tables & grills „Benches „Gazebo „Paved paths „Boardwalk through natural area „Stream restoration plantings (Horse Creek) „Concessions (bikes, SUPs, kayaks) „Bike rack „Trash receptacles „Hand-carry boat launch from shore „Interpretive signs Park at bothell lanDing 13.37 acres At NE 108th Street along Sammamish River Community Park Design Opportunities as Funding Allows „A draft master plan was created in July 2010 that indicates changes after bridge relocation. As that master plan is refined and finalized, compliance with ADA guidelines should be assured. „Panels of aging interpretive signs should be planned for replacement as they become less legible. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 105 of 358 56 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Amenities „Parking „Picnic table „Bench „Interpretive kiosk „Public art „Historic road feature „Picnic table „Shade trees „Trash receptacle reD brick roaD 0.5 acres Off 96th Avenue at Burke-Gilman Trailhead Mini Park Design Opportunities as Funding Allows „At least one designated handicapped parking space should be delineated for access to historic site as well as to Burke-Gilman Trail. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 106 of 358 57 Amenities „Playground „Sport court „Basketball court „Paved pathways „Natural cedar grove „Shade trees „Trash receptacles „Picnic table & grill „Bench royal oaks Park 2.25 acres NE 204th Place Neighborhood Park Design Opportunities as Funding Allows „Dense shaded area of western cedar grove could provide opportunity for a “nature play” amenity. „Add smaller park identification signs at each side entrance. „Lines could be re-painted on basketball court and sport court. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 107 of 358 58 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Amenities „Restroom „On-street parking „Basketball sport court „Playground & swings „Small picnic shelter „Open grass lawn „Shade trees „Paved paths „Picnic tables „Benches „Drinking fountain „Trash receptacle „Natural Area stiPek Park 3.73 acres Corner of 19th Avenue SE & 242nd Street SE Neighborhood Park Design Opportunities as Funding Allows „Playground area has drop-off barrier into wood chip surface (not ADA compliant). More wood chips need to be against existing pavement depression or a ramp should be created to address universal access. „Playground equipment has no shade and slide can get too hot for use on sunny days. Provide shade structure for comfort and safety. „Separated swing set area does not have universal access. Connect with path and ramp. „Path system could connect more formally through the natural area. „Side entrances into park could benefit with addition of small park identification signs. „Existing Lombardy poplars are aging and should be planned for removal in coming years. Plan for replacement with native canopy tree species. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 108 of 358 59 Amenities „Playground „Paved paths „Drinking fountain „Picnic tables „Bench „Trash receptacle „Connection to Conifer View Park tall tree Park 1 acre At cul-de-sac on 89th Place NE Mini Park Design Opportunities as Funding Allows „Provide a more all-weather surface for the trail connection between Tall Tree and Conifer View Parks. „Site furnishings not on accessible routes for ADA compliance. Consider adding a path to one of the picnic tables or providing a new table adjacent to the existing paved path. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 109 of 358 60 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Amenities „Playground „Basketball sport court „Paved path „Shade trees „Open grass lawn „Drinking fountain „Picnic table „Bench „Commemorative rock „Park identification sign volunteer Park 0.22 acres Holly Hills Drive NE Mini Park Design Opportunities as Funding Allows „Play equipment gets too hot for use on sunny days. Consider adding shade structures in playground or more shade trees nearby. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 110 of 358 61 Amenities „Playground „Swings „Parking lot „Sign kiosk „Paved path „Sport court „Shade trees „Open grass lawn „Picnic table „Bench „Public Mural on water tower „Former restroom building (closed) „Drinking fountain (not operating) william Penn Park 2.7 acres 100th Avenue NE Neighborhood Park Design Opportunities as Funding Allows „No shade for playground or picnic table limits comfort for park visitors. Consider adding shade structure to play area and more shade trees near picnic table and swing set. „Old restroom building should be demolished to allow expansion of playground or addition of small picnic shelter. Playground and picnic table are not ADA accessible. „Entry and exit into parking lot should have clear directional arrows painted into asphalt to clarify intended traffic pattern. „Designated handicap parking stall needs to add sign and painted travel aisle marking. „Plan for eventual replacement of red-leaf Norway maples along parking lot. Red photinia hedge along parking lot is not recommended in CPTED (crime prevention through environmental design) guidelines since it blocks visibility between park & parking lot. Consider removal. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 111 of 358 62 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 other recreational resources Snohomish County-Owned Parklands Forsgren Park Forsgren Park located at 23109 Carter Road, provides two practice soccer fields, baseball fields, parking, picnic tables, playground, walking paths, and restroom facilities on a former county gravel pit. The Northshore Soccer Youth Association funded the all-weather sports fields and manages the fields and their scheduling. The park is within the municipal urban growth area (MUGA) for Bothell. Locust Way Park Locust Way Neighborhood Park developed one acre in 2003. Owned and managed by Snohomish County Parks, the park contains a section of Swamp Creek, and woodland trails through a six-acre natural area. This park is within Bothell’s MUGA. Logan Park A former sand and gravel pit originally developed in the 1970s, Logan Park is a five-acre property with a jogging path, picnic tables, playground, parking, restrooms, basketball court and ballfield. This park is within Bothell’s MUGA. Miner’s Corner Park Miner’s Corner is 12-acre community park developed as a universally accessible facility with its focal point as a large accessible playground and nature-play area. The playground provides a tall lookout tower with an accessible ramp. The stormwater-fed sand & water garden provides opportunities for interaction with water. Numerous paths and play spaces in the woods and along a created intermittent stream emphasize exploration and discovery. Pathways provide a ½ mile perimeter loop. An open lawn area allows for a variety of sports and field games. The sports court contains 1/2 court basketball, four square and hopscotch spaces. King County-Owned Trails & Parklands 1st Lt. Madrazo Memorial Park This undeveloped park site is located on top of a wastewater storage tank owned and operated by King County. A 2012 master plan for site development proposes a multi-purpose sports field to support youth soccer, youth baseball and volleyball. A basketball court, restrooms and a picnic shelter are also proposed in the master plan. The City has negotiated a Memorandum of Agreement for development with the County. Implementation may be phased depending on level of secured funding. Sammamish River Park King County Parks and the City of Bothell have partnered to own and manage open space along the Sammamish River in conjunction with the regional Sammamish River Trail. The Park contains natural riparian forest and restoration areas to support both wildlife habitat and the health of the River. The Park abuts Blyth Park to the south and a bridge connects the Park to the Park at Bothell Landing across the Sammamish River. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 112 of 358 63 Burke-Gilman/Sammamish River Trail The Burke Gilman and Sammamish River Trails provides regional trail connections as part of the Locks to Lakes Corridor. The Sammamish River Trail is paved its entire 10.1 mile length from Bothell to Marymoor Park in Redmond. The Burke-Gilman Trail intersects with the Sammamish River Trail near Blyth Park and continues more than 20 miles to Shilshole Bay in Seattle. It is King County’s most heavily used regional trail. Tolt River Pipeline Trail This trail is part of the 12-mile utility easement corridor running from Bothell to the Snoqualmie Valley. The route follows the Tolt Pipeline that brings water to Seattle from the South Fork Tolt Reservoir. There are small parking spots where the trail crosses arterial roads but without trail support facilities. Trail offers views of distant mountains (weather permitting) and accommodates a variety of trails users. Lots of hills for cardio workouts. The 80-foot wide easement allows for a variety of wildlife encounters and quiet spaces. other Park & recreation ProviDers Northshore YMCA (YMCA of Greater Seattle) The Northshore YMCA provides facilities and programming to support a wide range of health, fitness and social services. Child care, summer camps, teen programs and youth & family activities and events support community quality of life. Swimming lessons, swim team and drop-in swim times fill a local need for aquatic programming. Health and fitness classes, personal training and recreation activities are offered. The following facilities support programming and self-guided recreation. „Fitness Center „Indoor Track „Kids Zone „Odyssey Ropes Course „Outdoor Climbing Wall „Racquetball Court „Swimming Pool and Spa „Two Gymnasiums Alderwood Boys & Girls Club The Alderwood Boys & Girls Club offers before and after-school programs and summer drop- in for youth and teens. Child care is available at their Martha Lake Elementary School facility. The Club’s sports programs include basketball, volleyball, flag football and soccer. Other recreational programs involve arts and crafts, computer education, healthy habits, power hour, STEM, Friday Teen Nights and Leadership/Service trailing. The Alderwood Boys and Girls Club has a full-sized gym and the Echelbarger Teen Center. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 113 of 358 64 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Kirkland Parks & Recreation Kirkland’s Parks and Community Services Department provides a wide range of recreation programming and activities from sports to learning programs as well as events and performing arts. The Peter Kirk Community Center includes a public outdoor pool with swimming and recreation programming. Kirkland’s recreation programming includes adult fitness, adult dance, preschool activities, youth activities, gymnastics, trips and special events for seniors. Their non-resident fee structure allows for use of programming and facilities by Bothell residents. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 114 of 358 65 The planning process assesses park and recreation activity, facility and programming needs and priorities and relies heavily on public input, park inventory conditions and gives consideration to state and national recreation trends. This planning assessment concludes with a detailed discussion of specific, local needs and how they might be considered within the broader parks, trails and recreation system with an eye toward fiscal responsibility and funding constraints. By considering the location, size and number of facilities by type and use, along with community interests and priorities, this plan evaluates the current and future demand for park and recreation amenities. The six-year Capital Facilities Plan which identifies and prioritizes crucial upgrades, improvements and expansions is founded on this work of assimilating the park system assessment, safety and maintenance priorities and the needs expressed by residents. TRENDS & PERSPECTIVES The following summaries of state trends and local insights reflect potential recreational activities and facilities for future consideration in Bothell’s park system. Examining current recreation trends can help inform potential park and recreation improvements and opportunities that may create a more vibrant parks system as it moves into the future. Additional trend data and summaries are provided in Appendix F. n eeds a ssessmentneeds a ssessment 66 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 115 of 358 66 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 statewiDe trenDs Washington Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan The 2018-2022 Recreation and Conservation Plan for Washington State provides a strategic direction to help assure the effective and adequate provision of outdoor recreation and conservation to meet the needs of Washington State residents. The plan identified near and long-term priorities with specific actions within each priority to help meet the outdoor recreation and conservation needs within the state. Five priority areas: 1. Sustain and Grow the Legacy of Parks, Trails, and Conservation Lands 2. Improve Equity of Parks, Trails, and Conservation Lands 3. Meet the Needs of Youth 4. Plan for Culturally Relevant Parks and Trails to Meet Changing Demographics 5. Assert Recreation and Conservation as a Vital Public Service Improve Equity The National Recreation and Park Association’s position on social equity states: “Our nation’s public parks and recreation services should be equally accessible and available to all people regardless of income level, ethnicity, gender, ability, or age. Public parks, recreation services and recreation programs including the maintenance, safety, and accessibility of parks and facilities, should be provided on an equitable basis to all citizens of communities served by public agencies.” The Washington plan restates that equity goal for all its citizens. Improving equity is also a strategy for improving a community’s health. Current statewide participation rates in outdoor activities were surveyed as part of the plan. Figure 8. Participation Rates for Washington Residents in Outdoor Activities 28% 30% 33% 45% 46% 48% 61% 67% 68% 82% 89% 94% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Bicycling Snow and ice activities Trending activities Camping Water‐based activities (freshwater) Outdoor sports Hiking Sightseeing activities Swimming Leisure activities at parks Nature activities Walking February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 116 of 358 67 local insights Local recreation demands and needs were explored through a variety of public engagement to gather feedback on strengths and limitations of existing park and recreational resources available to Bothell residents. Public outreach notification to generate interest in the PROS Plan project included a two-month long online community survey, stakeholder discussions, an open house to review opportunities across the park system, and pop-up displays at several community events during the summer of 2019. Community Survey A community survey was conducted from June to August 2019 and was designed to measure the level of satisfaction with existing parks and recreation opportunities in Bothell and the priorities for future improvements and services. Bothell residents strongly value their parks and recreation facilities. „Nearly all residents (97%) think parks and recreation are important to quality of life in Bothell. Residents use the City’s existing parks for a variety of reasons. „Large majorities of residents have visited the Park at Bothell Landing (90%) and Blyth Park (76%), while fewer have visited Cedar Grove Park (40%) and Centennial Park (35%). Bothell residents most commonly visit local parks and recreation facilities to use trails, relax, or for fitness. Residents are generally satisfied with existing parks and recreation facilities. „The majority of residents who had visited Bothell parks gave them condition ratings of excellent or good. „However, over half of respondents said they would visit City parks more often if the City provided more information (13%), addressed crowding (13%), provided more nearby parks (11%), added desired facilities or equipment (10%), or addressed maintenance (5%) or accessibility issues (2%). „Specifically, many residents wrote in requests for more places to walk or play with their dogs; places to play pickleball; more parking; and cleaner restrooms. Residents would like to see improvements made to the parks & recreation system, but also want to see the City preserve land for future parks and natural areas. „When asked which improvements they would like to see the City focus on, residents gave the highest priority to expanding the recreational trail network and acquiring land for future parks. „Developing new amenities in parks and acquiring land for open space were slightly lower priorities for residents. „Respondents support adding all-inclusive playground equipment, splash pads, and river access. Bothell residents visit local parks and recreation facilities for a variety of reasons. The most popular activities are using trails (73%) or relaxation (54%). More than one-third of respondents visited for fitness (46%), use a SAID PUBLIC PARKS AND RECREATION ARE IMPORTANT OR ESSENTIAL TO THE QUALITY OF LIFE HAVE VISITED THE PARK AT BOTHELL LANDING IN THE LAST YEAR SAY USING TRAILS ARE A REASON FOR VISITING LOCAL PARKS & OPEN SPACE 73% 90% 97% February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 117 of 358 68 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 playground (36%), or to view wildlife (36%). Between 10% and 30% of respondents visited Bothell parks for mountain bike trails or for athletic fields. In addition, 96 respondents (9%) wrote in that they visit parks to walk or play with their dogs, and 51 respondents (4%) wrote in that they visited to play disc golf. Figure 9. Main Reasons Respondents Visit Bothell Parks & Open Spaces The survey asked residents a series of questions regarding their needs for typical park and recreation facilities. When given a list of potential low cost park amenities the City could consider adding to the park system, respondents were supportive of all options listed. They were most supportive of adding multi-use walking and mountain biking trails and all-inclusive playground equipment. Figure 10. Interest in Various ‘Lower Cost’ Park Amenities When presented higher-cost potential improvements, respondents were highly supportive of adding splash pads or water spray features and improving river access. In a separate question, residents also expressed a willingness to increase taxes to fund additional splash pads and a community center. Respondents were less supportive of adding skateparks, artificial turf fields or cricket fields. 3.8% 9.5% 18.9% 19.7% 23.3% 30.4% 36.3% 36.4% 45.8% 54.3% 73.3% 0.0% 20.0% 40.0% 60.0% 80.0% I didn't go to any Bothell parks last year Class, camp or league activity Other Music concerts Sport fields Family gatherings / picnics Wildlife viewing Playgrounds Fitness Relaxation Trails 32% 38% 42% 45% 66% 52% 39% 28% 39% 27% 9% 15% 22% 10% 5% 6% 8% 8% 6%2%0%20%40%60%80%100% Picnic shelters / gathering spaces Community Gardens Off‐Leash Dog Opportunities All‐inclusive Play Equipment Walking & Mountain Biking Trails Very Supportive Somewhat Supportive Not Supportive Not Sure February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 118 of 358 69 Figure 11. Interest in Various ‘Higher Cost’ Park Amenities When asked which park and recreation improvements they would like to see the City focus on, respondents gave the highest single priority to developing new amenities in parks (27%). In looking at the sum of top three responses, more than three quarters of respondents identified expanding the recreational trail network (78%) and acquiring land for future parks (77%) as one of their top three priorities (each with a weighted average score of 3.5 on a five point scale). Acquiring lands for future parks was a higher priority in the northeast area of Bothell compared to other areas, and expanding the recreational trail network was a higher priority to respondents from the southeast area. Developing new amenities in parks and acquiring land for open space were slightly lower priorities for residents. Figure 12. Prioritizing Park & Facility Improvements The survey provided residents with multiple opportunities to share their ideas and suggestions via open-ended responses. Common themes from these comments include: „ Many respondents are concerned about the pace of ongoing development in Bothell and want to make sure the City protects access to nature, trees, and open space for both people and wildlife. They are particularly interested in the future of places like Shelton View and North Creek Forest. „ Many respondents noted that they are eager to see a permanent off-leash dog park in the City, either because they would use it themselves or because they hope it would lessen the number and impacts of unauthorized off-leash dogs in Bothell parks. „ Respondents expressed interest in, and enthusiasm for, the redevelopment of the former Wayne Golf Course. While some respondents hoped the City would keep a small golf course, most residents hoped for new amenities. „ Some respondents are concerned that future park acquisition, improvement and maintenance 7% 15% 18% 38% 53% 25% 34% 40% 38% 36% 52% 41% 33% 20% 8% 16% 10% 9% 4% 3% 0%20%40%60%80%100% Cricket Field Artificial Turf Fields Skateboard or BMX park Splash Pad / Water Spray River Access Very Supportive Somewhat Supportive Not Supportive Not Sure 5.7% 19.5% 23.2% 25.8% 26.8% 9.8% 22.7% 28.8% 22.9% 16.4% 14.5% 16.8% 24.8% 29.5% 15.7% 15.4% 23.4% 15.8% 14.7% 29.9% 54.6% 17.6% 7.4% 7.1% 11.1% 0%20%40%60%80%100% Providing more classes, camps & events Acquiring land for open space Acquiring land for future parks Expanding the recreational trails network Developing new amenities in parks 1st Priority 2nd Priority 3rd Priority 4th Priority 5th Priority February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 119 of 358 70 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 will require raising taxes above what they consider sustainable. Some felt that the City should ‘live within its means’ and that existing revenues should be sufficient to fund park needs. Others would like to see the City ask more of developers to fund the park system necessary to meet the needs of new development. Teen Survey A second survey was focused toward the needs and insights of Bothell’s teens. A short, five-question survey was circulated through Inglemoor and Bothell High Schools and was available online. Key Findings „The most popular activities for teens include hanging out with friends, watching movies, sports, going to the beach and hiking. „The top amenities teens would like to see in Bothell are a hang out space and walking trails. „The top event types that teens would attend include movies in the park, food truck nights, teen concerts and festivals and special events for teens. Dog Park Survey A third survey was administered to gain insights on the topic of dog parks. During the course of this planning project, the City implemented a temporary off-leash dog park, and it was very well-received by the community. An online survey was used to gauge the interest in and need for a permanent dog park and explore core concerns and issues about such a facility. Key Findings „Nearly 91% of the respondents said a dog park was definitely needed. „A plurality of respondents (41%) take their dog on daily or multiple walks per day around the neighborhood. „The top three dog park amenities include a double-gated entry, water source for dogs and shade for dogs and humans. Public Event Pop-ups & Meetings Community events were used as another way to capture insights from the community. Eighteen different pop-up events, plus one community meeting, provided additional thoughts on project ideas and local priorities. Top Parks, Trails & Open Space Improvement Ideas „Trails „Natural Areas/open space „River Access „Dog park „Water Play „Nature / Education February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 120 of 358 71 Park Distribution – gaP analysis Bothell residents are fortunate to have access to great parks; however, Bothell’s projected growth will place further pressure on access to new recreational lands. Understanding the known gaps in the park system and evaluating the City’s existing levels of service for parks will provide a foundation for strategic planning as a basis for a balanced distribution of parks, trails and recreation amenities in the future. To better understand where acquisition efforts should be considered, a gap analysis of the park system was conducted to examine and assess the current distribution of parks throughout the city. The analysis reviewed the locations and types of existing facilities, land use classifications, transportation/access barriers and other factors as a means to identify preliminary acquisition target areas. In reviewing parkland distribution and assessing opportunities to fill identified gaps, residentially zoned lands were isolated, since neighborhood and community parks primarily serve these areas. Additionally, walksheds were defined for neighborhood parks using a ¼-mile primary and ½-mile secondary service area with travel distances calculated along the road network starting from known and accessible access points at each park. Walksheds for community parks were derived using ¼-mile, ½-mile, 1-mile and 3-mile travel distances to acknowledge that community parks (including athletic fields) serve a wider array of users and driving to such sites is typical. Maps 2 through 5 illustrate the application of the distribution criteria from existing parks. Areas in white do not have a public park within reasonable walking distance of their home. The illustrated ‘walkshed’ for each existing Bothell park highlights that certain areas within the city do not have the desired proximity to a local park. Striving to provide a neighborhood or community park within a reasonable walking distance (e.g., ½-mile) may require acquiring new park properties in currently under-served locations, improving multi-modal transportation connections to allow local residents to safely and conveniently reach their local park, and evaluating the potential use of school sites as proxies for local neighborhood parks. As Bothell develops and acquisition opportunities diminish, the City should consider taking advantage of acquisition opportunities in strategic locations and as funding allows to better serve City residents. In concert with the search for developable park land, the City should continue to coordinate with proposed residential land development projects to consider when and how a public park could be incorporated into the planning of new residential communities. Resulting from this assessment, potential acquisition areas are identified for future parks (Map 6) and are noted in the Capital Planning chapter of this Plan. The mapping targeted five sites for future parks for the near- to long-term: „Acquisition (4-5 ac east-central Bothell) „Acquisition (3-5 ac west-central Bothell) „Acquisition (2-4 ac Alderwood area) „Acquisition (2-5 ac Kennard area) „Acquisition (2-3 ac Norway Hill area) February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 121 of 358 72 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 While the targeted acquisition areas do not identify a specific parcel(s) for consideration, the area encompasses a broader region in which an acquisition would be ideally suited. These acquisition targets represent a long-term vision for improving parkland distribution across Bothell. In addition, the City of Bothell should coordinate with Snohomish County and the City of Kenmore to proactively plan for new neighborhood and community park sites within and in proximity to Bothell’s urban growth area. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 122 of 358 Logan Parks Forsgren Park Swamp Creek Park Locust Way UW Bothell/Cascadia College Open Space Miner's Corner 1st Lt. Nicholas Madrazo Memorial Park East Norway Hill Doug Allen Sportsfields Bloomberg Hill Park Red Brick Road Pioneer Cemetery William Penn Park Royal Oaks Park Blyth Park Stipek Park Brickyard Road Park Tall Tree Park Conifer View Park Haynes Open Space Horse Creek Plaza North Creek Sportsfield 4 Park at Bothell Landing Centennial Park Cedar Grove Park Volunteer Park North Creek Forest Sammamish River Parkformer Wayne Golf Course 240 ST SE CAMPU S WAY NE 83 PL NEFILBERT DRNE 175 ST73 AVE NE196 ST SW (SR 524)9 AVE SE22 DR SELARCH WAY NE 181 S T NE 160 ST 131AVE NE112 AVE NEJUANITA-WOODINVILLEWAY NEI- 4 0 5 208 ST SE (SR 524)BOTHELL-EVERETTHWY (SR 527)130AVE NE26 AVE SE WOO D I N V I L L E DR ( S R 5 2 2 )NE 203 ST NE 180 ST 228 ST SW SIMONDS RD N E YORKRDNE BO T H E L L W A Y ( S R 5 2 2 )DAMSON RDNE 144 STBOTHELL-EVERETT HWYMALTBY R D ( S R 5 2 4) B O T H E L L W A Y N E WO O D I N V I L L E DR SR 20239 AVE SE FI L B E R T R D ( S R 52 4 )27 AVE SE(FITZGERALDRD)100 AVE NEBOTHELL WAYNE (SR 522)68 AVE NENE 177 P L NE 185 ST 120 AVE NE242 ST S E 228 ST SE 132 AVE NEJUANITA DR NE186 PL SE 212 ST SE JUANITAWOODINVILLEWAY NENE 195 ST NE 1 9 1 S T 214 ST SE N DAMSON RD PrivateRoad124 AVE NENE 190 ST 197 PL SE NE 145 ST 220 ST S E 35 AVE SEBEARDSLEE BLVD110AVE NESR 522102 AVE NENORTH RD17 AVE SEPrivate R d NE 188 ST 26 PL SENORTH CREEK PKWY S20 AVE SENORTH CREEK PKWY N29 DR SENORTH CREEK PKWY§¨¦405 §¨¦405 §¨¦405 0 0.5 1 1.5 20.25 Miles Legend City Limits Planning Area 1/4-mile Walkshed to Park 1/2-mile Walkshed to Park Bothell Parks (Active Use) Bothell Open Space HOA Private Parks State owned County Parks (King,Snohomish) Private Open Space School District Lands Non-Residential Land Uses County Line Streets Water ¹ Service Areas Small Parks (mini, nh, hoa) Map 2: Service Areas for Small Parks (Mini, NH, HOA) February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 123 of 358 Page Left Intentionally Blank 74 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 124 of 358 Logan Parks Forsgren Park Swamp Creek Park Locust Way UW Bothell/Cascadia College Open Space Miner's Corner 1st Lt. Nicholas Madrazo Memorial Park East Norway Hill Doug Allen Sportsfields Bloomberg Hill Park Red Brick Road Pioneer Cemetery William Penn Park Royal Oaks Park Blyth Park Stipek Park Brickyard Road Park Tall Tree Park Conifer View Park Haynes Open Space Horse Creek Plaza North Creek Sportsfield 4 Park at Bothell Landing Centennial Park Cedar Grove Park Volunteer Park North Creek Forest Sammamish River Parkformer Wayne Golf Course 240 ST SE CAMPU S WAY NE 83 PL NEFILBERT DRNE 175 ST73 AVE NE196 ST SW (SR 524)9 AVE SE22 DR SELARCH WAY NE 181 S T NE 160 ST 131AVE NE112 AVE NEJUANITA-WOODINVILLEWAY NEI- 4 0 5 208 ST SE (SR 524)BOTHELL-EVERETTHWY (SR 527)130AVE NE26 AVE SE WOO D I N V I L L E DR ( S R 5 2 2 )NE 203 ST NE 180 ST 228 ST SW SIMONDS RD N E YORKRDNE BO T H E L L W A Y ( S R 5 2 2 )DAMSON RDNE 144 STBOTHELL-EVERETT HWYMALTBY R D ( S R 5 2 4) B O T H E L L W A Y N E WO O D I N V I L L E DR SR 20239 AVE SE FI L B E R T R D ( S R 52 4 )27 AVE SE(FITZGERALDRD)100 AVE NEBOTHELL WAYNE (SR 522)68 AVE NENE 177 P L NE 185 ST 120 AVE NE242 ST S E 228 ST SE 132 AVE NEJUANITA DR NE186 PL SE 212 ST SE JUANITAWOODINVILLEWAY NENE 195 ST NE 1 9 1 S T 214 ST SE N DAMSON RD PrivateRoad124 AVE NENE 190 ST 197 PL SE NE 145 ST 220 ST S E 35 AVE SEBEARDSLEE BLVD110AVE NESR 522102 AVE NENORTH RD17 AVE SEPrivate R d NE 188 ST 26 PL SENORTH CREEK PKWY S20 AVE SENORTH CREEK PKWY N29 DR SENORTH CREEK PKWY§¨¦405 §¨¦405 §¨¦405 0 0.5 1 1.5 20.25 Miles Legend City Limits Planning Area 1/4-mile Walkshed to Park 1/2-mile Walkshed to Park 1-mile Walkshed to Park 3-mile Walkshed to Park Bothell Parks (Active Use) Bothell Open Space HOA Private Parks State owned County Parks (King,Snohomish) Private Open Space School District Lands Non-Residential Land Uses County Line Streets Water ¹ Service Areas Small Parks (mini, nh, hoa) Map 3: Service Areas for Community Parks & Fields February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 125 of 358 Page Left Intentionally Blank 76 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 126 of 358 Logan Parks Forsgren Park Swamp Creek Park Locust Way UW Bothell/Cascadia College Open Space Miner's Corner 1st Lt. Nicholas Madrazo Memorial Park East Norway Hill Doug Allen Sportsfields Bloomberg Hill Park Red Brick Road Pioneer Cemetery William Penn Park Royal Oaks Park Blyth Park Stipek Park Brickyard Road Park Tall Tree Park Conifer View Park Haynes Open Space Horse Creek Plaza North Creek Sportsfield 4 Park at Bothell Landing Centennial Park Cedar Grove Park Volunteer Park North Creek Forest Sammamish River Parkformer Wayne Golf Course 240 ST SE CAMPU S WAY NE 83 PL NEFILBERT DRNE 175 ST73 AVE NE196 ST SW (SR 524)9 AVE SE22 DR SELARCH WAY NE 181 S T NE 160 ST 131AVE NE112 AVE NEJUANITA-WOODINVILLEWAY NEI- 4 0 5 208 ST SE (SR 524)BOTHELL-EVERETTHWY (SR 527)130AVE NE26 AVE SE WOO D I N V I L L E DR ( S R 5 2 2 )NE 203 ST NE 180 ST 228 ST SW SIMONDS RD N E YORKRDNE BO T H E L L W A Y ( S R 5 2 2 )DAMSON RDNE 144 STBOTHELL-EVERETT HWYMALTBY R D ( S R 5 2 4) B O T H E L L W A Y N E WO O D I N V I L L E DR SR 20239 AVE SE FI L B E R T R D ( S R 52 4 )27 AVE SE(FITZGERALDRD)100 AVE NEBOTHELL WAYNE (SR 522)68 AVE NENE 177 P L NE 185 ST 120 AVE NE242 ST S E 228 ST SE 132 AVE NEJUANITA DR NE186 PL SE 212 ST SE JUANITAWOODINVILLEWAY NENE 195 ST NE 1 9 1 S T 214 ST SE N DAMSON RD PrivateRoad124 AVE NENE 190 ST 197 PL SE NE 145 ST 220 ST S E 35 AVE SEBEARDSLEE BLVD110AVE NESR 522102 AVE NENORTH RD17 AVE SEPrivate R d NE 188 ST 26 PL SENORTH CREEK PKWY S20 AVE SENORTH CREEK PKWY N29 DR SENORTH CREEK PKWY§¨¦405 §¨¦405 §¨¦405 0 0.5 1 1.5 20.25 Miles Legend City Limits Planning Area 1/4-mile Walkshed to Park 1/2-mile Walkshed to Park 1-mile Walkshed to Park 3-mile Walkshed to Park Bothell Parks (Active Use) Bothell Open Space HOA Private Parks State owned County Parks (King,Snohomish) Private Open Space School District Lands Non-Residential Land Uses County Line Streets Water ¹ Service Areas Small Parks (mini, nh, hoa) Map 4: Service Areas - All Parks & Open Space February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 127 of 358 Page Left Intentionally Blank 78 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 128 of 358 Logan Parks Forsgren Park Swamp Creek Park Locust Way UW Bothell/Cascadia College Open Space Miner's Corner 1st Lt. Nicholas Madrazo Memorial Park §¨¦405 §¨¦405 §¨¦405 0 0.5 1 1.5 20.25 Miles Legend City Limits Planning Area 1/4-mile Walkshed to Park / Open Space 1/2-mile Walkshed to Park / Open Space Bothell Parks (Active Use) Bothell Open Space HOA Private Parks State owned County Parks (King,Snohomish) Private Open Space School District Lands Non-Residential Land Uses County Line Streets Water ¹ Service Areas & Access Points City Parks, Open Spaces & HOA Parks (1/2-mile walksheds) Map 5: Service Areas - All Parks & Open Space (1/2 mi) February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 129 of 358 Page Left Intentionally Blank 80 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 130 of 358 Logan Parks Forsgren Park Swamp Creek Park Locust Way UW Bothell/Cascadia College Open Space Miner's Corner 1st Lt. Nicholas Madrazo Memorial Park §¨¦405 §¨¦405 §¨¦405 0 0.5 1 1.5 20.25 Miles Legend City Limits Planning Area Potential Acquisition Target Areas 1/4-mile Walkshed to Park / Open Space 1/2-mile Walkshed to Park / Open Space Bothell Parks (Active Use) Bothell Open Space HOA Private Parks State owned County Parks (King,Snohomish) Private Open Space School District Lands Non-Residential Land Uses County Line Streets Water ¹ Service Areas & Access Points City Parks, Open Spaces & HOA Parks (1/2-mile walksheds) Map 6: Target Acquisition Areas 35% 65% Population within 1/2‐mile Walkshed of Park Population farther than 1/2‐mile to Park February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 131 of 358 Page Left Intentionally Blank 82 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 132 of 358 83 neighborhooD & mini Parks With five neighborhood parks and six mini parks, small park spaces comprise approximately 13% of Bothell’s developed parklands and help distribute recreational amenities into residential neighborhoods. Most of the smaller parks have a limited number of amenities, but offer some play space or recreational activity. While they generally contain play equipment and a few site furnishings, space is limited, so residents must travel farther to get a wider range of more active recreational facilities, such as athletic fields, regional trail connections, waterfront access and natural lands or open spaces. community Parks The Park at Bothell Landing is the focal point for green park space downtown and is connected to the core downtown through the Horse Creek linear greenway to the new Horse Creek Plaza. The Park at Bothell Landing contains playgrounds, amphitheater, natural areas, historic structures, picnic areas, watercraft shore launch, restrooms, parking and a connection to the regional Sammamish River Trail. Further down the Trail, Blyth Park, another community park adds more recreational opportunities in south-central Bothell. Blyth Park contains playgrounds, picnic shelters, disc golf, horseshoe pits, volleyball, restrooms, parking, natural areas and a connection to the former Wayne Golf Course. Centennial Park has been reclassified as both community park and open space. The park’s developed features include a historic house that serves as a meeting room, picnic shelter, parking, restrooms, play area, picnic tables, BBQ grills and informal trails. A master plan for the park (aka, Thrasher’s Corner Regional Park) illustrates a formalized trail system, wetland boardwalks, and a connection to the proposed North Trail extension. athletics inFrastructure Sport Fields The City currently provides significant infrastructure in the way of athletic fields at North Creek Sportfields, Doug Allen Sportfields, Cedar Grove Park and East Norway Hill Park. The Parks and Recreation Department works in support of the various youth leagues and organizations with regard to field access and scheduling coordination and is open to a broader dialogue about long-term field needs and facility planning. With the all-weather and lighted fields at North Creek Sportfields, the seasons and times are extended when community leagues and regional teams can conduct practices, games and tournaments. The North Creek Sportfields are at a premium and cannot completely meet the current and near future demand for sports fields, in part, because youth sport leagues draw from a region larger than the city and because adjacent communities that also feed in to the youth leagues have an inadequate supply of sport fields. The other sports fields comprise natural grass fields which have a more limited season of play. As the demand for North Creek exceeds its availability, some consideration should be given to re-opening the community discussion on upgrading the Doug Allen Sportfields to all-weather surfacing and lighting. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 133 of 358 84 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Outdoor Sport Courts A limited distribution of sport courts exists within Bothell. School sites provide limited access to basketball courts, and numerous “street” hoops were noted during the inventory process and reinforced the demand for sport courts. Six outdoor basketball sports (less than full- sized) courts are provided within the City’s park system. Outdoor basketball courts should continue be provided for in new community parks with smaller sport court sizes within new neighborhood parks. The addition of a covered basketball court could provide extended sports use well through the wet winter months. Such a covered court could also be lined for alternative activities that can share the space such as four-square, funnel ball, pickleball and other paved surface games. Bothell currently has no dedicated pickleball courts available within public parks, but there are several multi-sport courts that accommodate this use. Outdoor pickleball should be considered at new community parks. Pickleball courts can be more successful if clustered as a sports complex rather than spread individually throughout the park system since this grouping promotes leagues, tournaments and related social interaction. Bothell currently has one outdoor sand volleyball court at Blyth Park. When grouped together, sand volleyball courts facilitate league play and provide for older teens and adult sports activity. More of these should be considered for inclusion in future community parks. The potential to include a second court at Blyth Park could be considered. GATEWAYS TO NATURE oPen sPace, greenways & other natural areas Bothell’s open space network includes wildlife habitat, creek corridors, and wooded slopes often incorporated with developed parks or regional trail systems. These spaces create unique connections as habitat for birds and other wildlife, as well as areas for special and/ or endangered plant species to thrive. The proximity to the linear natural corridor of the Sammamish River provide further habitat and species diversity. Bothell benefits from the attraction to visitors of the regional trail system and its open spaces through the available services for food, gas, and related economic activities. Enhancing connections to nature can be forwarded by extending the city trail system as funding allows through its greenway corridors as much as feasible, including improved access to the Sammamish River and local waterways. The City’s greenway corridor and easement acquisition efforts should be focused toward locations that support of the expansion of the trail network in a fiscally responsible manner. In future growth locations, the City should encourage the holding of greenways as development common areas or tracts, whenever possible, and include public access easements or rights over those tracts to minimize maintenance demands while allowing future development for public use. In areas where the private open space tracts overlap with mapped critical areas, the City should request additional lands within these set-asides to accommodate trail connections that do not encroach upon the critical areas. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 134 of 358 85 The former Wayne Golf Course acquisition has provided an unparalleled opportunity for enhancing local connections to existing neighborhoods for better access to parks and trails. A connectivity master plan should be conducted to identify the ideal and feasible alignment, connections and support amenities that should be part of this local community trail facility. Recommendations for Open Space & Greenways „The City should continue to protect, link and expand the critical areas throughout Bothell via developer set-asides and limited direct purchases to further the recreation trail program. Critical riparian areas along stream corridors offer an opportunity to weave nature throughout the community, protect critical habitat and create a broader network of trails. „The former Wayne Golf Course should be developed to provide valuable trail connections across its acreage from Blyth Park to neighborhoods to the west and south, particularly along the alignment of the Sammamish River in a fiscally sustainable way and careful consideration to salmon habitat. „The City should consider ways in which existing stormwater facilities and wetlands, including multiple publicly-owned sites, could be integrated into a natural area system and include nature- based education opportunities. „The City should continue to coordinate with community development and park planning staff to enable additional, safe pedestrian access across new neighborhoods to parks, schools and regional trails to promote Bothell as an outdoor lifestyles community. „The City could continue utilizing volunteers to aid in trail improvements, habitat restoration and developing an environmental interpretive and signage program to increase public awareness of the role of natural areas within the urban environment. „The City should continue to coordinate with the Counties, neighboring Cities and the Northshore School District to promote the connection of the trail system for off-street linkages and the growing trail network. water access Bothell has physical access to the Sammamish River and additional riverfront locations are always valued for public access. While access can sometimes be challenging due to topography, hydrology (floodplains & wetlands), future riverfront access should continue to be sought. The City should continue work to capture any opportunities during development activities and in partnerships with the County to expand public access and improvements along the Sammamish River, as well as the North Creek. TRAILS & CONNECTIONS Bothell’s trail system continues to grow to eventually connect all parts of the city together, with linkages to downtown, schools, neighborhoods, greenway corridors and park sites. The recreational trail system focuses on off-street connections, to serve pedestrians, cyclists and other non-motorized recreational and transportation needs. The community trail system improvements are on the City’s Transportation Improvements Project (TIP) list for segments of the North Creek Trail and the East Riverside Drive Trail to help with transportation alternatives and better connect local residents to greater recreational assets across Bothell. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 135 of 358 86 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 The regional trails that transect Bothell provide connections to neighboring sites and beyond and are mostly managed by county park providers. The Sammamish River Trail and Burke Gilman Trail have created exceptional trail resources. Within Bothell, linkages should continue to be implemented between individual residential developments and the regional and citywide trail system. The on-street bike route and sidewalk system meet transportation needs, but also supplements the off-street system by providing linkages and offering connections where off-street connections are presently unfeasible. The continued improvements to the on-street network are guided by the City’s Transportation System Plan. Public park planning participants voiced strong interest in an expanded, connected system of trails. The proposed trail improvements will provide logical pathway connections to key destinations, and these pathways should be comfortable and convenient for the community to use. Recommendations for the Trails Network „This Plan recommends the development of more detailed trail signage standards, route and wayfinding signage for parks, trails and facilities and an informational brochure identifying existing and planned trail facilities as funding allows. „With the former Wayne Golf Course, the opportunity exists to plan for and develop interior trails and create unique points of interest and connections to the Sammamish River Trail, and balancing needs against salmon habitat. „The North Creek Trail is the backbone of the growing Bothell trail system in addition to its connections with regional King County trails. Efforts should continue to establish the continuous trail along North Creek to link neighborhoods, parks and major local destinations. „Other opportunities for connections include improving the trail between Tall Tree Park and Conifer View Park, as well as creating a loop trail at Conifer View Park. „The City could also coordinate with King County to extend the Tolt Pipeline Trail and add more support facilities, such as more formalized parking, signage and wayfinding. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 136 of 358 Logan Parks Forsgren Park Swamp Creek Park Locust Way UW Bothell/Cascadia College Open Space Miner's Corner 1st Lt. Nicholas Madrazo Memorial Park East Norway Hill Doug Allen Sportsfields Bloomberg Hill Park Pioneer Cemetery William Penn Park Royal Oaks Park Blyth Park Stipek Park Brickyard Road Park Tall Tree Park Conifer View Park Haynes Open Space North Creek Sportsfield 4 Park at Bothell Landing Centennial Park Cedar Grove Park Volunteer Park North Creek Forest Sammamish River Parkformer Wayne Golf Course 240 ST SE CAMPU S WAY NE 83 PL NEFILBERT DRNE 175 ST73 AVE NE196 ST SW (SR 524)9 AVE SE22 DR SELARCH WAY NE 181 S T NE 160 ST 131AVE NE112 AVE NEJUANITA-WOODINVILLEWAY NEI- 4 0 5 208 ST SE (SR 524)BOTHELL-EVERETTHWY (SR 527)130AVE NE26 AVE SE WOODINVILLE DR (SR 522)NE 203 ST NE 180 ST 228 ST SW SIMONDS RD N E YORKRDNE BOTHELL W A Y ( S R 5 2 2 )DAMSON RDNE 144 STBOTHELL-EVERETT HWYMALTBY R D ( S R 5 2 4) B O T H E L L W A Y N E WO O D I N V I L L E DR SR 20239 AVE SE FI L B E R T R D ( S R 52 4 )27 AVE SE(FITZGERALDRD)100 AVE NEBOTHELLWAY NE(SR 522)68 AVE NENE 177 P L NE 185 ST 120 AVE NE242 ST S E 228 ST SE 132 AVE NEJUANITA DR NE186 PL SE 212 ST SE JUANITAWOODINVILLEWAY NENE 195 ST NE 1 9 1 S T 214 ST SE N DAMSON RD PrivateRoad124 AVE NENE 190 ST 197 PL SE NE 145 ST 220 ST S E 35 AVE SEBEARDSLEE BLVD110AVE NESR 522 102 AVE NENORTH RD17 AVE SEPrivate R d NE 188 ST 26 PL SENORTH CREEK PKWY S20 AVE SENORTH CREEK PKWY N29 DR SENORTH CREEK PKWY§¨¦405 §¨¦405 §¨¦405 0 0.5 1 1.5 20.25 Miles Legend City Limits Planning Area Trail: Existing Public Trails_privateminor Bothell Parks (Active Use) Bothell Open Space State Parks County Parks (King,Snohomish) Private Parks / Open Space HOA Parks School District Lands County Line Streets Water ¹ Map 7: Existing Trails February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 137 of 358 Page Left Intentionally Blank 88 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 138 of 358 89 IDENTITY & MAINTENANCE inFormation & wayFinDing Information on Recreational Opportunities The City should continue to enhance its website to provide information on local and regional park and recreation opportunities. The City should continue to strengthen existing partnerships with local businesses, sport leagues, the school district and the Bothell-Kenmore Chamber of Commerce to facilitate the promotion and distribution of information to the community. Continued partnerships with outside recreation programming providers and environmental education groups for land and water-based activities can enhance the opportunities to engage residents in healthy, active outdoor recreation. Wayfinding The City of Bothell can benefit from enhanced wayfinding and signage in support of its overall park and trail system. Opportunities exist to help visitors navigate and inform them about the public spaces they were entering. A clear need was identified the use of small park identification signs at side entrances. A good wayfinding system can provide a consistent identity and display effective and accessible information to orient the user. This guidance system ensures efficient use of the trail, park or other public space and conveys safety to the user by translating the environment into a known geography. Signs, symbols, mapping, color, standardized site amenities combined with good design of the physical environment (i.e., trail or park) helps the user navigate the space and stay comfortably oriented. Bothell could expand its wayfinding program to include both visual graphic standards and site furnishing standards. The use of consistent graphics and a coordinated hierarchy of sign types and sizes can provide park and trail users with wayfinding information to enhance their access and knowledge of the recreational system available for their enjoyment. A good wayfinding system applies the “simpler is better” concept. asset management Maintenance & Renovation The majority of the amenities and facilities in the City’s park system rated as being in good condition. Some areas in parks had developing pavement cracks that should be addressed before becoming serious tripping hazards or ADA access barriers. Some older park amenities and play structures, particularly in Bloomberg Hill Park are in need of repair or replacement. The capital facilities plan targets those elements that are in poor condition. Parks operations should continue to test and implement its new asset management program to track, identify and repair/replace park assets. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 139 of 358 90 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Universal Accessibility The park site conditions assessments identified a number of barriers in parks where ADA compliance was not met. As part of the capital repair program, these barriers, such as the need for playground ramps or benches and tables linked with paved pathways, should be addressed based on funding available. leveraging & volunteer DeveloPment Volunteer time and talent contributing to the City’s park and recreation system is a key enhancement to limited resources for local governments. Volunteers help encourage a sense of ownership and pride with trails, parks, open spaces and recreation programming to set the standard for community engagement. Trails and greenway management and restoration projects, in particular, can benefit from a volunteer workforce that has undergone training and support. The City should continue to implement its volunteer engagement and seek to capture the leverage that volunteers can provide for the parks and recreation system. Design continuity & stanDarDs The adoption and implementation of updated design standards for City parks will create a consistency in the methods used to maintain, repair and replace park amenities as they become worn or are damaged. Park benches, trash receptacles, picnic tables and signage can be consistent across all parks without reducing the potential to create unique spaces and individual park identities. This consistency can make the system more efficient to maintain and improve aesthetic appeal and safety. The City’s park design and maintenance criteria should be required for new parks to ensure quality and consistency of park amenities. City should prepare and adopt design standards to be applied to site development at the time of development review. STANDARDS & LEVELS OF SERVICE A level of service (LOS) review was conducted in addition to and in support of the gap analysis as a means to understand the distribution of parkland acreage by classification and for a broader measure of how well the City is serving its residents with access to parks and open space. Service standards are the adopted guidelines or benchmarks the City is trying to attain with their parks system; the level of service is a snapshot in time of how well the City is meeting the adopted standards. As noted in the inventory chapter, the City owns approximately 403 acres of parks and open space. An additional 7 acres of private HOA parks also exist within Bothell city limits. Also, this Plan proposes a consolidation of service standards for the different parkland categories. Using the standards from the 2014 PROSAP Plan, the following table shows how the acreage- based standards would translate to the proposed classifications, without changing the previously adopted standards. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 140 of 358 91 Figure 13. Existing Standards by Classification This Plan recommends minor acreage adjustments for two parks: East Norway Hill Park and Centennial Park. In each case, the intent is to better balance the park classification between active use areas and open space areas and to have those adjustments reflected in the system inventory. It is recommended that the acreage for East Norway Hill Park is re-assigned and split between the community park and the open space classifications. The site’s topography and access are constraints for the future development of the site. It is recommended that 11.45 acres is assigned to the community park classification, and the remaining 13.68 acres is assigned to open space. Similarly, Centennial Park has an expanse of wetland area that is more appropriately classified as open space. This Plan recommends that 20.9 acres of the 46 acres of the park are shifted to the open space classification. The remaining 25.6 acres are re-classified as community park. These changes will be consistent with the unique uses of each area of the two parks, as well as avoid ‘overweighting’ the community park and neighborhood park classifications with regard to standards and levels of service. These acreage re-apportionments are reflected in Figure 14. This Plan also proposes the elimination of numeric standards for open space. While numerical planning standards are common for helping to determine a desirable number of neighborhood parks per thousand residents, they do not translate easily to natural areas because of the uniqueness of the land base itself. Additionally, the City and the counties have provided leadership in requiring developers to set aside tracts of land through its land use regulations. At the present, approximately 862 acres of sensitive or protected lands within the city and the urban growth area have been set aside as privately held (HOA) open space tracts via the platting and land development process. The inclusion of future, protected sensitive areas will strengthen and expand the broader network of public and private open spaces. However, the priority for natural area acquisitions or the acceptance of open space dedications from developers should be focused toward those lands that expand ownership of adjacent City-owned properties or to ensure sufficient property is available to accommodate public access and future trail connections. Using the service standards from the previously adopted plan, Figure 14 illustrates the current level of service for the ‘core’ park classifications, which include mini parks, neighborhood parks, community parks and athletic fields. The figure also captures the private HOA acreage within city limits to acknowledge the impact of those sites on the levels of service.  Prior Classification  Proposed Classification Mini 0.1  acres/1,000 Neighborhood 1.1  acres/1,000 Community 1.2  acres/1,000 Athletic Fields 0.8  acres/1,000 Core Parks 3.2  acres/1,000 Core Parks 3.2  acres/1,000 Regional 0.2  acres/1,000 Regional ‐‐‐  acres/1,000 Open Space 1.2  acres/1,000 Open Space ‐‐‐  acres/1,000 Service Standard Service Standard 1.2  acres/1,000Neighborhood & Mini Community 2.0  acres/1,000 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 141 of 358 92 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Figure 14. Levels of Service for Core Parks at Current Standards (city limits) At approximately 147 acres, the current, overall level of service for the City of Bothell is 3.15 acres per 1,000 people, which is nearly on par with the adopted standard of 3.2 acres per 1,000 from the previous plan. Based on today’s inventory and existing standards, a deficit of 2.4 acres exists when looking solely at City-owned land within city limits. With the inclusion of privately-held HOA parks, the City has a slight, combined acreage surplus of 5 acres. With the projected population growth in the city and if the current inventory is held constant, the future need for core parks will grow to approximately 26.5 acres. Taking a closer look at how the demand for core parks is split between the two component classifications, Figure 15 segments the levels of services for each and also expands the service geography to include both the city limits and the urban growth area. Figure 15. Levels of Service by Classification at Current Standards (city limits + UGA)City & MUGA  Parkland Acreage (by Park Classification)  Community Parks (City only)126.1 acres Community Parks (Other Public Parks)16.7 acres Neighborhood & Mini Parks (City only)21.0 acres Neighborhood & Mini (Private & Other Public)26.7 acres Total 142.8 acres 47.7 acres  Level of Service 2019 2030 2019 2030 Current Service Standard Effective Level of Service based on total acreage  (acres/1,000 residents)1.98 1.66 0.66 0.55 Net LOS to Standard (acres/1,000 residents)(0.02) (0.34) (0.54) (0.65) Performance to Standard 99% 0% 55% 46% Acreage surplus (deficit)(1.32) (29.57) (38.81) (55.76) Community Parks Only Neighborhood/Mini Parks  2.0 ac/1,000 1.2 ac/1,000  Metric 2019 Population (OFM) 2030 Population Estimate (Comp Plan) Core Park Service Standard  Parkland Acreage (Core Parks Only)  City‐owned & maintained 147.17 acres 147.17 acres Private HOA Mini Parks & Other Public Parks 7.37 acres Total 147.17 acres 154.54 acres  Level of Service 2019 2030 2019 2030 Effective Level of Service based on total acreage  (acres/1,000 residents)3.15 2.60 3.31 2.73 Net LOS to Standard (acres/1,000 residents)‐0.05 ‐0.60 0.11 ‐0.47 Performance to Standard 98.4% 81.3% 103.3% 85.3% Acreage surplus (deficit) ‐ at today's LOS (2.43) (33.95)4.94 (26.58) Measurement 46,750 residents 56,600 residents 3.2 acres per 1,000 population City Only City + HOA February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 142 of 358 93 The City currently is attaining its standard for community parks servicing the entire planning area of the city plus the UGA. However, a deficit exists today for neighborhood and mini parks, with a current need for approximately 38 acres of neighborhood parkland. As the entire planning area grows in population into the future, deficits will increase for both classifications of core parks unless additional parklands are purchased. Figure 16 also highlights a greater current and projected need for neighborhood parks, rather than community parks, to serve the planning area. This analysis is consistent with the gap analysis mapping and public comment that suggests additional neighborhood parks are needed, especially in the northern half of Bothell and its UGA. However, while the demand for additional parkland is projected, the City’s existing financial constraints and City Council direction are moving the City toward a stance of taking care of existing assets versus system expansion. As a frame of reference, Figure 16 shows the current level of service for the entire planning area, segmented by open space use type and by ownership. These figures indicate that most of the existing park and open space inventory, both public and private, is held as passive or protected open space. Figure 16. Current Levels of Service by Open Space Use and Ownership going beyonD acreage stanDarDs Using a service standard for park acreage tied to a community’s population provides a common measure for guiding the amount of desired parkland. However, the acreage of parkland per capita provides only a limited measure of the value of recreational access and park amenities in demand for public uses. As the park system matures with increasing residential density, other assessment techniques should be incorporated going forward to gauge the community’s need for additional lands, facilities and amenities, which include the following. Park Pressure Park pressure refers to the potential demand on a park. One method of exploration examines the proximity of residential populations to a park and assumes that the residents in a ‘parkshed’ use the park closest to them and that people visit their closest park more often than those farther away. Using GIS, the ‘parkshed’ is defined by a polygon or a park service area containing all households having the given park as their closest park. The population within this park service area can then calculated, providing an estimate of the number of nearby potential park users. The acreage of the subject park is then used to calculate the number of Active Parkland 147.2 ac.28.9 ac.14.5 ac. Passive / Protected Open Spaces 255.9 ac. 119.1 ac. 861.8 ac. Level of Service (active)2.0 ac./1000 0.4 ac./1000 0.2 ac./1000 Level of Service (passive)3.6 ac./1000 1.7 ac./1000 12.0 ac./1000 Level of Service (sum)5.6 ac./1000 2.1 ac./1000 12.2 ac./1000 19.8 ac./1000 Private Composite Level of Service for System City‐operated Other Public February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 143 of 358 94 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 park acres available per 1,000 people within the parkshed. This measure of probable park use and population pressure identifies the adequacy of the park land (in acres per 1,000) rather than simply the location and ‘walkability’ determined by the park accessibility metric. Depending on the amenities and attractions within the park, the higher the population within a parkshed will result in greater the use and potential increased maintenance and wear. Park Amenity Mix Providing unique outdoor experiences, while working to fulfill basic recreational park amenities, will result in parks with a variety of amenities. The variety and location of amenities available within a community’s parks and recreational facilities will create a range of different preferences and levels of park usage by residents. Park systems should ensure an equitable distribution and quantity of the most common amenities like playgrounds, picnic shelters, restrooms, sports courts, sports field and trails to help distribute the potential usage of load on individual parks. Park Amenity Condition In addition to understanding the inventory of park amenities, communities must also assess the condition of each park’s general infrastructure and amenities. The condition or quality of park amenities is a key measure of park adequacy and a required assurance of public safety. General park infrastructure may include walkways, parking lots, park furniture, drainage and irrigation, lighting systems and vegetation. Deferred maintenance over a long time period can result in unusable amenities when perceived as unsafe or undesirable by park patrons. PROGRAMS, EVENTS & FACILITIES local FeeDback Community residents were vocal about their interest in expanded or additional indoor recreation facilities, events and programming. Given a choice between raising taxes to develop a facility in Bothell versus not having such a facility in the city, slight majorities of survey respondents supported more taxes for a community center (56%) and splash pad (52%). Respondents between 55 and 64 were slightly more in favor of taxes to support a community center. Respondents between 35 and 44 and those with children were more in favor of taxes for a splash pad. Online respondents showed slightly higher support for taxes for a community center. Survey respondents expressed greater interest in, and need for, adult enrichment classes and volunteer opportunities than for programs and activities than those geared towards youth or teens. Adult enrichment classes would include activities such as art, crafts and music, fitness classes and wellness. Perhaps unsurprisingly, respondents with children were more likely to be interested in youth and teen activities than those without children in their home. The following chart indicates how well met needs are for a range of program options, and shows the level of interest in each program area (in blue). Overall, survey respondents indicated that local needs are not being met for youth and teen programs or adult sports. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 144 of 358 95 Survey Highlights • Greater interest in  adult enrichment  classes (67%) &  volunteer opportunities  (69%) • Needs not met for  youth & teen programs  or adult sports Need & Support for  Programming 34.4% 39.3% 32.4% 39.0% 33.7% 66.9% 69.0% Figure 17. Sense of Fulfillment and Interest in Program Options Other comments from the survey, stakeholder sessions and the community meeting included: „Provide more events „Build a community/indoor center with meeting space „Offer more youth programs and preschool options „Provide more nature education/programming RECREATION FACILITIES city Facilities Lytle House Located in the Park at Bothell Landing, the Lytle House serves as a hub for many programs and activities, and is available for rent for parties, receptions and other events of up to 70 people. North Creek Schoolhouse Located in Centennial Park, this historic schoolhouse is available for rent for neighborhood meetings, family gatherings or small weddings. The schoolhouse accommodates up to 35 people. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 145 of 358 96 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 other Facilities Northshore YMCA The Northshore Branch of the YMCA of Greater Seattle serves North King and South Snohomish Counties, including the communities of Bothell, Woodinville, Kenmore, Duvall, and Carnation. Amenities at the YMCA include two gymnasiums, a fitness Center, indoor track, ropes course and climbing wall and a pool. In addition to the primary facility in Bothell, the YMCA operates an outdoor pool during the summer at Cottage Lake Park and offers numerous health and wellness programs, child care and youth sports at the Carol Edwards Center in Woodinville. Thorndike Community Room at the Anderson School (McMenamins) Built in 1931 as the first junior high in Bothell, the Anderson School offers a range of amenities and options for dining, socializing and play. The Thorndike Community Room holds up to 35 people and is free for use for residents within Bothell city limits. North Shore Lagoon Swimming Pool at the Anderson School (McMenamins) Another amenity provided at the Anderson School is a full-size saltwater swimming pool. Through an agreement with the City, McMenamins lets Bothell residents swim at the facility free of charge. Swimming classes (group and private lessons) and aqua fitness also are offered at the pool. Northshore School District The Northshore School District allows community use of its football, soccer, baseball, softball and multi-use fields, and a rental fee is charged. Northshore School District facilities include gymnasiums, theaters, sport fields and track ovals. The District makes its facilities available to local organizations, groups or individuals only after the District’s need for those facilities have been achieved. The District charges a facility rental fee, and the charge varies from facility to facility and from group to group. Northshore Senior Center Founded in 1972, the Northshore Senior Center is run as an independent, locally managed non-profit, and the Bothell facility is owned by the Northshore Parks and Recreation Area. Programs range from fitness to cards and games to lifelong learning. The multi-purpose room accommodates Zumba classes, line and ballroom dancing, and pickleball. Experienced professionals teach art, writing, estate planning, genealogy and anthropology courses, among others. The center also offers a variety of support groups and offers adult day health and respite care. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 146 of 358 97 Private Fitness Several private fitness clubs and centers operate in Bothell, and these enterprises further highlight the latent demand for indoor recreation facilities and for recreation programming choices. These facilities vary in their offerings, providing workout, nutrition, education and professional coaching at market rates. Since there are a number of private recreation, sports and fitness providers located in the Bothell market, these entities should continue to be relied upon to provide more specialized activities that are not easy for the public sector to provide due to a lack of facilities or expertise. Future Facility neeDs Interest in the City’s recreation programs are increasing. However, the number and types of activities the City can offer in its facilities are limited by a lack of facility capacity. Former guidelines from the National Recreation and Parks Association suggested a service standard of one community center per 20,000-40,000 people, and while that standard is no longer in use, it suggests that a certain population density is required to support such a facility. While public sentiment exists for a community center, a cautious approach should be taken and consideration given prior to the acquisition and development of such a facility. A prudent next step would be to conduct a more detailed assessment of residents’ interest in, likely use of and willingness to finance such a facility. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 147 of 358 98 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Page Left Intentionally Blank February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 148 of 358 99 The following Potential Projects List identifies the park, trail and facility projects considered for the next six years or more. The majority of these projects entail the maintenance, acquisition and development of parks, special recreation amenities and trails. Based on survey results and other feedback, Bothell residents have indicated an interest in park facility upgrades, enhanced trail connections and acquisition for future parklands as priorities, and the Potential Projects List is reflective of that desire. The following table summarizes the aggregate capital estimates by park types for the next six years. Figure 18. Potential Projects List Expenditures Summary c a P ital P lannin GcaPital P lannin G 77 $3,926,500  $1,021,500  $70,000  Repair/Renovation Development Planning February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 149 of 358 100 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 The Potential Projects List identifies land acquisition to ensure that sufficient lands and corridor connections are available for outdoor recreation as the Bothell urban area continues to grow in population. Acquisition target areas have been identified and ranked in priority. Emphasis has been placed on potential future park acquisitions and access rights along key trail corridors to serve the greatest population and then on filling gaps in neighborhood park land distribution within the city limits. The Potential Projects List also includes a prioritization of projects based on public feedback and staff review. In October 2019, City staff and the PROS Plan project team led the public through a process to explore the importance of different criteria to apply to the draft capital project list. These criteria were as follows: „Ability to Leverage Funding: projects that meet the criteria (i.e.: population size, demographics, income level, and access) for local, state and federal grants, as well as charitable foundations. „Community Need: projects that support parks and facilities infrastructure priorities identified through the community engagement process of the PROS Plan. „Safety & Security: projects that address parks and facilities safety and security needs in order to provide safe spaces that are accessible to all. „Location: projects that support equity and access to parks and facilities across the City. The ranked criteria were applied to the initial project list as weighted values. For each listed project, City staff identified a score for each of the criteria on a 1 to 3 scale, with 1 as the highest need. The individual project scores for each criteria were then weighted against the priority ranking of each criteria in a matrix. The result was a composite score to identify the overall project score for the criteria. The project list was sorted based on these scores, and these rankings will help inform staff for subsequent budget planning and outside funding requests. The sorting of the project list was segmented between the four major project classifications: Safety & Maintenance Project, Near-Term Project, Long-Term Project (2026+) and Future Project. The following Potential Projects List provides brief project descriptions and priority ranking to assist staff in preparing future capital budget requests. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 150 of 358 Bothell PROS Plan 2020: Potential Projects ListCategory Project SiteProject DescriptionType Funding2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 6‐Yr Sum FutureSM Cedar Grove  ParkField RepairsR33331.40600,000$              600,000$              SM Former Wayne Golf Course Bridge Condition Analysis (Wayne)P3 3 32 1.3050,000$                50,000$                SM Cedar Grove  ParkBoardwalk replacement (Bridge) R33321.30 25,000$                25,000$                SM North Creek Field #4 Turf Replacement (North Creek 4)R33311.201,000,000$          1,000,000$          SM North Creek Field #2 Turf Replacement (North Creek 2)R33311.201,000,000$          1,000,000$          SM Capital repairsPavement repairs, playground ramps, sports court painting, ADA.R33311.20 5,000$                  5,000$                  5,000$                  5,000$                  5,000$                  5,000$                  30,000$                SM Conifer View ParkSport court resurfacingR33211.0335,000$                35,000$                SM Bleacher replacementReplacement or safety rail installationR33 2 1 1.0310,000$                10,000$                10,000$                30,000$                SM Park at Bothell Landing Boardwalk replacementR33211.0335,000$                35,000$                SM Conifer View ParkADA entry improvementsR31220.93 15,000$                15,000$                NT Park wayfinding system Planning, graphics, signs, mappingP33331.4020,000$                20,000$                NT Tree planting programCanopy enhancement @ numerous parks & open spacesD23331.30 2,500$                  2,500$                  2,500$                  2,500$                  2,500$                  2,500$                  15,000$                NT Cedar Grove  ParkShade structure @ play areaD33311.2015,000$                15,000$                NT Stipek ParkShade structure @ play areaD33311.2015,000$                15,000$                NT Stipek ParkPlayground ramps & paved path to swingsR33311.208,000$                  8,000$                  NT Park at Bothell Landing Shade Structure @ amphitheaterR33311.2030,000$                30,000$                NT Bloomberg Hill ParkADA path & shade structureR33211.0330,000$                30,000$                NT Blyth ParkShade structure @ play areaD33211.0315,000$                15,000$                NT TBDDog ParkD33211.03 65,000$                65,000$                NT North Creek Field #3 Dugout roofsR33211.036,000$                  6,000$                  NT Red Brick Road Park Handicapped parking spaceR33211.032,500$                  2,500$                  NT William Penn ParkPlay area shade structureR33211.0315,000$                15,000$                NT TBDAll Inclusive PlaygroundD32331.30‐$                           ‐$                           NT Bench & table replacements Standardized & ADA‐compliantR33211.037,500$                  7,500$                  7,500$                  7,500$                  7,500$                  7,500$                  45,000$                NT Blyth ParkRestroom replacementR33120.97500,000$              500,000$              NT Former Wayne, William Penn, NCBuilding Demolition (William Penn, Wayne, NCF)R13130.87500,000$              500,000$              NT Tall Tree ParkPaved access to amenities, park connection trailR33110.8720,000$                20,000$                NT Volunteer ParkShade structure @ play areaD33110.8715,000$                15,000$                NT Brackett's LandingADA paved path & picnic tableD23110.777,500$                  7,500$                  NT Madrazo ParkConstruction D21110.57854,000$              854,000$              NT Conifer View ParkPaved loop trailD11110.4720,000$                20,000$                LT North Bothell Park  Acquisition: community parkA31331.20‐$                            4,000,000$          LT North Bothell Park  Design/development: community parkD31331.20‐$                            1,500,000$          LT TrailAdditional trail planningP31331.20‐$                           ‐$                           LT Neighborhood ParkAcquisition (4‐5 ac east‐central Bothell)A3 13 2 1.10‐$                            1,200,000$          LT Neighborhood Park Acquisition (2‐3 ac Norway Hill  area)A31321.10‐$                           850,000$              LT Neighborhood ParkAcquisition (3‐5 ac west‐central Bothell)A3 13 2 1.10‐$                            1,400,000$           Community Need Safety & Security Location / Geography Ability to Leverage Funding Priority ScoreFebruary 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 151 of 358 Page Left Intentionally Blank 102 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 152 of 358 Bothell PROS Plan 2020: Potential Projects ListCategory Project SiteProject DescriptionType Funding2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 6‐Yr Sum Future Community Need Safety & Security Location / Geography Ability to Leverage Funding Priority ScoreLT TrailCanyon Creek LoopD31321.10‐$                           ‐$                           LT Centennial ParkPhase II improvements: boardwalk, overlook, bridges, restorationD21321.00‐$                            2,224,000$          LT TBDMulti‐sport courts (pickleball, tennis, basketball)D31220.93‐$                           ‐$                           LT River Access A31220.93‐$                           ‐$                           LT TBDTeen SpaceA,D31220.93‐$                           ‐$                           LT Former Wayne Golf Course Trails, Site RestorationD21230.93‐$                           ‐$                           LT East Norway Hill ParkAdd'n Development: parking, restroom, OLA, trails.D11220.73‐$                            2,000,000$          LT North Creek Field #3Replacement w/ synthetic turf, backstops, fencingD21120.67‐$                            1,775,000$          LT William Penn ParkMaster plan for park renovationP11120.57‐$                           45,000$                LT Blyth ParkPhasing for master plan installationD11110.47‐$                            2,300,000$          FT Connectivity Master Plan Contiguous parks: downtown to Wayne Golf CourseP32221.03‐$                           150,000$              FT Aquatic Community Center Regional facility developmentA,P,D1 1 110.47‐$                            18,000,000$        FT Former Wayne Golf Course Deferred Bridge Maintenance (Wayne)R33 3 2 1.30‐$                           ‐$                           FT TBDSkate/BMX parkD21220.83‐$                            1,300,000$          FT Neighborhood Park Acquisition (2‐4 ac Alderwood area)A31321.10‐$                            1,400,000$          FT Neighborhood Park Acquisition (2‐5 ac Kennard area)A31321.10‐$                            1,600,000$          FT Bike Skills / Adventure ParkA,D21220.83‐$                            2,500,000$          FT Park at Bothell LandingFuture expansion/redevelopment (from SR522 realignment)D31120.77‐$                            14,214,000$        FT Shelton View Woods AcquisitionA21210.73‐$                            10,000,000$        FT TBDSplash pad installationD31120.77‐$                           550,000$              Total Projects Cost130,000$         2,718,500$     68,000$           682,500$         15,000$           1,404,000$     5,018,000$     67,008,000$   NOTE: This list identifies planning‐level cost estimates and does not assume the value of volunteer or other non‐City contributions. Detailed costing may be necessary for projects noted. This list is not an official budget and intended as a guiding document for City staff in the preparation of departmental budgets.Category CodeSM Safety & Maintenance ProjectNT Near Term ProjectLT Long Term Project (2026+)Type CodeA AcquisitionP PlanningD DevelopmentFebruary 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 153 of 358 Page Left Intentionally Blank 104 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 154 of 358 105 A number of strategies exist to enhance and expand park and recreation service delivery for the City of Bothell; however, clear decisions must be made in an environment of competing interests and limited resources. A strong community willingness to offer financial support is necessary to bring many of the projects listed in this Plan to life. The recommendations for park and recreation services noted in this Plan may trigger the need for funding beyond current allocations and for additional staffing, operations and maintenance responsibilities. Given that the operating and capital budget of the Parks and Recreation Department is finite, additional resources may be needed to leverage, supplement and support the implementation of proposed objectives, programs and projects. While grants and other efficiencies will help, these alone will not be enough to realize many ideas and projects noted in this Plan. The following recommendations and strategies are presented to offer near-term direction to realize these projects and as a means to continue dialogue between City leadership, local residents and partners. Additionally, a review of potential implementation tools is included as Appendix G, which addresses local financing, federal and state grant and conservation programs, acquisition methods and others. key Project recommenDations The following is a summary of key project recommendations which will require commitment from the City and its residents to continue to support a healthy park and recreation system that preserves and enhances the safety, livability and character of the community. i m P lementation i m P lementation 88 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 155 of 358 106 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Wayfinding & Signage Parks, trails, plazas and other public open spaces are the primary targets for unifying an urban environment into a cohesive, accessible and connected community through an identifiable wayfinding program. Bothell should pursue a comprehensive wayfinding program that includes both visual graphic standards and site furnishing standards. Colors, sign types, and information can help users navigate the outdoor recreation experiences offered by the City. Communications To broaden public awareness, the City’s website should be expanded to facilitate quick links to popular destinations and be designed with mobile users in mind, either through a mobile- friendly site or a web-based application. The website should include easy-to-access park system and facility maps, trail maps and an up-to-date listing of park sites and amenities to enhance the experience of the on-the-go user. The City should consider introducing and utilizing QR codes or comparable technology on signage as a means to share with or receive information from visitors about maintenance, restoration or monitoring data. Sports Fields: Continued Enhancement Sport fields, while well-provided at North Creek Sports Fields, will continue to be in demand as families continue to locate in Bothell. Existing natural grass fields could be upgraded or converted to artificial turf to meet the growing needs of community sports programs. Continued coordination with the school district for field usage and improvements and negotiating earlier play times (i.e. parking allowances) at North Creek Sports Fields may provide added capacity for growth of the sports leagues’ needs for practice and game play. Additionally, all-weather turf fields need replacement as continual use creates wear and tear and these fields have limited life spans. The need for replacement must be planned as part of the capital facilities program to ensure continued safe and functional provision of sports field infrastructure. New Park Design & Development As the proposed parkland acquisition program successfully secures properties for future parks, these new sites will undergo design and development to provide both basic park amenities and unique places for community use. While park development standards can ensure unified site furnishings across the park system, each park site can be designed and developed to create its own unique character. Master planning for new park facilities should undergo a public engagement process to ensure the identification of any specialized local needs and to solidify support for pursuing development funding. Including facilities for alternative or emerging sports can offer residents a more diverse range of recreational experiences, while creating destinations that attract and engage park users. Opportunities and facilities for other alternative sports could be expanded in the city. The desires for a stand-alone skate/BMX park, splash pad and mountain biking areas have been identified. Opportunities may exist to develop alternative sports facilities at a few existing parks and plan for these facilities in the site design of parks to be developed in the future. Generally, the City should also consider incorporating small-scale skateboard (skate spots), bike skills features or pump tracks into park sites, as appropriate. Off-leash February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 156 of 358 107 areas aka “dog parks” continue to be in demand, not just for pet exercise areas, but also for the social gathering activity that dog owners experience in these specialized spaces. An all- inclusive playground that provides universal access for children with disabilities has also been identified in the public input. Trail Connections & Linkages Residents are actively using the existing trails within and connecting through Bothell. The importance for more connectivity for walking and biking has been expressed in public input and endorsed in the City’s planning documents. The opportunity to connect across the former Wayne Golf Course illustrates one of the future targets for enhancing trail connections and creating more links for access across neighborhoods and parks, while considering limited impacts to salmon. Other opportunities for connections include improving the trail between Tall Tree Park and Conifer View Park, as well as creating a loop trail at Conifer View Park. The City could also coordinate with King County to extend the Tolt Pipeline Trail to fill the gaps in that alignment and connect to existing and planned trail corridors. As the community grows, additional trail planning should continue to ensure future alternative transportation options. ADA & Other Park Enhancements Minor improvements to access, such as providing ramped entrances, for site furnishings are necessary to conform to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and ensure universal accessibility. Also, the City should evaluate the play equipment and its signage for code compliance and replace outdated equipment, as appropriate. The Capital Planning section includes a line item for covering small upgrades and improvements to remove barriers and improve universal access. In general, the City should make improvements to existing parks as needed to ensure proper maintenance, usability and quality of park features and grounds. Tree plantings to expand and increase the shade tree canopy in active use areas like picnic and playground spaces as well as natural edges and park boundaries is recommended to improve natural habitat, human comfort and better stormwater management in parks and open spaces where tree cover may be limited or have room for enhancement. Land Acquisition To Meet Growing Needs & Fill Gaps The City must acquire additional parkland to serve its growing population and provide more accessible outdoor recreation for the community. As growth and expansion continue and annexation occurs, opportunities to acquire large park sites will be more difficult and require Bothell to think creatively and foster partnerships to provide desired public parkland with sufficient room for park amenities. Concurrently, partnerships with the local school districts could provide opportunities to improve school facilities in ways that may help meet community park needs. The possibility may exist for other public land management agencies, such as King and Snohomish Counties, to become partners in acquiring mutually beneficial public parklands. The long-term goal is to acquire sufficient acreage for five new neighborhood parks to fill major gaps and have sufficiently large sites for future park development. Specific target acquisition areas are noted on Map 6. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 157 of 358 108 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Recreation Programming The City should continue to foster agreements or partnerships with potential programming partners and contract vendors as it considers its role in providing for a variety of recreation services within the community. There should be clearly identified areas of programmatic responsibility to ensure that there is not overlap in resource allocation or that gaps in services are not present. The City should also match its programming efforts with available staff and financial resources, recognizing that increasing the role of the Parks and Recreation Department in providing programs will require an increase in full and part-time staff. Park Amenity Upgrades The City should also consider adding the following recreation features to expand recreational opportunities beyond named park and trail project targets as funding allows: „Shade structures and/or well-sited shade trees for playgrounds „Splash pad „Permanent off-leash dog parks „Nature playgrounds and with unique features „All-inclusive playgrounds „Older youth recreational amenities, such as parkour elements, bike skills or mountain biking „Gathering spaces (picnic shelters, etc.) „Outdoor fitness areas „Multi-sport courts „Public art A general consideration for the public is to create a park system that provided year-round facilities for all ages and all abilities to gather and recreate in diverse range of safe, clean and well-maintained park facilities that also balance fiscal stability. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 158 of 358 109 imPlementation tactics Inter-Departmental Coordination Internal coordination with the Public Works and Community Development Departments can increase the potential of discrete actions toward the implementation of the proposed recreational trail network, which relies in part on street right-of-way enhancements, and in the review of development applications with consideration toward potential parkland acquisition areas, planned trail corridors and the need for easement or set-aside requests. Volunteer & Community-based Action Volunteers and community groups already contribute to the improvement of parks and recreation services in Bothell. Volunteer projects include wildlife habitat enhancement, invasive plant removal, tree planting, trail building and community event support, among others. Bothell should maintain and update a revolving list of potential small works or volunteer-appropriate projects for the website, while also reaching out to the high schools to encourage student projects. While supporting organized groups and community-minded individuals continues to add value to the Bothell parks and recreation system, volunteer coordination requires a substantial amount of staff time, and additional resources may be necessary to more fully take advantage of the community’s willingness to support park and recreation efforts. Enhanced Local Funding According to the City budget, Bothell maintains reserve debt capacity for councilmanic bonds and voter approved debt. However, councilmanic bonds are unlikely due to a lack of resources for bond repayment. Community conversations regarding the need for a community recreation center and the potential to bundle several projects from the capital facilities plan warrant a review of debt implications for the City, along with the need to conduct polling of voter support for such projects. Park Impact Fees & Real Estate Excise Tax Park Impact Fees (PIF) are imposed on new development to meet the increased demand for parks resulting from the new growth. PIF can only be used for parkland acquisition, planning and/or development. They cannot be used for operations and maintenance of parks and facilities. The City of Bothell currently assesses impact fees, but the City should review its PIF ordinance and update the methodology and rate structure, as appropriate, to be best positioned to obtain future acquisition and development financing from the planned growth of the community. The City should prioritize the usage of PIF to secure new park properties and finance park or trail development consistent with the priorities within this Plan. The City currently imposes both of the quarter percent excise taxes on real estate, known as REET 1 and REET 2. The REET must be spent on capital projects listed in the City’s capital facilities plan element of their comprehensive plan. Eligible project types include planning, construction, reconstruction, repair, rehabilitation or improvement of parks, recreational facilities and trails. Acquisition of land for parks is not a permitted use of REET 2. REET February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 159 of 358 110 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 is used for other City projects, such as facility construction and public works projects, may be used to make loan and debt service payments on permissible projects. Through annual budgeting and with discussions with City Council, the Parks and Recreation Department should continue to seek access to REET funds and use the capital facilities plan to compile compelling projects to enhance service delivery of the amenities the community has provided voice to. Parkland Donations & Dedications Parkland donations from private individuals or conservation organizations could occur to complement the acquisition of park and open space lands across the City and urban growth boundary. Gift deeds or bequests from philanthropic-minded landowners could allow for lands to come into City ownership upon the death of the owner or as a tax-deductible charitable donation. Also, parkland dedication by a developer could occur in exchange for Park Impact Fees or as part of a planned development where public open space is a key design for the layout and marketing of a new residential project. Any potential dedication should be vetted by the Department to ensure that such land is located in an area of need or can expand an existing City property and can be developed with site amenities appropriate for the projected use of the property. Conservation Futures Both Snohomish and King Counties assesses the maximum allowable excise of $0.0625 per $1,000 assessed value to fund the Conservation Futures program and provides cities a venue to access these funds through a competitive, local grant process. The City should continue to submit grant applications for support in financing the acquisition of additional natural areas along creeks to facilitate the protection of these lands and enable improved linkages to expand the trail network. Grants & Appropriations Several state and federal grant programs are available on a competitive basis, including WWRP, ALEA, and LWCF. Pursuing grants is not a panacea for park system funding, since grants are both competitive and often require a significant percentage of local funds to match the request to the granting agency, which depending on the grant program can be as much as 50% of the total project budget. Bothell should continue to leverage its local resources to the greatest extent by pursuing grants independently and in cooperation with other local partners. Appropriations from state or federal sources, though rare, can supplement projects with partial funding. State and federal funding allocations are particularly relevant on regional transportation projects, and the likelihood for appropriations could be increased if multiple partners are collaborating on projects. Other Implementation Tools Appendix G identifies other implementation tools, such as voter-approved funding, grants and acquisition tactics, that the City could utilize to further the implementation of the projects noted in the Potential Projects List. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 160 of 358 111 APPENDIX AAPPENDIX A SURVEY SUMMARYSURVEY SUMMARY February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 161 of 358 112 Bothell PROS Plan 2020   PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com To: Nik Stroup, Director, Bothell Parks & Recreation Department Director  From: Steve Duh, Conservation Technix, Inc.  Date: September 9, 2019  Re: Bothell Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan   Community Survey Summary Results  Conservation Technix is pleased to present the results of a survey of the general population of the City  of Bothell that assesses residents’ recreational needs and priorities.  KKEEYY  FFIINNDDIINNGGSS     BBootthheellll  rreessiiddeennttss  ssttrroonnggllyy  vvaalluuee  tthheeiirr  ppaarrkkss  aanndd  rreeccrreeaattiioonn  ffaacciilliittiieess..     Nearly all residents  (97%) think parks and  recreation are important  to quality of life in the  City of Bothell.   RReessiiddeennttss  uussee  tthhee  CCiittyy’’ss  eexxiissttiinngg  ppaarrkkss  ffoorr  aa  vvaarriieettyy  ooff  rreeaassoonnss..    Large majorities of residents have visited the Park at Bothell Landing (90%) and Blyth Park (76%), while  fewer have visited Cedar Grove Park (40%) and Centennial Park (35%). Bothell residents most commonly  visit local parks and recreation facilities to use trails, relax, or for fitness.   RReessiiddeennttss  aarree  ggeenneerraallllyy  ssaattiissffiieedd  wwiitthh  eexxiissttiinngg  ppaarrkkss  aanndd  rreeccrreeaattiioonn  ffaacciilliittiieess..   The majority of residents who had visited Bothell parks gave them condition ratings of excellent or good.  However, over half of respondents said they would visit City parks more often if the City provided more  information (13%), addressed crowding (13%), provided more nearby parks (11%), added desired  facilities or equipment (10%), or addressed maintenance (5%) or accessibility issues (2%). Specifically,  many resident wrote in requests for more places to walk or play with their dogs; places to play  pickleball; more parking; and cleaner restrooms.  RReessiiddeennttss  wwoouulldd  lliikkee  ttoo  sseeee  iimmpprroovveemmeennttss  mmaaddee  ttoo  tthhee  ppaarrkkss  &&  rreeccrreeaattiioonn  ssyysstteemm  bbuutt  aallssoo  wwaanntt  ttoo   sseeee  tthhee  CCiittyy  pprreesseerrvvee  llaanndd  ffoorr  ffuuttuurree  ppaarrkkss  aanndd  nnaattuurraall  aarreeaass..     When asked which improvements they would like to see the City focus on, residents gave the highest  priority to expanding the recreational trail network and acquiring land for future parks. Developing new  amenities in parks and acquiring land for open space were slightly lower priorities for residents.  Respondents support adding all‐inclusive playground equipment, splash pads, and river access.  In open‐ended questions, residents expressed concern about the pace of development in Bothell, want  the City to protect access to nature, trees, and open space for both people and wildlife, and are  particularly interested in the future of places like Shelton View and North Creek Forest. Other residents  are eager to see improvements to Bothell’s park system, particularly to the former Wayne Golf Course,  or would like to see particular facilities added, such as off‐leash dog parks, trails, pickleball courts,  botanical gardens, and disc golf.  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 162 of 358 113 City of Bothell Page 2  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com SSUURRVVEEYY  MMEETTHHOODDOOLLOOGGYY   In close collaboration with City of Bothell staff and the Parks & Recreation Board, Conservation Technix  developed the 17‐question survey that was estimated to take less than ten minutes to complete.   The survey was mailed to a random sample of 2,500 households within the boundaries of the City of  Bothell on June 4, 2019. An online version of the survey was posted to the City’s website a week later to  allow the mail recipients to receive first notice about the survey. Reminder postcards were mailed to the  2,500 households on June 15th. Information about the survey was provided on the City’s website home  page and on the PROS Plan subpage. It was promoted via multiple social media postings, in addition to  numerous pop‐up events held around the city between June and August. The survey was closed on  August 31st, and data were compiled and reviewed. Overall, 381 responses were completed from the  print version mail survey, and 860 responses were generated via the online link published on the City’s  website. In total, 1,241 survey responses were recorded.  This report includes findings on general community opinions. Data are aggregated and summarized for  the mail and online surveys to highlight overall community preferences, with clarifying remarks on  response differences between the two datasets. The data for the mail and online versions were kept  separated. Percentages in the report may not add up to 100% due to rounding.   The main survey data were cross tabulated with the demographic data (e.g., age, location, number of  children in household) to examine if differences existed between the different respondent subgroups.  The summary below identifies variations in responses per question, if such variations existed and were  significant between subgroups.         February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 163 of 358 114 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 3  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com FFUULLLL  RREESSUULLTTSS      HHooww  mmuucchh  ddoo  rreessiiddeennttss  vvaalluuee  ppaarrkkss  aanndd  rreeccrreeaattiioonn??   Nearly all respondents (97%) feel that local parks,  recreation options and open space opportunities are  important or essential to the quality of life in Bothell. Eight  in ten respondents feel that they are essential; while an  additional 16% believe that they are important to quality  of life, but not essential. Only 1% of respondents believe  parks are “more of a luxury that we don’t need”.       WWhhiicchh  ppaarrkkss  &&  rreeccrreeaattiioonn  ffaacciilliittiieess  hhaavvee  rreessiiddeennttss  uusseedd??   The City asked residents which   parks and recreation facilities they have  used. Nearly all respondents have visited  the Park at Bothell Landing (90%). More  than three quarters have visited Blyth  Park (76%). Fewer residents have visited  Cedar Grove Park (40%) and Centennial  Park (35%).    The Park at Bothell Landing attracts  visitors from across the City, while Blyth  Park and Cedar Grove Park are more  heavily used by nearby respondents.  Online respondents indicated higher park  usage for all four sites over mail survey respondents.    HHooww  wwoouulldd  rreessiiddeennttss  rraattee  tthhee  ccoonnddiittiioonn  ooff  ppaarrkkss  aanndd  ffaacciilliittiieess  iinn  BBootthheellll??   Of the respondents who had visited various parks  and recreation sites in Bothell, the majority gave  all existing parks a condition rating of excellent or  good. Overall the Park and Bothell Landing  received the highest condition ratings, with 95%  of respondents ranking it as excellent or good.  Centennial Park received the lowest ratings, with  73% rating its condition as good or excellent but  27% rating it fair or poor.      13. When you think about the things that contribute to the  quality of life in Bothell, would you say that public parks and  recreation opportunities are…   Response options Percent Essential to the quality of life here 81%  97% Important, but not really necessary 16%  More of a luxury that we don’t need 1%    Don’t know 1%   7. Please indicate if you or any member of your household has used  any of the following parks listed below.  8. For those you marked with a YES… please indicate how you would rate  the condition of the park or recreation facility.   February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 164 of 358 115 City of Bothell Page 4  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com WWhhyy  ddoo  rreessiiddeennttss  vviissiitt  ppaarrkkss??     Bothell residents visit local parks and recreation facilities for a  variety of reasons. The most popular activities are using trails  (73%) or relaxation (54%). More than one‐third of respondents  visited for fitness (46%), use a playground (36%), or to view  wildlife (36%). Between 10% and 30% of respondents visited  Bothell parks for equestrian or mountain bike trails or for  athletic fields. In addition, 96 respondents (9%) wrote in that  they visit parks to walk or play with their dogs, and 51  respondents (4%) wrote in that they visited to play disc golf.  Respondents between 35 and 44, and those with children in  their household, were the most likely to visit for playgrounds,  athletic fields, classes, camps or leagues, and family gatherings.  Respondents without children were more likely than those  with children to respond that they had not visited a Bothell Park in the past year. Online respondents indicated slightly  higher responses for park visitation for sport fields, wildlife viewing, trails and family gatherings.     WWhhyy  ddoonn’’tt  rreessiiddeennttss  vviissiitt  mmoorree  oofftteenn??   When asked why they do not visit Bothell’s  parks and recreation facilities more often,  many residents responded that they do visit  (43%), use parks or facilities provided by  other cities or organizations (15%) or are  too busy (12%) suggesting that further  improvements would not increase their use  of parks.   However, over half of respondents selected  a reason that could be addressed by the  City, including lack of information (13%),  crowding (13%),  distance to parks (11%),  lack of desired facilities or equipment  (10%), maintenance issues (5%), and accessibility issues (2%). Specifically, many respondents wrote in requests for more  places to walk or play with their dogs; places to play pickleball; more parking; and cleaner restrooms.  Respondents with children at home were more likely to cite that parks and facilities are too crowded or do not have the  right equipment as reasons why they do not visit more often. Respondents without children at home were more likely  than those with children to cite being too busy as a reason why they do not use parks more often.   2. Please check all the reasons why your household does not use City of Bothell  park or recreation facilities more often.    Reason Percent  None (I/We use them)43% Other 18% Use parks or facilities provided by another city or organization 15% I do not know what is offered 13% Parks and sports courts are too crowded 13%  Too busy to go to parks and facilities 12% Parks are too far from my home 11% Parks do not have the right equipment 10% Parks and facilities are not well‐maintained 5% Inaccessible for my physical abilities 2% 1. What would you say are the main reasons you visited  Bothell parks and open spaces in the last year?    Reason Percent  Trails 73% Relaxation 54% Fitness 46%  Playgrounds 36% Wildlife viewing 36% Family gatherings / picnics 30% Sports fields 23% Music concerts 20% Other 19% Class, camp or league activity 10% February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 165 of 358 116 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 5  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com DDoo  rreessiiddeennttss  tthhiinnkk  tthhee  CCiittyy  ooff  BBootthheellll  nneeeeddss   mmoorree  ppaarrkkss  aanndd  rreeccrreeaattiioonn  ooppppoorrttuunniittiieess??     Just under half of survey respondents think   that the City of Bothell does not have enough  walking and biking trails (48%). Respondents are  most satisfied with the number of community  events, with 56% feeling that there are about  the right number or more than enough.  Respondents are more split on the adequacy of  parks, picnic areas, and sports fields.  Younger residents and those with children in  their household are more think there are not  enough sports fields or recreation programs  than older residents or those in adult  households.     WWhhaatt  ppaarrkk  aanndd  rreeccrreeaattiioonn  ooppttiioonnss  ddoo   rreessiiddeennttss  hhaavvee  aa  nneeeedd  ffoorr??  DDoo  tthheeyy   ffeeeell  tthheeiirr  nneeeeddss  aarree  mmeett??   The survey asked residents a series of  questions regarding their needs for  typical park and recreation facilities.   When given a list of potential low  cost park amenities the City could  consider adding to the park system,  respondents were supportive of all  options listed. They were most  supportive of adding multi‐use  walking and mountain biking trails  and all‐inclusive playground  equipment.   Respondents with children  expressed higher support for adding  inclusive playgrounds and splash  pads than those without children,  though both amenities were  supported by a majority of all  residents.  When presented higher‐cost  potential improvements,  respondents were highly supportive  of adding splash pads or water  spray features and improving river  access. In a separate question,  3. When it comes to the needs for parks, trails and recreation facilities, would  you say there are...  5/6. The following list includes lower cost (Q5) / higher cost (Q6) park amenities that the  City of Bothell could consider adding to the park system. Please indicate whether you  would be very supportive, somewhat supportive, not supportive, or not sure.  HIGHER COST  LOWER COST  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 166 of 358 117 City of Bothell Page 6  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com residents also expressed a  willingness to increase taxes to fund  additional splash pads and a  community center. Respondents  were less supportive of adding  skateparks, artificial turf fields, or  cricket fields.   The second pair of questions asked which  recreational programs and activities the  respondent’s household has a need for, and  then, whether that need is well met,  somewhat met, or unmet locally. In these  questions, respondents expressed greater  interest in, and need for, adult enrichment  classes and volunteer opportunities than for  programs and activities than those geared  towards youth or teens. Perhaps unsurprisingly, respondents with children were more likely to be interested in youth  and teen activities than those without children in their home. Online respondents indicated a slightly higher demand  (‘not well met’) for adult sports, and mail survey respondents showed a slightly higher demand for outdoor volunteer  opportunities.     WWhhaatt  ppaarrkk  aanndd  ffaacciilliittyy  iimmpprroovveemmeennttss  wwoouulldd   rreessiiddeennttss  pprriioorriittiizzee??      When asked which park and  recreation improvements they would  like to see the City focus on,  respondents gave the highest single  priority to developing new amenities  in parks (27%). In looking at the sum o  ftop three responses, more than three  quarters of respondents identified  expanding the recreational trail  network (78%) and acquiring land for  future parks (77%) as one of their top  three priorities (each with a weighted  average score of 3.5 on a five point  scale). Acquiring lands for future parks  was a higher priority in the northeast area of Bothell compared to other areas, and expanding the recreational trail  network was a higher priority to respondents from the southeast area. Developing new amenities in parks and acquiring  land for open space were slightly lower priorities for residents. Providing more recreational programs, including classes  and camps, or community events was the lowest priority – over half of residents rated it as their lowest priority among  the choices listed.          Higher Need / Somewhat Met   Adult enrichment classes, such as art, crafts & music, fitness classes & wellness   (67% / 62%)   Outdoor volunteer opportunities (69% / 59%)    Lower Need / Somewhat Met   Youth sports programs and camps during school breaks (39% / 53%)   Adult sports leagues, such as soccer & softball (39% / 49%)   Children's activities, such as supervised after‐school & summer day camp programs  (34% / 54%)   Teen activities, such as drop‐in facilities, field trips & camps during school breaks   (34% / 50%)   Programs for youth, teens and young adults with special needs, adaptive & inclusive  programs (32% / 49%)  4. For the following list, indicate how you would rank the priority for each  (1st priority is highest and 5th priority is lowest). Reorder the list by  dragging each line into your preferred order of preference.  9/10. Please indicate if your household has an interest in any of the programs  or activities below. Using the same list, please indicate how well your  needs are met locally.  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 167 of 358 118 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 7  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com   AArree  rreessiiddeennttss  wwiilllliinngg  ttoo  ppaayy  aaddddiittiioonnaall  ttaaxxeess  oorr  ffeeeess  ttoo  ffuunndd  iimmpprroovveemmeennttss  ttoo  ppaarrkkss  aanndd  rreeccrreeaattiioonn??   Given a choice between raising taxes to develop  a facility in Bothell versus not having such a  facility in the city, slight majorities supported  more taxes for 2 of 5 amenities tested: a  community center (56%) and splash pad (52%).  Strong majorities were not in favor of using  taxes to support sport fields with lights or a  skateboard/BMX park. Respondents between 55  and 64 were slightly more in favor of taxes to  support a community center. Respondents  between 35 and 44 and those with children  were more in favor of taxes for a splash pad.  Online respondents showed slightly higher  support for taxes for a community center.  The survey asked residents which additional  funding sources they would support to improve  parks and recreation opportunities in Bothell.  Respondents were most supportive of  implementing or increasing user and rental fees  to fund system improvements (42%).   Approximately 37% of respondents supported  increasing the City’s current levy or  implementing a new capital tax to fund park  system development and renovation projects.  Fewer than 30% of respondents   supported capital bonds, while another 35% of  respondents would not support any of the listed  options. There were no significant differences  between demographic groups.                       12. …what additional funding sources would you support to improve parks and  recreation opportunities in Bothell?  11. There may be some park and recreation experiences that are limited or  not available in Bothell, but are available in neighboring communities. If it  came down to a choice between increasing taxes to develop that facility  in Bothell versus not having that in Bothell, which would you choose?  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 168 of 358 119 City of Bothell Page 8  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com   OOtthheerr  CCoommmmeennttss   The survey provided residents with multiple opportunities to share their ideas and suggestions via open‐ended  responses. Common themes from these comments include:    Many respondents are concerned about the pace of ongoing development in Bothell and want to make sure the  City protects access to nature, trees, and open space for both people and wildlife. They are particularly  interested in the future of places like Shelton View and North Creek Forest.   Many respondents noted that they are eager to see a permanent off‐leash dog park in the City, either because  they would use it themselves or because they hope it would lessen the number and impacts of unauthorized off‐ leash dogs in Bothell parks.   Respondents expressed interest in, and enthusiasm for, the redevelopment of the Wayne Golf Course. While  some respondents hoped the City would keep a small golf course, most residents hoped for new amenities, such  as off‐leash dog parks, trails, botanical gardens, disc golf and restored open spaces.    Some respondents are concerned that future park acquisition, improvement and maintenance will require  raising taxes above what they consider sustainable. Some felt that the City should ‘live within its means’ and  that existing revenues should be sufficient to fund park needs. Others would like to see the City ask more of  developers to fund the park system necessary to meet the needs of new development.    February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 169 of 358 120 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 9  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com DDeemmooggrraapphhiiccss   Age  Respondents to the survey were roughly split between  residents over age 65 (20%), residents between 55 and 64 years  of age (17%), residents between 45 and 54 (19%), residents  between 35 to 44 (25%), and residents under 34 years of age  (20%).   Location of Residence  Nearly half of survey respondents live in the southwestern  portion of the City (south of approximately  244th St. SE and  west of I‐405). Another quarter of respondents live west of I‐ 405 but north of 244th. The remainder of respondents live in  either the northeastern part of the City (14%), southeastern  portion (10%) or outside of Bothell (7%).          Number of Children in Household  Over half of respondents (56%) have no children in their  household. These households tended to include older adults  (over age 55). The remaining 44% of households have one (16%),  two (23%), or three or more (5%) children in the home.  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 170 of 358 121 City of Bothell Page 10  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com AATTTTAACCHHMMEENNTT  11..  SSUURRVVEEYY  IINNSSTTRRUUMMEENNTT         February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 171 of 358 122 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 11  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 172 of 358 123 City of Bothell Page 12  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 173 of 358 124 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 13  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 174 of 358 125 City of Bothell Page 14  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com AATTTTAACCHHMMEENNTT  22..  OOPPEENN‐‐EENNDDEEDD  RREESSPPOONNSSEESS   1. What would you say are the main reasons you visited Bothell parks and open spaces in the LAST YEAR?   Cricket   Cricket    Cricket Ground   bike riding   biking   Mountain Biking   Mountain biking and disk golf   Disc golf   disc golf   Disc Golf   Disc golf   Disc golf   Disc Golf   Disc Golf   Disc golf   Disc Golf   Disc Golf   Disc Golf   Disc Golf   Disc Golf   Disc golf   Disc golf   Disc golf   Disc golf   Disc golf   Disc golf   Disc golf   Disc Golf   disc golf   Disc Golf   Disc Golf   Disc golf   Disc golf   Disc Golf  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 175 of 358 126 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 15  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  Disc golf   Disc golf   Disc Golf   Disc golf   Disc Golf   Disc Golf   Disc golf   Disc golf   Disc golf   Disc golf    Disc golf    Disc Golf at Howling Coyote is the only decent park. I love it there.    Disc golf at Wayne   Disc golf   Disgolfing at Blyth   Disk golf   Frisbee Golf   Dog   Dog   Dog exercise   Dog exercise and play   Dog Park   Dog park   Dog play   Dog play, sledding   Dog waling   Dog walk   Dog walk    Dog walking   dog walking   Dog walking   dog walking   Dog walking   Dog walking   Dog walking   Dog walking  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 176 of 358 127 City of Bothell Page 16  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  Dog walking   dog walking   dog walking   Dog walking   dog walking   Dog walking    Dog walking    Dog walking    Dog walking    dog walking & play   Dog walking and socializing   dogs to play in park   Dogwalking   exercising my dog   Exercising my dogs   Exercising my dogs   I have a small yard and need to exercise my dog   informal gatherings with my dog‐owning friends   Let my dog run around   Off‐leash Dog Park    Pet exercise   play with dogs and you meet other dog lovers    Pop up dog park   pop up dog park   Pop up dog park   Run my dogs   Spending the day with my dog   Take the dog for a walk.   To exercise my dog   To exercise my dog   To exercise my dog.  Loved the pop‐up dog park‐‐really need a local off‐leash area for my dog to play and exercise.    To let my dog run around   to play with our dog and exercise her   To play with our dog.   To walk my dog   To walk my dog  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 177 of 358 128 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 17  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  To walk my dog; would love an off leash area!   to walk my dogs   To walk our dog.   to walk the dog   Walk a dog   walk dog   Walk dog, ride bike   Walk dog.   Walk Dog/Get Dog Exercise   walk dogs   Walk dogs   Walk my dog   walk my dog   Walk my dog   Walk my dog   Walk my dog   Walk my dog in new places   Walk my dog in new places   Walk my dog, let kids play   Walk my dogs   walk my dogs   Walk neighbors dog on a LEASH.   Walk our dogs   Walk the dog   Walk the dog   Walk the dog   Walk the dog daily and 95% of the time in a Bothell park   walk the dogs   walking dog   Walking my dog   Walking my dog   Walking my dog   walking my dog   Walking my dog   Walking our dog   Walking our dog  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 178 of 358 129 City of Bothell Page 18  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  Walking our dog/dog park   Walking the dog   walking the dog   With my dog   Pop up fog park   Community events   Historic sites/museum & buildings   Bothell  Historical Museum events   Historical Museum ‐ docent    Visited Historical Museum   Adventuring    All ages of our family (infants, youth, adults, seniors) regularly rely on and use the trails and parks   Arbor Day   Blackberry picking   Do not over develop Bothell!   F3   Family oriented atmosphere   Geocaching   Have used other parks & beaches watching people’s animals ‐ Edmonds Beach for ferries, dives, trains, dogs, relaxation,  picnics, water   I   I am 72 years ‐ it is difficult to visit anywhere   j   No park near Queeensborough working in Shelton View Forest ‐ maybe we can make it a park   Older and have back problems   Open Space (park formerly known as Wayne Golf Course) to throw frisbee/ball/etc.   Please transform Wayne into a park like Marymoore!   Pokemon   Pokemon Go   Pokemon Go   Pokestops   skating   Tennis court   Too many dogs on & off leash using the park as its bathroom “everywhere”!   Visited the new park at Wayne.   I use the pickleball court at the Bothell Brickyard Park.  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 179 of 358 130 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 19  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  Insufficient pickleball facilities   Pickleball   Pickle Ball   pickleball   Pickleball   Pickleball   Pickleball   Pickleball   Pickleball    Pickleball and bike riding   Pickleball at Northshore Senior Center. This is my number 1 sporting activity.   Pickleball courts   Green space   Meditation   Meditation   Mental Health and connection with nature / Spiritual   Spiritual    To enjoy the green and nature   Looking for and hiding painted rocks   Rock Hunting   To hide and find painted rocks   Meeting with friends (older kids not really into the playgrounds, but the space to run around); Also many parks visited to  play Pokemon Go!   Socialization   park cleanup work groups   Shelton View Forest work parties   volunteer   Volunteer events with Friends of North Creek Forest (Work Parties and Education Field Trip support)   Volunteer work   Education event in North Creek Forest   Forest restoration work parties.   And trails    Hike Sheldon Forest    Hiking   I guide walks of groups interested in education, information and preservation of Bothell's remaining canopy/"lungs" of  balanced growth.   Walking  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 180 of 358 131 City of Bothell Page 20  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  Walking the dog & kid   Would like to go for walking safely with my walker to sit and look out towards the lake.   canoe rental at Bothell Landing   canoeing   kayaking   Waster sport activities, access to water   Access water   Hamaking or swimming   bird watching   To see the giant polished woodpecker and to relax   Watching wildlife   Would like to see the grass along the river cut down so we could better see the wildlife when walking    2. Please CHECK ALL the reasons why your household does not use City of Bothell parks and recreation facilities more often.   Difficult to park at Bothell Landing   my most commonly used park is Marymoor, for the dogs.   parking can be a challenge when everyone shows up to use it   Bathrooms smell, not clean   Some bathrooms aren't clean   Cold weather makes going to parks unappealing during winter.    No recreation facilities in the North end by Canyon Creek Elementary   Insufficient off leash space and threats of fines for responsibly running dogs off leash safely   We own recreational property where we spend our available time   Parking   I wish Bothell had a mountain bike park facility similar to Redmond's Bike Park and Issaquah's Duthie Hill   dogs off leash (tall tree park)   I live in the north/Snohomish end of Bothell, so favorite spots like Wayne or North Creek Forest are farther from me if I just  want some outside time. I use Shelton View Forest the most for that reason, which is not yet a park from my  understanding? Or I go to Swamp Creek Park in Kenmore.   Cedar Grove Park for a church picnic.  Shelton View Forest (DNR) for recreation and a sense of "forest" in a City   Bicyclists regularly engage in dangerous behavior (speed, ignore dismount signs)   Have friends in other cities   Too crowded   Some have insufficient parking.    No off leash areas for our dog   Lack of forest trails that are maintained   No off leash dog park  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 181 of 358 132 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 21  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  Tennis courts in parks of south Bothell would be nice.   Off‐leash dogs everywhere. My kids are allergic and the random dogs approaching them and licking them while the owner  stands by “oh he’s a friendly dog” is ridiculous    Parking availability   I would really love a nice dog park in Bothell. I go to Magnuson dog park a lot but it would be nice to not have to drive so far  all the time   Limited parking   I enjoy quiet areas for nature observation and longer walking paths.   need LARGE fenced open space for dogs   I go to Kirkland (Jasper) dog parks, along with Marymoor and Magnuson   When is Bothell Landing going to b upgraded per planned?   Not enough parks!   need more activities for adults   We need an off‐leash dog park!!!! I take my dog to Marymoor or Magnuson off‐leash dog parks because we do not have  one in Bothell.   off leash dogs   No off leash area    We would love to see covered playgrounds for those drizzly days in the year when the kids need to be outdoors ‐ something  like tarps over playsets   Long walking trials are farer and fewer between as i like to walk with my dog in the woods   I go to Redmond everyday to walk my dog at Marymoor   I like nature, so facilities don't excite me, woodlands do!   The sports organizations we participate in are not allowed to rent from the City of Bothell because their service area  extends beyond city limits.   Some don't have enough shade or places to sit.   There are no dog parks   No dog park   No good dog park   Heavy traffic after work. Too many people moving to the area.   areas in E Norway Hill park are used as homeless encampments; I even find used needles/garbage in my neighborhood park   Wayne golf course would be our ideal park since we l7ve on it. It is terribly maintained and not conducive for families or  friends to utilize as a park. Overgrown and not attractive    Would use more if there were an off leash area   Our dog can't be off leash to get the exercise he needs   I go to neighboring cities to let my dog play off leash   would like a more dog friendly park ‐ with area for my dog to run and play with other dogs   I have to go to parks in other cities to find an off leash park for my dog.    No dog park  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 182 of 358 133 City of Bothell Page 22  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  people routinely use my neighborhood park as an off‐leash dog space, making it unavailable for my use   No off leash dog park   Looking for dog friendly places... specifically dog parks    Too few parking spots.   there is a lack of off‐leash trails in the Bothell area   Too many dog poops in the new park (Wayne golf course park)   Lack of dedicated pickleball courts   There are non Off‐leash dog parks   No Pickleball courts available (indoor and outdoor)   No off‐leash dog areas   Looking for cricket sport field   If there is a park for playing cricket it would have been awesome as there are many cricket playing people all over Bothell   Cricket � play ground is not available.   Cricket filed   Pickleball   No dog park in all of Bothell/Kenmore area   Doesn’t have an off leash dog park section   It would be nice to have a designated off leash park   No courts dedicated to pickleball   too many dogs off leash.  I am allergic to dogs and cannot tolerate on jumping on me    Although there are a number of outdoor pickleball courts in Bothell, none have a restroom nearby and only one seems to  have a net set up. Also, the one on Brickyard Road has a long crack in the court on one side that runs the full length of the  court. Plus I prefer indoor courts.    Not enough parks   Not aware of where they are   Need more dog‐friendly park facilities, on‐leash and off‐leash   The only off leash park in Bothell is Tambark Creek which is tiny, muddy, and can take as much as an hour to get to in traffic.   Summertime picnics in the park often unavailable due to organized day camps reserving the picnic tables.   Want to go to nearby on‐leash dog park, but always see off leash dogs running around   desperately need an unleashed dog park for all of the people with dogs Bothell City Counsel has brought into the city with  all the new apartments and townhouses.   No off leash dog park   No off‐leash dog areas   There are no off leash option for dog owners   I do not go to any Bothell off‐leash dog park because there are no Bothell dog parks.    No off leash areas available nearby   My kids are 4 years apart in age. It is hard to find parks that fit both their physical needs and keep them both entertained.  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 183 of 358 134 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 23  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  For leash dogs! No enforcement or consequences   No off‐leash area to let my dog run   Lack of facilities for Pickleball playing   Use of parks and rec facilities difficult in fall and winter weather as there's limited covered areas when we have young kids.  Consider having an outdoor covered playground.   We travel for over an hour to get to an ice rink    Lack of pickleball courts (have to go to Redmond or Bellevue or Seattle to play outdoors)    Not setup for pickleball   No multi‐court Pickleball sites = 6 or more courts at a single site.   not aware of any  city  pickleball courts   I want to practice agility and the parks won't allow my dog off‐leash even though he is clearly working and under voice  control. Also, there are not enough Pickleball courts.   No out door pickle ball courts   Bothell needs a park with multiple pickleball courts. I would say 8 courts would be ideal. Locations with 8 courts (Green  Lake & Yost in Edmonds) regularly draw 30 to 50 players. With one or two courts people don't show up because you spend  too much time waiting.   Would like pickle ball courts   Doesn't have outdoor pickleball courts.   Need pickleball    Need more restrooms   Not enough pickle ball courts   need a park with multiple pickleball courts to attract players.   Facilities and offerings are limited.   Some areas (eg Bothell landing trails) feel too isolated for solo female walkers   We need more sports fields for our children.     Yucky bathrooms at some parks   Wayne Golf Course could use some upkeep   No more golf   Too many dogs/dog poo   Need more bath rooms    Filthy bathrooms at the landing   Electrical bikes, scooters, and skateboards, are becoming more and more DANGEROUS,  Too many close calls on Burke  Gilman Trail, way too many.   We go to Marymoor Dog park weekly. It would be good to have a large dog park like it in Bothell.   Mostly walking. Tree roots in walking path are difficult to traverse   Bathrooms are closed or not available (a must with little kids); no off leash park for dogs.   The Bothell parks seem to be very wildlife conservation heavy. While this is great, it would be nice for there to be bigger  recreational constructions (an example would be the big park next to the Pacific Science Center in Seattle or Maydenbaur  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 184 of 358 135 City of Bothell Page 24  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com Park in Bellevue) overall, just having not recreational activities built within parks would make them more desirable for my  family and for those around me, especially the youth   No quality dog parks   Lights are not turned ON at night during winter season if you don't have a reservation. We have a large number of players  that plays soccer regularly in North Creek Fields all year long and we end up playing in dark at night as we don't have a  reservation. Please have a manual switch at the light post so we can turn On when needed. We will appreciate if light is  made On‐Demand.   I work in Bothell, but live in Seattle.   We have a big yard at home   Parks not fully developed per adopted master plans.    People use Wayne like an off‐leash dog park, and one of my kids is afraid of large dogs running off leash.   Disc golf course is a little small and outdated   Disc golf not readily available    Need more disc golf options   Looking for building with free space for events   No quality 18 hole disc golf course worth the drive, I would drive for quality disc golf    No local dog park.   Parking a the Landing is awful. The gravel area to park is ridiculous    Not many parks are fenced and since my daughter is autistic and eloped in public, it's not safe for us to visit parks without  fences.    Lack of disc golf   Not enough parking   We regularly use local parks/rec but we do have to go elsewhere for some of our hobbies.   Parks don't have off leash dog areas    parking lot full   No dog parks near downtown    Need off leash dog park   Need more options for disc golf   No good dog parks   Mostly get out to Cascades frequently. Mountaineering   My family has grown up and live in other parts of the state   Lack of toilets   I use trails and natural areas   Not enough off‐leash dog areas   I want a nice open area to fly my drone. The old golf course park has plenty of room ‐ put us back away from others, but no  you put signs saying prohibited :( bad for recreational play.   No dog park   Centennial Park seems ignored  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 185 of 358 136 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 25  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  I like variety, but no fault of Bothell’s system   Ones that are close by   Parking has been an issue in the past and continues to be an issue when I attempt to go.   I don't know where all the parks are.   lack of fenced dog facilities   not enough dog friendly parks   No kids around ‐ workouts at organizations   Not big enough   I use parks when it suits me   Not enough variety, need water features, sand courts, tennis court   no dog park   Would like to walk Sheldon View Trail   Not enough tables or chairs   Too many dogs on & off leash using the park & everything in it as a bathroom!   Lack of parking   Not safe   Parking scarce   Bikes going fast   Limited parking options    Limited things to do if you don’t have kids   Lack of parking    Slough water is filthy ‐ no warning signs posted. Unhealthy for anyone who may come in contact with water.   no children in the household   Unleashed dogs   I am a senior citizen. I go with my kids and grandkids when we have an occasion.    parks have nothing for me except concerts   kids are big now   better trails and forest elsewhere   hard to walk   Love our parks; go often!   Use other city parks Renton/Bellevue   It would be nice to have some golf opportunity at the old Wayne course‐ not 18 holes, but somewhere for the less skilled.   We prefer to walk to the park so we go to the ones with trails.    No pickle ball courts   Bothell needs a splash pad park   Would like to be able to reserve picnic shelters for small groups, but FAR TOO EXPENSIVE now.  Used to be much more  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 186 of 358 137 City of Bothell Page 26  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com affordable.  We go elsewhere for our outdoor group activities, which is a HUGE disappointment.   Worried about safety at parks due to the growing drug problem around Seattle...more specifically, needles, car windows  being broken/broken into, and run in’s with mentally ill and or people on drugs.    No park space for Golfing   Doesn’t have an off leash dog area   I miss the Wayne Golf Course... My Dad worked there as a boy (50's & 60's) and is where I learned to play. I wish my child to  learn there too.   Not enough off leach dog areas   There are no off leash dog parks   no off leash area   Off leash dogs are a nuisance and a hazard   sidewalks and safe access to parks is an issue for us ‐ we live on 9th Avenue and do walk to Cedar Grove and Centennial,  however, I am nervous every time I take my kids there, or even when I’m jogging with headphones on or my back to traffic   Restrooms close too early.   The City has gotten too crowded and there are not enough open spaces to enjoy peacefully   No pickleball courts and no tennis courts   We go to Marymoor for the off‐leash dog park.    Generally looking for 2‐3 mile walks with wildlife photo opportunities   We would love public access to Lake Washington and a splash pad or spray park.   I have had health issues for the past 1‐1/2 years   We like to mountain bike and hike more than possible in Bothell.  5. The following list includes lower cost park amenities that the City of Bothell could consider adding to the park system. Please  indicate for each whether you would be very supportive, somewhat supportive, not supportive or not sure.   Please consider creating more trails that are walker friendly. Burke Gilman is unusable bc bikers going way too fast! Park  ranger needs to patrol their speed.   SAVE Shelton view forest   I do not support mountain biking and walking on the trail due to the accident risk.   Community Center/pool   Forest space   Skate Park, BMX Pump track or Mountain Bike trails   There are walking and biking trails in Shelton View Forest that my family and I use regularly! A community garden would be  great to foster more community! There was one at Country Village, but it fell into disrepair and is obviously gone now. :(   On‐site parking and restrooms for Shelton View Forest.  Regional attraction means cars are crowding dead end 7th Ave W  (South Entry) and 234th Pl SW (East Entry   NA   Fields or open space for activities such as drone practice, rocket launches, radio controlled aircraft, kite flying... without  concern of being disruptive to collocated activities.  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 187 of 358 138 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 27  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  Dark areas for stargazing   More garbage/recycling containers and particularly plastic water bottle disposal cans.   OFF LEASH DOG PARK NEXT TO THE WATER FOR DOG SWIMMING PLEASE!!!!   Off leash dog parks are a must in a city with unprecedented growth, especially apartments.  Apartment dwells do not have  the luxury of yards.     Off leash dog parks are a must in a city with unprecedented growth, especially apartments.  Apartment dwells do not have  the luxury of yards.     Music in the park!   Save Shelton view forest!   More dog parks please    another disc golf course/ expansion of current one   tree house   Wilderness areas preserved or expanded    How expensive is it to mow grass and paint stripes? We don't have enough athletic fields! This should be listed as an option  on this survey.   skate board park   Planting trees & supporting tree health in park areas where it is appropriate to help with climate change.    Native Plant specific spaces, herb gardens, garden labyrinth. No more concrete and sports fields please.    Expanded nonmotorized boat launch and landing facilities    Disk golf and a bump track for kids to ride on   equipment for checkout, like cornhole, jenga, croquet (and other outdoor games)   Disc golf courses (very low cost)   Splash pad   forest preservation‐very supportive   More trails in Northern Bothell. Shelton Forest   Something needs to be done to Wayne golf course.    Trees for off leash dog parks   When walking along the Sammamish River, I feel you should be able to see the river, so clearing could be kept up by so the  river is in view in the places that apply.   Walking/hiking without bikes   need at least some trails where you can exercise with dog off‐leash   Splash pads and wading pools! Please! Especially as summers get hotter.   dedicated pickleball courts ‐ it is low cost to convert a number of underutilized tennis courts   Protective perimeter fences.   Free Community Indoor Spaces   Shelton View Forest becoming a Bothell park   Indoor and Outdoor Pickleball courts please  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 188 of 358 139 City of Bothell Page 28  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  Facilities for playing Pickleball would be VERY much appreciated and supported!   Protecting existing land and parks from development   Off‐Leash Dog Park and Dog Swimming Area   on  off leash areas for dogs  not fenced    Transforming old tennis courts to pickle ball courts   pickleball   More places for under 5 year olds.   Splash pad!   Have volunteers do better signage. ADA Accessible trails would be awesome for both folks with mobility issues and  stroller/families. P.S. I'm a regular park goer with a lot of resources. Bothell needs to get opinions from folks/communities  who might not always have the resources/inclination to go to parks, i.e. disabled or low income folks. Thanks!   Are multi use trails safe for pedestrians? I know there are fights with mtn bikers at St Edwards park   Disc golf course   I would love an off leash trail area   Pickleball courts with restrooms   Need to enforce leash requirements new park (Wayne golf course)   Pickleball courts   Pickleball courts   Pickleball courts (indoors/outdoors)   Outdoor fitness, climbing and movement facilities.    Pickle ball courts   more pickleball courts   I am not supportive of off‐leash dog areas because they are not good places to take your dog off‐leash since it encourages  owners to relax and not actively monitor their pet for mis‐behavior. What is needed instead is greater education of  appropriate animal behavior and a different approach to off‐leash pets that integrates them into the ENTIRE park system  rather than "separate but equal" areas.   Multi use special permits for events that benefit the community   Outdoor pickleball courts.   Pickleball court lines at any tennis court (which are rarely used)... pickleball community is huge   Pickle ball courts   Pickleball   Pickle Ball Courts!   need a.park with multiple pickleball courts.   Save Shelton View Forest from development. Wonderful walking and biking trails in woods.   Turn the front 9 of Wayne back to a golf course. It was a good place for people to learn.    Splash park   #1 is a off leash dog park. We desperately need ONE!!!   February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 189 of 358 140 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 29  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  Water parks and skate parks   A permanent canteen/cafe at Bothell landing   Dedicated Outdoor Pickleball Courts   Skate park!   Splash pad    Having bigger landmarks such as a water fountain system to play in or a strip area with trendy foods or clothing stores.  Additionally, adding more art in the street would help Bothell with gaining self‐identity and it would be a great photo taking  opportunity. These are ideas that I know the youth would back up   Biking trails are not compatible with walking. I've been almost run down by too many bikers who treat trails as a highway.  We need hiker‐only trails.   New skate park    Disc golf   Extended Disc golf course (Blythe)   If this area is for suggestions ‐ additional/improved disc golf facilities   More Disc Golf courses   Disc golf   Disc Golf extension at Wayne back side   skate park/older teen/college youth areas with sport court/volleyball/community access to Cascadia/UWB courts   Nature interpretation   Very supportive of disk golf   Disc Golf   Disc Golf courses!   Expanding the disc golf course at Blyth Park.   Disc golf courses   Possibly more disc golf related growth    Disc Golf could be easily expanded into Wayne's course while still allowing opportunity for other activities and walking trail  use   Indoor community areas‐Free to residents   Highly support disc golf course development    Disc golf course   A bathroom for the Wayne Golf park would be very nice   More areas for dogs   Disc golf please!   Disc golf courses   River access ‐ for kayaking, canoeing ‐ at Wayne Golf as a connection w/Bothell Landing     Disc golf course   Mountain bike park with obstacles ‐‐ not just trails, and a bouldering/rock climbing structure. (Both could go in at Wayne  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 190 of 358 141 City of Bothell Page 30  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com Golf Course and still leave room for many other things!)   single use walking trails, it's too dangerous to walk on trails with bikes   I would REALLY love an off leash dog area near downtown    Nature. Trails   Disc golf expansion please   Expanded disc golf course  Very supportive   Disc Golf   tennis walls for practice    More disc golf would be supported a lot due to such a small amount as of now    More disc golf opportunities   Utilizing the old back 9 holes of the Wayne Golf course to turn the existing Howling Coyote 10 hole course into a full 18 hole  course would be an amazing use of the space, would not monopolize the whole park, would allow the parks department to  move the existing hole 1 away from the pedestrian trail and would bring more visitors to the park.  Using the Wayne  parking and promoting parking at the Wayne lots would help as well.  THANKS FOR READING :)   Disc golf please   DISCGOLF COURSE   Disc Golf an 18 hole course is needed   Open mowed grass for general play and relaxation    Hitting wall for tennis ‐ this only requires a concrete wall and a fence. Not expensive.   Water fountain maybe?   Look for what families say   Update playgrounds   Sports fields   Botanical gardens   Not commercial buildings & sales, just people; wooden castle playground structure at Alameada Park in Santa Barbara;  Frisbee golf/Ultimate Frisbee teen‐adult   Dog parks!   Natural spaces/preserved wetlands   Signage, parking & maintenance   Dog owners do not obey the rules, they need a place to go   Parking   Kayaking rentals; food trucks   Secure bike storage/garage   More free concerts / gatherings, more parking!   bike lanes on trails   Add fields/courts just like Marymoor   high bar and parallel bars  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 191 of 358 142 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 31  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  Wayne’s course park more amenities to use like playground, trails or off‐leash dog park   botanical garden   walking w/ no bikes   Baseball fields (definitely not enough)   Improving information about existing trails‐ improving trails through Blyth park/Wayne   Walking and biking don’t mix well. More walking opportunities.    parking   Pickle ball courts   Military Veterans Museum   natural area & forest trails.   natural spaces   Splash pads   Small outdoor sport courts (i.e., pickleball).  Would be great at Cedar Grove, Doug Allen, Blythe, William Penn, etc.   Very interested in community gardens but worry about vandalism. Also, we need more parks and fields to offset all of the  housing development!! Miners corner is too crowded. We are all crammed into our neighborhoods like sardines. Thank you  for creating more green spaces!!   Don't want mountain biking trails   Designated area for RC (remote control) hobbies.   Fenced off leashed dog parks such as Willis Tucker in Snohomish.  Separating large and small dogs.   off leash is top priority   better recycle/trash options with better labels/info/suggestions    Bothell NEEDS a Farmer's Market! (A nice, large, accessible one!)   Pickleball courts ‐ indoor & out‐door   Renaissance Festival   PLEASE ADD A DOG PARK AT WAYNE GOLF COURSE!!!    6. The following list includes higher cost park amenities that the City of Bothell could consider adding to the park system. Please  indicate for each whether you would be very supportive, somewhat supportive, not supportive or not sure.   I'm interested in open space with casual walking trails.  The Burke Gilman Trail and Bothell Landing offer this community  more than enough access for bike/walking access to the slough etc.    Pool   Free Indoor/ outdoor areas for Community events    Community center/pool   Drone flying course/area   Shelton View Forest ‐ volunteers already maintain it and it's regularly used and loved by locals.    Mountain bike park    A trail from Shelton View Forest, going west, already connects to Forsgren Park (SnoCo) and Swamp Creek.  The SVF  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 192 of 358 143 City of Bothell Page 32  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com Stewardship Association is willing to assist the City with annexation of the 400 homes west of Fruhling and DNR.  Residents  show increasing interest in preserving a forest on their east side, and understand that property taxes would, over 10‐15  years, be a significant "payment plan" for acquisition of otherwise threatened development.   Rock climbing wall   Na   Rock climbing wall, or possibly a managed/reservable aerial adventure/rope park. How cool would that make Bothell?!!   A cricket pitch is very costly to maintain (esp. the bowling pitch).  A rugby field would be better.   Wildlife viewing natural areas and trails   More park land aquisition   large fenced in off leash dog park with water   OFF LEASH DOG PARK AT WAYNE GOLF COURSE WITH WATER SWIMMING ACCESS FOR THE DOGS!!!   Cricket field is in‐line with being culturally sensitive.  Great idea!  The city sold off our last skateboard park.  It should be  replaced. Please consider providing another spot for teenagers to play and build their community.   Cricket field is in‐line with being culturally sensitive.  Great idea!  The city sold off our last skateboard park.  It should be  replaced. Please consider providing another spot for teenagers to play and build their community.   Nature trails   Saving Shelton View forest, w/limited alterations or improvements. Add a restroom/honey bucket, improve part of the trail  for disabled access.   Options 1 & 2 are the same thing. A cricket field is enormous and can have any of option 1 overlayed inside its boundaries.  Support for option 2 is defacto support for option 1..    DOG PARK   Tennis courts; include nets at pickle ball courts   dog off leash areas need to be added in the Bothell area.    Public tennis courts / off‐leash dog park   land purchases for future forest and meadow preservation‐very supportive   Off leash dog park!!!   A no cost option at Wayne Golf Course   brand new dedicated pickleball court area that is lighted and maintained   Protective perimeter fencing.   Free Indoor Community Spaces   Shelton view Forrest becoming a Bothell park   tennis court   Pickleball courts (Indoor and Outdoor) please.   Pickleball courts   More cricket grounds were requested    Pickleball facilities would be VERY MUCH appreciated!  If not dedicated courts, then striping on existing/new tennis courts.   Pickleball   Off leash dog area for exercise and play   New lit at night pickle ball courts.  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 193 of 358 144 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 33  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  Indoor pickleball courts.   Skateboard parks are AWESOME for teens. I'd be "very supportive" if we have the demographics to justify it.   Disc golf course   volleyball area   Pickleball courts with restrooms   Pickleball court   Covered kids playground to use when it rains.   Pickleball Courts     We need an ice rink in this area. It's differentiated and there is more than enough demand.  Residents must travel over an  hour to other communities' ice rinks   Pickleball ‐ fit 4 courts onto 1 tennis court.   Pickleball sites with at least 6 fixed, lined sports. This sport services all ages, teens to 90's.   Bothell Civic Center‐ pool, splash pad/water spray features,gym,class rooms,racket ball courts!!!   Indoor/outdoor pickleball facilities   We need more Pickleball courts   indoor as well outdoor pickle‐ball courts   PICKLEBALL!!!!! Easy to convert tennis courts and add a PERMANENT net,   Wider, erosion resistant, soft surface paths suitable for walking, running, cycling   Pickleball courts...   Pickle ball courts   Pickleball   Pickleball courts   pickleball courts   indoor recreational facility   Golf on front 9 back   Maintenance. Please mow the grass   Dedicated outdoor Pickleball courts   Adequate parking would be helpful.   Strip shops with small stalls with trending foods and trinkets (could just be an annual event thing), Outdoor public pools,  carousel, large “modern” park like one next to PSS, small carnival or amusement park (could be an annual thing)   public showers and restrooms   Disc Golf Courses   New Disc Golf Course   Disc golf facilities   A new disc golf course   Disc Golf at Wayne?   Disc Golf Courses!  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 194 of 358 145 City of Bothell Page 34  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  Disc golf course   Indoor Community areas‐ free to residents   Disc Golf Course at Wayne! That would be such a draw. Plus, you can build walking trails in conjunction with it!   Disc golf course   Disc golf course   Disc golf courses   Disc golf courses    Mountain bike trails, bike trail more directly connecting Bothell to thrashers along Bothell Everett highway without going  over through the business park.   I guess the rock climbing/bouldering structure would go under the higher cost amenities...   Pool beyond a splash park such as a lap swim pool which could include a recreational pool    More disc golf please   New disc golf course   Very supportive   Disc Golf   Tennis walls for practice    equestrian trails   More disc golf resources   Would like to see the expanding of Disc Golf Parks. Low cost and extremely fun. Great community builder.   Disc golf   Disc golf please   Disc golf course ‐ very supportive   Miniature golf, bicycle rental, and snack shop   Hitting wall for tennis ‐ this is only available at Grass Lawn Park in Redmond. We need this!   Skatepark please   Tennis courts    Dog parks   New trails   Anything that teens would like   I heard about a round hill or mound of dirt covered in artificial grass for kids to sled down on cardboard. Also, pole with a  slow hydraulic elevator ‐ going down, kids love it! Check out other large toys at Santa Barbara Zoo playground ‐ standing big  chimes to make musical sounds with a hard rubber mallet; Mommy and baby swing (Camarillo CA Community Center Park)   Small/med sized outdoor music amphitheater    tennis courts, pools   Increase number of benches along trails   Beach/sand courts   Pool!   Laser tag, indoor aquarium, small zoo  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 195 of 358 146 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 35  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  Botanical garden   Rock climbing   Outdoor pool/park   bike lanes   Post warning signs regarding toxic water first   Rec center w/pool, rock climbing.   equestrian park   Pickle ball courts   Military Veterans Museum   Pool.  We need an aquatic facility.  I know we try to punt it as a regional need, but as a city we fail to step up and at least  put it to a measure compared to forcing downtown renovations.   Golf amenities similar to Seattle: Interbay, Jefferson Park, Jackson Park.    Designated area for RC (remote control) hobbies.   Off leash dog park very supportive    The City of Bothell needs a splash pad/water park at the Park at Bothell Landing!   Re‐open the Wayne Golf Course front nine! Private management can run the clubhouse.   We were very disappointed that the existing skateboard park wasn't replaced when Pop Keeney was re‐done. We felt the  same about the baseball park. There are enough soccer parks and little league fields, we need ball parks for bigger kids.   Pickleball Courts...   Bothell only has one court and not very nice to play at.   Pickleball courts   Dance Dance Revolution Machines in the park   Secure bicycle lock up areas where we can leave a bike while enjoying the park without worrying about theft   Tennis and pickle balls courts  14. Do you have any other comments or suggestions for Bothell’s parks, programs or events?   Bring music back to Bothell Landing ‐ at least try to see how it works   Do not pave over Wayne. Keep it green, add trees, trails, splash pad   I find it difficult to walk along the Sammamish River Trail because the cyclists go too fast and don't warn pedestrians   Developed parks foster a great sense of community but we also need the undeveloped spaces such as Shelton View forest  which has trees that clean the air.  If you turn a blind eye to its destruction, then all this climate change rhetoric is just lip  service.  Time to put your money (our money) where your mouth is.   Love the location of new pop up park!!! Hope it stays!   More parking and improvements to infrastructure as well   More natural spaces, fields and forests. Less developed space. please save Shelton view forest, my kids love it there.   Pool! I'll pay taxes for that. And we really should have a community center and programs. I shouldn't have to go to another  city for that.    Stop over developing Bothell.  As someone who grew up here I no longer recognize my own community.  Part of the  essence of Bothell is its “small town” atmosphere.   February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 196 of 358 147 City of Bothell Page 36  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  Miss the chickens along Sammamish River Trail   Stop building more houses. Keep the few remaining green spaces for the future generation. It's not all about revenue. The  reason we moved here was because of the quaintness, the community, the horse ranches and woods/trees. All of that is  almost gone.   Stop building more houses, utilize those green spaces to benefit the future generations. Revenue is not the answer. I moved  to this town because of its smallness, community, the horse ranches and woods/trees. All are gone and it is sad.   Acquiring land for open space and parks should be a priority with the increasing density in our housing and population.   Dog park!    I think all of the parks I have visited are extremely well maintained. Although my household does not participate in youth or  adult activities, I know they are there and I like that it’s a service provided to our community. I would love to see more  community events throughout the year similar to the 4th of July events. Off the top of my head I think of concerts  downtown or in a park, movies in the park, sports leagues/games, festivals (maybe a Bothell Birthday party!)    Outdoor spaces and trails where I can connect with nature are important to me and my family. My family no longer has  children, so children's programs are no longer important for our family, but I feel they are very important to the  community. I live on the west edge of unincorporated Bothell, It would be nice to have parks that are close to me instead of  several miles away.   Do better with handling new development‐ keep open spaces too!   People work very hard for their money just to earn a living for family. We do not need to be taxed out of our city, county  and state for luxuries people around the world do not have. The greed is already much too enormous , we don't need to  spoil people any more and make others loose their homes due to that mentality. Taxes are being thrown and forced at the  homeowners from every angle there is. This has also resulted in the very high rents that people can't afford as it trickles  down from the property owners. That is exactly why we have so many homeless people and others who will never be able  to buy a home and live on their own. Think about it.......what a shame and very sad situation....the times we live in. All  because of G R E E D      Community center, activities for teens, parks in the north end and a pool are lacking in our city.    City & county need to work together, to have developers provide more funds for these community endeavors.     Save Sheltonview Forest   Bothell needs a Community Gathering place like the Hangar in Kenmore. Where residents can meet in small groups and  socialize, that Bothell residents can also reserve free room spaces for blocks of time to host meetings or events.    We need a community center/pool   Widen trails for walkers and bikers.   Allow dog owners to run dogs off leash in more spaces. Enforce pickup and aggression laws but leave owners who are  responsibly exercising their dogs alone. Also save Shelton View Forest.    The spread of development and destruction of green spaces in north Bothell is concerning. Bothell should hold onto  whatever forest land the city has for future parks and to maintain natural spaces. Centennial park needs additional activities  like a playground because it is a disappointing park and not a great use of space currently.   I think it is essential to keep as many open land/trail areas so kids can connect with nature and ensure our green spaces are  preserved for future generations.   With all of the development, protecting green open spaces is all the more important.    Please save Shelton View Forest from Developers   We need more parks in the Snohomish County portion of the city. Land should be purchased before it is developed, so it  will cost less. Developing and implementing a master plan to treat all the parkland along the Sammamish River as a single  park would put Bothell on the map as a tourist destination. Bothell should consider the role its parks could play in  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 197 of 358 148 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 37  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com endangered species recovery. While I believe acquiring raw land should be the top priority in this plan, the next one might  include indoor sports facilities (volleyball, basketball, swimming) and a community center, so land to host such facilities  should be acquired. Bothell should double the number of sports fields it has. Shelton View Forest should be acquired  quickly, and then park impact fees should be adjusted to reflect the higher ratio of parkland to population since fees were  last set. Bothell should develop its own transfer of development rights program to allow acquisition of new parkland at  reduced cost. Master planning of parks should include outreach to children, so their interest in playground equipment and  other recreational activities can be considered. "   If making an off‐leash dog park, be careful to not hurt the surrounding ecosystem, which is a huge issue at Marymoor park  along the river. Aquatic habitats are too sensitive for regular dog use.   Would like to make sure that Shelton View Forest remains a park for everyone to enjoy. It it is in a great location and is a  wonderful space to enjoy nature.   Build a off leash dog park at Wayne's golf course.   None   Save Sheltonview forest!!!! Please!!!!!!   The sidewalks near the playground at Bothell Landing are dangerous. I have tripped and fallen and recently saw a child trip  and fall. They need to be fixed.   As a daily user of/and someone who greatly enjoys Bothell's parks and trails... we need additional green spaces and parks as  the city continues to grow and fill with hundreds of new families and users.   I like the music in park program   Help purchase Shelton View forest, New bathrooms at Bothell landing, a boat center at old Wayne golf course, and  environmental center there too.   Save Shelton view forest   It is ESSENTIAL and CRITICAL to prioritize acquiring land  to preserve open spaces in Bothell. Even if they are not  immediately turned into parks (or ever.) There are far too many trees and even small pockets of open space being lost to  development which is bad for the environment as well as the sense of community in Bothell. Raise taxes or re‐prioritize or  whatever, but do more NOW before the options are gone. Make absolutely sure that Shelton View Forest is preserved and  find every possible opportunity to create more spaces like it and North Creek Forest. Even smaller tracts of undeveloped  area that might be privately owned like the drainage areas around creeks, etc. are worth saving.   Need to fund and collect as much open space as possible...Bothell is becoming too gentrified and expensive.   Better management of priorities on spending rather than tax increases as proposed now for almost everything!   Yes, strongly support saving  Shelton  View forest!!   PLEASE fund Shelton View Forest!!!   thank you for this survey and for the service you offer to Bothell   I enjoy exploring new trails and outdoor spaces. I recently came across Shelton View Forest. I never knew this was there and  now I go once a week, if not more! I would support it being a city park ‐ we can't afford to lose any more green space to  development. Let's get these spaces that are ideal for open space preserved, we can talk amenities down the road. Had a  fun time at concerts in the park this summer!    We don't need to have a Marymoor or a Bellevue city park up here, our smaller neighborhood parks fit Bothell just fine I  think. I think if we do want to spend more on parks, let's improve Bothell Landing instead of trying to make more parks. We  don't quite have the tax base of Bellevue to be able to build and sustain the downtown park, Meydenbauer park, etc, so  let's keep our expectations realistic. Bothell just doesnt have the same population as these other larger cities, so we don't  need to try to build a big venue for concerts or anything. And I think the local schools have enough fields for public use.    Keep Shelton View Forest as is  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 198 of 358 149 City of Bothell Page 38  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  Continue to keep Stipek Park playground and facilities clean and up‐to‐date. Very nice neighborhood park.   Please follow through and purchase Shelton View Forest! There are very few parks in this section of Bothell that are NOT  geared toward playgrounds and picnic areas. There are a lot of residents looking for trail running and easy after work hiking  opportunities in the area, and easy, safe outdoor areas to introduce young kiddos to (and foster a love for our natural  environments). Shelton View Forest is one of the few areas of its kind remaining in Bothell and is the only park of any kind  in the Shelton View area.    Bothell is rapidly losing its charm and attractive qualities. Country Village, the hub of small business and community space  in Bothell, is gone. Many businesses on Mainstreet have suffered due to unnecessary construction. Green spaces are  disappearing to be used as townhomes, bringing in more people without adding spaces to make current residents want to  stay. We must preserve existing FOREST space (Shelton View Forest, 46 acres of important wildlife habitat) rather than  focusing on artificial turf or sports facilities. Bothell has heritage that should be preserved, or there will be nothing in  Bothell worth staying for.   Fees should be reasonable to be inclusive of all people!   My teenage kids love to ride their bikes at Shelton View Forest.  They like to work and make more trails.  I am very happy it  is there to keep them busy and out of trouble.  I love all the new restaurants and stores in downtown Bothell.  It is a nice  area to walk around.  My kids miss the old skate park that used to be by the pool.  We go to the Woodinville one but it can  get crowded.  They also love the Redmond Bike Park.   A mountain bike park/trails or bmx area are of high interest to us. Same with common center for teens, especially with a  pool. Would like to keep open spaces with trails such as parts of Wayne Golf Course too. More things near North Bothell  before it’s completely built up with houses.    Please consider public lands as essential for water quality and salmon/ killer whale recovery along with other wildlife. These  parks are also the closest connection many city dwellers have to learning about nature, ecosystems, etc. so please be  mindful in how natural spaces are developed.   Bothell is projected to grow in the next 6‐10 years, and I am concerned with the rate of development about whether there  will be open space left to acquire as park space. Especially in Snohomish County, where park space is limited, I want to see  more investment in the long term from the City for parks planning in the outlier areas of the City. For example, Shelton  View Forest already has 4 miles of trails, and is being well taken care of by the Bothell community. I see more new people  visiting every time I go there. I would like to see more effort being made to saving these spaces ‐ the way I see it, they are  our last resort.    Continue to acquire or develop land available for "natural " parks such as Miners Landing or space like Shelton View Forest.   The ""Wayne Golf Course"" turned into a park may become a crossroads regional park, esp. useful for citizens near and  visitors to central Bothell.  But Shelton View Forest, 10‐15 minutes to the northwest is equally close to north end citizens of  Bothell & Kenmore, east Mountlake Terrace, south Lynnwood and Brier.  It has size and terrain to offer more a Cascades‐ like experience with both educational and recreational opportunities.  Though smaller, it compares to Lord Hill Regional  Park and Paradise Valley Conservation Area.  It's St Edwards park without noise from the lake.  SVF has 4 miles of tended  trails.  Healthy in my 70's, I could be a docent, or on‐site assistant to day‐camp outings and field trips.  Example:  I prep  ""lessons from..."" objects for classroom and library use for two elementary schools close to the forest.  City Manager Jennifer Phillips asked our Shelton View Forest Stewardship Association, to ""find funding for acquisition.""   So we are cultivating relationships and gathering contact information with citizens to the west of the forest.  IF they could  have a significant forest east and behind them as well as Forsgren Sports Fields (SnoCo) on their south side, they might seek  annexation if ""there was something in it for us.""  Otherwise, Lynnwood draws their parking, shopping and eating out.      We've learned from SnoCo that ""property taxes"" by law have built in formula for monies raised.  But even 8‐10% of these  same taxes ( x 400 homes) could provide payments over ___ years toward acquisition.  That's a revenue stream above what  the City has now for acquisition.  I'm willing to be a ""community liaison"" on behalf of my City to the friends we already  have in this neighborhood, and they would host neighbors to learn why my wife and I love being annexed to the City.  We  live on 228th at 2nd Pl W.    I've run through this urban forest for 30+ years, clearing windfall, hauling out garbage, rooting out ivy and blackberry,  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 199 of 358 150 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 39  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com removing trip hazards, mitigating erosion, installing benches and a story circle, building a scale model for group  presentations, and was part of the request  to Snohomish County Conservation Futures request that became (holding)  $1,000,000 toward acquisition.  More recently I ""supervised"" an Eagle Scout applicant as he, his dad and grandfather and  troop as they installed in‐forest trail kiosks, numbered posts and minimal signs that now correspond with trail maps, in part,  to aid first responders to a health or injury incident.  If you've not taken this ""hike in the City,"" call me for a look‐see.  It's rare to have a contiguous 75‐acre forest still  available.  IF we protect the heart of it by acquisition, we protect the whole of it, including peripheral canopy of F.E.M.A., an  elementary school, a pipeline corridor (access to parking, toilets, a playground and a bend of Swamp Creek.  We also invite  the critters displaced by dense ""build out"" of a community that needs balance in use of space.  If set aside as open space  until additional funding comes, a bare necessary investment might provide parking and a couple of pit toilets.  A lot of us  volunteers are ready to work under City supervision to maintain it as is, much of the hard work DONE.    DNR has recently approved SVFSA to reclaim another half mile of original trail!  That project begins this September and  comes under my supervision as SVFSA ""trail team lead." Bob Rorabaugh 206‐948‐9511   would like to see Shelton View Forest included in Bothell's plans. Already has established trails and willing volunteers.   would like to see Bothell include Shelton View Forest in their future plans. already has good established trails, and willing  volunteers.   I like the temporary dog park but I don't like the location... would love more trees planted near the roads in the park areas.   Consider using some space at Wayne's Golf Course Park for an off leash area for dogs.  We really need an off leash park in  Bothell.  The Pop Up park was a nice idea and well used, but too close to traffic (noisy and exhaust emissions not fun to  inhale).     We need a dog park    Please add a dog park. Don't turn it into Jasper's. Make it level. Shady area optional. Small dog area mandatory.   Rock climbing wall   Bothell has seen a lot of new construction recently.  This often means clearing of forests and vegetation.  Bothell should  work to preserve green spaces, such as Shelton View Forest, for the benefit of residents, wildlife, and the environment.   Development that involves land clearing should be assessed a tax/fee that would be set aside for open/green space  acquisition and maintenance.   Two suggestions: 1. Organize community garden with common space devoted to producing produce for donations to local  food bank, with additional space allocated for individual personal gardens. Locating on Western portion of Wayne golf  course would allow for parking space. Not sure about water for garden. WellS.? Slough? 2. Involve Northshore high schools  in planting trees on Wayne golf course. Trees store carbon. A good thing for the planet!"   More open space......for us to breathe. Too much concrete.    The Parks Department has always had dedicated and courteous employees and it just keeps getting better.   The Parks department has had many dedicated employees ad it keeps getting better   Thank you for doing the pop‐up dog park. I hope to see one developed in Bothell that includes shady areas and good/ample  parking.    We’d love to see a Gaga ball pit in Conifer View Park. Can we specifically raise money for this? I’d be happy to volunteer in  helping raise money.    On the whole the parks are great but lacking off leash dog areas.   We love Bothell and walk more than weekly to Blythe park and Bothell Landing.  We see the picnic tables old and dirty,  some dusty, unpaved lots for cars and the bridge that is needing to be repaired.  The trails along the river are bumpy from  tree roots.  At times I feel we look a bit broken down or under staffed perhaps?  Bothell is homey and full of character but  we hope can get more budget to spiff appearances up a bit.  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 200 of 358 151 City of Bothell Page 40  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  We love what you do, and are hopefully Wayne Golf course can become the gem of usefulness in the coming future as well.   I live near downtown Bothell.  When grandchildren come to play, I wish  the parks nearby (Blyth and Bothell landing) had  more play structures and features such as a splash pad.    We want more cultural community  programs in Bothell Downtown.   Invest in North Creek Forest Park trails. Please improve condition & access to forest trails in Centennial Park. Plant more  trees such as a forest memorial grove in Centennial Park and other parks. To draw community interest and support, have bi‐ annual tree & shrub planting events in local parks as well as general maintenance. Utilize professional landscapers,  foresters, and students/teachers from environmental UW Bothell & Cascadia programs to assist with these events. As for  outdoor classes, I recommend supporting local teachers who already provide programs rather than extending your  programs internally.    Just don't do anything where MORE land and trees will be removed.  Bothell was so nice until all the development in the  last few years!   Development of North Creek Forest for trails, hikes, etc. and for educational opportunities.   Inclusive playground and splash park at Bothell landing would be my priority. Especially since the park is at the heart of the  downtown revitalization and attracts many visitors.    A permanent dog park within Wayne Golf Course would be very beneficial    Please create an off leash park in part of the old Wayne Golf course. A good off leash park needs trees, shade, green gassy  areas and open space.     Keep Wayne gold course green. No sports. No dogs. No splash pad. No recreation. No skate park. Walking paths only. No  bike paths ‐ they are way too dangerous for walkers.    Please keep your foot on the gas. We’ll run parks make a difference for all families! Thanks for what you are doing. Bothell  is becoming a great place!   Seek active and early advice from citizens regarding development of Wayne Park.  I have been told that I would be notified  when meetings are occurring (“starting in early 2019”) but have not heard anything.  The Hood River, OR government  solicited advice (and subsequently enormous donations) from its citizens to create an exceptional riverfront park.   Save Yakima Fruit Market. Also want you to preserve open space around Canyon Creek. That area is a treasure. It’s a shame  we lost Country Village. Don’t blow this. Let’s not lose our character.   Would love to see some upgrading of East Norway Hill park commence (picnic tables and restrooms would be nice).   Majority of toddler programs bar kids with working parents from participating, due to timing. Don’t add fees to parks.   The building up has caused a huge influx of people using parks. It's kind of crazy now. Accommodations need to be made.   I would like to see Music in the Park moved back to Bothell Landing. It was more comfortable and fun there. I have been to  the sports field only 2times and just did not enjoy it or feel comfortable there   Love the pop up dog park at the landing.  Would like to see it become permanent.   We need more plants and open space or we’re going to lose the wildlife around here, and the plots of green being mowed  down for giant houses with no trees is devastating. More ferns! More trees! We can do high density with greenspace, parks,  and wildlife!    Keep the dog park please! Not all of us have human children.    Can you buy that empty lot by the library and convert it into a park? We need more green spaces... Bothell is going crazy  with all the development and stripping the land of trees and trees... save that lot by the library for a park   More parks   Please please bring in a splash pad.  I hate dragging my toddler to every other city except their home town to play in a  splash pad   February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 201 of 358 152 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 41  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  We need more parks for all the families that are moving into these new developments that are under construction. Too  much developments and not enough parks and green space.    Plant more trees.  Leave the existing trees alone.  Quit developing/over developing the city. The streets cannot support it.  Wildlife is being killed because of it.  Just leave it alone.    Bothell parks are generally not as well kept as some of our neighboring cities‐‐ Wilmot Park in Woodinville for example.   There are no parks here I would "show off" to guests.  The entire Bothell Landing area would be a wonderful asset to the  community if expanded  and maintained as a crown jewel of the parks system.     Dog park in the new Wayne Golf Course that was purchased.     Replace wood chips with soft turf and install a playground designed for children under 5 (ie what Bellevue downtown park  has)   Would like to see a central community, treed green space in Bothell city center (by city hall) with water feature (like  Redmond). A small town gathering area. Great for 4th of July and other holiday festivities. Would also like to see Wayne  considered for large space dog park. Parking and water is available. would be a smaller scale success  Marymoor. Current  usage is a great indicator of how well this would be received as park addition. Thanks for reaching out and asking what the  community would want with this survey.   Dog Park at Wayne golf course. Plenty of room and parking.   More info on what's going on! I would love to volunteer with the salmon habitat enhancement work in the former Wayne  golf course but hadn't heard about the opportunities   more awesome playgrounds, particularly with themes. make sure parks are bike accessible, provide bike racks   We need an adequate off leash dog park. Preferably somewhere with shade and enough space so dogs are all mashed  together.    You didn’t  ask about Old Wayne’s Golf park development.  You have the land and what and how is BOTHELL going to  develop????   Bothell parks, programs and events are what MAKE a community.  This city has been over developed and the parks must be  enhanced to keep up with the growing population.   Keep adding parks as revenue permits   PLEASE INSTALL AN OFF LEASH DOG PARK AT WAYNE GOLF COURSE WITH WATER SWIMMING ACCESS FOR THE DOGS!!!  MAINTENANCE CAN BE MANAGED BY VOLUNTEER COMMUNITY MEMBERS JUST LIKE MARYMOORE DOG PARK!!!   Keep Shelton View Forest. We all need the nature especially with an ever expanding city, we need a place to reconnect to  our earth   Off leash dog parks, skateboard parks, walking/biking trails all high on my list of park priorities for Bothell.  We have such a  great city.  Let's keep acquiring and preserving our open spaces too.  Work toward saving Shelton View Forest if possible.   That would be a treasure.   Please develop the old Wayne's golf course (or whatever it's name is) park so it is not just an off leash dog park! Too many  people now just let their dogs run everywhere there and do not pick up after them. It's such a beautiful space with great  potential. I hope thought and planning really goes into how it is going to be used in the long run. Also, the city should look  into developing an outdoor archery range, like at Wayne's golf course for example. Archery is the largest growing family  sport and there is a need for a family friendly (not gun range) course in this area. This could be a source of revenue for the  City and great opportunity for people living in Bothell.    Protect Shelton View Forest   My household doesn'T have kids, & does have some older adults with mobility issues. While I love the Music in the Park  idea, I'd like to see more variety in programming bands. Also sorely needed is handicap parking closer, or volunteers who  can watch items dropped off. There are many city police & fire people there supporting the event. Could they help? Or  teens needing community hrs.?  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 202 of 358 153 City of Bothell Page 42  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  Update bathroom facilities in Bothell Landing.      Can golf course be used for off leash?   Would love more events like Music in the Park, local markets (evenings in Summer), pop up food truck nights.  Maybe those  are happening and I’m just not aware?  If so, better ways to get the word out.    The temporary dog park at Bothell Landing is a nice trial but the perfect location is Wayne Golf Course!!   None   Save Shelton view forest! More biking, hiking, walking trails   More Dog parks please. Keep the Pop up park open.    I think that the Blyth disc golf course could be easily expanded onto the back nine of Waynes. This would increase not only  how amazing the course is, but also allow for players to be more spread out.    SAVE SHELTON VIEW FOREST!   Keep Shelton View Forest and expand it   Off leash dog park   Highly support an off‐leash dog park that includes trails for dogs and owners to walk.   We need a permeant dog park.  The old golf course would be a perfect place for one.  The golf course has a lot of potential.    Save our green space. No more housing developments.   Parking at Bothell Landing ‐ the street is a one way dead end.  Current design does not allow for sufficient space to turn  around.  Recommend a cul‐de‐sac layout which allows for turning around.   Save Shelton View Forest, it is an important park with beautiful trails and is well‐loved by the community   Keep and create as many natural and wild places as you can, they are essential to health and humanity.   There were a few question that I didn't answer because none of the answers offered seemed to fit. There should've been a  "not applicable" (or similar) option offered. I was concerned that if I answered those questions the answers could be  misinterpreted. For example, if I said that the programs for young kids "met my needs" (only because I don't use those  programs because I only have teens now) that could be interpreted as "the programs for young kids are very good and I am  happy with them". But what I am really trying to say is that my need for those programs is zero, so I have no use for them,  so even though I do not use those programs MY needs are being met. I hope you can understand my explanation!   The City needs to figure out a way to better partner with organizations like NYSA and SoundFC (soccer) to use athletic  facilities despite the fact the service area of those organizations extend beyond the Bothell Municipal boundaries. Bothell  Cougar Jr. Football has a monopoly on city assets because of this rule. This used to be a football town with a drinking  problem... now a days it's a drinking town with a football problem!   Definitely need more off‐leash dog parks.   dog park at Wayne golf course!   Preserve Shelton View Forest   As we get more buildings downtown, the need for parks increases.  We need green spaces, trees, and outdoor places to  rejuvenate in.  Please prioritize the funding for Shelton View Forest, so we keep as many trees as possible in our city.  Thanks for all you do!   Wayne Golf course needs to have some park of it designated as an off lease park. Not buying that gibberish about not being  able to use it for that use due to “passive” contract language. Calling BS on that.    Save Shelton View forest!   Please include Sheltonview Forest in your list of funding priorities for the next six years!  We love hiking there.  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 203 of 358 154 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 43  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  I would LOVE to have public tennis courts, a golf course, and a community gym with an indoor pool. —The time it takes to  travel due to traffic and expensive fees to access these resources privately are barriers to many in the Bothell community.    No more taxes, we are being taxed to death now and also people are overly spoiled. Some people are starving and do even  have water to drink.    Open areas are essential even if not fully developed.  For example the Shelton View Forest is a good investment even if  limited funds are used to maintain it.  It is good for the environment and as well as a place to just enjoy nature.  I would  very much like dog off‐leash areas to be added in the Bothell park system.    Old Wayne golf course could accommodate an off leash dog park easily.   This is the perfect location.    This would attract  dog lovers from all over Eastside and Westside areas so attracting revenue to nearby businesses (think Marymoore off leash  park) you could increase the dog liscensing fee to pay for maintenance (garbage disposal and poop bag costs or use  volunteers.    Please keep Shelton View as a trail/park!  Our family loves it there.    More educational events about fauna and flora, mindfulness/spirituality, emotional connection to nature   Our family and puppy really love and appreciates the pop‐up dog park. I hope this will be continued after the test run!    I am very much in support of the Shelton View Forest and hope that the City of Bothell will preserve this wonderful wild  area for the current generation and generations to come!   I am excited that Bothell is working on Green Spaces and volunteer programs like Kirkland and Seattle has. Keeping our  community involved, keeping lands green, and curbing invasive species so that our ecosystems remain more balanced is  critical to Bothell's Parks and Open Spaces.    Quality Parks and schools have a dramatic impact on maintaining/improving property values in a community. I support a  vibrant, active, diverse community.    Keep Shelton View Forest on the list of parks   Save Shelton View forest    Please purchase Shelton View Forest as an addition to the Bothell park system.   Bring back the country village   Increase view of river from landing and Wayne by removing tall brush and trees and leaving lower vegetation to protect  river banks. when increasing paddle boat access to river use floats that are low to water around 6”. Access the floats with  ramps to top of bank to limit erosion of banks.   Please preserve the wild spaces, specifically Shelton view forest which is a gem and a resource we can never give back of we  mow it down and replace with hosuing.  Bothell needs to retain its charm.     Too much emphasis (in dollars and priorities) is being given to the Park at Bothell Landing.  With limited dollars we need to  say that the current Park at Bothell Landing is good enough and instead invest ASAP in acquiring land for Open Spaces  within the city of Bothell (ie. Shelton View Forest).  People who do not live close to downtown Bothell are being  underserved.   Please keep Shelton view Forrest as rec area. This area is a special treasure for our area.    Maintenance,restrooms and river access   Use the spaces you have to improve Bothell. Wayne’s is going completely uncared for. How do we know the value of open  spaces when we can’t use them!   Dog park at Wayne land.   Please view all parks along river as one. Develop a master plan we can grow into. 20 years. Make more trails. Mountain  biking and bump tracks. Outdoor climbing walls and other outdoor activities that create lifelong activities.   No more new housing more trees and green space  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 204 of 358 155 City of Bothell Page 44  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  I don't ever vote against taxes for parks, so I probably am not the best person to answer which type of tax I would be willing  to approve.  We moved within horse pastures in every direction of our house 17 years ago and now all we have is housing  developments. (And I am on the Kenmore line...it is even worse in North Bothell).  I can't even believe the amount of clear  cutting.  In that time I only know of one new park.  If we are going to increase the poplulation so drastically we have to  preserve green spaces.   Turn Wayne golf course into a disc golf course!   Develop the former Wayne Golf course and add bike trails, off leash area and skateboard facilities.   Without the parks, Bothell isn’t Bothell. Shelton View Forrest is an amazing piece of nature inside a growing city. Places like  this should be saved so that even as the city expands, we have places to go connect back to nature. Nature and trees bring  peace. Please please please do not destroy Shelton View Forrest for houses. Our kids need nature’s education. If we want  our world to sustain and continue we have to teach our generations the story of The Giving Tree. Nature gives all she has  and we usurp it and squeeze for more. Please let us keep this Forrest. It is a refuge   we need a dog park!    I really wish we had more classes like Kirkland offers.   I would suggest to keep the pop‐up dog park!   Please try to save as much forest and meadow as possible.   My dogs and I love the pop up dog park at Bothell Landing. I really hope we can develop a permanent location in Bothell. If  not at Bothell Landing what about using part of the golf course property just acquired?   After acquiring Wayne golf course the city really had no plan. Very disappointed in the lake of maintenance to this property.  it really can't cost that much to at least mow the property. It is concerning right now as the grass is so high in some areas it  can become a fire hazard. This is not an area that us conducive to family functions. Its basically unusable for anything  except walking your dogs.    Please please please make Wayne golf course, a portion of it, an optional off leash dog park! It’s perfect for it!! I love  walking my dog there and meeting fellow dog owners. Love the sense of community    "Penn Park could use a facelift. The restroom there seems unused and water fountain does not work. If it were gated, then  it could be a small dog park.   Bike lanes and safer walking to/from Maywood Hills Elementary and to/from Bothell Landing are needed. These will  promote use of park.   Much needed field for ultimate Frisbee or a disc golf course.   Dog park needs to include tree shaded areas and access to creek, large space for big dogs to run, dirt trail for owners to  run/jog/walk with their dogs, and dog/human water fountain.  Accesss to creek probably needs to be closed during salmon  season.   Canoe/kayak/paddle board shop is convenient.   Maple Valley Park offers swimming in lake, life guards, and free life vests of various sizes."   I would love to see more bike‐friendly amenities, specifically better bike commute options from North‐South, connecting to  the Sammamish River Trail   really need an off leash area for dogs   Very supportive of off leash areas for dogs.    SPLASH PAD!!!    Enough space and current funds to have off leash dog park without raising taxes    I think a dog park is a wonderful idea! I will use it all the time!�   I understand there is now a pop‐up off‐leash dog park. I hope this means that people will keep their dogs fully under control  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 205 of 358 156 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 45  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com in transit to same. I live near Penn Park, and people frequently treat it as an off‐leash dog park, including coming/going with  the dogs off leash. This becomes a problem since the park is a people space, and generally, people need to be more  considerate of those who for disability/health reasons do not wish to be jumped or run at by dogs (friendly or otherwise).  Outside of a so‐designated fenced enclosure, I expect dogs to be on a leash or, at very minimum, fully voice controlled. I no  longer use my neighborhood park because people behave in ways that are inconsiderate and dangerous to other users. For  that reason, I have deep reservations about how people will behave when a space is named as off‐leash. Who will hold  irresponsible users to account?   We moved here six months ago and use the parks about every day. We love it here and the parks are a big part of the  reason why.   I'm concerned about some bikers going way too fast on the trail.   Please keep the dog park at Bothell landing. There is a great need for it and it is the perfect location.     I am looking forward to the dog park and feel making it permanent will not only be a positive thing for the current residents  and their dogs, but it will be a better reason for more people to live here.   We need a dog park.  Thank you!   Off leash dog park is essential!!!!!!!! Our pups deserve a spot to play!    I just have to say that I love the City's focus on parks. I think the purchase of the golf course was an amazing win for the city  and think it would be a great place to build a community center. Keep up the great work!   Need to increase and improve both active and passive parks and recreation opportunities to meet needs of growing  population.   Bicycling is becoming more popular in our area and Bothell is good, but not great in supporting it both as recreation and  transportation. We can do better. I’d like to see more mountain bike trails developed.   Off leash dog parks are desperately needed. People are using Wayne Golf course as an off leash park even though there are  numerous signs saying dis must be leashed. Perhaps enforcing that with tickets could generate funds for off leash areas.   We need to utilize our open spaces that we have.  Excellent example is Wayne with great open spaces and wide open trails.   A few of the trails are great for off‐leash.  Since we currently have no off‐leash trails, it would be a good place to add a few.   The parks and trails are a big reason we live here. On the subject of taxes, my property taxes have gone up substantially in  the last 2 years and there seems to be new developments about every 100 yards. I would think the existing and new tax  revenue streams are sufficient as opposed to more taxes.    I love Bothell Parks and Rec. I'm proud of their dedication, passion, and hard work.  But it's a hard time to ask for new  funds.  My property value increased almost 90% last year. Ninety percent!!  I know that's not your fault, but it shows that  ""levy‐this"" and ""bond‐that"" ad infinitum is not a sustainable funding solution without strongly impacting citizens.  :(  Much love to you.   I would really like an off‐leash dog park in Bothell, preferably near the Park at Bothell Landing   Protect Shelton View Forrest    As much walkability and spaces for building community as possible! I don't want to raise my family in a drive‐by or strip mall  kind of town. Thank you.    We love living in Bothell! But with the rapid rate of new construction, we really hope Bothell is setting aside land for parks  and open space before it’s all gone. Especially since more people (especially in high density housing) is going to increase the  usage of current parks, and the playground at Bothell Landing is always packed as it is.   N/A   Please keep Shelton View Forest from being cleared.  It’s such a pleasant place to visit.  The trails are great for me, my kids  and our dog.   Would strongly encourage off‐leash park areas in Bothell.   February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 206 of 358 157 City of Bothell Page 46  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  Extremely important to keep & maintain the existing parks & NOT sell to Land Developers!!   Would love an off leash dog area   Please, for the sake of current and future generations, preserve Shelton View Park. It is a gem in the city of Bothell and  destroying it to make room for more houses would make life worse for so many people. A city isn't defined by the number  of houses it holds, but the number of treasures.   Save Shelton View Forest from development. I use the trails here nearly every day. I love the wild feeling there.   I hope you will include Shelton View Forest into the park system in Bothell   Save Shelton View Forest!   Free Indoor Community spaces like The Hangar in Kenmore   Save Shelton View Forest!   Shelton View Park should be recognized as a Bothell park   Shelton view ForreSt should be a Bothell pArk. It is full of wildlife and awesome trails.    Please do what you can to see that Shelton View Forrest is preserved for hiking and nature appreciation.  You can build a lot  of new stuff, but they're not building new forrests!   In order to ensure there are parks for everyone in every area of Bothell, Shelton View Forest should be  purchased by the  city of Bothell.   It's good to have tennis courts nearby   Please do not develop the Wayne Golf Course.  We don't need more buildings or man made things.  Leave the nature be!!!   We need Pickleball courts in the Northshore area. Dedicated courts for outdoor, lines for pickleball in gyms and community  centers. This region needs more Pickleball courts.   I think a youth council should be developed   Acquire land now for open space and park land; use this to provide connected or semi‐connected recreational trail systems  to be used by locals or for individuals to make connected bike rides or trail runs. The popularity of connecting off‐road  routes is exploding now.   Support community partners to provide additional enrichment events by waiving onerous fees.   I would love to see Bothell Landing used for the music again and for things like the Farmers Market ‐ such an amazing space  I feel like it doesnt get used.    weekend music and arts festivals during July and August.    Please ensure the preservation of Shelton View Forest in Snohomish County. It’s critical that this land remain available.    Please consider offering mountain biking classes in Shelton View Forest.   Please maintain or add pickleball courts.    Hire people who want to earn their pay.   we need a off leash dog park   Please allow cricket in Bothell parks   Please have a cricket field here. There are more than 200 plus folks who are interested to have a ground here in Bothell.    Shelton View Forest provides much needed recreational trails for residents from all over the city of Bothell and south  Snohomish County. It has been a public space forever, gifted to the state of WA at statehood. Keep it in the PROSAP.    Cricket fields needed in Bothell   Please help us with one cricket play ground, thank you so much for this opportunity. I wish all the best to Bothell  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 207 of 358 158 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 47  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com Community.    Need more cricket fields    I am a broken record....more Pickleball opportunities :)   Need multiple cricket fields or we should be allowed to play on turf grounds. Existing fields are rejecting our requests   We love the trails and community feel here. With losing Country Village I’d love to see more places for people to gather,  especially green open places. I would also love to see concessions in parks ‐ might be a way to pay for things. I’d happily buy  an ice cream bar or cup of coffee to support parks.   No   Pickleball   Save Shelton View Forest!    Please acquire and protect Shelton view forest. It is a wonderful and heavily used area. With natural trials, teaching spaces,  mountain biking, hiking. The local community supports, maintains, and loves it.  Help us preserve it.   An off‐leash dog area in the Red Brick Road Park is critical to all of the dog owners, as there are many in Bothell! Please help  with the will of the citizens that want an acceptable area to enjoy with our dogs without having to have to drive to Seattle  or Redmond to visit a dog park. It is important to see how they function and try to replicate a volunteer system that has  minimal overhead while providing an amazing benefit for so many local residents. The slough runs between both lakes, and  dogs are encouraged to swim at Marymoor. During known, predictable salmon migration periods, the water is fenced to  prevent dogs from entering too far. These are easily solvable problems with precedent showing how it can be done, cleanly  and even on a larger scale. Thanks for reading.   Wayne golf course should be on off leash dog park  90 percent of the people that use it are dog people  and letting the dogs  run together great place for that and we need that  and would not cost anything but a sign  i go there 2 to 3 times a day and  so i see how everyone acts  people pickup after dogs  every time  please try to make it work    Need a substantial off leash area in Bothell for people to be able to exercise and play with their dogs. This need is currently  not being met in Bothell.    Need off leash dog are at Wayne park.   I just want to say that I'm grateful for all the time and resources that Bothell puts into its parks. Having these spaces of  green means of the world. It would be nice if there were more off‐leash areas though for dogs. Giving a space where people  can exercise pets that are otherwise cooped up in apartments is really important. Anyway, thanks for all your hard work.   I would support an off leash dog park if  it was nowhere near the Sammamish River Slough. I also would support a  community center if it was in North Bothell.   allow a portion of the Wayne golf coarse to be used for an off leash area of some sort . With the increase in multifamily  living in Bothell people are going to need an area for their pets to get some exercise   Bothell Parks need more open space for off leash dogs to exercise and play with their family.    Please provide an off leash park with enough acreage to support fetch and socialization. This is a dog friendly region and  Bothell currently lacks the facilities to support our pets.   We need to allow maximum use of Wayne Park (former golf course) especially for playing with pets as a passive form of  recreation.   Shelton View Forest should be purchased from DNR to make a nice city owned Forest with great hiking trails, and a lot of  wildlife like deer, owls, coyotes, bobcats, and many more.    We need areas to exercise ours dogs. Walking them in trails is not sufficient for dog less than 10 years old. They need a  space to run.    The city need to enforce the dog leash laws.  Every time I go to Wayne park (not mentioned) there are dogs running around  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 208 of 358 159 City of Bothell Page 48  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com with no law enforcement to be seen.  I suspect that the police dept are fond of dogs and don't want to enforce the leash  laws.   I strongly support an off leash dog park.  While there is plenty of space at the golf course and lots of community interest  there, please use caution and, if done, please ensure the it is distant from the waterways and preserves water quality,  shoreline condition, and wildlife habitat.   Save Sheldon View Forest!   add pickleball courts fastest growing sport for vadults vand youth   More indoor facilities that can be used for multiple activities such as pickleball would be great for year round activities.  Most schools in the area have space for team sports such as basketball, baseball, and tennis and these facilities are often  not in use. Severall local parks have outdoor pickleball and basketball courts, but very limited parking, no restrooms and  some  courts have no nets, and at least one is in bad shape. By contrast, the facilities at the Northshore Senior Center are in  constant use.   I would love more playground space for kids under 5. Of all the parks in Bothell there is only 1 that has anything for  toddlers.    We are fortunate to have high quality neighborhood parks (Conifer Park, William Penn Park, Stipek Park, Royal Oaks Park,  etc) that also add to the high quality life here in Bothell.  These are not large parks but are well used by the local  neighborhood to walk dogs, visit, and picnic.  Perhaps as housing developments are planned, smaller parks such as these  could be incorporated into planning. As part of the City's park portfolio, is seems that it might be easier to purchase,  develop and maintain these small green spaces (that have great value).   Please bring Shelton View into the Bothell Park System.  Connect it with Swamp Creek to achieve a large, multi city park.   Education programs about maintaining healthy parks.   I would support increased taxes to go towards the purchase of more green space.  Wayne golf course is a good example of  an outstanding accomplishment of the city.     Shelton View Forest is my primary concern. We love it and want it to be part of the Bothell Parks system.    There aren’t a lot of programs geared toward kids with autism or sensory processing disorder. All the really cool classes  offered by Bothell, I look at and say “Cool but our son can’t be in a class that big.”   Overall I think Bothell does a good job on parks and realizes they are critical to maintaining sanity in this ever growing city. I  miss little old Bothell, but having open spaces and local trails to walk helps keep me sane.    Thanks for what you do.    Acquire Shelton View Forest !!!   Really need to know more about the funding options to make an informed selection of those. Also need information about  benefits of artificial turf vs real lawn to know if I think it is a justifiable expense    I would love to see expansion of sports activities. I'm a big disc golfer and love going to Blyth with my buddies a few times a  week. It's helped me lose 15 pounds this year! So having more courses would be amazing.   Please save Shelton View Forest!   Keep Shelton View forest & other wooded trails.   Shelton View Forest must be saved!  Bothell needs to purchase this land. It is a wonderful place for families a a valuable  educational resource for the students at Shelton View Elementary School.     We’ve already lost so much of our green space in that part of Bothell ‐ please, please save it!"   I feel strongly that our beautiful parks stay free and open to the public‐‐ including everyone's financial status. While  charging for parking is reasonable to me, I would encorage the city of Bothell not to charge user fees for enjoying the  outdoors in this lovely community.  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 209 of 358 160 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 49  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  Please make the Golf Course a off leash dog park, as it already is an unofficial one, it would be better to have it be a official  one   I would love to see an off leash area on the Wayne Golf Course land.  In particular, it would be great to have a fenced  pathway that begins near the old clubhouse and parking lot that leads to the far foot bridge near NE 170th St., so the off  leash area would be concentrated on the southwest side of the Sammamish River.   Maintenance   Restrooms, especially at Park at Bothell Landing need major improvement/ upgrade    I love Tracey   Bothell desperately needs a nice off leash park area. The Wayne Golf Course is perfect for this! A huge open space, it could  be a good rival/alternative to Marymoor.    Seriously...you brought thousands of new resisdents with all the new building....people have dogs....what have your  provided for the dogs? Where in the 98011 area is there an off‐leash park for dogs? Plenty of parks for all the new people,  but what about all the dogs? Certainly these new residents pay taxes.....you can afford to provided an unleashed are big  enough for dogs to run in. Why cant we share some of the space at the golf course? Or any other park area? It's not right  not to be able to share.   We moved here from Henderson NV where the parks and rec dept has youth sports. I was disappointed to see that Bothell  does not have that, and only private youth sports exist here (which are much more expensive and generally not just for fun)   Bothell needs some off leash dog parks/areas large enough for dogs to run and play.    We need an off‐leash dog park, preferably with access to water to swim.   We need off leash areas. Too much attention is paid to poorly behaved children and not enough to the dogs who need  space to run. Why can’t we share the space with well trained dogs and humans? Enforce existing rules about controlling  dogs and picking up after them, while allowing dogs to run free under voice control of their owners.    The rental prices of park spaces increased in January and are very high. Last year, I paid $100 for  a 2hr rental at Blyth Park  for a 4yo's birthday party... and that's fine. And I understand that the current rental blocks include more hours, but the  rental price is way too high for parents looking for a simple park birthday party. I live in the part of Bothell that is  Unincorporated Snohomish County, and $190 for a park shelter is *way too high* to guarantee space for a park birthday  party ‐ that's on par with local entertainment spaces (Chuck E Cheese, Elevated Sportz, etc) without providing any staff or  services.    Please a dog park where dogs can be walked off leash not just an off leash “pen”    Would be helpful to know more about plans to enhance former Wayne golf course space. Lots of space there to do great  things, but it's a free for all right now and lots of off leash irresponsible pet owners taking over there. So much that even  though it's a few blocks away I don't feel I can go there with my dog or even without them. Not comfortable being there  with large off leash dogs including pit bulls.    The former Wayne's golf course space should have an off leash dog park because so many are using it as such a it isn't safe.  My dad was attacked my on leash dogs by off leash dog there    no   Maintenance of existing assets and acquiring land to preserve future opportunities should be the highest priorities.   We need more pickleball courts.  My family currently uses indoor and outdoor courts in Edmonds, Greenlake, and  Shoreline.  Many cities are putting alot of effort into converting tennis courts or installing new pickleball courts and I think  Bothell needs to realize there's a great need for it.  The court at Royal Oaks Park needs an upgrade, btw.    Pickleball courts are needed   I am particularly interested in the improvement of facilities for Pickleball playing in all parks.   Better signs and directions to parks from public/downtown spots.  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 210 of 358 161 City of Bothell Page 50  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  Pickleball is one of the top growing sports in the country and would be nice to see some dedicated courts built or at  minimum the courts/surface at Royal Oaks and Willian Penn park redone.     Redeploy underused spaces   There is no major Pickleball site, which is under serving a sport that is growing 15% per year driving people to visit crowded  sites at Shoreview Park (6 courts), Yost (8 courts) & Green Lake (8 courts). These sites each serve over 100 players daily.   Make it easier to use volunteers and then USE them as much as possible.   If you build it, They will come.   Please add another dog park!!   Support  increasing   outdoor & maybe indoor pickleball courts   Pickleball leagues   no   1) Pickleball ‐ a great sport for all ages that exercises the mind and body without being overly impactful. Bothell needs to  get DEDICATED pickleball courts both indoor and outdoor. Playing on courts line for many other sports is confusing and  difficult. Also not everyone has a pickleball net, so permanent nets should be installed. And multiple courts (at least 4) are  needed at a location because players like to come as a large group to use the facility so that playing partners can switch  around.   2) Create a better policy for off‐leash dogs that allows dogs participating in dog sports to use open space/parks. City of  Mercer Island has a policy that allows this and could be a place to start for ideas  (http://www.mercergov.org/Page.asp?NavID=3133). Or you could develop an ""off‐leash"" license just like licenses for any  number of things. To qualify, a person's pet would need to pass the AKC Canine Good Citizen test, and have taken at least 6  months of additional training in a dog training class. The license could be put on a laminated 8x12 paper that has to be  posted when the dog is off‐leash in a public area, so that if ppl had specific complaints about that dog, they could record  the number and submit the complaint. After _____ minor or one major incident, license suspended until remedial training  is taken. You could implement rules like ""Must be ______ feet away from picnic shelters or children's play areas"" in order  to respect other users who prefer to be away from dogs."   no   I would like to see the addition of pickleball courts to new or existing Bothell Parks. It would be preferable to add multiple  courts to a single park rather than adding 1 court to several parks. We need a location with 6 to 8 courts to draw enough  people so that all skill levels can find competitive games and not have to wait too long between games.   I think you could really attract people to Bothell if you had pickleball courts.     Pickleball....indoor and outside   Choices and effective budgeting are good. More taxes are bad.   Pickle Ball is the fastest growing sport in America/Bothell.  Please address more areas to play pickle ball.  Thanks    I support adding 6 to 10 pickleball courts to an existing park.    Indoor and outdoor pickleball.   An Off Leash Park should be a priority. Today (6‐17‐19) when walking the Front 9  I saw 5 people walking 6 dogs without a  leash. I feel for the animal control officer.   Bothell has a nice sports field and park offerings, but it's time for us to step it up with offerings for youth/teens with a  skatepark and an indoor recreational facility that will provide opportunities year round for indoor court sports, more fitness  and art classes, and community spaces. With our NW weather, outdoor only facilities are not sufficient for a community of  our size. The YMCA is not accessible to many families because of the membership fee to take classes and play sports and it  doesn't fill the need for the community.  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 211 of 358 162 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 51  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  We need a dog park and more sport fields!!!   Looking forward to the development of park features at the Wayne golf course park. A good mix of facilities with lots of  open space to roam and play please!   With the exploding number of condos and apartments in Bothell, we need more parks and open space to offer  opportunities  for recreation and outdoor activities for the residents who live in those units   There should be a pathway for cyclists exiting the Burke Gilman Trail at the old Wayne Golf Course so they can get to 96th  Ave NE.  It would be short, low cost and create an opportunity to improve active transportation in Bothell.     The playground equipment at William Penn is desperately old and in need of updating to meet the needs for kids of all  ages.  The restrooms at Penn Park are also never open, yet there is a building right there.     Allow for a variety of options in one location so there can be something for everyone. Allow for pedestrian travel to the  parks‐ safe sidewalks, trails, bike paths. Consider a fenced park geared towards toddlers and preschoolers‐ preferably with a  coffeeshop or coffee truck option nearby. More community events with options for volunteering/ giving back such as  charity runs. I think a beautification effort in the vein of the Mukilteo way plantings in Everett near Forest Park would be  fun (memorial day weekend plant lots of annuals). Also, would love summer movie nights/summer concerts/summer  events like an obstacle course run, etc. all of these should have restaurants/bars nearby or the option of food trucks. Any  kind of summer festival that includes safe carnival rides/fair food/ face painting/ balloon animals, etc.    pop‐up crafts/classes at community events   I would love to see Shelton View Woods established as a priority. There are multiple acres of woods with trails enjoyed by  Bothell families, local hikers, and bikers. The forest already has an engaged group of volunteers and is situated next to an  elementary school, which provides opportunity for hands‐on learning experiences. Preserving green spaces in Bothell like  this one is absolutely essential to keeping this city a place where people want to live and raise their children.    Save Shelton View Forest from Development!   More options for kids classes & activities on weekends for working parents. Better website‐ make it easier to browse and  register online.    I would like more trails made in the grass at the upper 9 park to better enjoy the area ‐ we go there every day! Thank you.   Please provide good adult education courses such as arts and cooking classes.   Reopen the front 9 of Wayne as a golf course. It was great for learning and taking kids. The back 9/8 can remain a park. Use  the profit from the course for funding for other public amenities.    I like the list that's in The Bridge   Please reinstate support and funding for the Shelton View forest. I believe preservation of the few remaining wild areas in  Bothell is vitally important.   Off lease dog park please   Off leash dog park is needed.    Parking at all local parks is small. Not an incentive to use parks. Area at old Wayne's golf course should have proper  bathrooms.   Drop surveymonkey, Qualtrics is local   Please include a plan to save Shelton View Forest for the use of the community.   Very important to our quality of life.   Make centennial park a true park w water playground and beautified trails   With all of the new housing being developed I would think Bothell is collecting significantly more tax revenue. The town just  needs to put more money aside for activities in the parks. Things for people to do there. We have beautiful parks in Bothell  but we do NEED to expand into some new things such as a dog park, sprinkler park and skate park. We want to continue to  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 212 of 358 163 City of Bothell Page 52  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com attract young families and we NEED these things. The camps and activities can all be a user fee. No one should have to pay  for someone kids to go to camp. The dog park can be enhanced with Volunteers just like Marymoore. Marymoore also  charges $1 to park your car as well they ask for donations. Most people send in $20 a year or more to S.O.D.A. No one  minds paying a little if they are using the service.    Don’t raise taxes.  Tax revenue has increased due to the booming economy, and we just passed a firehouse levy.  Unless it’s  a splash pad or a community center, use what you have    Clean up the filthy inside of the bathrooms at Bothell landing. There’s no changing table for babies. Parents have to change  diapers right on the counter. It’s gross. Even the door is filthy. �   Money needs to be managed better in this city that keeps getting bigger because neighboring smaller cities have more  activities and amenities than we do!!!!   I would love to see non motorized ways to get from park to park such as the trail to get you from Bothell Landing to Blyth.  This is a great way to get families to explore multiple parks while exercising   A food outlet with seating /social gathering/coffee etc. at the Landing.   Better use of the Bowl.  Used to be a lot of fun   Mow the grass please   Shelton view forest is a treasure for our community. Please help us keep this green space.   A Community & Events Center like Mercer Island’s could generate revenue to pay for new amenities such as a public  swimming pool and dedicated outdoor Pickleball courts   I feel Bothell has several very nice parks that are all well maintained.  I am looking forward to the decisions that will be  made on the development of Wayne golf course.  So much opportunity there.    Developers should be contributing to our community in direct proportion to their success. The city should be insisting the  community is protected from rampant development. I hold the city responsible for allowing (encouraging!) the over‐ development.   Parking can be an issue at Blythe and other popular parks. If we can create more community open space, we will also need  sufficient parking. I moved to Bothell partly for all the nature/parks/community feel, so please continue to place focus on  this area! It is becoming esp important as we become more densely populated.    In general, things in Bothell seem behind in times. It has a very old‐fashion feel. While this may be admirable to older  residents, there are many more younger families and current young adults that desire more amusement amenities. The  ideas in the survey like a water park type fountain, more festivals/carnivals, and community centers are all great ideas.  Overall, speaking for the young adults, small strip pop up food stalls are very popular, large community centers with many  different activities (similar to Bellevue club), and aesthetic sculptures or murals are, what I would say, some pretty  significant desires.    Having new Indoor Sport/Event Arena will bring revenue to city.   It's not all about kids and youth, it's about getting people out and meeting each other and having public spaces where  people intentionally gather and hear about community news.   I would love for there to be a Youth Council formed so that students can have a voice within government decisions as well.    Don’t wait too long to put capital bond/operating levy ballot before the voters!   Would like to see more enforcement for people who don't pick up after their dogs and let them off‐leash in areas where it's  not allowed.   I live in Everett but travel to Bothell frequently to play disc golf at Blyth. I happily spend money at local businesses during  my visits. Thank you for asking for public feedback!   I'd like to see improvements or expansion to the disc golf facilities in Bothell. Monroe has an excellent (private) course and  MLT has an expert‐level course unfriendly to beginners. Bothell has a beginner‐friendly course but it needs development to  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 213 of 358 164 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 53  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com be on‐par with Bothell's other part offerings.   Please make a new disc golf course in Bothell.   There is a growing disc golf community in your city and it would behoove you to address the space available in Wayne park  and keep safety risks to picnickers and campers at Blyth park to a minimum.   We would love a playground structure at Centennial park!   Improve current amenities: Use Northshore Senior Center and Churches with large buildings more as all ages  programming/community center; improve/increase waterfront/water sport access at Bothell Landing; add community  center programming in current house on property, water access, dog park, trails, sport field/court to old Wayne golf course  land   More funding for Parks Department!   Disk Golf is a great passive use activity that is inclusive of all community members regardless of ethnicity or income.   Please increase disc golf opportunities and quality of opportunities in Bothell.   A 9 hold disc golf course on Wayne back 9 would be amazing!   Expand the disc golf course at Blyth Park to the SE portion of the former Wayne if course!   I'd like to see Blyth Park expanded to include the old Wayne golf course area and the disc golf course expanded to 18  permanent baskets.  I play the present course there (Howling Coyote) at least once a week.   Create more disc golf courses. It’s a great use of land and disc golf is a great community sport for all ages and is cheep to  maintain.    Turn Wayne’s golf course into a disc golf course!!    It would be great for the current small disc golf course in Blyth park to expand into a full size course with additional baskets  in Wayne park. This would create the ability to still have a small course for beginners while having he option of a larger  course for the disc golf community here in Bothell. Disc Golf is a recreational activity that can coexist with near any park  and requires little to no maintenance. This relatively small budgetary improvement would add a lot of value without  restricting other activities.   We want a youth council for the city of Bothell so students get their input. Bothell youth council   I would love a dog off leash area and more river access for small boats. Bothell Parks crew do a great job and will require an  increase in budget support as our city grows and oarks are more heavily used.   Off leash dog park at former Wayne Golf   Look at Mary more park as an example. There are so much opportunity to have festivals, 4th of July events and cool things  that the community can do together. Parks are not just about the trees and play grounds but about the community they can  build    A disc golf course at Wayne or Centennial is the main reason I took this survey. It's a fantastic use of land, reduces transient  population and promotes outdoors and fitness.    establish a youth counsel! students want our voices to be heard   A high quality 18 hole disc golf course is needed in Bothell! Thanks for the opportunity to submit my values and opinions on  PROS!    Add more disc golf courses    Restroom for the golf course   Would love an off leash dog park. Maybe one that you have to be "approved" to use? To weed out those who bring  aggressive dogs etc.    Increase public, volunteer investment in parks. For example, an off‐leash dog area could be administered by a group of  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 214 of 358 165 City of Bothell Page 54  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com volunteers, with space rentals to generate some revenue.  Same thing for a pea patch program, maybe even a skate park.  Let the community do some of the ongoing work and money‐raising.   I would like to see an array of children's classes and programs similar to Kirkland...with similar low costs.   Please turn the Marty Freese's Yellow Farmhouse on 112th into a education center.    Please install a 18 hole discgolf course.   The area has the potential to have a world class course!  Look to other cities like  Portland that just hosted a huge tournament.  This sport can be played by all ages and is one of the fastest growing sports in  the world.   Wayne is not being utilized to its potential. A disc golf course would bring in extra revenue and has the potential to be the  only gold standard course in King County. This would also bring the possibility for the professional pro tour to make  Washington an official stop on that tour. Every hotel room would fill if this became a reality. The cost would be almost  insignificant because if a club could be formed, the club would handle all maintenance and improvements along with  assuring the course is kept clean and free of litter and debris.    Disc golf is an increasingly growing sport that allows for parks to have multiple uses. It is able to coexist with walking trails  and other activities!    Use some of the Wayne land for a mountain bike loop, connect it to blyth and  climbing trail up tolt. More direct bike  connection from up by country village to new bike path without having to go around cascadia, business park. work with  Kenmore/Brier to bike to Lynnwood area safer.   With housing going in so rapidly, this is a dire need.  Wayne Golf course is huge but not very central and currently fairly  useless for most of Bothell.  Needs parking, shelters, water access, dog park, playground and trails.  Shelton View forest  desperately needs to be preserved.  And every single developer should be contributing significantly towards the  preservation of real, usable green space (not just the token little piece in their new development) and the development of  our parks.   We need an off leash dog park near downtown with an area for small dogs     Can we not implement a parking fee to gain additional revenue?   Catalogue offers many options for families with young children. Maybe I'm outside the target demographic, although I can  appreciate opportunities for children to stay active. Are programs offered with demographic studies in mind?"   My son is not a big organized sports kid. Having a mountain bike park/skate park/bmx park would be a fantastic asset to the  community, giving a space to get out doors and be active for the non‐competitive yet active kids in town.   What happened to the skate park and Bothell landing park upgrades  that were promised YEARS ago when Bothell Way was  realigned?  The drawings had it located at the bottom of 180th next to the old ski shop.  Now that property is for sale and  our “upgraded” park is a big patch of grass and gravel parking. What gives?     Add championship disc golf course destined by a professional disc golf course developer   Love the new park at Wayne golf!   "More live music using local Bothell bands/musicians! Put in Mtn. bike trails including obstacles to practice on in the golf  course. Climbing ‐‐ outdoor but covered bouldering would be ideal. (There's an artificial boulder in Woodinville, let's get  some climbing in Bothell too! Again, set among the fields in the golf course would be a great setting ‐‐ even for artificial  rock...)   More weekend classes for kids? Our son enjoys them, but the offerings are somewhat limited..."   We need more fields in our community   Highly support park maintenance, protecting land, etc...Property taxes have risen way too much in the past few years  though. There should be money already there for parks.    Taxes are so high in king county Bothell. It’s not fair to raise taxes even more just to give the community what should  already be here. What is the city collecting from new developers to help with these projects? They have the money and  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 215 of 358 166 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 55  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com should support the growing community not the existing residents.    Please put an off leash dog park near downtown!!!!   More disc golf courses (Wayne) or expanded disc golf courses (Blyth)   I move to Bothell approximately 2 year ago and have found the parks an invaluable resource for coping with my depression.  Disc golf literally save my life. It's a low no work out which shares it's space with other activities and requires low care after  installed. There's a sizable players group here in Bothell an I'm proud of being a part of it.   Disc golf is an exploding, healty, family activity   Please let us build mountain bike trails in Bothell   Pretty please with sugar on top work with the blyth disc golf club to install a premier disc golf course on the front or back 9  at Wayne. I have lived in Bothell since 2012 and would like to have a pro course to play near my home.    You should know that the disc golf community is sharing this link on all the disc golf Facebook pages in the PNW, asking  "golfers" to take the survey and "ask for more disc golf."  It will skew your numbers.  Thought you should know.   Please put in tennis walls!  Cheap and don't take much space!   We have a great start to a useful,  beautiful network of parks.   Would love an off‐leash dog park.  Looking forward to what's  to come at Wayne golf course...  An amphitheater would be great there for outdoor concerts and plays like Shakespeare in  the park.   Baseball fields, disc golf   Would love to see a permanent disc golf course installed at the old Wayne golf property.    Would love to see a splash park of some sort!   Absolutely not supportive of developing Wayne Golf Course with sports fields or other very high traffic use.  Best use there  are trails, open grass, bike rental, snack shop.     Please consider creating a discgolf course on the old Wayne Golf course as discgolf is low cost and low maintenance and co‐ habitates with nature extremely well. Plus, the discgolf community is very willing to assist and keep the already low costs  down to a minimum. Thank You!   An 18 hole Disc golf Course is needed in this area.   I really think a the old golf course would be an excellent place for an amazing off leash dog park. With so many condos,  apartments etc being built this has become a very popular amenity in other communities and Bothell is behind   Please provide some opportunities for tennis players, like tennis walls. I understand that soccer, softball, and other team  sports are more popular, but tennis walls would be well used and are not expensive to build. The one at Grass Lawn Park in  Redmond is the only public wall around in the suburbs of Seattle. This would be a huge win for Bothell.   I prefer NOT to leave it up to a vote for Bothell citizens who are very liberal when it comes to giving more money to  activities I am not interested in nor apply to me. FYI I have no children.    off leash dogs at Bothell parks are already a problem and are illegal, making a park just for them is a disaster waiting to  happen   Bikes ‐ if you do any walk/bike trails ‐ post rules and a speed limit and then ENFORCE it.  The bikers on Burke‐Gilman are  speed demons and make the trail entirely unsafe for walkers and families.  Put stop signs on the trail for bikers ‐ when  necessary.     Keep the park at the old Wayne Golf Course as natural as possible ‐ both the front and back 9 holes.  No sports, no dog  parks, no slough access, no buildings.  That land is amazing and should be kept as natural and as building fee as possible. "   Parks are super important for a healthy, thriving community   Save Shelton View Forest!   February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 216 of 358 167 City of Bothell Page 56  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  Not many parks near Queensborough so think Shelton View Forest could be a great one for the city.   water activities   skate rentals   Good idea to survey   Bring back front 9 of Wayne Golf Course. Leave back 9 as a park   Please keep Shelton View Forest open for enjoyment, not more building   Senior activities ‐ benches sitting areas   Updated playgrounds, fix bumps on BGT   So far ‐ so good   Please let development (condos!) and more parks!   Appeal to people in ages 20s and 30s so Bothell has more exciting experiences and that group doesn’t have to seek out in  Seattle or Kirkland   I go to Kirkland for parent/small child activities b/c no options here (South Bothell). Bothell Landing Park is fantastic, except  the restrooms ‐ they always smell so I never use them and will visit less once kids are potty trained.   A botanical Garden like Bellevue   Stop buying land for “open space”. Those type of spaces are not used & become over‐grown eyesores that are a waste of  our taxes. Please do not let the Wayne Golf Course turn into a rats nest of overgrown vegetation that no one uses.   We should sell the 35 million dollar city building to a private company; downsize to a small wood framed building and use  the money to fund parks   Leave open space for just people in   Due to all the development that has happened in Bothell over the last 5 or 6 years, we have lost a lot of trees/green space.  It is important to not lose more, however, raising taxes is not a good answer. How about using some of the additional taxes  being collected from all the new building to protect green space/trees/forests.   Thanks to everyone who keeps them clean and safe.   Yes, get the Council to stop throwing $$ into downtown redevelopment and fix our parks & streets!   I walk with a walker. Don't go many places.   Please have more family restrooms in parks. Due to ages of kids, sometimes we need to enter whole family in the restroom.   vintage car show   more off leash dog facilities   safety no matter what the activity ‐ so no liability for Bothell   Your online reference address was not specific therefore couldn't find survey online   Wayne Golf Park needs to have wildflower and/or rose gardens. Plant trees, bushes, play area for kids perhaps off leash dog  park. What about a community garden/p‐patch (if not at Wayne somewhere else).   Provide ample quiet places where one can sit and listen to the birds   Thank you for including Wayne’s Golf Course as a Bothell Park. Our family enjoys the use several days a week!   More sports fields and more off leash dog spaces   Yes! Why has Bothell allowed such HUGE growth? The roads are full ‐ STOP!   I would like to see more natural, wooded areas left untouched in Bothell. There is so much building of new homes, leaving  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 217 of 358 168 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 57  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com less space for wildlife.   Use current tax funds wisely ‐ no new property taxes ‐ nice parks are no use to residents who are taxed out of their homes   Better info on what parks/trails exist. I went to City Hall to get a park/trail map and it was very difficult/impossible to get  the desired info   More bike and accessible parks for pedestrians and wheelchair users would be wonderful!   Need additional auto parks and bike trails, bus, car, parking, bike racks, enforce no loiteringor camping, stop homelessness,  protect our investment   The corner on Bothell Way that’s been under construction for years with no progress (or current owner) used as a small  public park   I am saddened at the amount of building the Bothell planners are allowing for our community. With every development,  trees are cut. This contributes to less sound barriers, less cleansing of our air, and less area for wildlife. Please slow down!   Most cities with a river running through it take advantage of such a special feature by opening vistas to it; having special  celebrations on it; promote kayak, canoe, and boat travel on it and educate the historical significance of the rive. Bothell  has turned its back on the river!   Thank you for making Bothell a great place to raise a family   I can’t stress enough the need for a dog park. It angers me so much, people w/ off‐leash dogs. They don’t obey the laws so  give them a place to go.   More parking!   We need to hear more in the community about Wayne Golf Course   Save Shelton View Forest from development ‐ purchase DNR and McCoast Property   Green space is the primary determining factor for choosing Bothell to live in   Sheldon View Forest is wonderful, if you haven’t been go!   Too bad they didn’t think of parks when they added all new development by the Library! Sad really the way the city add  new homes and apartments someone needs to look at parking ‐ poor planning! The concrete parking slabs, I hate them!   Free parking for Bothell residents on 4th of July events. Have “taste of Bothell” downtown Bothell with vegan options, kid  friendly, music, contests, small carnival rides in the park areas.   The parks are absolutely essential to quality of life. My grandchildren visit often and the play equipment is often packed  with kids. More equipment is needed.   The more open land conserved and kept away from people and dogs ‐ the better.   Bothell needs more events. Especially needed in the downtown given the growing residential population in the DT  neighborhood.   As long as you keep the homeless from harassing or scaring my kids so we can use the parks, its essential to our quality of  life.   With all the new development cutting down trees and taking away open spaces it is vital o have many parks   Seeing that you closed Wayne, how about a chip & putt green? We could use old #15 green it is out of the way to cover  costs we could sell an annual pass   Car shows, food events/games at that golf course you bought, maybe a kiddy pool   I hesitate to fill out this questionnaire, although I do not use the classes/sports programs, I think they are very important. I  just can't assess whether they are sufficient at this time. They were 10 years ago when I used them.   Currently both walkers and bikers use the trail system. The bikers believe they have right of way on the entire trail. It is  essential to have a designated lane for bikes to ensure walkers safety.  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 218 of 358 169 City of Bothell Page 58  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  I think the senior center (publicly funded) is underused ‐ vacant most evenings. I also miss music in the park at Bothell  Landing.   Make Wayne like Marymoor Park   The water condition of the slough is very bad. I would like to see testing done and results posted publicly. At the very least,  signs should be clearly posted regarding water quality for recreational users. Last summer, a family member and our dog  were exposed to campylobacteria and became very ill. Hospitalization was required after being exposed to slough water.   Our property taxes recently sharply increased, so I hesitate to recommend a tax increase. But recreational opportunities are  important, especially for children/youth, and make Bothell a special place to live. Thanks for buying the "Back Nine".   Off leash dogs are a big problem, need stricter laws/roles and a place for them to go (away from my young kids)   I am a senior citizen. I don’t use the parks as much as I did when our children lived at home.    build a calisthenics park ‐ e.g. calisthenics‐parks.com   More amenities for waynes course park and off‐leash park for dogs   Bothell needs a rec center and a splash pad. Good models to look to are in Provo, Utah and Iceland.    Bothell should have kept the Country Village as a community resource gathering place!   More baseball field as land got harder to acquire.    I'd like to have a dog park with a small dog area separate from the big dogs and a trail with no bikes allowed   None   More off leash dog parks. Biking trails for exclusive use (Burke‐Gillman too crowded w/bike racers)   1) Purchase Sheldon View Forest; 2) Thanks for all the work Parks & Recreation do; 3) We shouldn't spend $ on a  community center when we have the terrific North Shore Y   More police presence at Cedar Grove park   Improve pathways through Wayne, connect up trail system, provide better signage/info about trails, hiking opportunities  either in or starting at parks.    Restrooms at parks need to open earlier for those who exercise in the early morning, please.   Charge small fees for activities to raise money needed. Our prop taxes are high enough!   With more housing constantly being built, we will need to increase public spaces.    A recreational center or community center in Bothell would be wonderful. With a large family being able to go to one place  ad have activities to do for varying ages would be helpful.   Off leash dog parks, please!    Put and maintain trails in North Creek Forest and a community garden and use volunteer efforts for such with outdoor  classes integrated with the development and maintenance.   A Veterans Museum to thank and honor all our Veterans. All of King Co and Sno. Co do not support any veterans museum.  All of our leadership at Bothell level and County level do not appreciate their veterans or their freedom.   Please work to maintain as much natural space as possible ‐ we need trees since so many are being removed for building   Please save Shelfton View Forest. It's a key part of the community. If the forest is gone many people that live around it will  also leave.    William Penn Park needs attention   Put a dog park and mountain bike trails at Wayne!   Bothell needs to offset the housing building by adding more green space, not expensive sports fields & splash parks.  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 219 of 358 170 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 59  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  Bring back an aquatic facility.  Build one as a model similar to Snohomish or lynwood or bainbridge that combines  recreation with functional.  Its critical for senior citizens in reducing healthcare through non stress exercise.  Swimming for  sport as well as safety.  Yes is a high cost to build, but done right can be self sustaining if not slightly positive on the budget.   The bathrooms at Blyth and Bothell Landing Parks are in great need of improvement. They are old, dirty, and poorly  maintained. A semi‐regular sweep of the bathroom ceilings at Bothell Landing Park would be appreciated—there are tons  of cobwebs and bugs living there. The quality of the bathroom facility is inconsistent with the lovely park and playground.  The tire mountain at Blyth Park needs to go. Instead, a flat grassy area would allow parents to see children better (kids go  down the other side). Bees often create nests in the tire mountain. The tire mountain is gross and tacky. Please tax me and  take it away.   Please preserve green space in Bothell! We are losing it so fast. Secondly, more money for park upkeep.   When adding new spaces and programs, please consider the parking situation.   Splash pad please.   It's important for Bothell Parks & Rec to manage expenses frugally and make sound spending decisions so those at all  income levels can enjoy these wonderful resources without having to pay (either directly or indirectly) too much.   Please put a splash park and kids park in the golf course that was just purchased.  Also put BBQ / picnic area.   If money is spent improving our parks, what resources will be used to keep the parks safe and drug dependent individuals  out? I know Bothell isn’t as bad as Seattle, but it’s only a matter of time. I would suggest also setting up security systems  and cameras to prevent or deter parking lot vandalism. You can’t go to a park in Seattle anymore without seeing broken  glass on the ground.    Playgrounds can get crowded and not enough equipment for kids to play (swings, slides, etc)   Designated area for RC (remote control) hobbies. Also police force to protect our parks from hobos, marijuana/drug use.  Alcohol is okay.   Lots of people are moving into Bothell which has also lead to an increase in the number of dogs.Please develop more off  lease  dog parks.   In the event of having a dog park would increase the value of Bothell. Dog parks don’t take much to keep going. This would  open up opportunities for volunteer positions, allow our pups to have some free space to run around instead of driving all  the way to Marymoore off leash dog park which is super over crowed and doesn’t give my pup the opportunity to run  around like he does at Wayne’s park    I think community‐oriented open space is absolutely necessary for our modern quality of life and creation of social bonds.  Without parks and community events, we might as well all live alone.   more trails and turf fields.   Grass fields are often unusable in during the fall/winter/spring because of our wet climate.    Developing the space at Park at Bothell landing is my number one request. A splash pad/water park is needed A BMX bike  area and off leash dog park are also needed in Bothell. Thank you for all your hard work!  We love Bothell parks   Would like community gardens/pea patches and off leash dog park or area   "You guessed it... Bring back the front 9 at Wayne Golf Course. I will happily volunteer and/or be an active board member.  Brent Fitzgerald @ brent@sdesworks.com"   We really need a community center, especially as Bothell keeps growing.  Something similar to North Kirkland Community  Center where there are classes, community events, etc.     "Please add pickleball courts.  The only one in Bothell currently doesn’t even have a net.  There are no useable courts in the  city limits that have nets and are in decent condition.  Thank you! "   "Add musical instruments to the park like these: https://freenotesharmonypark.com/blog/2010/05/21/musical‐playground‐ rotary‐park‐moab‐utah/"   we need a dog park. without a designated dog park every park becomes a dog park.  Kirkland has one. Mill Creek has one.  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 220 of 358 171 City of Bothell Page 60  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com Redmond, Bellevue, Mountlake Terrace. But not Bothell. And int he core of Bothell not the border with Mill Creek that can  be 30minutes from DT.   No thanks.   We need an off‐leash dog area! Now that Red Brick road has been leash law enforced there's no option other than  Marymore or Willis Tucker. DO NOT DEVELOP THE AREA NEXT TO CITY HALL! Make that a central outdoor area for the  residents to enjoy   Look forward to seeing the old Wayne course named and fixed up   We need more dog friendly areas   Changing tables in restrooms at all parks. Family restrooms. Fix restrooms at William Penn Park   what is going to happen with the park that was the Wayne Golf Course? It is a great natural space!   Need to better manage off leash dogs, enforce leash laws, and provide a dedicated space for off leash dogs. Signage is not  sufficient to stop people from letting dogs run off leash and this creates a safety hazard for other users.    Landscape crews need to trim back the plant growth. Every year walking paths go from being big enough for at least two  people to pass each other to only a single person can fit forcing it to be one way.   Build sidewalks in Canyon Park, on 19th SE   More activities and events that are friendly to babies and parents/caregivers. Better sidewalks in outskirts of main town.   Communication in this city is very limited. If you don't have kids in school, you don't know what's going on. I think we need  more free, community oriented activities, and more enrichment activities for kids and adults. People in Bothell need more  opportunities to get to know their neighbors. We have some nice green spaces, and the ones in my neighborhood seem to  be utilized. It's ironic that we might have to raise taxes to get a new skate park and baseball fields, as we had both of those  before they were turned into McMenamin's new parking lot by Pop Keeney. Would it be possible to partner with the school  district to get access to the turf fields with lights that already sit inside our town? They're already set up for baseball,  softball, soccer and lacrosse. Just a thought.   Bothell needs a year round Farmer's Market! One that has both fruits and veggies besides the usual crafts stuff. It would be  ideal if it were at Bothell Landing or some other place near downtown. I think it would add a great sense of community and  vibrancy to our city.   Volume of parks is of less concern to our family than quality, but I do realize that proximity does matter to many.  I would  rather pick fewer projects and make them nice than more for less money.  As an advocate for health and fitness, the safe  streets initiative is also a concern ‐ i believe there should not be a concern for safety when traveling to/from a park via bike  or as pedestrian.  I would put money toward safe streets and purchasing the land for future projects, even if that means it  takes much longer to get the park/project funded.  I realize it may mean that my kids don't get to enjoy a new park before  they grow up, but I think it's important for future generations of the community   I was surprised to find the restrooms locked at 8:30 PM recently. The sun doesn't set until 9ish PM and the lot was pretty  much full of cars with kids at the playground but the restrooms were locked. Not acceptable as far as I'm concerned. Kids  and families need restroom facilities while the park is still useable.   Developers got Country Village; if they get Shelton View Forest as well, there will be little of interest left in Bothell that  makes it special and unique.    Our community is growing and changing which means our public spaces should adapt.    Renovating the playground at Bothell Landing would be wonderful.   The City has done a poor job of allowing developers and the University of washington to overdevelop our city. As a resident  for 18 years, i have watched density rise, city sponsored activities decline and the old town feel of Bothell become that of  the dour city of seattle. My interest in anything Bothell offers is zero lately, as the city has shown that it is all about lining  developers and greedy council members pockets and robbing the honest taxpayers of the city of the fundamental right to  live happily in their neighborhoods. The planning department should be ashamed of themselves for allowing huge high‐rise  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 221 of 358 172 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell Page 61  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com apartment buildings to be built with less than one parking spot per unit. We have university students parking in our  neighborhoods on our lawns because the UW charges them to park on campus, after charging then tuition. And they want  yet another parking garage that the kids will not use, but the city will continue to allow them to increase enrollment. It's  this kind of backwards philosophy that makes us citizens dislike the city and its proposals. You want to poll us on parks,  when you went and sold/ developed all the decent land in the area. As usual Bothell, too little, too late   One sport that is missing in Bothell is Pickleball.  Most of us go to other towns to play outdoors and Seattle community  centers to play indoors.  Pickleball is the fastest growing sport in the country and Bothell needs to address this issue.   The need for Pickleball courts is growing. The Northshore Senior has some indoor courts at select times. The YMCA has  some indoor pickleball if you can afford membership. Some Bothell residents travel to Redmond Senior Center to play  outdoor pickleball. Pickleball is a great sport for the whole family.   As Bothell grows, it will need more parks. Even small spaces are lovely to come across. I especially love the idea of  community gardens since so many of the newcomers will be living in apartments and can't have a garden of their own.   Even small parks (<6000sqft) can offer a  neighborhood benefit and provide hidden gems in the city, differentiating us from  other local communities.    More events would be great!  Given the growing residential population in our downtown, A DOWNTOWN BOTHELL  FARMERS MARKET YEAR ROUND would be utilized often!!   We enjoy the new Wayne Golf Course park, would like to see a fenced off‐leash dog area.   Please work on connecting Parks, schools, business centers and downtown with a network of safe (protected from cars)  biking and walking trails to reduced vehicle traffic and parking demands on the city infrastructure    A census of use is important but more cultural offerings like music. theater in the park and more town sponsored events are  important.   we need playgrounds that are geared for elementary kids (example Miner's Corner), many of the parks have playgrounds  that are really only good for kids till about 6 years old.  Also, parking lots that are large enough to handle the number of  people who use the park & surrounding area (example: Bothell Landing parking is terrible!)   An off leash dog park is really needed!   1. Sammamish River Trail, without speed control or separation of bikes, pedestrians is hazardous. Will not use under  current conditions.    We desperately need a wading pool and splash pad. Families are constantly begging for it in the Bothell FB group. I would  like to see the space around City Hall become a park. Kids already run up and down the steps and along the fountain. It is a  nice central location. Bringing the Farmer's Market there would make sense, too. With Bothell losing green spaces to  development, it is so important to develop public parks. In Seattle, I was always a short walk to a park no matter where I  lived. I think a huge children's park like the Maple Leaf park would be amazing. Maybe William Penn Park could be  updated?    Keep the golf course as open space! What a wonderful addition to Bothell and something that really sets us apart. Maybe  get rid of some blackberry bushes and get river access there, a playground and splash pad! It’s so large you could even do  an off leash area if dog lovers are pushing for it!   PLEASE add a fenced in, off leash dog park at Wayne Golf Course! Mirrored after Marymoor ‐ even a $1 parking fee isn't  unreasonable to help fund it. We need off leash places for dogs and there is plenty of room there! Thank you    N/A   Manage the resources you have better (reduce overhead like this survey).  We can not afford more government    Please save Shelton View Trail System! And please work toward not only protecting those kinds of open spaces we already  have, but acquiring new open spaces to enjoy in the future. Otherwise Bothell will be cookie cutter houses as far as the eye  can see.   To form and hear feedback from a Youth Council in Bothell  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 222 of 358 173 City of Bothell Page 62  Parks, Recreation & Open Space Plan    PO Box 12736, Portland, OR 97212  PO Box 885, Orinda, CA 94563  503.989.9345 www.conservationtechnix.com  I and a number of others would like to see the expansion and improvements to disc golf equipment in parks.    February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 223 of 358 174 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Page Left Intentionally Blank February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 224 of 358 175 APPENDIX BAPPENDIX B TEEN SURVEYTEEN SURVEY February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 225 of 358 176 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 1 | Page To: Nik Stroup, Parks & Recreation Director From: Tracey Perkosky, Parks Planning & Grants Manager Date: November 4, 2019 RE: Teen Survey Results In an effort to reach out to teens, a written survey was distributed to Seniors at Inglemoor High School and an online survey was distributed to Bothell High School via a student volunteer, Erin Powers. The survey was open from October 16th to November 1st. In total, 159 responses were received. The only required question on the survey was if the respondent attended the Northshore School District. All but one respondent attended a school in the Northshore School District. The majority of the respondents were 17 years old (76%) followed by 16% who were 18 years old, 7% were 16 years old and 1% were 15 years old. The survey asked “What do you like to do for fun?” and respondents were instructed to select all that applied plus there was an opportunity for a free text response via the “Other” category. The text responses are listed at the end of this report. The most popular responses were to “Hang out with friends” (79), “Movies” (60), “Hiking” (47) and “Go to the beach” (47). 16% 76% 7% 1% Age 18 17 16 15 0 20 40 60 80 100 Post on Instagram/TikTok, etc. Sports Gaming Read Hiking Mountain Biking Skateboarding Go to Beach Pokemon Go Movies Geocaching Art (music, crafts, etc.) Hang out with friends School Activities Participate in Social Activism Church/Religious Activities Other What Teens Do for Fun February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 226 of 358 177 2 | Page In response to “What amenities would you like to see in Bothell?” the most popular responses were a “Hang out space (like the Hangar)” (128), followed by “Walking trails” (96), “More open spaces” (63) and “More parks” (61). Respondents could select one or all options. The “other” category had free text responses listed at the end of this document. The teen survey respondents were very interested in events in Bothell. For the question “Would you go to:” followed by 8 options the top three choices each received over 100 votes. They were “Movies in the park” (118), “Food truck nights” (105), and “Teen concerts” (103). 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 Amenities 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 Teen Concerts Fun Runs Festivals & Special Events for Teens Game Nights Movies in the park Food Truck Nights Adventure Races Scavenger Hunts Events Teens Would Go To February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 227 of 358 178 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 3 | Page The final question was “What else would you like to see or do in Bothell?” and the responses were entirely free text: I don't really know walking trails concerts! road biking more food trucks, game nights dog park! I want them to improve some of the sidewalks playgrounds for adults! more courts permanent dog park dog park events my favorite movie is megamind food events community building spaces help to beautify our parks community spaces & cafes I like to walk trails and go to events more coffee shops more coffee shops nothing picnic days outdoor movies 10k more opportunities for teens areas fur public use/hangout benches Concerts would be soooooo coool!!!! There are so many kids in the north shore district who are making music too so it would be so sick Monitor creepy men at the library Idk Concerts, paddle boarding and water sports More places to park just a collective place where high schoolers can hangout Mcdonald’s I would just like places to go hangout with friends like a little cafe or something similar to what’s in F.R.I.E.N.D.S If you have concerts for teens, you should let some teens perform! There are a lot of creative, musical teens in the area. Also a different genre of music each time would be cool, from pop to country to edm!! Annual run or event that the whole community gets involved in Less people that aren't actaully from here H More opportunities for teens to meet and hang out! drive in movies Ski bus February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 228 of 358 179 4 | Page Sex a drive in movie theater Black people I think we should keep the dog park, or make an upgraded version I think it is the best idea and so many people use this space for their dogs Have a movie drive in Hmmmm More community Calisthenic park Less development Race More community country village More play fields More social events Keep the dog park up! More hangouts!! More restaurants with more popular branded companies. Any big brand franchise, like Nike or maybe even a mall n/a Game Center The survey also offered the opportunity for free text answers to some of the other questions. What you like to do for fun? coffee dates biking (street, trail) study Video Production/PC Building lifting weights/parkour biking (not mtn) being on the water work playing with my dogs writing cooking Dance Ski Snowboarding Skiing February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 229 of 358 180 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 5 | Page What amenities would you like to see in Bothell? road biking trails none a nice modern workplace playgrounds for teens/adults (adult sized swings) basketball courts (similar to hang out) cafes flat place to roller skate Sports field Dog parks Stage A study space open past 9pm on weeknights More basketball courts. Covered area basketball park This is a copy of the paper survey: February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 230 of 358 181 APPENDIX CAPPENDIX C DOG PARK SURVEYDOG PARK SURVEY February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 231 of 358 182 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 To: Nik Stroup, Parks & Recreation Director From: Tracey Perkosky, Parks Planning & Grants Manager Date: October 11, 2019 RE: Dog Park Survey Results A community survey was open from August 1 to September 15, 2019. It was available exclusively via an online survey link. Staff promoted the survey during two on-site events, via social media (Twitter, Instagram & Facebook), City’s website, and posted at the dog park itself. It was also promoted by KING5 during an interview with Police Department staff. The timing of the survey aligned with a “pop-up” or temporary dog park located at the Park at Bothell Landing. The survey received 1,405 responses of which 1,203 self-identified as residents. The survey had two paths if the respondent did not have a dog and did not plan on getting one in the future, then they were asked Q1. When you think about a dog park in Bothell, do you think of it as something the community needs or doesn’t need?; Q2. What size is/are your dogs? (an option being no dog in the household); Q8. What is your greatest concern about having a dog park in Bothell?; and Q9. Are you a Bothell Resident?. The other respondents who either owned a dog or planned to get one in the near future were asked additional questions regarding potential locations, park amenities, etc. A full copy of the survey instrument is at the end of this report. Not surprisingly, nearly 91% of the respondents said it was definitely needed and 6% said that it was probably needed. Less than 3% were neutral, probably don’t need or definitely don’t need. The majority of respondents (57%) had “No concerns” over a dog park, but for those that had concerns “Excess dog waste” (11%) and “Animal vaccinations/illnesses” (11%) were of greatest concern. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 No Concern Safety Noise Animal vaccinations/illness Overuse Excess dog waste Other Dog Park Concerns February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 232 of 358 183 There were 618 dogs between 41-80 pounds and 447 dogs between 16-40 pounds. There were 70 respondents who said that they “do not currently have a dog and do not anticipate having one anytime soon.” The remainder of the survey questions were designed to determine potential permanent dog park features. The respondents were asked: “What best describes your current method used to provide your dog with exercise?”. The majority of respondents currently take their dog on “daily or multiple walks per day around the neighborhood” (41%) followed by “Frequent visits to area dog parks (at least once per month)” (26%). 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 0-15 pounds 16-40 pounds 41-80 pounds Over 81 pounds No dog, but will add one soon No dog, and will not add one soon Dog Sizes in Bothell 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 1-2 walks per week 3-5 walks per week Daily or multiple walks in neighborhood Area dog parks Go illegally off leash in parks Don't actively exercise dog Current Exercise Method February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 233 of 358 184 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 A free text question asked “Where do you currently take your dogs to walk, socialize and exercise?”. The full answers are at the end of this report, but most respondents said local parks and nearby dog parks as well as their neighborhoods. The survey asked “About how often would you use an outdoor, fenced-in, off-leash dog park in Bothell? Most respondents (44%) said a “few times per week”, followed by 26% who said “daily”. For potential locations, the various parks suggested all ranked about equal for a permanent park. 26% 20%44% 5%1%4% How often would you use a Bothell Dog Park Daily 1x per week Few times per week 1x per month Few times per year Never Where? Park at Bothell Landing East Norway Hill Blyth Park Cedar Grove William Penn February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 234 of 358 185 For permanent amenities, survey respondents were asked to mark if an amenity was “Very Important”, “Somewhat Important”, “Not Important” or “I don’t know”. Water for dogs and a double gate entry system were “Very Important” followed by “6 foot high fencing”, “natural grass/weeds” and “enclosures for smaller dogs” also ranked high when combing “Very” and “Somewhat” important. Finally, the survey asked “Are you interested in serving on a volunteer committee for the dog park?” and 282 individuals provided their email address for follow-up. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 235 of 358 186 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 5 | Page Responses to “Where do you currently take your dogs to walk, socialize, and exercise?” Tambar Marymoor and Edmonds off leash area at beach Pop up park, walks Cedar Grove Park, Park at Bothell Landing Marymoor, Willis Tucker, neighborhood walks my neighborhood. juanita park and juanita bay park, down town Kirkland, and the pop up park in Bothell Edmonds off leash area, cedar park bothell Neighborhoods, sammamish river trail, other trails in the area that I can find. All current parks Magnesun Park, Bothell, mountlake terrace neighborhood Neighbourhood Marymoor park, oo denny Mountlake terrace neighborhood Coffee store Bothell pop up Nowhere Kirkland juanita and bothell and greenlake Around our neighborhood Neighborhood or in our backyard Around my neighborhood. Around the block my backyard Just around our apartment complex. There aren’t a lot of off leash parks for little guys that are safe and secure Stipek Kirkland Walks in neighborhood and inviting friends over with a dog to socialize Downtown neighborhood streets Around my neighborhood and to the pop up dog park Magnuson off leash park and Willis tucker off leash park Our neighborhood...sometimes Marymoor...but it’s too big, and dangerous for a smaller dog Neighborhood walk, backyard with ball, no frequent socialization Neighborhood, bars and dog parks Bothell Landing Bothell dog park, before I had to go to Robinswood in Bellevue Edmonds off leash park Beardslee Boulevard, Burke Gilman Trail Daycare, or on 112th Avenue trail Swamp creek, Brightwater, Sheltonview Forest neighborhood, Jaspers dog park Greenlake My sister house, she has a dog Montlake terrace dog park February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 236 of 358 187 6 | Page In my neighborhood wayne golf, marymoore, edith mouton Around the neighborhood, dog parks, and in the house with my other dogs Neighborhood school walks to and from downtown Bothell, Bothell pop up dog park My neighborhood, Jasper's Dog Park in Kirkland Around the neighborhood or into Seattle for their dog parks Around downtown Bothell, Marymoor Park, Samm. Trail, Kirkland Marymoor Willis Tucker I don’t have a dog Edmonds or Kirkland Bothell pop up dog park Walk around the Maywood neighborhood, and visit the pop-up dog park 1-2 times per week Trails above Blythe Park, Wayne’s, and Norway Hill Willis Tucker Park Juanita I don't have a dog. Marymoor park Our neighborhood Neighborhood I currently bring my dog to excersize & play with other dogs at the pop up dog park in bothell everyday, which is only a 5 minute commute. Before that I had to drive 45mins round trip to go to marymoor dog park. Sammamish river trail; North Creek trails in business park Edmonds beach Walks around the neighborhood and apartment, marymoore off leash dog park and three forks off leash dog parks and local parks SixOaks off-leash (really tiny) pet relief area, around the neighborhood, pop-up park Bothell Landing Dog Park, Miners corner Neighborhood, friends houses On our street or hiking; she is working her way up to gaining confidence for a dog park Walks in the neighborhood and BHS North creek trail at house Bothell pop up Off-leash dog parks Neighborhood or dog parks My neighborhood LOCAL DOG PARKS - TAMBARK, WILLIS TUCKER, ETC. Mary moor, magnuson park parks Neighborhood Neighborhood and dog parks Marymoor slough trail, neighborhoods, parks Neighborhood Work, walks around my development, hike in the mountains on some weekends February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 237 of 358 188 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 7 | Page marymoor dog park or walk around the neighborhood. Miners Corner No where Pop up dog park in Bothell Snohomish, Redmond for off leash. Neighborhood for walks Around town, tambark Yard and on walks Edith Moulton Park and Wayne park Edith Moulton Marymoor Neighborhood Our neighborhood Marymoor, Dogwood Now the pop up dog park but before that they rarely got of leash because we couldn’t get to the dog park on a regular basis like we do now since the pop up cane about . Please let’s keep the dog park so many people in the community are using it at that location me and my dogs have meet so many new friends there, it would be are shame if it went away for good Parks Mill Creek off-leash dog park. Our neighborhood. Around the neighborhood Around my neighborhood, dog parks in other cities Na Marymoor, Wellington Hills golf course neighborhood and Samm. River trail Dog parks, and walks in the neighborhood. around the neighborhood Neighborhood Marymoor Neighborhood and Magnuson Magnuson Park Neighborhood Tambark Creek dog park, love the amenities there, trails, fields, kids play area, dog park. Would love a different option sometimes though. Downtown bothell Anywhere they're allowed. Neighborhood or park tambark Neighborhood Neighborhood Marymoor dog park or magnusen dog park Walks through our neighborhood and area dog parks Local walks Neighborhood My own yard, friend's horses Neighborhood Walk Walk through neighborhood or dog park On the hill by Westhill February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 238 of 358 189 8 | Page Walk around downtown Bothell Saint Edwards With friends around neighborhood Neighborhood Neighborhood, marymoor Around neighborhood Tambark Marymoor St Edwards Neighborhood and parks Burge gilman trail I don't have a dog but love doggies and would love for them to have a place to go! Tambark, Willis tucker Dog park Around my neighborhood Around the neighborhood pop up dog park, neighborhood, puppy class, church Neighborhood, dog parks Marymoor Neighborhood I don’t own a dog. Around bothell. Around our neighborhood several times or Marymoor dog park not many places in Bothell... Neighborhood and parks in other cities Between William Penn Park and Stipek Park I dint Dog parks, hiking, and walking around the neighborhood. Neighborhood, logboom Near Bothell high Walks and Tambark dog park Neighborhood and pop up dog park or Magnuson dog park in Seattle around our neighborhood Daycare, magnuson, marymoore My neighborhood and the Burke Gillman Around my property Pop up dog park in Bothell Everywhere! Around our neighborhood as stated previously don't have a dog live in Kenmore but plan to add a dog in the near future to our family I walk my corgis around downtown Bothell atleast 3 times a day and primarily go to MaryMoor Dog Park, Magnuson, or the walking trails in Woodenville every weekend. Miners corner, blythe park, Bothell Landing, Brightwater, Willis Tucker Park, Centennial Park, everywhere and the power lines and then the neighborhood Mary moor dog park, Willis Tucker dog park Miner park Marymoor park in Redmond February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 239 of 358 190 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 9 | Page Tambark Creek off leash dog park Magnuson dog park Back yard Marymoor Neighborhood Cedar Grove Park. I don't have a dog now Around my neighborhood Around my bothell neighborhood Neighborhood Neighborhood, Edmonds dog park, willis tucker dog park Neighborhood Magnuson Dog Park Magnesan navel base dog park Magnuson Pop up in bothell/shoreline dog park Around my house because all dog parks are too far away to commit too during the week. Magnuson Park, Andrew’s Bay (boating), Marymoor, Dogwood, Hop&Hound Magnuson off leash dog park Marymoor or Jasper's Woodinville, or any local off-leash dog park Around the house and Edith Moulton Brickyard Park Backyard and walks around neighborhood Walks around our neighborhood on leash and to Willis tucker off leash dog park. Shoreline off leash dogpark, Mountlake Terrace off leash dog park, neighborhood walks Marymoor and magnuson park Jasper and the pop up dog park off 522 around the neighborhood and mary moore park The Bothell pop up dog park and walks around the neighborhood. Wayne golf course park, neighborhood Neighborhood walk or Bothell pop up. Been exploring other dog parks too like Edmonds and Marymoor On the streets Mostly around my neighborhood Off-leash parks in Kirkland and Redmond Around the neighborhood. Having the Bothell dog park has been fantastic! trails near our house, sidewalk, business complex paring lot to allow to run Burke Gilman Trail, Wayne golf course, neighborhood. Around our apartment. Prefer parks/dog parks but there aren't as many close to us. The one at the landing is awesome and soooo convenient Around the neighborhood or dog parks Neighborhood walks Various parks Walking around the neighborhood, since dog parks are too far away Whidbey island MARRY MORE Neighborhood, Petco February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 240 of 358 191 10 | Page Edith Moulton dog park Bothell pop dog park There is an abandoned field in my neighborhood that residents take their dogs to play and socialize. Most people let their dogs play off leash (though it is not technically sanctioned for that). Open parks that are not off leash but people do it anyways Neighborhood and local northern dog parks Riverside Park Westhill Neighborhood around neighborhood or take to marymoor Around the block for walking and Edmonds dog park to socialize St. Edwards State Park Magnuson dog park, Golden Gardens dog park Neighborhood, area off leash parks Around the neighborhood but traffic is an issue Magnusson Park Dog Park Neighborhood, park, trail Walking around downtown bothell Neighborhood dog park and dog daycare Marymoore Edith mouton Wayne golf around neighborhood and dog parks around neighborhood and weekly trips to luther burbank dog park Brickyard Rd Park and behind Northshore Jr High They go everywhere with us except to work. We goto Marymoore and Minor park in Bothell walk around the neighborhood, trail at North Creek business park, dog park at Marymoor (favorite!!!) Tambark or Willis tucker The POP-UP DOG PARK at Bothell Landing, Daily + 'Rosie' 22lbs walks 3-times daily = @ 3-hrs/day (1-hr of which is currently at the Bothell POP-UP Dog Park Tambark Dog Park, Mill Creek Burke Gilman Trail, and occasionally to the dog park in mill Creek but it’s tough to drive out there often. Blythe park, Marymoor off leash park Kirkland dog park or neighborhood In my neighborhood or at Wayne Park Marymoor Neighborhoods, local parks, Occasionally Jasper’s and Marymoor. Daily walks around neighborhood and weekly trips to Luther Burbank Dog park Bothell off leash, marymoor off leash, Seattle off leash marymoor park redmond Walk around the neighborhood, no good areas to socialize without decent travel. Marymoore dog park Pioneer Cemetery Bellevue Downtown Park Around my block Bothell pop up dog park Willis tucker Willis tucker Around the neighborhood and to the dog park at Edith Moulton Park February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 241 of 358 192 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 11 | Page Marymoor, Bothell pop-up park, Magnuson Neighborhood and local parks Neighborhood, local parks Bothell Landing, Miners Park, neighborhood In our neighborhood / development Pop up park! Marymoor Park Bothell pop up Tambark Neighborhood Kirkland bothell landing Doug Allen Sportsfields Around the neighborhood or to Seattle I used to walk my dog around my building, the Junction, and that vacant lot down on the corner of 520, but now we go to the dog park every day, and love it! Walking a dog leads to little socialization for the dog and myself - at the dog park we both get out and visit others! Neighborhood near our home (near the pop-up dog park) Walks around the neighborhood, hikes, dog parks, dog friendly breweries Walks around downtown Bothell East Norway Hill Park Marymoor park Neighborhood walks 3-4x per day, various dog parks 4-5x per week Because one of my dogs was traumatized by illegal fireworks being fired over her while out for a walk during non-summer days, we can't walk her in our neighborhood most of the time. We walk in nearby parks. Seattle pop-up dog park Pop up dog park bothell Dog park Kirkland offleash Dogwood Play Park, Marymoor, Willis Tucker, Magnuson, Voff Bark & Brew Around neighborhood (no sidewalk), Marymoor dog park around my neighborhood a d this dog park Neighborhood Back yard and dog parks Neighborhood or local school Walking and dog parks in Seattle Westhill Jasper’s Dog Park In our neighborhood Our neighborhood- or have to drive to Marymoore Petsmart Jasper’s Dog Park in Kirkland On leash around the neighborhood in downtown Bothell. Dog parks in Kirkland and Redmond dog parks in Edmonds, Magnusen, Marymoor, Tambark Creek, Mountlake Terrace, Kirkland Neighborhood Just walks around the neighborhood on weekdays on the weekend to parks for leashed walks Juanita beach and Doug Allen February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 242 of 358 193 12 | Page Neighbors with dogs, dog parks, hiking/walking trails Marymoor Outside our apartment complex Marymore dog park Our neighborhood (Maywood Hills) Magnuson Dog Park Around the neighborhood Marymoor, Magnuson, and Edith Moulton dog parks neighborhood Throw the ball in the yard Magnuson dog park N/a Near my house in kenmore Jasper's Dog Park Marymoor, Edmonds dog park, Magnuson, Wayne's golf course Downtown bothell,.pop up park Magnuson Off Leash Dog Park Pipeline I don’t have a dog. But I live near Doug Allen, which is often used for off leash dogs. I think I dog park would help with that. Just walks, no socialize Doggy day care in Bellevue Tambark or Willis tucker. Or walks around the neighborhood Marymoor Neighborhood walk Neighborhood, Marymoor Neighborhood Local parks and in our neighborhood Marymoor, or tucker park Bothell, sandpoint Willis Tucker & Tambark Creek Off-Leash Dog Parks My own neighborhood Around the neighborhood and Wayne golf course park. Trails, neighborhood streets, etc Marymoor park Neighborhood or Marymoore dog park Burke Gilman's trail My dog is deaf and blind now but we used to go to redmond off leash Neighborhood or Merrymore Park Marymoor Round my neighbor Magnesium park and Willis tucker Pipeline and golf course Dog park Walks around our neighborhood and socialization has been play dates or she loves the pop up dog park Neighborhood walk Neighborhood February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 243 of 358 194 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 13 | Page Around the neighborhood and at the dog park My dogs died but I took them on the North Creek Trail, Bothell Landing trails, trails by McDonalds, anywhere I could find a trail that didn't have a lot of bikes or dogs off leash Downtown bothell Bothell Landing, Sammamish trail, Marymoor off leash dog park Bothell Dog Park, Marymoor Dog Park Magnuson park or marymoor Marrymoor Park, Magnusson, Bothell pop up Jaspers dog park Neighborhood, bothell Landing, Willis Tucker park (about 25 min drive) Bothell Pop Up dog park and Magnuson dog park Mt Lake Terrace dog park, edmonds dog park Marymoore dog park, magnuson dog park Bothell pop up dog park and Magnuson dog park Neighborhood Around our apartment complex, dog parks, Dog parks, Burke-Gilman trail Marymoor park Usually just walks around the neighborhood. I have to travel around the Eastside if I want to go to a dog park. Bothell is much closer for socialization for my dog. st Edwards Park Neighborhood Don’t have a dog yet Pop up dog park in bothell Pop up dog park, open grass area by house, walks along trails Jaspers Dog Park and Marymoor. We have enjoyed the new pop-up park. Around my neighborhood or my backyard. My own neighborhood Burke Gilman trail walks, neighborhood walks, magnusson dog park, st Edwards park Don’t have a dog Dog park, daycare neighborhood, off-leash areas farther away Marymoor of leash dog park Neighborhood walks, Tambark Park, business park trails Willis Tucker Dog Park walk around our Westhill neighborhood but we don't have a place to socialize Marymoor, Magnuson, Shoreline, Mountlake Terrace Woodinville Walks around the block Edmonds beach dog park St Ed's, Wayne Golf Course Trail, neighborhood, doggie day care, Neighborhood and marymore off leash dog park Centennial Park Neighborhood and dog park neighborhood, Magnuson Park - once a month Doodle Round up Dogs parks, gardens and trails February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 244 of 358 195 14 | Page Walk around neighborhood; socialize at Magnuson off leash dog park Montlake Terrace Off-leash Dog Park, Magnuson Park Willis Tucker park Mukilteo, Edmonds, or Kirkland Neighboorhood Neighborhood Bothell pop up dog park Samamish River Trail Bothell Landing, Wayne Golf course, neighborhood walks, jaspers Open field that i drive 15 minutes too pop up bothell landing, edith moulton park & kirkland downtown parks Edith Moulton Dog Park Kirkland around the neighborhood Walks around the neighborhood and dog parks neighborhood three times a day, Marymor once a week Bothell landing Magnuson Off leash dog park Bothell pop-up dogpark, Mountlake Terrace dogpark, around our Queensborough neighborhood in Bothell Around the block, on a trail or a dog park Marymoor Dog Park Marymoor Off-Leash Dog Park Magnosun off leash dog park The Bothell dog park 4 times a week,Bothell landing, around the neighborhood Log boom park, St. Edwards park, Burke Gilman trail, Edmonds anywhere thst has water Friends acreage, walking, beach Through my neighborhood or to a local park Walks around the neighborhood, playing in the yard, and there is a small off leash park nearby. It is quite small however. Pop up dog park neighborhood, other dog parks Marymorre Dog park Neighborhood walks Runs with me, walks with me, hikes with me. Maywood hill. Sammamish trail Tambark Pop-up dog park, only place we have gone I am a pet sitter and so have multiple dog clients, I take them sometimes to the Pop Up Park and think it fills a great need in Bothell, especially with all the apartments going up. My neighborhood around Canyon Park MS and Bothell dog park. Around 241st St SE and 23rd Ave SE my neighborhood Bothell dog park or walks on St. Edwards trails Dog parks, walks, hikes My neighborhood, other parks, Lake Washington February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 245 of 358 196 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 15 | Page Westhill Neighborhood and Doug Allen Around the neighborhood The pop up dog park Mary moor or Doug allen Bothell Lansing /Birk gillmam trail, the old Wayne’s golf course Tucker Willis, Marymoor and Magnuson Wayne golf course park (on leash), Jasper’s dog park in Kirkland At a school yard that allows dog after school hour Currently don't have one Dog park I don’t have a dog (which is also why I love the dog park) Gilman Trail Marimore Walk around the neighborhood. Run at marymoor dog park. Daycare 2x week. Marymoor dog park, cavaliero dog park, or Willis tucker Sidewalk and yard Around my neighborhood, and to the pop-up dog park Neighborhood Around the neighborhood Marymoor and Magnuson Willis Tucker Park. Walking around neighborhood. Hiking on local trails. Neighborhood and marina. Complex My neighborhood or walking trails. Pop up dog park Kenmore Neighborhood Jasper's Dog Park Bothell pop up dog park Marymoor, Bothell landing! Around the Bothell high school Eastside Off-Leash (Shoreline), Magnuson, Marymoor, Dog friendly businesses Walking in neighborhood or to an OL Dog park near Hamlin Park. Marymoor dog park Around the neighborhood Redmond Edith Moulton Willis Tucker park I don't have a dog, but drive by the pop up park everyday and see how good it is for the community and how busy it is (so was obviously needed). Public school grounds Edith Moulton Park Marymoor Dog Park or Tambark Creek Willis Tucker as well as other normal parks Other municipality dog parks Edmonds dog park, or Tambark dog park Magnason navel base dog park February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 246 of 358 197 16 | Page Walk around neighborhood - often take roommate's dog to park to throw frisbee Edmonds Wayne parks where no one goes Jaspers dog park Neighborhood streets Magnuson Park on 35th Around Kirkland/ Marymoor Park Magnuson Around my neighborhood near Frank Love Bothell PopUp, Magnuson Marymoor, Magnuson, St Edwards, o.o. Denny, Wayne, Burke gilman, inglewood neighborhood On walks down the street or to the park Sammamish trail or Edmonds DogPark Bothell landing, Edmonds dog park Willis tucker park Mountlake Terrace dog park Dog park neighborhood To Ballinger lake- there’s no where near by Neighborhoods around us. Puppy daycare Neighborhood Neighborhood, Willis Tucker dog park My neighborhood (Mays Pond) Marymoor, Magnuson dog parks Neighborhood Marymoor off leash park Willlis tucker dog park Bothell No dog Tambark or the neighborhood or Mukilteo Neighborhood, Shelton view forest, mountlake terrace dog park wayne golf course. Off leash park at Wayne Park would be best Doug Allen, Wayne's Golf course I walk my dog in my neighborhood. Neighborhood, or Jaspers Seattle or Kirkland magnuson dog park Around downtown Bothell and on the trails neighborhood Neighborhood, Edmonds dog park, Kirkland dog park, Magnuson dog park, Woodenville river front walk around my neighborhood Jasper Park or Marymore Park Downtown bothell neighborhoods, Mud Bay, Mill Creek town center around our neighborhood for walks. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 247 of 358 198 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 17 | Page Locally or when i visit friends with dogs in surrounding towns. Long walks around town, marymoor, jaspers dog park Marymoore park Pop up park have been VERY helpful due to location. Lots of friendly pups and humans. Hope the city can do something permanent. The Landing, Mercer Island, and Seattle dog parks Bothell neighborhood Marymoor Park or Edmonds Elementary school by my house Local dog parks (mill creek, Mountlake Terrace) neighborhood walks Y neighborhood Neighborhood, Willis Tucket Park Bothell Home, Edmonds dog park, various Seattle dog parks Lake Sammamish River Trail Bothell Lansing dog park Sidewalks, parks (on leash) Jasper Dog Park, Marymoor and/or Duvall I have to walk around downtown but do not always feel safe. I’m a woman in my 30s Bothell Landing and Stipek park. On leash only. Bothell Landing, Samammish River Trail, and shops around downtown Bothell. Neighborhood It’s hard to find places, but either Kirkland or Redmond. Walks in my neighborhood Magnuson, marymoor Neighborhood Walk around neighborhoods Tambark, Mill Creek Nature Preserve and North Creek Trail The dog park in Snohomish Neighborhood walks Na Marymoor, Howarth, and Willis Tucker Off leash dog Parks We have a large yard, we go to local dog parks and an unsanctioned offleash area that is not in Bothell Neighborhood Marymoor Wayne Doug Allen field Neighborhood Around the house Drive to kirkland and walk there. No great spots in bothell. Neighborhood , and dog parks Downtown Bothell / Bothell Landing Cedar grove park, walked around downtown N/A North creek trail, retaining pond Shelton View elementary. i don't have a dog February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 248 of 358 199 18 | Page dont have dogs, but like the dog park Kenmore Burke Gilman Trail off Bothell Landing near home the neighborhood/downtown area Willis Tucker Park my neighborhood, parks I won't name because I just said I let them off leash Around my apartment complex Kirkland or Mill Creek Marymoor Marymoor park Marymoor Na Tilt pipeline trail kirkland marymoor or magnuson Trails Dog friendly bars, dog parks, parks Many parks in western washington; i prefer onleash Wherever animal control isn't My neighborhood In neighborhood Neighborhood Neighborhood Parks Neighborhood Magnuson marymoror Tall Tree Friends place Other parks Bothell Landing or Bothell High school area friends houses Trails N/a Neighborhood Neighbor Sammamish trail Walk daily in Westhill. Little dog socialization with other dogs along our walk route. I don’t currently own a dog I don’t have a dog, but the dog park is a great idea Neighborhood or not at all Around the neighborhood none as I said in number 2, i don't have a dog, you're survey is flawed Walk the sidewalks in my neighborhood N/A Juanita beach Mountlake dog park and marymoor park Seattle My yard February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 249 of 358 200 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 19 | Page Dog play groups, and play parks Dog park in kirkland Park In my backyard, or around the neighborhood Marymoor dog park, miner’s corner Snohomish county park Marymoor dog park, Magneson dog park, Kirkland waterfront, our neighborhood My residence Nearby school Marymoor - too far!!! Marymoor Hikes, Shelton view forest, neighborhood West hill Neighborhood Tambark Creek Park kirkland water front Pop up dog park! Centennial park in bothell Marymoor Neighborhood or Marymoor Dog Park Seatac Neighbors yards and dog parks Around neighborhood Neighborhood Mary moor Neighbor hood, downtown bothell park area by the river Trails & Dog Parks all around seattle Kirkland off leash dog park Bothell Landing, Marymoor Park, Samammish river trail here! to the pop up dog park The park across the street Volunteer Park Pipeline through bothell. Recently the dog park works better Jasper's Dog Park in Kirkland, Mountlake Terrace dog park, edmonds beack dog park Magnesium park or walk in a trail On my street. Little to no socialization with other dogs, that's why we love the park! Marymoore, Dogwood, bars Walks in Downtown Bothell Wayne golf course, sammamish trail, marymoor, pop-up park Bothell Landing Park Sidewalks in Bothell Kirkland Do not have a close dog park, I was driving to Edmonds dog park. Only on the green space of my apartment complex. Lots of children play there, so they socialize with my dog. Around my neighborhood and to dogparks Volunteer Park, the field at Bothell Way and 98th, around the neighborhood and downtown My own neighborhood, the Park at Bothell Landing, Jasper’s, Centennial February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 250 of 358 201 20 | Page Tambark Offleash Dog Park Neighborhood streets dogs walk the neighborhood or back yard - no opportunity to socialize Bothell landing currently To the Bothell Off-Lease Park - I love it Backyard, neighborhood street, or sometimes the Magnuson Park off-leash area. Marymoor Neighborhood Around the neighborhood, but not far as we have no sidewalks where we live. We take them to other off leash dog parks in other cities, but it would be nice to not have to drive so far. Neighborhood walks, Magnuson Park around town Around the block. Although we've used the bothell landing a toooon since it popped up. We have to leave our dog home for 9ish hours each day and to be able to have a place that close to get to in 8min is amazing. We also go to local dog parks but all are farther than the one at the landing which has been so convenient and plenty of space to run. The neighboorhood, the off leash area at Bothell landing(going 3-4 times during the work week) and sometimes farther like Marymoor, Jasper park isn't the best but we go there Neighborhood Several different dog parks Magnusson Off-Leash Dog Park Walks around my neighborhood, to off leash dog park in Kirkland, and to parks in Bothell- Sammamish River trail, Wayne Golf Course North bend Dog Park North bend Richmond beach, Hamlin park, edmonds My neighborhood Everywhere. I go to all dog parks around Kirkland, Redmond, mill creek, lynnwood, Snohomish etc Around the neighborhood, but to marymoor park to run and socialize. Burke Gilman Trail and Jaspers Dog Park Sammamish trail, marymoor, robinswood, parks Kirkland Dog Parks Other dog parks further away Tamarak Dog park Jasper MaryMoor Dog Park Our neighborhood (Bloomberg Hill) burke gilman trail, various dog parks Around my neighborhood neighborhood neighborhood, Sammamish River Trail Park at Bothell Landing and Sammamish Trail Bothell Landing Park Samamish hiking trail Bothell Landing Park and surrounding area Downtown Bothell Tambark or Jasper February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 251 of 358 202 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 21 | Page Around Bothell and Jasper’s dog park Magnuson, marymoore, dogwood Bothell landing park Magnuson, Edith Moulton, Jaspers, Marymoor and Edmonds Beach Tambark creek dog park Jasper dog park Wallace Swamp Creek Park walks, Meetups, dog parks Willis tucker off leash neighborhood & Marymoor Marymoor Trails, daycare, dog parks Around the neighborhood, local human parks, Mukilteo dog park Sammamish River Trail, Jaspers Off Leash, Willis Tucker Off Leash, Bone-A-Fide Dog Ranch Willis tucker and mountlake terrace and Burke Gilman dog parks, but they are all too far away On our acre of land for exercise . Socialize at the off leash park in bothell twice a week Burke Gilman Trail, Willis Tucker Dog Park, or around the neighborhood Dog Park in Kirkland My backyard, or a dog park (usually Tambark or Magnuson) Dog parks we have to drive to Did take to local parks such as Magnuson or Juanita. Planning on getting another dog and this park would be great Around the neighborhood Marymoor Marymoore park Wayne, Blyth, the bothell pop up dog park, william penn park Trainers dog group Dog park and neighborhood walks Our neighbors house Bothell landing around our neighborhood Neighborhoods or trail. The trail is difficult because she would like to chase the ducks, chickens ect. Near open grassy area, doggie day care, doog bar and brewery, around the block Neighborhood, Sammamish River trail/park at Bothell landing, paradise lake Conifer View, new pop up park Canyon Park Day camp 2 days a week and weekend at Marymoor dog park Trail system around park at bothell landing. Marymoore dog park neighborhood Bothell, Magnuson Park, around the neighborhood Around my neighborhood and downtown bothell area trails Marymoor Dog Park Around our neighborhood Marymore, Wellington golf course, Wayne golf course, pop up park at Bothell Landing my neighborhood February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 252 of 358 203 22 | Page Marymoor, Jasper dog park Neighborhood and downtown Bothell and Bothell golf course and the sammamish trail Before Bothell Pop Up - we were taking our dogs to Marymoor Dog Park in Redmond. Currently, we walk our dogs in neighborhoods 2x daily and sometimes hike in nearby mountains. AT HOME Redmond, Seattle Tambark Willis Tucker Marymoor Na The trail N/A The pop up dog park Downtown bothell Marymoore dog park Marymoor Dog Park Neighborhood On hikes all around the area. Or Jasper park. Around the neighborhood and Tambark dog park Marymore Sammamish trail or on sidewalks Neighborhood trails The pop up dog park - before this all the way to a park in Bellevue Neighborhood walks, schools after hours N/A n/a Tambark Marymore Neighborhood, Richmond beach, Hop and the Hound Marymoor and Edith park Miner's Coner Park at Woodinville or Bothell Business Park Neighborhood, Tambark Park, The Hop and Hound Marymoor, big Finn hill park, wayne’s Golf course park, neighborhood walks, local parks (on leash) Marymoor, Magnuson, Tucker Willis, swamp Creek Conifer view neighborhood Dogwood play park I do not have a dog Neighborhood Kirkland and Redmond off-leash dog parks Jasper dog park, Edith Moulton dog park, Willis Tucker dog park, pop up dog park in Bothell, walks around downtown Bothell Downtown, local parks, and family w/ their dogs Dog parks Neighborhood near Bothell High Around the downtown Bothell area. park Golf course Edith Moulton off leash park February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 253 of 358 204 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 23 | Page Around the neighborhood, and usually travelling far distances to existing dog parks On leash walks around the neighborhood or to off leash parks like Jasper's in Kirkland. We need an off leash park in Bothell! Marymoor Swamp park Around neighborhood Mountlake Terrace Dog Park Wayne Hikes far outside of Bothell, walks around neighborhood, limited ability to be off leash dog park at sand point Marymoor Roof at SHAG Parks on leash, backyard play, neighborhood on leash, Tambark Creek dog park, St. Edwards Park trails, Bothell Landing to Blyth to Wayne loop, Bothell Landing pop up dog park Neighborhood Neighborhood Norway Hill pipeline trail Jasper's dog park Neighborhood, tambark dog park Tambark Creek Tambark off leash and Willis Tucker off leash park A small dog park in Kirkland or day care Westhill; Downtown Bothell Swamp Creek Park / Anderson Golf Course Park Around our neighborhood, Marymoore, friends houses Around the neighborhood Logan Park Redmond and Magnuson Neighborhood My neighborhood or the beach around our neighborhood, Marymoor Neighborhood and Logan Park, and now the pop up park! Around the neighborhood Around my neighborhood on leash, there wasn't a place to safely go off leash until this pop up. Magnusen Wayne golf course and our neighbor hood BG trail, neighborhood Around the neighborhood. events Edith Moulton dog park and doggie daycare Marymoor Dog Resort, Lake City Currently the Bothell Pop Up Park Marymoor Marymoor off leash magnasun February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 254 of 358 205 24 | Page Neighborhood walks and Magnuson off-leash park Trail and former golf course ON LEASH Westhill area Marymoor off leash park Queensborough neighborhood Various dog parks, and occassionally empty lots. Mount lake terrace dog park Off leash dog parks - closest large ones are 30 mins away neighborhood, trails Jasper Dog Park Neighborhood street; Bothell Landing Various parks, nature preserves, and around the neighborhood Jaspers, Edith Moultan Dogwood Indoor park Lake City. Wayne Golf Course. Magnussen Park. Car keel Park. Edmonds park. Home Depot. Starbucks. I HAVE TO TAKE HIM OFF LEASH IN PARKS. THATS WHY WE NEED AN APPROPRIATE PLACE THAT IS SAFE Neighborhood, Sammamish River Trail Marymoor Park Edith Wharton Park Dog parks, apartment complex (living an apartment really emphasizes the need for an off leash area) Neighborhood, kirkland dog park by Helen Keller elem school I don't have a dog - but I love to see them play in an off-leash park Mountlake Terrace dog park or on walks near canyon park I have to take two buses to get to a dog park friends house Walks around our neighborhood in Maywood hills area Westhill area Walk neighborhood w family, burke trail w friends and their dog, throw ball in our yard daily Shoreline dog park We walk around downtown bothell and hope to run into another dog on our route to say hi to. Other parks Marymoor Off-Leash Dog Park Parks, trails, neighborhoods neighborhood I live in, the pop-up dog park at Bothell Landing Willis Tucker Around Bothell city hall Downtown bothell/restaurants Around local neighborhoods and to local parks in Bothell Other dog parks Other dog parks Marymoor Dog Park Around the neighborhood, Doggy Haven, friends houses in Monroe Walks around downtown bothell or Magnuson dog park Marymoor Dog Park Bothell Westhill elementary Neighbor hoods February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 255 of 358 206 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 25 | Page Neighborhood walks, Marymoor or Magnuson dog oarks Other dog parks, around our condo Around the neighborhood and downtown Bothell area. Stipek Park Hop and Hound, downtown Bothell, and over to Beardslee Magnuson park, neighborhood, Luther Burbank various neighborhood walks, Bothell golf course front 9 and back 9 and now the dog park. LOVE IT. Neighborhood walks, daughters house & Dog Park in Kirkland Walks around our neighborhood and McMenamins My neighborhood Marymoore or Edmonds off-leash Dog park Nowhere Wayne Golf Course, Wallace Swamp Creek, Magnusen Park Edmonds Marymoor Dog Park, Edmonds Dog Park, Mountlake Terrace Dog Park, Dogwood, Magnusson Dog Park, Walks around the Neighborhood The small park near the Bothell library across from new toll brothers townhouse development Around the neighborhood and local dog parks in Snohomish and King co. Magnuson Off Leash Dog Park Parks Marymoor Bothell trail Around my neighborhood or at the dog park. Y Long drive to either Magnuson or Marymoor. Hikes in Sheltoview or Paradise Valley. Daily walks around Westhill neighborhood and Conifer View/Tall Tree Park or Doug Allen Sports Field Walks downtown Bothell and visits to Marymoor dog park Loops around downtown bothell Scent work classes Bothell Landing on a walk on the Burke-Gilman Trail Around Westhill elementary, Bothell High School, downtown. Neighborhood walks, park walks, doggy day-care. Since you didn't give an option for additional comments, I'd like to register my first choice for a dog park would be at Wayne Golf Course! I live near Doug Allen sports field. Thats where I used to go, but now so many people go and let their dogs off their leash that I can't go there. Why isn't Doug Allen part of the list?! Dogs are frequently off leash there! Long walks (up to 4 miles) on sidewalks in the area. Marymoor, Edith Moulton, St. Ed State Park, get together with friends Trails and through town My neighborhood Magnussen, shelton view, bothell pop up dog park Shelton View Forrest, Montlake Terrace, Magnuson around the neighborhood or friends houses Marymoor park offleash Marymoor or magnuson Marymoor for dog park and daily walks at all different area parks Magnuson February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 256 of 358 207 26 | Page around neighborhood or drive places for variety Marymoor Off-Leash Park Just on the street, along the bike trail In neighborhood, Kirkland, Marymoor dog park Marymoor park The river trails or around mcmenamin’s Around downtown Bothell Bothell and the trail Around the neighborhood Trail, downtown Bothell,beach, Bothell Landing, Willis d tucker park, Bothell pop up dog park, Shelton View forest, magusson neighborhood, own yard Neighborhood, Tambark Dog Park Marymoor Near home Friends house Marymoor Park, dog parks in Edmonds and Everett, walk in neighborhood Brightwater Plant Willis Tucker Dog Park or around our complex Willis tucker park Trail by house, Bothell Landing Park, Neighborhood, City of Bothell's Sidewalks. Mountlake Terrace dog park Burke Gilman Trail, Magnuson Park, Iaspers dog park Tambark creek North Creek, Royal Oak, Canyon Park Business Park Dog parks: Tambark, Marymoor, Edmonds beach dog park. At least once a week. Marymoor, Everett Bothell Lansing, Bellevue Town square Bothell landing, Bellevue downtown park. Burke Gilman trail, Blythe park, downtown bothell Wayne’s Marymoore Jaspers Dog Park Neighborhood Neighborhood or Old Wayne Golf Course Marrymoore or st Edwards on leash St Edward’s Finn Hill neighborhood walks, Eidth Moulton fog park Neighborhood walks, Marymoor Park. We have a large yard (over an acre) so we also play in the yard. Mary moor dog park Finn Hill neighborhood Private park opposite St Brendan's Yard. Walk in park. Neighborhood streets, parks or drive to dog parks (magnuson or marymoor) Neighborhood and other dog parks Neighborhood Marymoore and Magnuson Dog Parks February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 257 of 358 208 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 27 | Page Around the blocks and in parks, also drive to Remond for their off leash park Jasper’s in Kirkland Neighborhood and public school grounds, dog park Around the neighborhood, Saint Edwards state park Marymoor Dog Park Kenmore neighborhood, magneson park Neighborhood walks, off leash parks (Magnuson), and doggy day care. Plus throwing tennis balls at home in the yard. Mary moor My neighborhood Around my neighborhood Around the apartment complex. Around the block, dog parks Marymoore St. Edwards state park, my neighborhood Magnuson Bothell Landing walking loop, St Edwards, local neighborhood in Kenmore, Edmonds Beach offleash or Magnusson Park off leash - both of which are great not too far for frequent visits. Street the neighborhood Burke Gilman trail, Wayne golf course burke gillman trail, willis tucker dog park Around Bothell Marymoor or around town. Willis tucker Wayne’s golf course Magnuson park off leash area Burke Gilman/Sammamish river trail, Willis Tucker dog park, Wayne Golf course Willis Tucker Fill hill middle school track St. Edwards Park City streets Wayne Curve Anywhere I can! Walk at condo & Bow Wow Fun Towne Bothell landing park, downtown Bothell, Samammish trail Marymoor Off Leash Dog Park Marymoor, Magnuson dog parks we have a huge yard Neighborhood, Wayne Golf Course, friends with dogs, my yard, Jasper's (Kirkland) Magneson Park Neighborhood westhill neighborhood Local school yards Nearby school Around town or Luther Burbank dog park Trails February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 258 of 358 209 28 | Page Magnuson or Marymoor Parks, neighborhood, hikes Doug Allen Local neighborhood or walking trails Our neighborhood Burke Gilman trail, Sammamish River trail, Willis Tucker dog park, Loganberry dog park, agility class, disc competition Marymoor Dog Park Edith Moulten, Wayne golf course Tambark Walk around the neighborhood and Centennial Park & Willis-Tucker dog park Backyard mostly, Willis Tucker for the off leash trail area Magnuson dog park Around neighborhood. Marymoor one time. Wayne Golf Course a few times. Area schools. The Golf Course, and the Westhill Field Parks, neighborhood, hiking trails, lakes Our trailer park has a green space that is large enough to get good exercise in. There aren't enough dogs to socialize though. Marymoor Wayne golf course, Burke Gilman Trail and tambark creek off leash park Pioneer cemetery Willis dog park Anywhere Neighborhood, Jasper's dog park in Kirkland, Marymoor dog park Parks, around the neighborhood Bothell City Parks Walk around the neighborhood. Tambark Park to the dog park. daily walks around the neighborhood; but drive to local area dogparks at least once a week. Perfer those with water access to help cool her down on hot days Cavalero Dog park Marymoor Dog Park I take her to a doggy daycare once a week, but I think she hates it. Jasper's off leash park in Kirkland, Marymoor off leash Park, Walks in neighborhood and Wayne's curve Trails and Parks Marymoor and Magnuson Dog Parks, Walks around the neighborhood arond the neighborhood walks, and neighboring dog parks. I take her to an off leash dog park at least weekly Westhill Marymoor and Luther BUrbank Marymoor off leash dog park Neighborhood Howarth Park and Marymoor Park Twin Ponds Park in Shoreline and Country Pasture Getaway using new Sniffpot app Marymoor, st edwards Walk up to an hour leashed in Bothell neighborhoods, go to Marymoor dog park or one in Everett almost 1x/month, play fetch in backyard but dog gets bored w/backyard for fetch and likes to play it elsewhere. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 259 of 358 210 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 29 | Page Around the neighborhood, burke gilman Maywood neighborhood Around downtown leashed home or neighborhood Around Maywood hills neighborhood, hop and hound locally. Also Luther Burbank Park. Marymoor, doggie daycare in Woodinville (Cascade Kennels) Willis tucker off leash area Mill Creek Willis Tucker dog park, tambar Creek dog park, marymoor dog park Around my neighborhood, north creek office park, tambark dog park, dogwood Westhill Around Westhill 2 walks daily. Edmonds Dog Park. No where Walks around the block/neighborhood and other off-leash dog parks Sidewalks, parks, small open spaces Wayne golf course Willis Tucker Park PARKS NEAR DOWNTOWN OR WAIKING DOWNTOWN Usually just in my backyard. He loves grass. Occasionally take him to the small dog park in Kirkland, but it's very dirty and gets very muddy in the winter. N/a Marymore off leash dog park Neighborhood Magnuson Dog Park Seattle, and various bothell trail Around Bothell neighborhood, also have a big yard Marymoor silver creek park Marymoor North Creek On walks in the neighborhood and to dog parks. Around Bothell, Marymoor Dog Park, Magnuson Dog Park Bert giliman trail around my neighborhood Neighborhood, plenty of dog to meet while walking Marymoor Kenmore-Bothell-Brier, streets around Lockwood Neighborhood park, daily long walks, sometimes to Marymoor or other off leash park Marymoor Edmonds dog park, marymoore dog park Burke-Gilman trail Marymoor Medina park, marymoor, dog sports Magnuson park, shoreline offleash, neighborhood N/a I don't, but others take their dogs off-leash to Linwood, St Eds, and other places my kids play. Mountlake Terrace Off Leash Dog Park, around our neighborhood for walks February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 260 of 358 211 30 | Page Edith Moulton off leash park My neighborhood, Maywood Hill. He gets most of his exercise I our backyard. In my local neighborhood on leash Tambark Park. West Hill neighborhood for walks on-leash. Not sure if it’s an option, but I think a fenced in dog park at the old Wayne Golf Course Park would be the ideal location. Lots of land. Trees for shade. And fairly decent parking. neighborhood Wayne Gold Course Neighborhood walks Neighborhood, or Jasper’s Dog Park in Kirkland Dogwood and shoreline dog park around the neighborhood Neighborhood, sometimes mtlake terrace dog park Westhill Neighborhood Neighborhood Downtown bothell Local Trails mostly Kenmore Kenmore dog park Neighborhood or occasionally Marymoor dog park Nowhere Magnusun, Marymoore, Mountlake Terrace, Edmonds dog parks, walks, runs on the trail I usually take her all the way to redmond to marymoor, but I would love to have an off leash dog park in walking distance of us. Marymoor Magnusson Dog Park Marymoore Park He has a rover sitter where he socializes with multiple dogs , I take him on walks around neighborhood Magnuson,?Snohomish River Trail, and around my home. Sidewalks, Trails, Downtown, Wayne's Golf Course On the Burke Gilman trail or marymoor Dog parks, Dogwood, neighborhood walks, hikes, Marymoor, Strawberry Fields For River, beach Around neighborhood twice daily; family and friend homes; Willis tucker & Edmonds dog parks, illegally in open spaces We have to drive all the way to marymoore dog park or magnuson for her to be off leash. We go to hop and hound once a week and she can socialize with other dogs there. Pickles Playland, Marymoor, Edith Moulton, Voff Bark & Brew For dog parks we have to go to seattle/Snohomish/marymoore the Old Wayne golf course Neighborhood walks, dog parks in other areas MLT dog park Daycare Around our neighborhood, parks, off leash dog parks, and puppymanner doggy daycare friends houses or walk around our neighborhood Marymoor Dog Park, Neighborhood walks Our neighborhood, merrymoor Parks February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 261 of 358 212 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 31 | Page neighborhood, old Wayne Golf Course Shoreline off leash park and magnuson off leash park Shoreline dog park; Magnuson Dog Park; local parks Walks around neighborhoods, Woodinville downtown park, brickyard park, Maltby dog park Edmonds off leash beach, walks around Bothell landing neighborhood, bothell pioneer cemetary,u-w bothell campus and trails, sammamish river trail, green lake old Wayne Golf Course west of 96th, Shelton View hiking area, Swamp Creek Park, Edith Moulton Park, Finn Hill trails, Edmonds Marina Dog Park, Marymoor Burke Hillman trail or local parks Jasper Park in Kirkland Around my neighborhood Swamp creek, magnuson park, neighborhood walks Neighborhood/Burke-Gilman Horizon View Park, Eastside Off Leash Dog Area, Magnuson Off Leash Area/Beach, Marymoor Dog Park, Edith Molton Dog Park, St. Edwards State Park, Green Lake, camping/hiking to assorted parks. Marymoor off leash, Willis Tucker off leash and trails, Tambark off leash, Edmonds waterfront dog park, Howarth off-leash, town centers/communities, dog-friendly stores (pet stores, Lowe's, Ross) and restaurants, neighborhood walks... Neighborhood Mountlake terrace and kirkland Willis tucker, marymore or Edmonds beach off leash park St. Edward Park N/A Sammamish River trail, dog parks Wayne Golf Course and Marymoore Park Kirkland and Snohomish county dog parks. Around neighborhood or other dog parks Jasper Dog Park and Willis Tucker Dog Park, which are both a 25 minute drive Around our neighborhood - the Bothell downtown core marymoor or jasper dog parks, sometimes Paradise Valley Conservation area. Mostly around the neighborhood. I'd tell you but then you'd come and give me a ticket. Tambark park, Edmonds marina Dog park, and walks in the neighborhood Doug Allen sports field, powerline trail Paradise Valley Conservation Park, Bothell Business Park Mountlake Terrace or Magnuson Neighborhood Hiking trails, Shelton View Forest, lakes, local parks, Marymoor Off Leash, Edmonds Off Leash Tambark, Marymoor Friends yards, around the neighborhood. neighborhood Sammamish river trail Marymoor park Dog park in Kirkland, on the trail near river, Hop & Hound Marymoor, neighborhood walks Marymoor off leash park, any store or restaurant that allows dogs inside. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 262 of 358 213 32 | Page Kenmore parks Sammamish river trail, downtown, Bothell landing, Beardslee to north creek business park and the dike trails Parks, dog parks, around the neighborhood Neighborhood on leash Around the neighborhood (Canyon Park area), hikes, or other nearby dog parks (~15+ mins driving distance) n/a Marymoor Off-Leash Dog Park Near the Junction and along the trail By the library Neighborhood walks + daycare Front yard Neighborhood and dog daycare Local lake Magnuson Dog Park Marymoor, open fields, breweries Edmonds OLA, Willis Tucker OLA Neighborhood or Jasper dog park in Kirkland Marymoor, Magnusun or Edmonds. My dog needs a large open field to run and get her energy out On a walk MLT.dpg park Around the neighborhood Magnusen Neighborhood Neighborhood and of leash areas Walking to/from our house within our neighborhood. Sometimes take to Marymoor dog park and Edith mouton. Marymoor Off-Leash Dog Park It’s hard to socialize regularly because the off leash options are limited When able lynndale Marymore sandpoint Marymoor Tambark dog park, Edmonds, neighborhood walks Green Lake, Marymoor, Luther Burbank, and neighborhood. Marymoor Park, Jasper’s Park, Edmonds Beach Park and Willis Tucker Marymoor Park, Edmonds off leash park We do walks at Bothell Landing but go several times a week to Magnuson dog park. We'd love a Bothell option! Neighborhood Park at Bothell Landing (live nearby) North Creek trails Marymoor tambark Centennial Park neighborhood and Samm. River trail Marymoor February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 263 of 358 214 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 33 | Page Neighborhood Tambark dog park, Bothell neighborhoods Magnuson, mostly Waynes Gold course in Bothell Wayne, Westhill Elementry, Burke-Gillman Trail All over, parks not off-leash friendly :( My neighborhood Willis Tucker neighborhoods Volunteer park in the vacant parcel across the street that slated to be built on Westhill neighborhood uw Walks around neighborhoods, and the dog parks in nearby cities like Edmonds or mountlake terrace. I don't Juanita Beach, Edith Moulton Park, Heritage P February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 264 of 358 215 APPENDIX DAPPENDIX D PUBLIC MEETING SUMMARIESPUBLIC MEETING SUMMARIES February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 265 of 358 216 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 MEETING NOTES PROJECT NUMBER: # 19-119PLN ISSUE DATE: October 14, 2019 PROJECT NAME: Bothell PROS Plan RECORDED BY: Steve Duh, Kristin Anderson TO:FILE PRESENT:Members of the public Members of Parks & Recreation Commission City Staff Project team members from Conservation Technix and Stepherson & Associates SUBJECT:Bothell PROS Plan: Open House #1 Notes (October 10th) Community members were invited to an open house for the Bothell Parks, Recreation and Open Space (PROS) Plan on Thursday, October 10, 2019 from 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. at Bothell City Hall. The project team prepared informational displays and a presentation to share with attendees. The presentation offered an overview of the planning process and timeline, along with information about the City’s park and recreation system, along with a summary of recent community survey results. Following the presentation, attendees were asked to work in small groups to discuss project ideas and prioritize ideas by ‘voting’ with dots for their top interests for park system needs and for recreation program and events. Attendees were encouraged to talk with each other, record their comments and complete two written comment cards. City staff and project team staff aided the small group discussions by facilitating and answering questions. A representative from each table provided a short summary of their table’s discussion for the benefit of the whole gathering. Approximately 45 people attended the meeting and provided comments. In all, 234 unique comments were recorded and tabulated from attendees to the meeting. PUBLIC COMMENTS The following represents a summary of the comments received during the evening meeting. Table Exercise #1 During the first table-based exercise, attendees were asked to think about and note their ideas responding to the following question. Individual ideas were written on Post-It notes, then as a table, notes were grouped into similar topics. Attendees were then asked to use sticky dots to identify their top three choices, which could have been for a grouped topic or an individual idea. “Thinking of the City’s parks, trails & open spaces, what improvements to the Bothell system would add the greatest value for your use and enjoyment?” The following list represents the top grouped topics, based on the number of ‘dots’ scored for each. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 266 of 358 217 Bothell PROS Plan: Open House #1 Notes (October 10th)  Bothell PROS Plan  Project Number # 19‐119PLN  Page 2  __________________ Item Frequency 1.Trails 19 2.Natural areas / open space 16 3.River access 4 4.Dog Park 4 5.Water Play 4 6.Nature / education 4 The following wordcloud illustrates the comments for arts, events and programming by font size for frequently used words. A complete list of comments collected is included at the end of this summary. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 267 of 358 218 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Bothell PROS Plan: Open House #1 Notes (October 10th)  Bothell PROS Plan  Project Number # 19‐119PLN  Page 3  __________________ Table Exercise #2 A second table-based exercise was conducted in a similar manner to the first. For this one, the topic was regarding events, programs and venues. Attendees were asked to note their ideas in response to the following question. “Thinking of the events, programs and venues, is anything missing or needs to be added / expanded to improve local options for recreation programs, events and activities?” The following list represents the top grouped topics, based on the number of ‘dots’ scored for each. Item Frequency 1.Events 18 2.Community/indoor centers 10 3.Recreation programming 8 4.Farmers Market 7 5.Nature education/programming 7 6.Park at Bothell Landing 5 The following wordcloud illustrates the comments for arts, events and programming by font size for frequently used words. A complete list of comments collected is included at the end of this summary. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 268 of 358 219 Bothell PROS Plan: Open House #1 Notes (October 10th)  Bothell PROS Plan  Project Number # 19‐119PLN  Page 4  __________________ Reporting Back - Top two or three categories reported by each table for questions 1 & 2 (combined & not ranked): Natural and open spaces More educational signage Improved access for all: bathrooms, benches Community meeting spaces Skateboard park Connecting trails Amenities along the trails Mtn bike and paved trails Partnerships to improve events Neighborhood events Fancy venue/community space Safe and expanded trails Natural spaces Complete Park at Bothell Landing Farmers Market Street festivals Open space acquisition and improvement Trail improvements Attractions: movies Community center meeting space Youth programs/preschool Table Exercise #3 A third table-based exercise revolved around exploring concepts for balancing community needs for projects with limited resources. Attendees were asked to discuss and rank a series of the following six concepts as ways to filter future project ideas and recommendations for the PROS Plan. Community Need Safety & Security Usage / Resident Benefit Location / Geography Local / Regional Significance Ability to Leverage Funding Following the individual and table-based ranking, each table reported back the top three categories. The table below illustrates the results from the reporting-back.   Criteria Number of top 3 ranks  Community need 4  Ability to leverage funding 4  Safety & security 2  Usage/resident benefit 2  Location/geography   Local/regional significant     February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 269 of 358 220 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Bothell PROS Plan: Open House #1 Notes (October 10th)  Bothell PROS Plan  Project Number # 19‐119PLN  Page 5  __________________ A compilation of the individual and table-based ideas and comments are attached. Every effort has been made to accurately record this meeting. If any errors or omissions are noted, please provide written response within five days of receipt. cc: Tracey Perkosky File February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 270 of 358 221 Table Exercise #1 Individual & Table comments regarding parks, trails & open spaces Table  Ideas Themes No. of Dots Better signage to connecting trails North‐South trail/protection area for biking/walking/running Safe street crossing to connect sections of former Wayne golf course Connecting social resources to parks = ex = school>parks>libraries Trails/walking paths that are lit in the evening Improve bike trails Improve walking trails Formal bike trails Safe kids bike paths Create relaxation places for all Create peaceful places to be in nature Multi‐generational recreational places More sports fields Pickup sports field space ‐ basketball, lighted space Adding Shelton View Forest to P+R Preservation of green spaces for local wildlife A permanent dog park inside downtown core Permanent off‐leash dog park Permanent enclosed dog park More public art Not categorized 0 More shade covers that also let in light Not categorized 0 Restoration at open spaces (i.e. remove blackberry + add natives) Better water access More open spaces Utilizing the former Wayne Golf Course More trails in our big/new parks/O.S. Maps for trails (like Cougar Mt. trail network) Improved Trails (walking) Marked Trails New Trails (walking) Improved connectivity of parks with trails Maintaining and upkeeping trails at Centennial Park Courts (e.g. bball+tennis Disc Golf *More at Blyth full course! *Blyth too small for full course More sports fields Expanding the disc golf course at Blyth to the upper woods Birding Area (signage) Wildlife + historical signage Access to river for quiet birding (Juanita Wetland) Pull out areas to "set a spell" Water features for play Splash pad Water features for art (could incorporate play too) Parking (enough?) Areas for food trucks Pump track (for bikes)Mt. Bike Trails 1 Art in the parks (interactive art!)Art 0 Water 2 Infrastructure/access 1 2 Trail improvement 4 Recreational  activities 3 Environmental  education/interpreta tion 2 Conservation 3 Dog park 2 1 Open space  acquisition/improve ment 5 Safe & expanded  trails 5 Natural space 5 Sport fields 3 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 271 of 358 222 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Dog park Not categorized 0 Swings for all age groups baby‐adults Not categorized 0 Trails for kids use More walking trails Connect Blyth to Wayne with marked access point Labyrinth Develop walkable trails thru Wayne Bench placement on Wayne for passive meditation and enjoyment Habitat restoration / minimal development / minimal trails / place for wildlife Open space 3 Permanent dog park Dog Park 2 Signage for tree species Signage for wildlife More natural playgrounds (less plastic) Nature pre‐school Velodrome BMX Park Mountain Bike Trails Skateboard park Community center area in park area Access for canoes, kayaks, etc. to launch (not just rentals) Utilize amphitheater (more) at Landing Not categorized 1 Community pool / hot tub / indoor water park Splash pad Climbing wall Pavement surfacing (asphalt improvements) Recreation ‐ cafes shops for bikers/walkers along trail and parks  Bike trails like Burke‐G asphalt ‐ not trail Mountain bike trails Parks + roads planning ‐ coordinate boulevards + street design Former Bothell Mall = downtown park connecting to Sammamish River enhanced via bridge Trails / tree planting exercise to educate about climate change More small parks in Snohomish County Trails / interpretive signs on ecology ‐ "nurse log" "biology of forest" Trail enhancement historic markers / info on the pioneer families photos + text Parks integrated together ‐ trails to unite Multi‐use trail connecting to Burke along 52 from canyon park River access River access Restoration of existing natural areas Parks event spaces ‐ Band shell Allow commercial boat concessions to use Bothell loading points (created or existing) More river exposure, i.e. @ Landing make stretch of river visible to amphitheater, picnic table users Make river navigable ‐ move logs out of main channel Community center for classes + rent Market hall (small retail) Destination ‐ Tavern on the Green / cafes and places to hang "Paseo" Local art Inclusive Parent kid swings 4 Trails 6 River 4 Place making 4 2 Community Center 1 Recreation activities 0 3 Wheels 2 Trails/Nature 4 Nature/education February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 272 of 358 223 Educational signage Basic life skills (cooking, budgeting, computers/internet) Active areas with multi‐generational uses Inclusive elements in neighborhood parks Diversity second word illegible Skate park Pump track/ skate park Splash pad Splash pad Toddler area (fenced!) More shaded areas/shelters Drinking water fountains Dog park Dog park Off‐leash dog park Amenities 1 Dog 0 Inclusion 2 Skate Park 2 Splash pad 2 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 273 of 358 224 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Table Exercise #2 Individual & Table comments regarding events, programs and venues Table Ideas Themes No. of Dots Open‐air markets in Bothell Landing Farmers market type space Farmers market place Farmers market Street Festivals (sidewalk, E6) Class and event space in North Bothell Better use of little amphitheater by Lytle House Finish PABL Finish Bothell Park and parking Meeting room spaces Indoor community space ‐ birthday party type space Larger meeting spaces Rental shelters for community activities ‐ beyond just Blyth and Cedar Grove Community Center New ideas for events and programs Multi‐generational events Multi cultural inclusion in programming More art programs (docents, mentors, etc.) Community events in winter/spring Easy access to events venues Better parking for programs More teen programs Skateboard park Low cost camps and after‐school programs Wildlife walks Wildlife walks Better communication about programs, events More/better publicity about events Summer story walk (walk the book) Disc golf tournaments similar to the Bothell Bomber Group paddles Movies in the park Environmental education center Nature walks Guided tour once a month by park official. Changes seasonally intro to "your" park Environmental learning center Restoration activities (removal of invasives) River festival St Patrick's event Christmas tree lighting Bring back 4th battle reenactment Salmon festival 5k runs Slough events e.g. paddle boat races Pet parade Improve 4th of July parade floats or more than advertisements More community meeting spaces 2 Events 3 1 Attractions 4 Education  resources 3 Accessibility 2 Teens 1 Communication 0 Farmers Market 6 Wildlife walks 1 Park at Bothell  Landing 5 Community  gathering 4 Programming 3 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 274 of 358 225 Salmon themed mini‐golf course Community center Indoor sports facility Community/recreation center Programs/classes for kids preschool to elementary (i.e. dance, karate, gymnastics, etc.) Youth programs 2 Aquatics center City pool Larger farmers/craft market Farmers market Late afternoon into evening summer farmers/community market Art display Art exhibitions Nature education for kids Nature‐based pre‐school and other education Restrooms for Wayne Restroom at William Penn Signage ‐ what to look for Signage  /wayfinding 2 Community center Community kitchen Community center Water access for small human powered watercraft River access / Kayak launch spot Dedicated road bike lanes Residential sidewalks More concert venues Concerts/commun ity events 1 Picnic shelter at Wayne Picnic shelters 0 Liaise w/ community partners to create fun and ease burden on city staff Farmers market in downtown Bothell Art and craft shows on Main St Xmas tree lighting and city events / city supported Improve the spring and autumn lull Collaboration with other entities (e.g. UWB/CCC) Mardi Gras Boat races Riverfest Downtown farmers market Work w/ farmers market (space!) Seasonal/quarterly all‐city parties (just more events) Shakespeare in the park UW Drama / Bring Seattle actors to Bothell Rainforest concert committee to organize venue and calendar Keep Beerfest in garage Pioneer Days Communal Bothell river festival / Parks ‐ boat contest? Parade of boats? Promote Bothell museums events, open‐hours 19th Amendment history of women's right to vote Events 9 Historical 4 Community  centers 2 Water access 2 Access/mobility 1 Public restrooms 3 3 Community  /indoor centers 3 Aquatics center 1 1Farmers Market Art 0 Nature childhood  education/  programming 4 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 275 of 358 226 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 More actively using parks and facilities in programming e.g. nature and historical  walks/talks Children's books pop‐up book about bridges Bothell birds Young people activities ages "a place to go" Youth activities / pre‐teens teens / Need places where they can go to do things they like  skatepark/youth center Teenage/young adult programs and teams More kids sports lessons Classes/activities for 6‐9 y/o / Rec programs now are mostly for toddlers ‐ 5 y/o (or so)  teen 12‐adult Organized activities for different abled youth and adults Something for 45‐55 "pre‐seniors" Cultural music and festivals to celebrate diversity Accessible signups Neighborhood parties at parks (meet your neighbors) Group bike rides on the trail Bicycle race triathlon or duathlon SOB summits and Bothell bike Weekend and evening kid/toddler events Learn to play sports for adults/recreational leagues Painted crows! (like painted horses, pigs, pianos) "Parents night out" ‐ drop kids off w/ activities Allow fun activities on City Hall Plaza on weekend/after hours Hobby‐based classes e.g. knit, crochet, art, electronics stuff Make permitting special community events less onerous/expensive Movie nights (city hall plaza?) Kenmore showed Captain Marvel Led tours (walking, biking) Close Main Street to cars "forever" for walkers and festivals Main St 0 Places for events / Fancy Hall concerts ‐ could be the "Tavern on the Green" Riverwalk / street of shops along river / tenants for retails and restaurants Cable station for broadcasting concerts, interviews with artists, speakers Volunteering opportunities Better outreach/promotion / sustainable Parks blog for stories columns photos photo contest Places 0 Outreach 0 4 Special groups 3 Bike events 1 Activities 1 Youth 3 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 276 of 358 227 APPENDIX EAPPENDIX E STAKEHOLDER SUMMARIESSTAKEHOLDER SUMMARIES February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 277 of 358 228 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Interview Notes 1 June 14, 2019      Stakeholder Interview Notes Project Name: Bothell PROS Plan Update  Project No.: Proj‐# 19‐119PLN  Location: In‐Person Group Discussion  Date: June 11, 2019 Time: 3:00 pm  Notes by: Steve Duh    Interviewees: Hilary Sanders, Shelton View  Stewardship Association  David Bain, OneBothell and Friends of  the North Creek Forest      Roger Burton, OneBothell  Sarah Witte, Friends of the North Creek Forest    Subject: Sports League Representatives: Interviews      As part of the Bothell Parks, Recreation and Open Space Plan Update, the consultant team met with  representatives from local environmental organizations that focus on natural area preservation and local  volunteerism.   Following brief introductions and an overview of the PROS update planning process and timeline, stakeholders  provided a summary of their organization. The group discussion generally followed a series of questions to gather  perspectives regarding visioning, partnerships and opportunities for the future.     Opening Remarks  Shelton View Stewardship Association – The Shelton View Forest is 42 acres of forest land, part of it is  owned by DNR. The group has been raising money and securing grants to purchase the property. Part of  the forest is private, and a developer was interested in upzoning it for development. The group would like  to see trails on site and have it be a place where people can see and explore the forest.   OneBothell – The group was formed in 2015 to preserve the Wayne Golf Course, and it is now  transitioning into a new role. It is moving toward coordinating activities for volunteers to help improve  and maintain the former golf course. OneBothell may expand efforts for citywide volunteerism and focus  on restoration of the Sammamish River.  Friends of the North Creek Forest – The group led the 2016 acquisition of the North Creek Forest. The  group raised funds to acquire and maintain the site. The group has several committees:  o Education: school outreach; encourage environmental education in the forest  o Stewardship: business community outreach  o Restoration: water quality; forest health vegetation assessment (intended to inform a master plan  for the property)  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 278 of 358 229 Stakeholder Interview Notes (continued)     Interview Notes 2 June 14, 2019  Dave is motivated to improve conditions for killer whale recovery and sees opportunities to focus on  upstream improvements for salmon. The North Creek can be improved for salmon habitat and is salmon  bearing. Swamp Creek might be viable for restoration.   General Comments  Balance growth with preservation. Focus on the north end of the city where there is and continues to be  exponential growth. Not much attention has been paid to schools or parks in the north. Explore how to  achieve balance with geographic distribution of parks and open space too. Downtown has good  distribution and good access. The north end has limited park access.   King County has had money for parks and open space, and Snohomish does not.   10‐year vision   Healthy streams and forests  More park spaces – including active areas for playgrounds, sport fields, skateparks ad biking  Better connections – away from traffic and using natural areas  o Wayne Golf Course to Tolt Pipeline Trail  o Trail connections for Shelton View Forest to unincorporated Snohomish   o Bike paths to parks  Ideally, short walk or drive to local neighborhood parks (distribution)  Multiple uses (parks activity spaces) spread across the city – attention for function and activities  Stewardship   o Improve North Creek Forest (interior forest and improve edges); Improve waterways  o Use the yellow farm house as a visitor center and interpretive venue; Infrastructure needed and  improvements for bus turn‐around  o Desire to get folks from around the region to witness a functional forest  Connectivity   o Integrate parkland on both sides of the Sammamish River; the crown (Lake Pleasant, Sammamish  River, Swamp Creek, Shelton View) and crown jewel (downtown).   o Integrate bikes into the park system  o Centralize parking with shuttles to parks  o Trails are ok within open spaces; they provide access to water/nature for learning; getting people  into open space with trails lets people enjoy/see/care about nature  o Link Wayne Golf Course to Tolt Pipeline Trail, Burke‐Gilman Trail, Sammamish River Trail – tie to  North Creek Trail and Mill Creek  More sport fields are needed        February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 279 of 358 230 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Stakeholder Interview Notes (continued)     Interview Notes 3 June 14, 2019  Staffing and Funding Priorities  City now has a volunteer coordinator position, which is a good addition and could be a good point of  contact for these groups going forward. How can the City better utilize volunteer energy? Act as a  clearinghouse; use Facebook and emails to post opportunities  City needs to look out 10+ years and acquire properties for the future and leverage the Park Foundation’s  efforts to raise money  Continue the model of allowing volunteers to purchase and maintain properties. The City’s perspective on  Shelton View Forest is that maintenance and operations will cost $200,000 per year versus the opinion to  have the environmental groups solicit and coordinate volunteers for annual maintenance.  Acquire lands for the North Creek Trail; Fitzgerald area; new land east of Brackett’s Landing  Have open and clear communications and collaborations with the Park Foundation – more integrated  relationship        -- End of Notes -- February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 280 of 358 231 Interview Notes 1 August 20, 2019      Stakeholder Interview Notes Project Name: Bothell PROS Plan Update  Project No.: Proj‐# 19‐119PLN  Location: Phone Interviews  Phone Call  Dates:  August 2019 Time: varies  Notes by: Jean Akers    Interviewees: Chris Finger, NGSSA VP of Scheduling  Joey Wyrick, NYSA  Andrew Schauer, NS Lacrosse        Subject: Sports League Representatives: Interviews      As part of the Bothell Parks, Recreation and Open Space Plan Update, the consultant team contacted  representatives from local and regional sports organizations that regularly reserve sports fields within the City of  Bothell. These stakeholders were interviewed by phone to explore their sports leagues current participation in  facility use and to discuss and existing issues with Bothell fields, scheduling or programs as well as gather input on  future potential improvements for serving the active recreation needs within the community.  Six sport league representatives were contacted, and feedback was gathered from the Northshore Youth Soccer  Association, the Northshore Girls Softpitch Softball Association and the Northshore Lacrosse.  After a brief introduction to the PROS update planning process, stakeholders provided a summary of their  organization, sharing recent trends in participation, targeted participants, season(s) of play, general field uses and  rough percentages of Bothell residents among their members. The phone conversations then focused on  questions exploring any current challenges with scheduling, availability of fields, potential for growth, and future  needs for success program continuation. Overall, stakeholders expressed an appreciation for Bothell’s handing of  field scheduling and coordination.  Trends in Participation   Northshore Girls Slowpitch Softball Association (NGSSA) has been established since 1971, staffed by  volunteers, and provides girls softball leagues for ages pre‐K through 12th grade. Recent trends (last ten+  years) in participation have shown a steady decrease in participation as a greater variety of girls’ sports  have been available. Past participation has involved over 1,000 girls per season; current annual  registration is typically about 300 participants. About 75‐80% of the NGSSA players are Bothell residents.  The softball season runs from March 1st through early June.  The Northshore Youth Soccer Association (NYSA) provides soccer programming to approximately 4,500  players (1,140 youth reside in Bothell) and use about 50 fields across Bothell, Woodinville, Kenmore and  parts of unincorporated King and Snohomish counties. Participation trends have been even over the last  few years.   February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 281 of 358 232 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Stakeholder Interview Notes (continued)     Interview Notes 2 August 20, 2019  The NYSA fall season extends from August to mid‐November, involving ~3,500 players with year round  programming for ~1,100 players.  The Northshore Lacrosse Club (NLC) is an umbrella organization comprised of Bothell Lacrosse, Inglemoor  Lacrosse, North Creek Lacrosse, and Northshore Girls Lacrosse. The NLC has field lacrosse programs for  boys and girls from kindergarten through high school. The primary lacrosse season extends in the spring  from March through June involving ~300 players. Some fall programming is offered for skills training.  Northshore Lacrosse Club serves participants within the Northshore School District with about 50‐60% of  participants residing in Bothell. The sport of lacrosse has been growing and its growth is currently limited  by field availability allowing for the provision of more teams.    Demand for Facilities   NGSSA schedules about 200 games and 600 practices in two hour blocks each year. North Creek fields are  preferred, but they are not always available due to competition with other sports league scheduling.  North Creek fields are typically targeted for the middle and high school teams while the school district  “dirt” fields are typically booked for the other age groups. The number of available time slots are  sometimes a challenge to meet their existing needs.  NGSSA conducts two tournaments each season using the North Creek turf fields for the full weekend.  While their lower participation numbers limit their preferential field scheduling, the City does favor their  tournament schedules.  The NYSA peak fall season competes with junior football and high school soccer teams so no access to  Northshore School District fields is available for the fall season.  NLC programs include between 20‐25 teams using North Creek, Doug Allen and School District fields  based on allocation by field providers. Practices require the subdivision of fields for multiple team use  within each allocated time period.  The City of Bothell does a good job of field allocation based on numbers of program participants who  reside within the city. The system is perceived as fair and equitable. Stakeholders could not express the  same level of clarity or predictability about the School District or County system of field allocation.  North Creek fields are considered as exceptional, in good conditions and operated very well. Doug Allen  fields were considered passable but some stakeholders mentioned the slope being noticeable, grass  uneven, and the weather conditions from mid‐November through March limiting or precluding field use.  Ideas for the Future  Convert North Creek field #3 to an all‐weather turf surface to extend the available seasons of play.  An improvement to scheduling could involve an on‐line system where all leagues could trade/swap field  times in real time. Current system requires emails back and forth with recreation scheduler. The intent of  an online system could reduce the times when fields are vacant from cancellations. Other leagues could  pick up the defaulted time slots and avoid vacancies on premium North Creek fields.  Converting the school district’s “dirt” fields to artificial turf with lighting could greatly expand the  available facilities for many community sports leagues.  February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 282 of 358 233 Stakeholder Interview Notes (continued)     Interview Notes 3 August 20, 2019  Convert Doug Allen fields to artificial turf (or an upgraded grass condition) and install lighting to add fall  through winter programming uses.  Negotiate with businesses at North Creek fields to allow for recreational parking starting at 4:00pm  instead of having to wait until 5:30pm. This earlier tie slot would allow significantly more availability for  sports field programming.  Partner with the school district to upgrade fields on middle and elementary school grounds to install  artificial turf and lighting to meet more community needs and allow for sports program expansion and  growth.  Negotiate with Pop Keeney and/or UW Bothell for some shared use of their field facility by community  youth sports leagues.        -- End of Notes -- February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 283 of 358 234 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Page Left Intentionally Blank February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 284 of 358 235 APPENDIX FAPPENDIX F RECREATION TRENDSRECREATION TRENDS February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 285 of 358 236 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 The following summaries from recognized park and recreation resources provide background on national, state and local trends that may reflect potential recreational activities and facilities for future consideration in Bothell’s park system. Examining current recreation trends can help inform potential park and recreation improvements and opportunities that may enhance the community and create a more vibrant parks system as it moves into the future. 2019 nrPa agency PerFormance review The 2019 NRPA report summarizes the key findings from the National Recreation and Park Association’s NRPA Park Metrics, their benchmarking tool that assists park and recreation professionals in the effective management and planning of their operating resources and capital facilities. The report offers a comprehensive collection of park- and recreation-related benchmarks and insights to inform professionals, key stakeholders and the public about the state of the park and recreation industry. The 2019 NRPA Agency Performance Review contains data from 1,075 unique park and recreation agencies across the United States as reported between 2016 and 2018. Key Findings and Characteristics: Park Facilities „There is typically one park for every 2,181 residents. „The typical park and recreation agency has 10.0 acres of park land for every 1,000 residents in its jurisdiction. „An overwhelming majority of park and recreation agencies has playgrounds (94.4%) and basketball courts (86.1%) in their portfolio of outdoor assets. „A majority of agencies offers community centers and recreation centers; two in five agencies offer senior centers. Programming „Key programming activities include team sports, social recreation events, fitness enhancement classes and health and wellness education. „82.4% of agencies offer summer camp for their community’s younger residents. Staffing „The typical park and recreation agency has a payroll of 38.2 full-time equivalent staff (FTE’s). „The typical park and recreation agency has 8.3 FTEs on staff for each 10,000 residents in its jurisdiction. „Operations and maintenance, programming and administration are the main responsibilities of park and recreation workers. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 286 of 358 237 Budget/Finance „The typical park agency has annual operating expenditures of $3,834,500. „The typical park and recreation agency has annual operating expenses of $78.69 on a per capita basis. „The median level of operating expenditures is $6,750 per acre of park and non-park sites managed by the agency. „The typical park and recreation agency spends $93,230 in annual operating expenditures for each employee. „At the typical park and recreation agency, personnel services account for 54.9% of the operating budget. „The typical park and recreation agency dedicates 44.3% of its operating budget to park management and maintenance and 41.8% to recreation. Agency Funding „Park and recreation agencies derive 59.3% of their operating expenditures from general fund tax support. „The typical park and recreation agency generates $20.11 in revenue annually for each resident in the jurisdiction. „The typical park and recreation agency recovers 27.3% of its operating expenditures from non-tax revenues. „Park and recreation agencies will spend a median of $4,007,250 million in capital expenditures over the next five years. „On average, just over half of the capital budget is designated for renovation, while 30.9% is aimed at new development. Park facilities differ greatly across the local and regional park and recreation agencies in America. The typical agency participating in the NRPA park metric survey serves a jurisdiction of 39,183 people but population size can vary widely. The typical park and recreation agency has jurisdiction over 19 parks comprising a total of 432.5 acres. Park facilities also have a range of service levels in terms of acres of parkland per population and residents per park. These metrics are categorized by the agency’s population size. Figure D1. Median Residents per park based on Population Size 2,181 1,231 1,881 2,451 3,132 5,602 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 Median Residents per Park (by Population) 10.1 11.8 9.6 8.4 8.5 12.5 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Median Acres of Parkland per 1,000 Residents (by population)Figure D2. Acres of Parkland per 1,000 Residents based on Population Size February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 287 of 358 238 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 The typical park and recreation agency that manages or maintains trails for walking, hiking, running and/or biking has 11.0 miles of trails. Agencies serving more than 250,000 residents have a median of 82.0 miles of trails under their care. Park and recreation agencies take on many responsibilities beyond their traditional roles of operating parks and related facilities (96%) and providing recreation programming and services (93%). In addition to those two core functions, the key responsibilities for park and recreation agencies are listed in the table below, based on percent of agencies. Figure D3. Key Responsibilities of park and Recreation AgenciesFrom NRPA 2019 Agency Performance Report Key P&R Responsibilities Percent of  Agencies Operate and maintain indoor facilities 87% Operate, maintain or manage trails, greenways and/or  blueways 78% Conduct major jurisdiction‐wide special events 76% Operate, maintain or manage special purpose parks  and open spaces 71% Include in its operating budget the funding for  planning and development functions 67% Operate and maintain non‐park sites 65% Operate , maintain or contract outdoor swim  facilities/water parks 59% Administer or manage tournament/event quality  outdoor sports complexes 57% Operate, maintain or contract tennis center facilities 51% Administer community gardens  40% Other responsibilities of park and recreation agencies can include golf courses, tourist attractions, outdoor amphitheaters, indoor swim facilities, farmer’s markets, indoor sports complexes, campgrounds, performing arts center, stadium/arena/racetrack, and/or fairgrounds. Beyond the comparative metrics of park and recreation agencies, the NRPA performance report also noted trends that have significant impact on agency performance. The report predicts that investments in park infrastructure will rise in 2019-2020 thanks to increased revenues from local tax receipts. As a result, park and recreation agencies - regardless of size, location, population served or budget - will likely be able to plan for and construct more recreation facilities. The growth of new recreation facilities and capital improvements will result in positive impacts on local, regional and state economies. Technology will continue to have influence on parks from monitoring systems and beacon counters to biometric identification systems. Questions of data security will remain paramount as these technologies become less expensive and more prevalent. Recreational and commercial scale drones are more prevalent and both the advantage for imaging, mapping and monitoring and the potential for disruptive uses will become factors in application and management. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 288 of 358 239 The consolidation of public services continues to affect park and recreation agencies. The potential opportunity to reduce costs and allow for greater efficiencies may pressure governments to combine park facilities with public schools or consolidate with public works. This trend can present both opportunities and threats to the efficient and effective functioning of park and recreation services. Emerging trends will continue to encourage park and recreation providers to become more nimble and more adaptable to the ever changing conditions and public expectations for sustained high-level performance. Agencies must be proactive in assessing their position and be fully grounded in reliable data about their investments, operations and tangible results. the state oF the inDustry rePort Recreation Management magazine’s 2017 State of the Industry Report summarizes the opinions and information Recreation Management magazine’s 2018 State of the Managed Recreation Industry report summarizes the opinions and information provided by a wide range of professionals (with an average 21.3 years of experience) working in the recreation, sports and fitness facilities. The 2018 report indicated that many (86.6%) recreation, sports and fitness facility owners form partnerships with other organizations, as a means of expanding their reach, offering additional programming opportunities or as a way to share resources and increase funding. Local schools are shown as the most common partner (61.3%) for all facility types. Parks and recreation organizations (95.8%) were the most likely to report that they had partnered with outside organizations. Survey respondents from urban communities are more optimistic about positive changes to revenues, while rural respondents are not. In 2018, 41 percent of respondents said that revenues increased from 2016 to 2017, while 11.1% reported a decrease. Looking forward from 2018 to 2019, 50 percent of urban respondents expect revenues to increase, and just 4.3 percent project a decrease. In last year’s report, parks respondents had reported increases in their average operating expenditures with operating costs that grew by 58% between fiscal 2013 and fiscal 2016. After a significant increase in operating expenditures in fiscal 2016, costs have fallen again in 2017, and are expected to rise more steadily over the next two years, though not to the high reported last year. From 2017 to 2018, respondents said they expect their operating expenses to increase by 1.7 percent, followed by a further increase of 4.9 percent projected in fiscal 2019. The greatest decrease (16.8%) in average operating costs from 2016 to 2017 was reported by parks and recreation respondents. Relative to costs and revenues, few facilities covered by the survey reported that they cover more than 90 percent of their operating costs via revenue. The percentage recovered varied with type of organization with the average percentage of costs recovered for all respondents hovering near 50%. For parks, the cost recovery rate increased from 43.4 % to 43.9 % from 2017 to 2018. Over the past decades, public parks and recreation departments and districts have faced a growing expectation that facilities can be run like businesses. Many local facilities are expected to recover much of their operating costs via revenues. While this is the business model of for-profit facilities like health clubs, it’s a relatively recent development for publicly owned facilities, which have typically been subsidized via tax dollars and other funding sources. Most recreation providers (80.5%) have been taking actions to reduce expenditures. Cost recovery actions typically involve reduction in expenses with improving energy efficiency as the most common action (48.3% of respondents). Increased fees and staffing cost reductions and putting off construction or renovation plans were reported as other common methods for reducing operating costs. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 289 of 358 240 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Utilization of recreation facilities has shown steady increases by the majority of respondents. Looking forward, more than half of respondents expect to see further increases in the number of people using their facilities. The expectation is that this trend will continue in the next two years. This year saw a fairly significant drop in the average number of people employed at the organizations covered by the survey. After several years of steady growth, to a high of 147.6 employees in 2017, the average number of employees dropped by 21.7% in the past year. On average, this year’s survey respondents employ 28.2 full-time workers, 39.8 part-time employees, 44.8 seasonal workers, 43.2 volunteers, and 9.1 employees of some other designation. In 2018, more than three-quarters (77.7%) of respondents said they plan to maintain existing staff levels, up from 57% in 2017. A majority of respondents (83.2%) require certifications for some of their staff members to help measure and verify specific types of professional knowledge and skill. Of those respondents that require certification, the most common types of certification required included CPR/AED/First Aid (required by 90.3% of those who said they require some staff members to be certified), background checks (83.4%), and lifeguard certification (56.3%). Over the past five years, the percentage of respondents who indicate that they have plans for construction, whether new facilities or additions or renovations to their existing facilities, has grown steadily, from 62.7 percent in 2013 to 69.5 percent in 2018. Construction plans of all kinds are most common among camps and parks. For camp respondents, 47.1 percent are planning new facilities, 45.9 percent are planning additions, and 60 percent are planning renovations. They were followed by parks, 33.9 percent of whom have plans for new construction, 32.6 percent for additions, and 57.7 percent for renovations. Parks saw modest increases to their construction budgets from 2016 to 2018, with respondents expecting to see increases of 13.5%. Public organizations saw the sharpest increase to their construction budgets from 2016 to 2018, with an increase of 28.7 percent, from $3,877,000 in 2016 to $4,990,000 in 2018. Parks respondents were more likely than other facility types to include: playgrounds (86.7% of parks respondents had playgrounds); park shelters (80%); park restroom structures (75.6%); outdoor sports courts (74.4%); community and multipurpose centers (58.4%); bike trails (46.4%); skate parks (41.1%); dog parks (38.8%); community gardens (33.7%); disc golf courses (32.9%);fitness trails and outdoor fitness equipment (32.6%); splash play areas (30.7%); golf courses (19.9%); ice rinks (17.6%); waterparks (16.8%); and bike/ BMX parks (11.4%). Park respondents (56.2%) reported plans to add features at their facilities. The top 10 planned features for all facility types include: 1. Splash play areas (23.6%) 2. Synthetic turf sports fields (17%) 3. Fitness trails and/or outdoor fitness equipment (16.4%) 4. Fitness centers (16.3%) 5. Walking/hiking trails (15.5%) 6. Playgrounds (15.2%) 7. Park shelters (13.6%) 8. Dog parks (13.5%) 9. Exercise studios (12.9%) 10. Disc golf courses (12.9%) Respondents from community centers, parks and health clubs were the most likely to report that they had February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 290 of 358 241 plans to add programs at their facilities over the next few years. The 10 most commonly planned program additions in 2018 include: 1. Fitness programs (planned by 25.9% of those who will be adding programs) 2. Educational programs (25.7%) 3. Mind-body balance programs (23.3%) 4. Teen programs (22.7%) 5. Environmental education (20.7%) 6. Day camps and summer camps (20.3%) 7. Special needs programs (18.9%) 8. Adult sports teams (18.5%) 9. Holidays and other special events (18.3%) 10. Individual sports activities (17.5%) While in general, overall budgets are the top concern for most respondents, equipment and facility maintenance lead the issues of budgetary challenges with staffing as the second most common concern. Marketing, safety/risk management, and creating new and innovative programming are continuing challenges for facility managers. Current concerns on the rise in 2018 include older adult fitness and wellness, legislative issues, environmental and conservation issues and social equity and access. the outDoor ParticiPation rePort According to 2018 Outdoor Participation Report, published by the Outdoor Foundation in Boulder, Colorado, more than 146.1 million Americans (49%) participated in an outdoor activity at least once in 2017. These outdoor participants went on a total of 10.9 billion outdoor outings, a decrease from 11.0 billion in 2016. Participation in outdoor recreation, team sports and indoor fitness activities vary by an individual’s age. Recent trend highlights include the following: „Twenty percent (20%) of outdoor enthusiasts participated in outdoor activities at least twice per week. „Running, including jogging and trail running, was the most popular activity among Americans when measured by number of participants and by number of total annual outings. „Nineteen percent (19%) outdoor participants lived in the South Atlantic region of the US, making its population the most active in outdoor activities. „Walking for fitness was the most popular crossover activity where 45.8% of all outdoor participants also walked. „Data shows that adults who were introduced to the outdoors as children were more likely to participate in outdoor activities during adulthood than those who were not exposed to the outdoors as children. „The biggest motivator for outdoor participation was getting exercise. Favorite activities and participation rates range with demographics. In 2017, the average participant had 15 years of experience enjoying outdoor recreation. The data shows, as would be expected, that the amount of experience increased as the participant aged. Those ages 45 and up averaged 25 years as outdoor participants. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 291 of 358 242 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 sPorts, Fitness & leisure activities toPline ParticiPation rePort Prepared by a partnership of the Sports and Fitness Industry Association (SFIA) and the Physical Activity Council (PAC), this 2018 participation report establishes levels of activity and identifies key trends in sports, fitness, and recreation in the US. The largest focus of activities continues to be toward fitness sports. Winter sports gained the most of all categories, increasing 2% over the last year. The interest in activities has started moving toward outdoor recreation. The top aspirational activity for all age segments was outside, ranging from camping to biking to birdwatching. Fitness sports/activities continues to have the highest participation rates; having 64% of the US population ages 6 and over engaging in activities like running/jogging, high intensity/impact training, row machines, and swimming. Outdoor activities remained second but was flat from 2016; seeing a increase in day hiking and backpacking, but lost participants in canoeing and adventure racing. While age clearly affects how often someone participates, what they do can also be age dependent. Young kids, ages 6 to 17, who tend to be more active overall, focus on team sports and outdoor activities. While Boomers prefer fitness activities, especially low impact such as aquatic exercise, cycling, and walking. Millennials are more likely than the other generations to participate in water sports, such as stand up paddling, boardsailing, and surfing. Inactivity rates remain higher than 10 years ago despite the promotion of the benefits of an active lifestyle. Over a quarter of the US population (ages 6 and over) did not participate in even the lowest caloric activity in 2017. Trends continue to show how income affects inactivity. Generally, the affluent are getting more active while the less affluent are becoming more inactive. Despite aspirations to become more active, the biggest influence on engaging more participants is having a friend or family member to take part in the physical activity. First time participation depends on who you are doing it with more than if you have the time. national survey on recreation anD the environment The National Survey on Recreation and the Environment (NSRE) is a comprehensive survey that has been collecting data and producing reports about the recreation activities, environmental attitudes and natural resource values of Americans since the 1980s. The NSRE core focus is on outdoor activity participation and personal demographics. The most recent 2012 NSRE reports the total number of people participating in outdoor activities between 2000 and 2007 grew by 4.4% while the number of days of participation increased by approximately 25 percent. Walking for pleasure grew by 14% and continues to lead as the top favorite outdoor activity. Nature-based activities, those associated with wildlife and natural settings, showed a discernible growth in the number of people (an increase in 3.1% participation rate) and the number of days of participation. American’s participation in nature-based outdoor recreation is increasing with viewing, photographing, or otherwise observing nature clearly measured as the fastest growing type of nature-based recreation activity. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 292 of 358 243 americans engagement with Parks survey (From nrPa) The vast offerings of the local park and recreation agency improve the lives of people throughout our nation. From the fact that Americans on average visit their local park and recreation facilities approximately 29 times a year to the majority of Americans identifying parks and recreation as an important service provided by their local government, the general public is an untapped advocate to spread the public park and recreation story. This annual study probes Americans’ usage of parks, the key reasons that drive their use and the greatest challenges preventing greater usage. Each year, the study probes the importance of public parks in Americans’ lives, including how parks compare to other services and offerings of local governments. The survey of 1,000 American adults looks at frequency and drivers of parks/recreation facilities visits and the barriers to that prevent greater enjoyment. Survey respondents also indicate the importance of park and recreation plays in their decisions at the voting booth and their level of support for greater funding. Key Findings: „Americans on average visit their local park and recreation facilities approximately 29 times a year, with 3 in 5 saying their most recent visit was within the past month. „Three in four Americans agree that the NRPA Three Pillars of Conservation, Health and Wellness, and Social Equity represent what they see as the priorities for their local park and recreation agency. „Nine in 10 Americans agree that parks and recreation are important services delivered by their local government. „Seven in 10 Americans say they are more likely to vote for local politicians who make park and recreation funding a priority. „Three-quarters of Americans support increased local government spending for park and recreation agencies with solid support for a nearly 30 percent increase in funding for local park and recreation agencies. washington statewiDe comPrehensive outDoor recreation Plan The 2018-2022 Recreation and Conservation Plan for Washington State provides a strategic direction to help assure the effective and adequate provision of outdoor recreation and conservation to meet the needs of Washington State residents. The plan identified near and long-term priorities with specific actions within each priority to help meet the outdoor recreation and conservation needs within the state. Five priority areas: 1. Sustain and Grow the Legacy of Parks, Trails, and Conservation Lands 2. Improve Equity of Parks, Trails, and Conservation Lands 3. Meet the Needs of Youth 4. Plan for Culturally Relevant Parks and Trails to Meet Changing Demographics 5. Assert Recreation and Conservation as a Vital Public Service Sustain & Grow the Legacy A wealth of existing recreation and conservation areas and facilities should be kept open, safe and enjoyable for all. Some modification to meet the interests of today’s population may be needed at some facilities. Sustaining existing areas while expanding and building new facilities to keep up with a growing population is one of the five priority goals. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 293 of 358 244 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Improve Equity The National Recreation and Park Association’s position on social equity states: “Our nation’s public parks and recreation services should be equally accessible and available to all people regardless of income level, ethnicity, gender, ability, or age. Public parks, recreation services and recreation programs including the maintenance, safety, and accessibility of parks and facilities, should be provided on an equitable basis to all citizens of communities served by public agencies.” The Washington plan restates that equity goal for all its citizens. Improving equity is also a strategy for improving a community’s health. Current statewide participation rates in outdoor activities were surveyed as part of the plan. Figure D5. Participation Rates for Washington Residents in Outdoor Activities Participation Rates for Top 12 Categories Youth Participation Rates  Activity %Activity % Walking 94%Walking 88% Nature activities 89%Leisure in parks 78% Leisure activities at parks 82%Trending activities 77% Swimming 68%Fishing in freshwater 77% Sightseeing activities 67%Nature‐based activities 75% Hiking 61%Bicycling 74% Outdoor sports 48%Freshwater‐based activities* 66% Water‐based activities (freshwater)46%Target shooting 62% Camping 45%Hiking 57% Trending activities 33%Outdoor sports 57% Snow and ice activities 30%Off‐road vehicle riding 57% Bicycling 28%Fishing in saltwater 53% Get Youth Outside Washington State youth participate in outdoor activities to a greater extent than those found nationally. Park and recreation providers are urged to offer a variety of outdoor activities for youth and to support youth programs. Most youth are walking, playing at a park, trying new or trending activities, fishing in freshwater, exploring nature, and riding bikes. Other activities of interest to youth are activities in freshwater such as boating and paddling, fishing in saltwater, and target shooting, hiking, outdoor sports, and riding off-road vehicles. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 294 of 358 245 Figure D6. Youth Participation Rates for Washington Residents in Outdoor Activities Participation Rates for Top 12 Categories Youth Participation Rates  Activity%Activity % Walking94%Walking 88% Nature activities89%Leisure in parks 78% Leisure activities at parks82%Trending activities 77% Swimming68%Fishing in freshwater 77% Sightseeing activities67%Nature‐based activities 75% Hiking61%Bicycling 74% Outdoor sports48%Freshwater‐based activities* 66% Water‐based activities (freshwater)46%Target shooting 62% Camping45%Hiking 57% Trending activities33%Outdoor sports 57% Snow and ice activities30%Off‐road vehicle riding 57% Bicycling28%Fishing in saltwater 53% Plan for Culturally Relevant parks and Trails to Meet Changing Demographics Washington’s population is expected to grow by 2 million people by 2040 leading to more congestion and competition for recreation resources. Between 2010-2040, the percent of people of color are expected to increase from 27 percent to 44 percent. With the cultural change in the population, preferred recreational activities also will change. By 2030, more than one of every five Washingtonians will be 65 years old or older. By 2040, there will be more seniors than youth. Park and recreation providers should be prepared to create new and diverse opportunities and accommodate the active senior population. Assert Recreation and Conservation as a Vital Public Service The 2018-2022 Washington SCORP recognizes that outdoor recreation contributes to a strong economy and is a public investment like other public services and infrastructure. The report cites the Outdoor Industry Association and other economic studies that reinforce the importance of park and recreation services locally, regionally and statewide. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 295 of 358 246 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Page Left Intentionally Blank February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 296 of 358 247 APPENDIX GAPPENDIX G IMPLEMENTATION TOOLS & TACTICSIMPLEMENTATION TOOLS & TACTICS February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 297 of 358 248 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 LOCAL FUNDING OPTIONS The City of Bothell possesses a range of local funding tools that could be accessed for the benefit of growing, developing and maintaining its parks and recreation program. The sources listed below represent likely potential sources, but some also may be dedicated for numerous other local purposes which limit applicability and usage. Therefore, discussions with City leadership are critical to assess the political landscape to modify or expand the use of existing City revenue sources in favor of park and recreation programs. councilmanic bonDs Councilmanic bonds may be sold by cities without public vote. The bonds, both principal and interest, are retired with payments from existing city revenue or new general tax revenue, such as additional sales tax or real estate excise tax. The state constitution has set a maximum debt limit for councilmanic bonds of 1½% of the value of taxable property in the city. general obligation bonD http://apps.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=84.52.056 For the purposes of funding capital projects, such as land acquisitions or facility construction, cities and counties have the authority to borrow money by selling bonds. Voter-approved general obligation bonds may be sold only after receiving a 60 percent majority vote at a general or special election. If approved, an excess property tax is levied each year for the life of the bond to pay both principal and interest. The state constitution (Article VIII, Section 6) limits total debt to 5% of the total assessed value of property in the jurisdiction. excess levy – one year only http://apps.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=84.52.052 Cities and counties that are levying their statutory maximum rate can ask the voters, at any special election date, to raise their rate for one year (RCW 84.52.052). As this action increases revenue for one-year at a time it is wise to request this type of funding for one-time uses only. regular ProPerty tax - liD liFt http://apps.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=84.55.050 Cities are authorized to impose ad valorem taxes upon real and personal property. A city’s maximum levy rate for general purposes is $3.375 per $1,000 of assessed valuation. Limitations on annual increases in tax collections, coupled with changes in property value, causes levy rates to rise or fall; however, in no case February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 298 of 358 249 may they rise above statutory limits. Once the rate is established each year, it may not be raised without the approval of a majority of the voters. Receiving voter approval is known as a lid lift. A lid lift may be permanent, or may be for a specific purpose and time period. A levy lid lift is an instrument for increasing property tax levies for operating and/or capital purposes. Taxing districts with a tax rate that is less than their statutory maximum rate may ask the voters to “lift” the levy lid by increasing the tax rate to some amount equal to or less than their statutory maximum rate. A simple majority vote of citizenry is required. Cities and counties have two “lift” options available to them: Single-year/basic or Multi-year. Single-year: The single-year lift does not mean that the lift goes away after one year; it can be for any amount of time, including permanently, unless the proceeds will be used for debt service on bonds, in which case the maximum time period is nine years. Districts may permanently increase the levy but must use language in the ballot title expressly stating that future levies will increase as allowed by chapter 84.55 RCW. After the initial “lift” in the first year, the district’s levy in future years is subject to the 101 percent lid in chapter 84.55 RCW. This is the maximum amount it can increase without returning to the voters for another lid lift. The election to implement a single-year lift may take place on any election date listed in RCW 29A.04.321. Multi-year: The multi-year lift allows the levy lid to be “bumped up” each year for up to a maximum of six years. At the end of the specified period, the levy in the final period may be designated as the basis for the calculation of all future levy increases (in other words, be made permanent) if expressly stated in the ballot title. The levy in future years would then be subject to the 101 percent lid in chapter 84.55 RCW. In a multi-year lift, the lift for the first year must state the new tax rate for that year. For the ensuing years, the lift may be a dollar amount, a percentage increase tied to an index, or a percentage amount set by some other method. The amounts do not need to be the same for each year. If the amount of the increase for a particular year would require a tax rate that is above the maximum tax rate, the assessor will levy only the maximum amount allowed by law. The election to implement a multi-year lift must be either the August primary or the November general election. The single-year lift allows supplanting of expenditures within the lift period; the multi-year left does not, and the purpose for the lift must be specifically identified in the election materials. For both single- and multi- year lifts, when the lift expires the base for future levies will revert to what the dollar amount would have been if no lift had ever been done. The total regular levy rate of senior taxing districts (counties and cities) and junior taxing districts (fire districts, library districts, etc.) may not exceed $5.90/$1,000 AV. If this limit is exceeded, levies are reduced or eliminated in the following order until the total tax rate is at $5.90. 1. Parks & Recreation Districts (up to $0.60) Parks & Recreation Service Areas (up to $0.60) Cultural Arts, Stadiums & Convention Districts (up to $0.25) 2. Flood Control Zone Districts (up to $0.50) 3. Hospital Districts (up to $0.25) Metropolitan Parks Districts (up to $0.25) All other districts not otherwise mentioned February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 299 of 358 250 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 4. Metropolitan Park Districts formed after January 1, 2002 or after (up to $0.50) 5. Fire Districts (up to $0.25) 6. Fire Districts (remaining $0.50) Regional Fire Protection Service Authorities (up to $0.50) Library Districts (up to $0.50) Hospital Districts (up to $0.50) Metropolitan Parks Districts formed before January 1, 2002 (up to $0.50) sales tax http://apps.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=82.14 Paid by the consumer, sales tax is a percentage of the retail price paid for specific classifications of goods and services within the State of Washington. Governing bodies of cities and counties may impose sales taxes within their boundaries at a rate set by state statute and local ordinances, subject to referendum. Until the 1990 Legislative Session, the maximum possible total sales tax rate paid by purchasers in cities was 8.1 percent. This broke down as follows: state, 6.5 cents on the dollar; counties, 0.15 cents; cities, 0.85 cents; and transit districts, a maximum of 0.6 cents (raised to 0.9 cents in 2000). Since then multiple sales options were authorized. Those applicable to Parks and Recreation include: counties may ask voters to approve a sales tax of up to 0.3 percent, which is shared with cities. At least one-third of the revenue must be used for criminal justice purposes. Counties and cities may also form public facilities districts, and these districts may ask the voters to approve a sales tax of up to 0.2 percent. The proceeds may be used for financing, designing, acquisition, construction, equipping, operating, maintaining, remodeling, repairing, and reequipping its public facilities. Revenue may be used to fund any essential county and municipal service. If a jurisdiction is going to change a sales tax rate or levy a new sales tax, it must pass an ordinance to that effect and submit it to the Department of Revenue at least 75 days before the effective date. The effective date must be the first day of a quarter: January 1, April 1, July 1 or October 1. business anD occuPation tax http://apps.leg.wa.gov/rcw/default.aspx?cite=35.102 Business and occupation (B&O) taxes are excise taxes levied on different classes of business to raise revenue. Taxes are levied as a percentage of the gross receipts of a business, less some deductions. Businesses are put in different classes such as manufacturing, wholesaling, retailing, and services. Within each class, the rate must be the same, but it may differ among classes. Cities can impose this tax for the first time or raise rates following referendum procedure. B&O taxes are limited to a maximum tax rate that can be imposed by a city’s legislative body at 0.2 percent (0.002), but grandfathered in any higher rates that existed on January 1, 1982. Any city may levy a rate higher than 0.2 percent, if it is approved by a majority of voters (RCW 35.21.711). Beginning January 1, 2008, cities that levy the B&O tax must allow for allocation and apportionment, as set out in RCW 35.102.130. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 300 of 358 251 aDmissions tax http://app.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=35.21.280 An admissions tax is a use tax for entertainment. Both cities and counties may impose this tax through legislative action. Cities and/or counties may levy an admission tax in an amount no greater than five percent of the admission charge, as is authorized by statute (cities: RCW 35.21.280; counties: RCW 35.57.100). This tax can be levied on admission charges (including season tickets) to places such as theaters, dance halls, circuses, clubs that have cover charges, observation towers, stadiums, and any other activity where an admission charge is made to enter the facility. If a city imposes an admissions tax, the county may not levy a tax within city boundaries. The statutes provide an exception for admission to elementary or secondary school activities. Generally, certain events sponsored by nonprofits are exempted from the tax; however, this is not a requirement. Counties also exempt any public facility of a public facility district for which admission is imposed. There are no statutory restrictions on the use of revenue. imPact Fees http://apps.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=82.02.050 Development impact fees are charges placed on new development in unimproved areas to help pay for various public facilities that serve new development or for other impacts associated with such development. Both cities and counties may impose this tax through legislative action. Counties that plan under the GMA, and cities, may impose impact fees on residential and commercial development activity to help pay for certain public facility improvements, including parks, open space, and recreation facilities identified in the county’s capital facilities plan. The improvements financed from impact fees must be reasonably related to the new development and must reasonably benefit the new development. The fees must be spent or encumbered within ten years of collection. real estate excise tax http://apps.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=82.46.010 Excise tax levied on all sales of real estate, measured by the full selling price, including the amount of any liens, mortgages, and other debts given to secure the purchase. Both cities and counties may impose this tax through legislative action. Counties and cities may levy a quarter percent tax (REET 1); a second quarter percent tax (REET 2) is authorized. First quarter percent REET (REET 1) must be spent on capital projects listed in the city’s capital facilities plan element of their comprehensive plan. Capital projects include planning, acquisition, construction, reconstruction, repair, replacement, rehabilitation, or improvement of parks, recreational facilities, and trails. The second quarter percent REET (REET 2) must also be spent on capital projects, which includes planning, construction, reconstruction, repair, rehabilitation, or improvement of parts. Acquisition of land for parks is not a permitted use of REET 2. Both REET 1 and REET 2 may be used to make loan and debt service payments on projects that are a permitted use of these funds. The City of Bothell currently assesses both REETs and uses this funding for a variety of capital project needs. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 301 of 358 252 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 loDging tax http://app.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?Cite=67.28.180 The lodging tax is a user fee for hotel/motel occupation. Both cities and counties may impose this tax through legislative action. Cities and/or counties may impose a “basic” two percent tax under RCW 67.28.180 on all charges for furnishing lodging at hotels, motels and similar establishments for a continuous period of less than one month. This tax is taken as a credit against the 6.5 percent state sales tax, so that the total tax that a patron pays in retail sales tax and hotel-motel tax combined is equal to the retail sales tax in the jurisdiction. In addition, jurisdictions may levy an additional tax of up to two percent, or a total rate of four percent, under RCW 67.28.181(1). This is not credited against the state sales tax. Therefore, if this tax is levied, the total tax on the lodging bill will increase by two percent. If both a city and the county are levying this tax, the county must allow a credit for any tax levied by a city so that no two taxes are levied on the same taxable event. These revenues must be used solely for paying for tourism promotion and for the acquisition and/or operating of tourism-related facilities. “Tourism” is defined as economic activity resulting from tourists, which may include sales of overnight lodging, meals, tours, gifts, or souvenirs; there is no requirement that a tourist must stay overnight. real estate excise tax - local conservation areas (king county) http://apps.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=82.46.070 Boards of County Commissioners may impose, with majority voter approval, an excise tax on each sale of real property in the county at rate not to exceed 1% of the selling price for the purpose of acquiring and maintaining conservation areas. The authorizing legislation defines conservation areas as “land and water that has environmental, agricultural, aesthetic, cultural, scientific, historic, scenic, or low-intensity recreational value for existing and future generations...” These areas include “open spaces, wetlands, marshes, aquifer recharge areas, shoreline areas, natural areas, and other lands and waters that are important to preserve flora and fauna.” King County does not currently assess a Conservation REET. conservation Futures tax (king & snohomish counties) http://apps.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=84.34 The Conservation Futures Tax (CFT) is provided for in Chapter 84.34 of the Revised Code of Washington. Both King County and Snohomish County impose a Conservation Futures levy at a rate of $0.0625 per $1,000 assessed value for the purpose of acquiring open space lands, including green spaces, greenbelts, wildlife habitat and trail rights-of-way proposed for preservation for public use by either the county or the cities within the county. Funds are allocated annually, and cities within the county, citizen groups and citizens may apply for funds through the county’s process. The CFT program for each county provides grants to cities to support open space priorities in local plans. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 302 of 358 253 FEDERAL & STATE GRANTS AND CONSERVATION PROGRAMS rivers, trails anD conservation assistance Program http://www.nps.gov/orgs/rtca/index.htm The Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance Program, also known as the Rivers & Trails Program or RTCA, is a technical assistance resource for communities administered by the National Park Service and federal government agencies so they can conserve rivers, preserve open space and develop trails and greenways. The RTCA program implements the natural resource conservation and outdoor recreation mission of NPS in communities across America. community DeveloPment block grants These funds are intended to develop viable urban communities by providing decent housing and a suitable living environment, and by expanding economic opportunities, principally for low and moderate income persons. Snohomish County, in partnership with 18 cities and towns within the county through an interlocal agreement, receives CDBG funds on an entitlement basis as an Urban County Consortium. The county administers this funding on behalf of the consortium through the Snohomish County Office of Housing and Community Development (OHCD). CDBG funds can be used for a wide variety of projects, services, facilities and infrastructure. north american wetlanDs conservation act grants Program http://www.fws.gov/policy/524fw1.html The North American Wetlands Conservation Act of 1989 provides matching grants to organizations and individuals who have developed partnerships to carry out wetland conservation projects in the United States, Canada, and Mexico for the benefit of wetlands-associated migratory birds and other wildlife. Two competitive grants programs exist (Standard and a Small Grants Program) and require that grant requests be matched by partner contributions at no less than a 1-to-1 ratio. Funds from U.S. Federal sources may contribute toward a project, but are not eligible as match. The Standard Grants Program supports projects in Canada, the United States, and Mexico that involve long- term protection, restoration, and/or enhancement of wetlands and associated uplands habitats. The Small Grants Program operates only in the United States; it supports the same type of projects and adheres to the same selection criteria and administrative guidelines as the U.S. Standard Grants Program. However, project activities are usually smaller in scope and involve fewer project dollars. Grant requests may not exceed $75,000, and funding priority is given to grantees or partners new to the Act’s Grants Program. recreation anD conservation oFFice grant Programs www.rco.wa.gov The Recreation and Conservation Office was created in 1964 as part of the Marine Recreation Land Act. The RCO grants money to state and local agencies, generally on a matching basis, to acquire, develop, and enhance wildlife habitat and outdoor recreation properties. Some money is also distributed for planning February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 303 of 358 254 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 grants. RCO grant programs utilize funds from various sources. Historically, these have included the Federal Land and Water Conservation Fund, state bonds, Initiative 215 monies (derived from unreclaimed marine fuel taxes), off-road vehicle funds, Youth Athletic Facilities Account and the Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program. Aquatic Lands Enhancement Account (ALEA) This program, managed through the RCO, provides matching grants to state and local agencies to protect and enhance salmon habitat and to provide public access and recreation opportunities on aquatic lands. In 1998, DNR refocused the ALEA program to emphasize salmon habitat preservation and enhancement. However, the program is still open to traditional water access proposals. Any project must be located on navigable portions of waterways. ALEA funds are derived from the leasing of state-owned aquatic lands and from the sale of harvest rights for shellfish and other aquatic resources. Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program (WWRP) The RCO is a state office that allocates funds to local and state agencies for the acquisition and development of wildlife habitat and outdoor recreation properties. Funding sources managed by the RCO include the Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program. The WWRP is divided into Habitat Conservation and Outdoor Recreation Accounts; these are further divided into several project categories. Cities, counties and other local sponsors may apply for funding in urban wildlife habitat, local parks, trails and water access categories. Funds for local agencies are awarded on a matching basis. Grant applications are evaluated once each year, and the State Legislature must authorize funding for the WWRP project lists. Land and Water Conservation Fund The Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) provides grants to buy land and develop public outdoor facilities, including parks, trails and wildlife lands. Grant recipients must provide at least 50% matching funds in either cash or in-kind contributions. Grant program revenue is from a portion of Federal revenue derived from sale or lease of off-shore oil and gas resources. National Recreational Trails Program The National Recreational Trails Program (NRTP) provides funds to maintain trails and facilities that provide a backcountry experience for a range of activities including hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, motorcycling, and snowmobiling. Eligible projects include the maintenance and re-routing of recreational trails, development of trail-side and trail-head facilities, and operation of environmental education and trail safety programs. A local match of 20% is required. This program is funded through Federal gasoline taxes attributed to recreational non-highway uses. Youth Athletic Facilities (YAF) Program The YAF provides grants to develop, equip, maintain, and improve youth and community athletic facilities. Cities, counties, and qualified non-profit organizations may apply for funding, and grant recipients must provide at least 50% matching funds in either cash or in-kind contributions. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 304 of 358 255 Puget Sound Acquisition and Restoration Fund Grants are awarded by the Salmon Recovery Funding Board for acquisition or restoration of lands directly correlating to salmon habitat protection or recovery. Projects must demonstrate a direct benefit to fish habitat. There is no match requirement for design-only projects; acquisition and restoration projects require a 15% match. The funding source includes the sale of state general obligation bonds, the federal Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery Fund and the state Puget Sound Acquisition and Restoration Fund. stP/cmaQ regional comPetition - Puget sounD regional council http://psrc.org/transportation/tip/selection/ Surface Transportation Program (STP) funds are considered the most “flexible” funding source provided through the federal Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient, Transportation Equity Act (SAFETEA-LU). Many types of projects are eligible, including transit, carpool/vanpool, bicycle/pedestrian, safety, traffic monitoring/ management, and planning projects, along with the more traditional road and bridge projects. The purpose of the Congestion Mitigation Air Quality (CMAQ) program is to fund transportation projects or programs that will contribute to attainment or maintenance of the national ambient air quality standards for ozone, carbon monoxide and particulate matter. The two goals of improving air quality and relieving congestion were strengthened under SAFETEA-LU by a new provision establishing priority consideration for cost- effective emission reduction and congestion mitigation activities when using CMAQ funding. The King County Growth Management Planning Council serves as the countywide board in the allocation of some federal transportation grant funds to projects within King County, through the Puget Sound Regional Council. king county grant exchange http://dnr.metrokc.gov/wlr/pi/grants.htm The Grant Exchange is a clearinghouse of grant and technical assistance programs offered by the King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks with the goals of protecting and enhancing the environment, increasing community stewardship, and providing expertise and consultation to projects. Grants and technical support are an important way in which King County increases opportunities for community stewardship of natural resources. These funds are leveraged by developing and strengthening partnerships with community organizations and local governments. On average, every dollar invested through grants is matched by three dollars in cash and in-kind contributions. wilD Places in city sPaces http://dnr.metrokc.gov/wlr/pi/grant-exchange/wildplaces.htm Wild Places in City Spaces provides grants up to $10,000 to volunteer organizations, community groups and government agencies for projects reforesting urban areas and restoring habitat within the urban growth area of King County. Funds are available under the Urban Reforestation and Habitat Restoration Grants Program. Grants support projects to reforest urban areas, remove invasive non-native plant species or provide wildlife habitats. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 305 of 358 256 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 natural resource stewarDshiP network http://dnr.metrokc.gov/wlr/pi/grant-exchange/NRSN.htm The Natural Resource Stewardship Network assists urban forestry and watershed stewardship projects and provides grants and technical assistance to projects that involve communities and youth in improving neighborhood green spaces and forests. Grants of up to $20,000 are available for projects within the urban growth area of King County that enhance, protect and manage urban forest, soil and water resources and will reimburse up to 50% of labor and materials costs. Inner-city and low income communities receive priority for support. Funds are provided by the King County Forestry Program and the King Conservation District. waterworks grants http://dnr.metrokc.gov/wlr/pi/grant-exchange/waterworks.htm Individual grants up to $50,000 are available for community projects that protect or improve watersheds, streams, rivers, lakes, wetlands and tidewater. Projects must have a demonstrable positive impact on the waters of King County and provide opportunities for stewardship. A minimum of 10 percent cash match is required for awards more than $2,500. king county youth sPorts Facilities grant (ysFg) The Youth Sports Facilities Grant Program is intended to facilitate new athletic opportunities for youth in King County by providing matching grant funds to rehabilitate or develop sports fields and facilities. The maximum award is $75,000 and projects should be located on public land or have public access for the proposed youth sports use. king county cultural heritage grants through 4culture https://www.4culture.org/grants-artist-calls/ As the cultural funding agency for King County, 4Culture offers grants and cultural support in four program areas – arts, heritage, historic preservation and public art. Funding is provided from lodging tax and 1% for Art funds. The City of Bothell should continue to support the Bothell Heritage Society and other community partners in cultural grant funding efforts. OTHER METHODS & FUNDING SOURCES metroPolitan Park District http://apps.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=35.61 Metropolitan park districts may be formed for the purposes of management, control, improvement, maintenance and acquisition of parks, parkways and boulevards. In addition to acquiring and managing their own lands, metropolitan districts may accept and manage park and recreation lands and equipment turned over by any city within the district or by the county. Formation of a metropolitan park district may be initiated in cities of five thousand population or more by city council ordinance, or by petition, and requires majority approval by voters for creation. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 306 of 358 257 Park anD recreation District http://apps.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=36.69 Park and recreation districts may be formed for the purposes of providing leisure-time activities and recreation facilities (parks, playgrounds, pools, golf courses, paths, community centers, arboretums, campgrounds, boat launches, etc.) and must be initiated by petition of at least 15% percent of the registered voters within the proposed district. Upon completion of the petition process and review by county commissioners, a proposition for district formation and election of five district commissioners is submitted to the voters of the proposed district at the next general election. Once formed, park and recreation districts retain the authority to propose a regular property tax levy, annual excess property tax levies and general obligation bonds. All three of these funding types require 60% percent voter approval and 40% percent voter turnout. With voter approval, the district may levy a regular property tax not to exceed sixty cents per thousand dollars of assessed value for up to six consecutive years. Park anD recreation service area (Prsa) http://app.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=36.68.400 Purpose to finance, acquire, construct, improve, maintain or operate any park, senior citizen activities center, zoo, aquarium and/or recreation facilities; and to provide higher level of park service. The City of Bothell along with other regional partners comprise the Northshore Parks and Recreation Service Area, which owns the Senior Center building. business sPonsorshiPs/Donations Business sponsorships for programs may be available throughout the year. In-kind contributions are often received, including food, door prizes and equipment/material. interagency agreements State law provides for interagency cooperative efforts between units of government. Joint acquisition, development and/or use of park and open space facilities may be provided between Parks, Public Works and utility providers. Private grants, Donations & giFts Many trusts and private foundations provide funding for park, recreation and open space projects. Grants from these sources are typically allocated through a competitive application process and vary dramatically in size based on the financial resources and funding criteria of the organization. Philanthropic giving is another source of project funding. Efforts in this area may involve cash gifts and include donations through other mechanisms such as wills or insurance policies. Community fundraising efforts can also support park, recreation or open space facilities and projects. The Community Foundation of Snohomish County also offers small grants ($500 - $5,000) to qualified non-profit organizations (501(c)(3)) or public agencies such as local government, schools, libraries or parks. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 307 of 358 258 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 ACQUISITION TOOLS & METHODS Direct Purchase methoDs Market Value Purchase Through a written purchase and sale agreement, the city purchases land at the present market value based on an independent appraisal. Timing, payment of real estate taxes and other contingencies are negotiable. Partial Value Purchase (or Bargain Sale) In a bargain sale, the landowner agrees to sell for less than the property’s fair market value. A landowner’s decision to proceed with a bargain sale is unique and personal; landowners with a strong sense of civic pride, long community history or concerns about capital gains are possible candidates for this approach. In addition to cash proceeds upon closing, the landowner may be entitled to a charitable income tax deduction based on the difference between the land’s fair market value and its sale price. Life Estates & Bequests In the event a landowner wishes to remain on the property for a long period of time or until death, several variations on a sale agreement exist. In a life estate agreement, the landowner may continue to live on the land by donating a remainder interest and retaining a “reserved life estate.” Specifically, the landowner donates or sells the property to the city, but reserves the right for the seller or any other named person to continue to live on and use the property. When the owner or other specified person dies or releases his/her life interest, full title and control over the property will be transferred to the city. By donating a remainder interest, the landowner may be eligible for a tax deduction when the gift is made. In a bequest, the landowner designates in a will or trust document that the property is to be transferred to the city upon death. While a life estate offers the city some degree of title control during the life of the landowner, a bequest does not. Unless the intent to bequest is disclosed to and known by the city in advance, no guarantees exist with regard to the condition of the property upon transfer or to any liabilities that may exist. Gift Deed When a landowner wishes to bequeath their property to a public or private entity upon their death, they can record a gift deed with the county assessors office to insure their stated desire to transfer their property to the targeted beneficiary as part of their estate. The recording of the gift deed usually involves the tacit agreement of the receiving party. Option to Purchase Agreement This is a binding contract between a landowner and the city that would only apply according to the conditions of the option and limits the seller’s power to revoke an offer. Once in place and signed, the Option Agreement may be triggered at a future, specified date or upon the completion of designated conditions. Option Agreements can be made for any time duration and can include all of the language pertinent to closing a property sale. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 308 of 358 259 Right of First Refusal In this agreement, the landowner grants the city the first chance to purchase the property once the landowner wishes to sell. The agreement does not establish the sale price for the property, and the landowner is free to refuse to sell it for the price offered by the city. This is the weakest form of agreement between an owner and a prospective buyer. Conservation and/or Access Easements Through a conservation easement, a landowner voluntarily agrees to sell or donate certain rights associated with his or her property (often the right to subdivide or develop), and a private organization or public agency agrees to hold the right to enforce the landowner’s promise not to exercise those rights. In essence, the rights are forfeited and no longer exist. This is a legal agreement between the landowner and the city that permanently limits uses of the land in order to conserve a portion of the property for public use or protection. The landowner still owns the property, but the use of the land is restricted. Conservation easements may result in an income tax deduction and reduced property taxes and estate taxes. Typically, this approach is used to provide trail corridors where only a small portion of the land is needed or for the strategic protection of natural resources and habitat. Through a written purchase and sale agreement, the city purchases land at the present market value based on an independent appraisal. Timing, payment of real estate taxes and other contingencies are negotiable. Park or Open Space Dedication Requirements Local governments have the option to require developers to dedicate land for parks under the State Subdivision Law (Ch. 58.17 RCW) and the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) (Ch. 43.21C RCW). Under the subdivision law developers can be required to provide the parks/recreation improvements or pay a fee in lieu of the dedicated land and its improvements. Under the SEPA requirements, land dedication may occur as part of mitigation for a proposed development’s impact. lanDowner incentive measures Density Bonuses Density bonuses are a planning tool used to encourage a variety of public land use objectives, usually in urban areas. They offer the incentive of being able to develop at densities beyond current regulations in one area, in return for concessions in another. Density bonuses are applied to a single parcel or development. An example is allowing developers of multi-family units to build at higher densities if they provide a certain number of low-income units or public open space. For density bonuses to work, market forces must support densities at a higher level than current regulations. Transfer of Development Rights The transfer of development rights (TDR) is an incentive-based planning tool that allows land owners to trade the right to develop property to its fullest extent in one area for the right to develop beyond existing regulations in another area. Local governments may establish the specific areas in which development may be limited or restricted and the areas in which development beyond regulation may be allowed. Usually, but not always, the “sending” and “receiving” property are under common ownership. Some programs allow for different ownership, which, in effect, establishes a market for development rights to be bought and sold. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 309 of 358 260 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 IRC 1031 Exchange If the landowner owns business or investment property, an IRC Section 1031 Exchange can facilitate the exchange of like-kind property solely for business or investment purposes. No capital gain or loss is recognized under Internal Revenue Code Section 1031 (see www.irc.gov for more details). This option may be a useful tool in negotiations with an owner of investment property, especially if the tax savings offset to the owner can translate to a sale price discount for the City. Current (Open Space) Use Taxation Programs Property owners whose current lands are in open space, agricultural, and/or timber uses may have that land valued at their current use rather than their “highest and best” use assessment. This differential assessed value, allowed under the Washington Open Space Taxation Act (Ch.84.34 RCW) helps to preserve private properties as open space, farm or timber lands. If land is converted to other non-open space uses, the land owner is required to pay the difference between the current use annual taxes and highest/best taxes for the previous seven years. When properties are sold to a local government or conservation organization for land conservation/preservation purposes, the required payment of seven years worth of differential tax rates is waived. The amount of this tax liability can be part of the negotiated land acquisition from private to public or quasi-public conservation purposes. Snohomish County has four current use taxation programs that offer this property tax reduction as an incentive to landowners to voluntarily preserve open space, farmland or timber land on their property. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 310 of 358 261 OTHER LAND PROTECTION OPTIONS lanD trusts & conservancies Land trusts are private non-profit organizations that acquire and protect special open spaces and are traditionally not associated with any government agency. Forterra (formerly called the Cascade Land Conservancy) is the regional land trust serving the Bothell area, and their efforts have led to the conservation of more than 234,000 acres of forests, farms, shorelines, parks and natural areas in the region (www.forterra. org). Other national organizations with local representation include the Nature Conservancy, Trust for Public Land and the Wetlands Conservancy. regulatory measures A variety of regulatory measures are available to local agencies and jurisdictions. Available programs and regulations include: Critical Areas Ordinance, Bothell; State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA); Shorelines Management Program; and Hydraulic Code, Washington State Department of Fisheries and Department of Wildlife. Public/Private utility corriDors Utility corridors can be managed to maximize protection or enhancement of open space lands. Utilities maintain corridors for provision of services such as electricity, gas, oil, and rail travel. Some utility companies have cooperated with local governments for development of public programs such as parks and trails within utility corridors. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 311 of 358 262 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 Page Left Intentionally Blank February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 312 of 358 263 APPENDIX HAPPENDIX H OTHER COMMUNITY PLANSOTHER COMMUNITY PLANS February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 313 of 358 264 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 To supplement community outreach, a number of community plans were reviewed for past policy direction and goals as they pertain to the provision and planning for parks, trails and recreation opportunities for Bothell. The development of each involved public input and final adoption by their respective responsible legislative body. City of Bothell Comprehensive Plan 2015 In its comprehensive plan, the City acknowledges that the value of built public infrastructure is a means for enhancing the quality of life and enriching the human spirit, rather than an end unto itself. The Imagine Bothell… Comprehensive Plan provides a vision for how the City will grow and develop over the next 20 years. The Plan guides decision making to ensure that future goals can be met in a sustainable manner. The 2015 Bothell Comprehensive Plan is consistent with the Washington Growth Management Act (GMA) and its Land Use Element designates a Bothell Planning Area that includes portion of unincorporated King and Snohomish Counties. Vision 2040 policies are addressed throughout all elements of the Plan. The Plan includes a Natural Environment Element with the intent to expand the community’s commitment to stewardship of natural resources and to provide a policy basis for City decisions which affect the natural environment. As a follow up to their 2013 Shoreline Master Plan, the City included a Shoreline Master Program Element in the Plan to further protect and steward the riparian corridors of the Sammamish River, North Creek and Swamp Creek that flow within the City. Shoreline master programs seek to protect the river’s ecological functions while providing for public access to shorelines and enabling recreational opportunities associated with waterways. The Imagine Bothell… Comprehensive Plan updates its Parks, Recreation and Open Space Element by adopting the Bothell Parks, Recreation and Open Space Action Plan (PROSAP). The City’s overall objective is to develop and maintain a well-designed system of parks, recreation and open space facilities and programs that encourages optimum use of recreation resources available to Bothell residents and improves their quality of life. The PROSAP vision provides a variety of parks and recreation opportunities throughout Bothell that reflects the character and core values of the community. The PROSAP goals and policies provide a direction that is consistent with other growth management elements that guide Bothell’s future. Actions cited in the Plan provide specific direction for parks and recreation towards improving service provision, updating fees & charges, filling gaps in park distribution, creating park master plans, coordinating with the School District, acquiring and developing new facilities, providing trails and walking routes, continuing to enhance recreation programming, and providing superior park operations and facility maintenance. In addition to the acquisition of land for neighborhood parks, the Plan identified 12 priority projects including an aquatic/community center, parks, sports fields and open spaces to provide for the future of Bothell’s park and recreation system. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 314 of 358 265 Parks, Recreation & Open Space Action Program 2014 The Bothell Parks, Recreation & Open Space Action Program (PROSAP) was updated in 2014 from its first 2008 plan. The 2014 PROSAP identified a need to acquire 40.11 additional acres of parkland within the city limits and 46.17 acres within the municipal urban growth area (MUGA) by 2025. The Plan also identified the need to provide for additional indoor recreation opportunities by supporting the Northshore Parks and Recreation Service Area in locating and developing a regional aquatic center as well as acquiring land and developing a community center for Bothell’s residents. The PROSAP reinforced the goals, policies and actions that were developed in the 2004 Imagine Bothell…Comprehensive Plan. The 2015 city comprehensive plan update adopted the goals and policies of the 2014 PROSAP. The PROSAP proposed specific improvements to parks, athletic fields, regional facilities, trails, open space, recreation programming and operations and maintenance. The 2014 PROSAP included a proposed 2013-2019 capital facilities plan that included investments in existing and undeveloped parks and creation of new infrastructure through both parks and open space acquisition. Bothell Shoreline Master Program Update 2012 Bothell’s Shoreline Master Program (SMP) encompasses the Sammamish River, North Creek, and Swamp Creek; land within 200 feet of the ordinary high water mark of these waterways; and their floodways, 100- year floodplains and associated wetlands. The 2012 SMP update holds jurisdiction over 782.8 acres within the city limits and Bothell Planning Area. The SMP is consistent with Bothell’s comprehensive plan and the state Shoreline Management Act. The SMP is provisioned to support comprehensive public access, physical and visual, to Bothell’s shorelines and to protect the ecological function of the riparian areas and aquatic environments. The SMP encourages continued acquisition of land for the public along the Sammamish River and the use of footbridges to connect opposite banks of the Sammamish River, North Creek and Swamp Creek where compatible uses would benefit from the connection. Recreational opportunities that do not compromise the shoreline’s ecological functions are also encouraged in the SMP. The SMP promotes the planting and establishment of more native plant species to benefit terrestrial and aquatic habitats. The City of Bothell 2017-2023 Capital Facilities Plan The City’s 2017-2023 Capital Facilities Plan (CFP) cited six park capital projects to be funded and implemented over the six-year CFP term. Those projects include the Cedar Grove Park field improvements, the Madrazo Memorial Park development, Horse Creek Plaza development, Park at Bothell Landing bridge replacement, park acquisition in north Bothell and the acquisition of the Wayne Golf Course. The total costs for the six projects is estimated at $11,760,000. Extensions of the North Creek Trail (section 3 & 4) are listed under Transportation capital projects, estimated at $3,921,000. City of Bothell 2019-2020 Biennial Budget One of the ten goals adopted by the City Council for this biennial budget was Parks/Recreation/Open Space Partnerships. In the approved City capital facilities plan, park projects included the pedestrian bridge replacement at Park at Bothell Landing, the Cedar Grove Park field improvements and construction/ improvements to sections of North Creek Trail. The Parks and Recreation Department listed its proposed outcomes and activities to include seeking out land acquisition and grant opportunities, constructing the 1st Lieutenant Nicolas Madrazo Park, updating the PROSAP plan, constructing the Horse Creek Plaza in downtown and completing the replacement of the pedestrian bridge at Park at Bothell Landing. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 315 of 358 266 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of Bothell 2017-2018 Biennial Budget The City’s budget priorities for parks and recreation for the past biennial budget were identified as completing the Wayne Golf Course purchase and planning, Parks & Recreation Open Space Partnerships, and securing north Bothell park land, open space and various other park properties along with ongoing maintenance and operating costs and future park mater planning and construction expenses. City of Bothell Citizen Survey 2015 In 2015, the City conducted a citizen survey to measure satisfaction with city services, priorities for spending public dollars and to understand citizen information needs. Most survey respondents described the City of Bothell as an excellent or good place to live. The majority of respondents (86%) ranked the appearance of parks and trails was good to excellent. The survey indicated that 72% of respondents were positive about the City providing parks to serve all parts of the City. Acquiring and developing park land and providing a range of quality recreation programs for youth and adults were ranked among the lower priorities (compared to fire, police, emergency and transportation services) for how the City should spend tax dollars. Respondents generally felt less safe in 2015 than in 2008 in their neighborhood, a city park, or in business areas both during the day and after dark. Canyon Park Vision Report The Canyon Park area was developed in the late 1980s and early 1990s and has recently undergone an updated planning process with its designation as a Regional Growth Center (RGC). The RGC designation can help the City get federal and state funds to help pay for local road improvements as the planning area may grow from its current 1,400 people to 4,454 people and employment may increase from 10,000 employees to an additional 753 jobs. The Canyon Park RGC is a neighborhood in the Snohomish County portion of Bothell that serves as a major employment and commercial hub for the City of Bothell and the surrounding region. The Canyon Park RGC is comprised of a diverse mix of office, light industrial, R&D, retail and other commercial/residential uses in a 735-acre area. One of the most predominant and important features of Canyon Park is its abundance of open space and critical areas. The area defined by wetlands and creeks and features a natural divide in topography along its eastern border. Wetlands are a predominant feature of the Canyon Park RGC and are preserved throughout the area in protective tracts or are owned by the City of Bothell. The environmental features of Canyon Park represent both opportunity in the form of public open space and constraints in terms of limiting the amount of developable land for future growth. North Creek provides a natural corridor within Canyon Park that connects to the regional watershed. The North Creek Trail runs north to south through the center of the Canyon Park area. The extension of North Creek Trail (Section 3) is noted as a planned transportation improvement that will complete non- motorized access to the business park. This trail extension would parallel SR 527 from 214 St SE to SR 524. The Vision Report planned transportation improvements also noted the need to complete the missing link of the North Creek Trail (Section 4) along SR 524 between the current trail and Filbert Road. Two other transportation related opportunities cited, one: a potential Canyon Park Loop bicycle route including improved wayfinding signage to destinations and trail crossings and two: improved pedestrian/bicycle access to the subarea by using a new street design standard in addition to the formalization of existing informal pedestrian “goat” paths to the east side neighborhoods. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 316 of 358 267 The Canyon Park Vision for Parks and Public Space holds the objective of implementing new public park space with recreational uses and with investments in signature public spaces. Existing wetland areas are targeted for improvements that support passive recreation opportunities, as pedestrian amenities. Green spaces and natural features are recognized as an important visual amenity for the future of Canyon Park. Snohomish County Park and Recreation Plans Snohomish County adopted a new Park and Recreation Element (PRE) in June, 2015 as part of the County’s comprehensive plan to provide a long-term strategy for providing park facilities through 2035. The County also created a separate Park and Recreation Visioning Plan (PRVP) and Park Inventory Report (PIR) to specifically address the Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office (RCO) grant eligibility requirements and document Parks’ inventory. Both the visioning plan and the park and recreation element are used to create the capital park improvement plan for the county. The PRE indicated that Snohomish County is seeking to address recreation needs through partnerships with other recreation providers when/ where appropriate. In the southwest county recreation area (synonymous with the Southwest County Urban Growth Area that includes Everett, Mukilteo, Mill Creek, Lynnwood, Edmonds, Mountlake Terrace, Brier and Woodway and areas of unincorporated UGA), the county owns 34 park properties, including open space tracts within the city of Bothell. The county park plans assert that the Southwest County Recreation Area will require coordination with all recreation providers to create an integrated system of parks which offers recreation opportunities greater than that provided by any one single provider. Northshore Aquatics Needs Analysis & Location Study 2008 The Cities of Kenmore, Bothell and Woodinville commissioned a study in the Northshore Parks and Recreation Service Area (NPRSA) to evaluate aquatics needs that covered current aquatic resources and projected future needs. The planning team built on the general concept from a 2003 study to develop public consensus for a preferred site and specific facility concept. The recommendations included developing a 55,000 square foot multi-function regional aquatic center, centrally located in the NPRSA, within Bothell’s downtown revitalization area. The study recommended next steps to include identifying and securing a specific site near the current pool site, building awareness and a detailed proposal and planning for a ballot vote to support project funding. Anderson School Public Benefits Agreement 2012 As part of the purchase and sale between the City and Anderson School Properties, LLC and McMenamins Brew Pubs, Inc., an agreement was negotiated to ensure that the site development would contribute to the economic, cultural and recreational revitalization of the City and its downtown. The redevelopment of the school property included the redevelopment of the Pool and Pool Building to be used by the public and in connection with the hotel facility. The provision of certain public benefits were part of the consideration for the purchase of the property. The agreement also ensures that a community meeting room is available without charge to the City or the public. The pool and pool building is to be open to the public for at least 98 hours per week for use by Bothell residents without admission charges. The agreement also provided for the easements necessary to redevelop the Horse Creek drainage system. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 317 of 358 268 Bothell PROS Plan 2020 City of BothellParks & Recreation Department21233 20th Ave SEBothell, WA 98021http://www.ci.bothell.wa.us/ February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 318 of 358 City Council Agenda Bill AB # 20-015 TO: Mayor Olsen and Members of the Bothell City Council FROM: Jennifer Phillips, City Manager DATE: February 4, 2020 SUBJECT: Consideration of Suspending the Rules of Recording for Board and Commission Interviews POLICY CONSIDERATION: Should the City Council suspend the rules of recording for the upcoming Board and Commission Interviews on February 11? Section 8.06 of the Protocol Manual permits suspension of audio recording via a motion to suspend the rules. HISTORY: DATE ACTION JANUARY 19, 2018 Suspended Rules of Recording for Council Retreat JANUARY 30, 2018 Suspended Rules of Recording for Board & Commission Interviews JANUARY, 15, 2019 Suspended Rules of Recording for Board & Commission Interviews MARCH 5, 2019 Suspended Rules of Recording for the 3/12 Council Teambuilding Retreat JULY 16, 2019 Suspended Rules of Recording for the 7/19 and 7/24 Workshops with B&C members and stakeholder groups on the Arts Commission Cultural Plan DISCUSSION: Historically, Council has suspended the rules of recording for Board and Commission Interviews and Council retreats and other informal/collaborative meetings in which no action is taken. FISCAL IMPACTS: There are no financial impacts associated with this item. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 319 of 358 City Council Agenda Bill AB # 20-015 ATTACHMENTS: Att-1. Protocol Manual Section 8.06 RECOMMENDED ACTION: Provide direction to staff regarding recording of the February 11, 2020 Board and Commission Interviews. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 320 of 358 8.06 Audio Recording of Meetings The City Clerk, or designee, shall make and keep audio recordings of all meetings of the Bothell City Council, except those meetings or portions of meetings conducted in Executive Session, or unless a motion is passed to suspend audio recording of a meeting. Recordings and related records of all City Council meetings, except as referenced above, shall be retained by the City in accordance with the Washington State Records Retention Schedule. Att-1 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 321 of 358 (This page intentionally left blank) February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 322 of 358 City Council Agenda Bill AB # 20-016 TO: Mayor Olsen and Members of the Bothell City Council FROM: Michael Kattermann, Community Development Director DATE: February 4, 2020 SUBJECT: Consideration of 2020 Planning Docket POLICY CONSIDERATION: The Council is being asked to provide direction about staffing and priorities for the Proposed 2020 Planning Docket (Attachment 1) and work program for the Strategic Planning staff and Landmark Preservation consultant. These policy decisions affect how the City regulates and manages growth, meets its obligations under Federal and State law, achieves Council goals, and responds to community requests. The proposed docket prioritizes work on mandatory and Council goal-related tasks with the remainder of time allotted to additional tasks as staffing allows. As part of this item, it is requested that Council consider the following policy questions: 1. Which staffing option should be applied to the proposed docket? 2. Would a majority of the Council change the proposed docket with additions, deletions or different priorities? 3. Who should bear the cost for amendments related to affordable housing: City; non-profit developers; for-profit developers; or shared between City and developers? HISTORY: DATE ACTION FEBRUARY 19, 2019 City Council approved 2019 Planning Docket DECEMBER 4, 2019 Planning Commission reviewed preliminary docket and added items JANUARY 8, 2020 Planning Commission commented on draft docket and priorities The proposed 2020 planning docket was developed by staff based on federal and state mandates, Council goals, previous docket items, Planning Commission input and private requests. Staff began the process by preparing a list of potential tasks, primarily involving Plan and Code Amendments. Following this, staff February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 323 of 358 City Council Agenda Bill AB # 20-016 determined the number of hours that can devoted to the overall Docket and estimated hours needed for each task in that year. On December 4, 2019, staff presented and reviewed the preliminary docket with the Planning Commission. The Commission had an opportunity to make suggestions and items were added. On January 8, 2020, the Planning Commission commented on the draft docket and priorities. They recommended forwarding the draft docket to the City Council at that meeting. DISCUSSION: Historically, the Docket contains more work tasks than can be accomplished during the calendar year. This is due to the increasing number of growth-related issues and the limited resources that can be devoted to this work. The proposed Docket lists Plan and Code amendments, Landmark Preservation activities, and other related tasks the City could undertake in 2020 and future years. Some Docket tasks, such as Canyon Park Subarea Plan, have the potential to affect significant changes to the city. Similarly, the mandatory tasks for buildable lands, growth targets, and countywide planning policies (#’s 3-5) are foundational to the next required update of the Imagine Bothell…Comprehensive Plan in 2023. The work of the Docket is carried out by two senior planners and a part-time (i.e. 10 hours/week) historic preservation consultant. These three people are charged with doing much of the work of these tasks including public engagement, managing consultants, and staffing the Planning Commission, the Landmark Preservation Board, and the Shorelines Board. One of the senior planners will be retiring at the end of July. Council direction on whether or when to fill the senior planner position will determine how much of the Docket is feasible to address in 2020. Options for staffing are: 1. Fill senior planner position to overlap with current staff for about 4 months; 2. Fill senior planner position upon retirement; 3. Do not fill senior planner position this year. Staff set aside approximately $108,000 of the $400,000 from the State Legislature to fund about six months of a senior planner’s salary and benefits. The purpose of the set aside was to dedicate significant staff time to the Canyon Park Subarea Plan project and to generate sufficient salary savings to overlap new staff with a senior planner retiring at the end of July. This overlap provides greater focus on Canyon Park to use the state funds by the June 30, 2020 deadline and brings the project nearer to completion before retirement. It also provides opportunity for a transfer of knowledge and additional assistance on February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 324 of 358 City Council Agenda Bill AB # 20-016 Canyon Park, as well as transition time for a new planner on other tasks while the incumbent is available. The status of the 2019 Docket (Attachment 2) is an important consideration in reviewing the proposed 2020 Docket. All of the tasks from the 2019 Docket that are underway or previously deferred are also included in the proposed 2020 Docket. These were prioritized for completion along with the federal and state mandates and Council goals. The proposed docket offers three optional lists of priorities corresponding to the staffing options discussed above. After Council direction on the staffing option, staff is seeking Council direction on any changes to the priorities in the proposed docket. Additionally, staff is seeking Council direction on whether developers should bear any of the cost for two tasks (#8.E and #11.A) that benefit two specific projects but are also included in the Housing Strategy adopted by Council in 2018 and could have city-wide applicability. Task 11.A is related to city-owned Parcel A and the non-profit developer has identified potential regulatory challenges. Task 8.E is to create development standards for micro-apartments that are not addressed in current code. A project that could include market rate affordable units and income-restricted affordable units through the Multi-Family Tax Exemption program has been through the pre-application process. FISCAL IMPACTS: The current staffing level of two senior planners is included in the Adopted 2019- 2020 Budget. Approximately $108,000 of the $400,000 from the State Legislature in 2019 was set aside to fund one additional senior planner for six months. ATTACHMENTS: Att-1. Proposed 2020 Planning Docket Att-2. Status of 2019 Planning Docket RECOMMENDED ACTION: Move approval of: 1. Filling the senior planner position to overlap with current staff for about 4 months (Option 1); 2. The proposed 2020 planning docket that corresponds with the approved staffing option; and 3. Staff working out a shared cost agreement with developers benefitting from tasks 8.E and 11.A providing amendments for affordable housing. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 325 of 358 (This page intentionally left blank) February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 326 of 358 Attachment 1 PROPOSED 2020 PLANNING DOCKET Included in Staffing Options 1 & 2; deferred in Option 3 Included in Staffing Option 1; deferred in Options 2 & 3 Page 1 # Source / Status Tasks Proposed Timing Estimated Hours 1 State Mandate, Initiated 2017, Underway Code amendments to Title 14, Critical Areas. Updates are needed to comply with FEMA and Ecology requirements regarding flood plains and wetlands, respectively. Additional analysis (BAS) per Council in 2019. 2020 80 2 GMA Consistency “A” deferred from 2019 “B” and “D” New Comprehensive Plan Amendments A. Transportation Element: Add policy and text amendments from Bike Plan adoption. B. Update annual amendment provisions for consistency with GMA. C. Incorporate updated Canyon Park Subarea Plan into Imagine Bothell…Comprehensive Plan. D. Parks, Recreation and Open Space Element: Add policy and text amendments from PROS Plan adoption. E. Private amendment requests see Task #19. A-D 2020/2021 E – Defer 2023 A - D 120 PW , Parks E – See Task #19 3 State Mandate Initiated 2019 Buildable Lands Report (King and Snohomish). Between 2019 and 2021, counties and cities will be updating buildable lands inventories and analyses that inform new growth targets and capacity for 2023 Comprehensive Plan Update. Report due 6/30/2021, data & analysis 2020-2021 240 GIS 4 State Mandate New Growth Targets (King and Snohomish). Establishing population and employment targets that will inform the 2023 Imagine Bothell…Comprehensive Plan Update. 2020-2021 120 5 State Mandate New Countywide Planning Policy amendments (King and Snohomish). Revisions to reflect Vision 2050 updates that will inform the 2023 Imagine Bothell…Comprehensive Plan Update. 2020-2021 80 6 State Mandate New Reduced parking/HB 1923. 2019 legislation requires reduced parking for affordable, senior and disabled housing within ¼-mile of frequent transit service. Option 1: 2020 Options 2 &3: Defer 200 7 Council Goal, Initiated 2016, Underway Canyon Park Subarea and Regional Growth Center (RGC) Plan Update Phase 2. Develop and analyze land use and transportation alternatives; draft environmental review. Phase 3 unfunded – Final EIS, Amend code & policies. 2020 (state funding thru 6/2020) 800 PW, Fire, Parks, GIS, Finance, Police 8 Council Goal A – Underway Housing Strategy Implementation – Work plan approved 7/2018 includes: A. Plan and Code amendments for affordable housing provisions in Canyon Park. A – 2020 A – Included in #7 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 327 of 358 Attachment 1 PROPOSED 2020 PLANNING DOCKET Included in Staffing Options 1 & 2; deferred in Option 3 Included in Staffing Option 1; deferred in Options 2 & 3 Page 2 # Source / Status Tasks Proposed Timing Estimated Hours B – Ongoing C – Underway D – New (Planning Commission) E – Housing Strategy, New B. Continue with ADU Code amendments initiated in 2018 (e.g. fees, maximum area limitations, elimination of other barriers) with input from ARCH study. C. Plan and Code amendment to develop a Multi-Family Tax Exemption (MFTE) program. D. Cottage Housing – Tier 1 action in Housing Strategy to encourage innovative housing types in SF zones. E. Revise regulations for micro- apartments. B – Options 1 & 2: 2020 Option 3: Defer C – 2020 D – Defer E – Options 1&2: 2020 Option 3: Defer B – 200 PW C – 80 D – 200 E – 160 9 A – Initiated 2018 (grant funded thru 6/2021) B – New (grant funded thru 6/2021) C – Initiated 2016, Deferred D – New (Planning Commission) E – New (Planning Commission) F – New (staff) Code Amendments. A. Increase Short Plat size from 4 lots to 9. Reduce processing time for applicants and staff for smaller-scale subdivisions. B. Allow duplexes on corner lots in single family zones. C. Code amendments to Title 12 for consistency with state regulations regarding “Residential Care Facility”. D. Assess steps needed to participate in King and Snohomish County transfer of development rights (TDR) programs. E. Incentivize solar power and include other sustainable practices in building and development regulations. F. Housekeeping amendments: 1. Clarify SEPA rules regarding Legislative (Type V) actions (14.02) 2. Correct outdated references 3. Review minimum 800’ floor area requirement in Lower Maywood Special District – may prohibit smaller ADUs (12.54.020(B) 4. Clarify lighting standards within public ROW – refer to PW Standards (12.14.240) 5. Improve visibility of building addresses – current 12” limitation difficult for emergency responders (12.22) 6. Combine/clarify ‘building coverage’ definitions (11.02) A – 2020 B – 2020 C – Defer D – Defer E – Defer F – Option 1: 2020 Options 2&3: Defer A – 80 PW B – 160 C – 100 D – 40 E – 200 F - 200 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 328 of 358 Attachment 1 PROPOSED 2020 PLANNING DOCKET Included in Staffing Options 1 & 2; deferred in Option 3 Included in Staffing Option 1; deferred in Options 2 & 3 Page 3 # Source / Status Tasks Proposed Timing Estimated Hours 7. Review ham radio operator regulations for consistency w/fed regs – requires CUP for any antenna (12.06) 8. Review HVAC screening requirements – modern equipment much smaller (12.14) 9. PW code amendments (processing only) 10 Initiated 2018 A – Underway B – Underway C – Housing Strategy, Deferred D – Deferred Downtown Subarea Code amendments: A. Revise public space regulations to achieve better outcomes. B. Downtown Historic Resources Regulations and Title 22, Landmark Preservation, to preserve historic buildings/facades on Main Street and historic downtown core, in coordination with the Downtown Historic District and Landmark Feasibility Study. C. Remove 3-story overlay in General Downtown Corridor and add affordable housing overlay; D. Parking requirements related to outcome of parking management plan or Phase 2 study (not funded). A – 2020 B – 2020 C – Defer D – Defer A – 80 B – 120 C – 100 D – 80 11 A – New B – Initiated 2019, deferred Potential Downtown Plan and Code amendments regarding city-owned parcels A. Revise regulations to address site-specific constraints of Parcel A. B. Update Planned Action EIS capacity analysis. A – 2020 B – Defer A – 120 B – 160 12 Initiated 2019, Awaiting NSD application Northshore School District Impact Fee Collection – District requesting City collect school impact fees. Defer 40 13 Initiated 2019, deferred Comprehensive Plan and Code amendments regarding private streets – Seeking policy direction on private streets. A. Policy direction from Council B. Comp plan and code amendments A, B – Defer A – 80 B - 160 14 Initiated 2018, deferred Review of BMC Chapter 12.22, Signs, and potential Code amendments per US Supreme Court ruling (Reed v Town of Gilbert). This concerns regulation of signs based on content and review of City’s regulations for compliance with Court decision. Defer 60 15 Initiated 2018, deferred Comprehensive Update to the Landscape Regulations - Current landscaping regulations Defer 200 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 329 of 358 Attachment 1 PROPOSED 2020 PLANNING DOCKET Included in Staffing Options 1 & 2; deferred in Option 3 Included in Staffing Option 1; deferred in Options 2 & 3 Page 4 # Source / Status Tasks Proposed Timing Estimated Hours are geared toward a suburban style of development and should be updated. 16 Initiated 2016 – 2018, deferred Code amendments to regulations pertaining to adult entertainment. Council initiated Code amendments to clarify current regulations pertaining to espresso stands. Defer 60 17 Initiated 2019, deferred Code amendments for City Council review of proposed park land dedications. Earlier and defined process for proposals to dedicate parkland. Defer 80 18 Initiated 2019, deferred Amend the Shoreline Master Program regarding buffer enhancement incentives – Review current provision allowing reduction of standard buffer width in exchange for buffer enhancement. Defer 120 +consultant 19 A - Initiated 2019, deferred B – New C – New Property Owner Requests – Plan & Code Amendments A. 10116 and 10126 NE 187th ST from R 4,000 to R 2,800 – Property adjacent to R 2,800. Increases allowed units from 5 to 7. B. 20316 90th Ave NE in Westhill Subarea from R 9,600 to R 7,200. C. 24328, 24232, 24318, 24310 - 7th Ave SE in Westhill Subarea from R 9,600 to R 7,200. A – C Defer 2023 periodic update A – 100 B – 80 C - 100 20 Initiated 2016- 18, Planning Commission recommenda- tion 2016 Nike Hill Plan and Code amendments. Apply three-story (35 feet) Residential Activity Center and mixed-use zoning classifications in the Neighborhood Activity Center at Meridian Avenue and 228th Street SE/SW with affordable housing requirements. Defer 2023 periodic update 150 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 330 of 358 Attachment 1 PROPOSED 2020 PLANNING DOCKET Included in Staffing Options 1 & 2; deferred in Option 3 Included in Staffing Option 1; deferred in Options 2 & 3 Page 5 STAFF RESOURCES OPTION 1 (2.3 FTE) Strategic Planning Hours by Priority and Timing ALL TASKS 2020 PRO- POSED 1. Mandatory (State, Federal) 840 840 2. Supports a Council Goal 1,440 1,240 3. Optional Council Preference 2,670 760 TOTAL 4,950 2,840 Estimated staff hours available 2,800 2,800 DIFFERENCE (2,150) (40) New in 2020 (included in 1-3 above) 1,720 1,100 STAFF RESOURCES OPTION 2 (2.0 FTE) Strategic Planning Hours by Priority and Timing ALL TASKS 2020 PRO- POSED 1. Mandatory (State, Federal) 840 640 2. Supports a Council Goal 1,440 1,240 3. Optional Council Preference 2,670 560 TOTAL 4,950 2,440 Estimated staff hours available 2,400 2,400 DIFFERENCE (2,550) (40) New in 2020 (included in 1-3 above) 1,720 620 STAFF RESOURCES OPTION 3 (1.5 FTE) Strategic Planning Hours by Priority and Timing ALL TASKS 2020 PRO- POSED 1. Mandatory (State, Federal) 840 640 2. Supports a Council Goal 1,440 880 3. Optional Council Preference 2,670 560 TOTAL 4,950 2,080 Estimated staff hours available 1,900 1,900 DIFFERENCE (3,050) (180) New in 2020 (included in 1-3 above) 1,720 540 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 331 of 358 Attachment 1 PROPOSED 2020 PLANNING DOCKET Included in Staffing Options 1 & 2; deferred in Option 3 Included in Staffing Option 1; deferred in Options 2 & 3 Page 6 2020 Docket- LPB Work Plan New / From Previous Docket / Started / Not Started Task Priority Estimated hours total hours available – 736 520 regular/ 216 grant- funded From Previous Docket / Started Post-WWII Historic Resources Inventory Update (HRI) - Initiated 2013 – Board must maintain an inventory of resources over 50 years old. This update will add approximately 400 properties built in the post-WWII or “mid-century” period. The board has been awarded a grant which will supplement consultant hours. Mandatory 205 (70 reg./ 135 grant- funded) New Post-WWII Landmark Nominations – Initiated 1/2020 – Staff will produce landmark nominations for three post-WWII era properties. LPB Priority 120 (40 reg. 80 grant- funded) From Previous Docket / Started Bothell Then & Now book update – Initiated 1/2018 – working on an update with added content to include McMenamins, post-WWII resources, and Snohomish Co. Resources. LPB Priority 135 From Previous Docket / Started Native Peoples Project – Not yet Initiated – Project TBD: assist LPB with administrative tasks and coordination between departments and participants as needed. LPB Priority 25 Other Planning and Permit Review activities per consultant contract Contract Priority 250 Available Consultant Time Estimate Regular consultant hours 520 Grant Hours awarded 215 Total 735 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 332 of 358 Attachment 2 2019 PLANNING DOCKET STATUS 1 # 2019 Docket Task Year initiated - Status MANDATORY 1 Shoreline Master Program (SMP) Periodic Update 2018 – Complete 2 Code amendments to the Critical Areas Ordinance (CAO): 2017 – Underway 3 Code amendment to 12.11 to Wireless Communication Facilities (WCF) regarding ‘small cell’ facilities 2018 – Complete 4 Comprehensive Plan Amendments A. Capital Facilities Element – add fire station rebuilds B. Transportation Element – Bike Plan adoption C. Establish R-AC minimum density/FAR requirements 2019 – Underway 2019 – Deferred 2019 – Underway 5 Buildable Lands Report 2019 – Underway SUPPORTING COUNCIL GOALS 6 Plan and Code Amendments for Updating the Canyon Park Regional Growth Center A. Phase 1 - Visioning B. Phase 2 - Subarea Planning. C. Phase 3 – Regulations & Planned Action EIS 2016 Phase 1 - Complete Phase 2 – Underway Phase 3 - Underway 7 Housing Strategy Implementation A. Affordable housing in Canyon Park B. ADU Code amendments C. Multi-Family Tax Exemption 2018 Canyon Park – Underway ADU – Underway MFTE – Underway COUNCIL PRIORITIES 2019 8 LEAN Process as it is applied to Development Services Initiative A. Clarify whether Planned Unit Development (PUD) clustering provisions can be applied to multi-family residential zones. Current language does not provide certainty. B. Clarify prohibition on ‘rounding up’ unit and lot yield in Title 12 (Zoning). Applicants often request ‘rounding up’ of unit or lot yield which is prohibited under current Plan and Code requirements. C. Amend Title 11 (Administration) to give applicants 180 days to re- submit additional materials requested by City. Code currently allows 90 days. Grants additional time for complex resubmittals and aligns with recent Title 20 amendments. D. Correct Title 12 (Zoning) requiring deduction of surface water facilities from net buildable area, which is inconsistent with other sections of and Code Comprehensive Plan. E. Clarify subarea descriptions in Title 12 (North Creek/NE 195th St. Subarea). Description of subareas needs clarification and map. F. Clarify Title 12 regarding sign height. Code unclear that overall sign height includes base. G. Amend Title 11 to define “detached condominium units.” Currently no definition. Detached condos have appearance of single family but are technically multi-family residential uses. H. Amend Title 11 procedures for plan and code amendments to reflect current structure. I. Increase Short Plat size from 4 lots to 9. Reduce processing time for applicants and staff for smaller-scale subdivisions. J. Code amendments to Title 12 for consistency with state regulations regarding “Residential Care Facility”. 2019 A - Complete B – Complete C - Complete D – Complete E – Complete F – Complete G – Complete H – Complete I – Deferred J – Deferred February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 333 of 358 Attachment 2 2019 PLANNING DOCKET STATUS 2 # 2019 Docket Task Year initiated - Status 9 Code amendments to the Downtown Subarea regulations. A. Public open space regulations to achieve better outcomes; B. Downtown Historic Resources Regulations and possibly Title 22, Landmark Preservation, to preserve historic buildings/facades on Main Street and in the historic downtown core, in coordination with the Downtown Historic District and Landmark Feasibility Study (see Landmark Preservation # 2); C. Remove 3-story overlay in General Downtown Corridor and add affordable housing overlay; D. Parking requirements related to outcome of parking management plan or Phase 2 study (not funded). 2018 A - Underway B – Underway C – Deferred D – Deferred 10 Potential Downtown Plan and Code amendments regarding city- owned parcels A. Amendments as needed related to sale and development (e.g. architectural guidelines, land uses, and building heights). B. Update Planned Action EIS capacity analysis if needed. 2019 A – Complete B – Deferred 11 Property Owner Request - Code amendment to allow Nursing Homes / Rehabilitation facilities as conditional use in single family residential zones. 2019 – Complete 12 Northshore School District Impact Fee Collection. 2019 – Not Started OPTIONAL-COUNCIL DEFERRED 13 Comprehensive Plan and Code amendments regarding private streets. 2019 – Deferred 14 Review of BMC Chapter 12.22: Signs and potential Code amendments in light of the US Supreme Court ruling in Reed vs Town of Gilbert, Arizona in June, 2015. 2018 – Deferred 15 Comprehensive Update to the Landscape Regulations. 2018 – Deferred 16 Code amendments to regulations pertaining to adult entertainment. 2016 – Deferred 17 Code amendments for City Council review of proposed park land dedications. 2019 – Deferred 18 Amend the Shoreline Master Program regarding buffer enhancement incentives. 2019 – Deferred 19 Property Owner Request – Plan and Code amendment to change 10116 and 10126 NE 187th from R 4,000 to R 2,800. 2019 – Deferred 2023 20 Nike Hill Plan and Code amendments. 2016 – Deferred 2023 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 334 of 358 City Council Agenda Bill AB # 20-017 TO: Mayor Olsen and Members of the Bothell City Council FROM: Nik Stroup, Director of Parks and Recreation Shelby Krogh, Parks and Recreation (Presenter) DATE: February 4, 2020 SUBJECT: Study Session on Special Event Permit Process POLICY CONSIDERATION: This item asks the City Council to participate in a discussion regarding their objectives for improvements to the Special Event Permit process. Staff will propose specific policy changes for Council consideration at a later date anticipated for Spring 2020. HISTORY: DATE ACTION JUNE 19, 2012 City Council adopts Ordinance 2095: Special Event Permits MARCH 5, 2019 City Council considers updated Special Event Permit Process; Tabled until later date to include feedback JULY 16, 2019 City Council received an overview of next steps on the Special Event Permit Process update On June 19, 2012, the City Council adopted Ordinance 2095 which implemented language and processes for permitting special events. In fall of 2018, staff were asked to participate in updating Special Event Permit policies and processes to better address the growing number of applications received each year. On March 5, 2019, staff presented to Council proposed modifications to the Special Event Permit process, including a new application and requirements. Staff requested that Council: •Approve the new process, application, and requirements •Provide direction on whether event organizers should be required to pay the cost of contracted and City services necessary to meet City requirements, or if those costs should be subsidized by the General Fund February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 335 of 358 City Council Agenda Bill AB # 20-017 •Provide direction on use of Main Street and City Hall garage for special events •Approve the proposed ordinance After discussion and input from both City staff and community event organizers, Councilmember McAuliffe moved to table the item to a date to be determined by the City Manager to allow for additional public process and input. The motion carried 7-0. On April 1, 2019, Volunteer and Special Event Coordinator Shelby Krogh was hired and tasked with taking over the Special Event Permit process, as well as with creating opportunity for further public input. On July 16, 2019, Council received a staff report with information on next steps. Completion of internal and external stakeholder interviews, as well as industry research, have taken place since that time and staff is seeking input from Council on their objectives for the new process. DISCUSSION: Special events provide a unique and vital service in a community. They: •Create space for neighbors and visitors to connect •Provide opportunity to preserve tradition and celebrate diverse cultures •Act as a conduit for tourism and economic development by increasing visibility of local attractions and businesses •Foster partnership amongst public and private entities Dependent on location and scale, special events can also prompt closures of streets, impact bus service, block access to businesses, and create risks in safety and sanitation. In 2019, an estimated 37,000 people attended special events in Bothell. Of those attendees, 15,000 participated in City-organized events while an estimated 22,000 people participated in non-City-organized events. Where are we now Medium and large-scale special events that take place in the City of Bothell are monitored and regulated through the City’s Special Event Permit application (Att-1). Special Event Permits are administered by the Special Event Coordinator in consultation with the following departments, who administer and oversee requirements for certain public health and safety elements: February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 336 of 358 City Council Agenda Bill AB # 20-017 •Executive – Emergency management, communications, and tourism •Community Development – Life safety review, Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accessibility review, and business licenses •Fire – Fire Permit and inspection (separate permit process); emergency medical technician (EMT) services •Legal – Insurance and indemnification •Parks and Recreation – Park/facility usage and city personnel for site maintenance •Police – Security (PSES or other service provider), barricades, traffic and crowd control •Public Works – Equipment, restrooms, waste disposal, City personnel for site maintenance, and Right-of-Way permits (separate process) Every proposed event is unique and through the Special Event Permit process, City staff work with organizers to gain an understanding of the full scope of the event. Some events require very little City oversight, while others require staffing and service from multiple City departments. The permit and review process allows the City to ensure events meet legal requirements and are conducted in a manner that prioritizes public health, safety, and accessibility. The City of Bothell processed 50 Special Event Permit applications in 2019, 42 in 2018, and 17 in 2017. Since 2014, the City has experienced a 1150% increase in Special Event permits processed. It is important to note that City events were not being evaluated through this process prior to 2018. Of the 50 applications processed in 2019: Type of Event Total Number of Events Number of Events Organized by City Number of Events Organized by External Organizer Athletic 9 0 9 Camp 4 2 2 Commercial 4 0 4 Community (free) 24 21 3 Free Speech 0 0 0 School Picnic 5 0 5 Street festival/fair 4 0 4 Other 0 0 0 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 337 of 358 City Council Agenda Bill AB # 20-017 It is clear from the increase in special events that Bothell has become a desirable destination for special events. Conversely, the rapid growth and variety in Special Event Permit applications submitted each year is straining the City’s existing permit process. Based on Council goals and consistent feedback received from event organizers, staff recognizes improvements to our Special Event Permit process are necessary to support the higher volume of applications, address safety and sanitation concerns, and support special events that activate our public spaces. To better evaluate the state of the current process, the Special Event Coordinator conducted internal and external stakeholder interviews to better understand strengths, weaknesses and opportunities. External stakeholder interviews Of the events organized by non-City-employed organizers, 25 unique individuals applied for a permit in 2019. These 25 individuals were asked to participate in an online survey to measure satisfaction with the current process, and prompt additional conversation and feedback. Nine organizers completed the survey, four of which agreed to one-on-one interviews with the Special Event Coordinator. Each interview consisted of nine questions and took place over one to two-hour spans. Staff interviewed a variety of organizers, including those who oversee a summer camp, a street festival, a free community event, and a commercial event. Six organizers provided specific feedback outside of the survey and interviews as well. •When asked about overall level of satisfaction with the current Special Event Permit process, 56% were somewhat or very satisfied, while 44% of respondents were not so satisfied or not at all satisfied. •55% of respondents shared that it was somewhat easy to produce a special event in the City of Bothell, while 45% shared that it was not so easy or not at all easy. •When asked to consider responsiveness of City staff during the permit review process, 44% of respondents shared that they felt the City was extremely or very responsive, 44% shared that they felt the City was somewhat responsive, and 12% shared that the City was not at all responsive. •When asked how important permit costs are when considering whether or not to hold an event in the City of Bothell, 89% of respondents shared February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 338 of 358 City Council Agenda Bill AB # 20-017 that it is extremely or very important, while 11% shared that costs were somewhat important. Additional key topics that arose in the survey and discussions are as follows: •Permit process is cumbersome and difficult to navigate. •Decentralized nature of communication with event organizers, including information about fees, requirements, and expectations is frustrating. •Next steps and timelines for approval are unclear, creating stress and uncertainty for applicants. •Partnerships and availability/cost of City resources (staff, equipment, money) are unclear and inconsistent. •Increasing fees (Att-2) and requirements create barriers for many non- profit or cultural events. Uncertainty was a key theme in nearly every conversation that staff had with event organizers throughout this feedback process. Increasing fees have caused tension as organizers grapple with their budgets and a few organizers expressed that new increases may drive them to either move their event to another City or cancel it altogether. Organizers also felt as though expectations regarding safety and sanitation were not clear from the beginning and only became so once they’d begun the review process and invested money in their event. By addressing these concerns with an updated permit process, the City will hopefully be able to continue hosting long-standing special events, increase trust in City services, and lower barriers for new events that add value and diversity to our community and economy. Internal stakeholder interviews City staff directly impacted by or involved in the Special Event Permit processed were asked to provide feedback as well. Interviews were conducted one department at a time and staff were asked 17 questions. Key topics that arose in the interviews are as follows: •The permit process and associated fees must be streamlined to decrease confusion and equitably ensure safety and sanitation standards are met. •Consistency amongst the quality of application materials is necessary for staff to review applications in a timely manner. •Addressing requirements for non-traditional uses of space and atypical structures (ex: risers) will decrease confusion for staff and organizers. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 339 of 358 City Council Agenda Bill AB # 20-017 •Direction is needed on who is designated as a City partner, and what level of support is granted to those events. •Increasing requests and/or need for City resources (staff, equipment, etc.) creates strain on department staff, resources and budgets. Structure, consistency, and efficiency were the primary themes of discussion amongst internal departments. As the number of special event applications grow, staff are faced with using a process that can no longer handle the variety and complexity of events taking place in the community. By addressing the challenges above, the City can more appropriately allocate resources to the special event permit process, and ultimately provide more meaningful customer service to organizers. Where do we want to be? Based on the feedback received, staff is proposing that the update of the Special Event Permit process seek to accomplish these objectives: •Streamline and centralize the customer experience By improving our Special Event Permit process and providing tools to clearly set expectations earlier in the process •Protect public safety and health By ensuring all events meet or exceed standards for safety and sanitation •Set clear, inclusive policies By standardizing requirements for events while still providing flexibility •Encourage a variety of events By setting appropriate levels of cost recovery for the permitting process and use of City resources •Activate public spaces By establishing venue standards that address impacts to community services, safety and sanitation In addition to the objectives above, staff proposes to address the need and desire for a community event partnership program which would support events that strengthen Bothell’s sense of community, celebrate its history, or provide a public benefit not otherwise addressed by the City. This program proposal would be addressed separately from the Special Event Permit process update, however will be included in our discussion given the feedback received from both internal and external stakeholders. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 340 of 358 City Council Agenda Bill AB # 20-017 How do we get there? For this study session, staff seeks Council’s feedback on the objectives for the Special Event Permit process updates, and any other elements related to permitted special events in the community. Once Council provides direction to staff on their objectives for the new permit process, internal departments will work together to create a plan that meets each objective and begin formatting policies and procedures to support them. Staff will also engage other municipalities and Washington Cities Insurance Authority to ensure best practices are being implemented. Staff will propose specific policy changes for Council consideration at a later date anticipated for Spring 2020. FISCAL IMPACTS: Fiscal impacts related to the Special Event Permit process update are contingent on direction given by Council to address the aforementioned goals. ATTACHMENTS: Att-1. Current Special Event Permit Application Att-2. Current Special Event Permit Fees Att-3. Example Event Expenses (based on current fees) RECOMMENDED ACTION: Provide staff with direction on Special Event Permit process updates. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 341 of 358 (This page intentionally left blank) February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 342 of 358 Att-1 Special Event Application Packet Special Event Guidelines The City of Bothell recognizes the contribution of special events to the city’s attractiveness for residents, tourists, and businesses. A Special Event Permit is required to use any type of a City-owned property when one or more of the following conditions exist (BMC 5.06): 1. The proposed event is reasonably likely to involve more than 75 people; 2. The proposed event is reasonably likely to require City personnel for road closures, traffic control, crowd control, or other safety and logistical support; 3. Public rights of way are impeded by the event’s activities. 4. The proposed event requires approval from two (2) or more City departments; 5. Special circumstances which require (1) the coordination of multiple uses of public property; (2) assuring the preservation of public property and public places; (3) prevention of dangerous, unlawful or impermissible uses; and/or (4) protection of the safety of persons and property around the event; as determined by the City Manager or designee. The application/permit process ensures that the activity meets legal requirements, allows the City to adequately schedule needed public services, and alerts affected neighborhoods and businesses. Please note that for events that take place solely within a City of Bothell park, there is a separate application process. Please contact Bothell Parks and Recreation at (425) 806-6760 for a Park Reservation Request Form or go to www.bothellwa.gov. For other exemptions to the permit requirement, please see the section “Exemptions.” The City of Bothell will review all requests and make a decision to permit the event based on the following considerations. • Safety of pedestrians and vehicles • Overall impact on street access and traffic • Impacts of other activities (events, construction) on the date(s) requested • Number of times a neighborhood has been impacted by events in a one-year period • Availability of City personnel and resources In the case of a schedule conflict or multiple events impacting a specific neighborhood, priority is given to City of Bothell events and to others on a first-come, first-served basis. Rev. 2/19/19 Contact: Parks & Recreation 425.806.6760 www.bothellwa.gov February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 343 of 358 Att-1 Special Event Requirements Pre-Event Coordination Provide and submit to the Special Event Coordinator all necessary permit information including a completed Special Event Application Form. All necessary documentation must be included with the application at the time of submittal, at least 60 days prior to the event. Meet all event requirements in a timely manner. The nonrefundable application fee is set forth in the 2019 Fee Schedule (Resolution No 1383): Small Event (100-200 participants and/or a race) = $300.00* Large Event (200+ participants and/or parade of any size) = $675.00* *Please note that additional shelter rental fees apply for events that take place within a City of Bothell park. Notification of Impacts Provide proof of any communications, letters, flyers, signage, news releases or newspaper ads informing these parties of the event and any impacts such as traffic volumes, parking, detours, delays and noise. The parties to be notified will be determined by the City and may include residents, businesses, transit, WSDOT and other agencies. All communications must include a name and contact information for the event organizer(s). This communication should be completed 2 weeks prior to the event. For events with significant impacts to residents and/or businesses, the City may notify the impacted area and allow a comment period during the 30-day review. Limitations on Event Promotion The date of the event shall not be considered confirmed and the applicant shall not market or promote the event until the City issues the special event permit. Traffic Control Plan Provide detailed plan of traffic control with map showing placement of traffic monitors and public safety officers in critical areas. This plan needs to include an emergency services plan (first aid & medical assistance) showing a site diagram of the event for emergency access routes and a plan to mitigate fire and medical emergencies. For assistance and expertise, please contact Bothell Police and Fire Departments. Transportation/Parking Plan Provide a written plan for handling event parking for the participants and spectators, and show any documentation pertaining to arrangements made with any transportation agencies such as Metro Transit, Sound Transit, Community Transit, WSDOT and the City of Bothell Public Works Department that may be impacted by traffic reroutes and/or delays due to street closures. Contact names and numbers must be provided to the City of Bothell. These agencies may be contacted at the conclusion of the event for evaluation purposes. Documentation must be received no later than 2 weeks prior to the event. Security and Crowd Control Any City requirements for uniformed public safety officers and/or other City staff will be determined by the City. Page 2 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 344 of 358 Page 3 Att-1 Portable Toilets Large events may be required to provide portable toilets and hand-washing stations for attendees. The American Restroom Association recommendation for provision of toilets is one restroom for each gender for every 300 persons. The following is a rough guideline for estimating the number of portable sanitation units: Number of Hours for Event 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 # of People # of Portable Restrooms 0-500 4 4 4 6 6 6 8 8 8 8 1,000 4 4 4 6 6 6 8 8 8 12 2,000 8 8 8 8 8 12 12 12 12 16 3,000 8 8 10 10 10 12 16 16 20 20 4,000 8 8 12 12 16 16 20 24 24 28 5,000 12 12 12 16 20 30 30 30 30 34 Garbage and Recycling Garbage cans must be provided if existing public receptacles are not able to handle the large volume of waste created at the event. You are encouraged to contact the City’s Recycling Coordinator for information about how to maximize recycling at the event. The event organizer is responsible for cleanup and restoration of City property following the event. The City will charge for staff time at overtime rates for any additional cleanup that is required following the event. Food Service and Health Codes Required permits must be obtained and displayed for food preparation, handling and distribution. Please contact the appropriate county health department (King County or Snohomish County depending on where the event is located). Fire Safety In order to ensure a safe and enjoyable time for all at your event, the Bothell Fire Department requires you to contact the Community Risk Reduction Office: (425) 806-6250 for permit information. A fire permit and an on-site inspection may be required before the event can begin. Business License Anyone engaging in business in the City of Bothell must obtain and be the holder of a valid business license (BMC 5.04.010). “Business” means all activities for gain, such as the sale of goods or services. City of Bothell annual business licenses run from July 1 to June 30. Annual business license renewals are mailed during the month of June. If you have any questions regarding whether or not you need a business license or how to obtain a business license, please contact the City of Bothell Community Development Department (425) 806-6400. Noise All events must adhere to City Noise Regulations (BMC 8.26). Equipment Expenses related to barricades, traffic control devices, portable toilets, garbage receptacles and removal are the responsibility of the event organizer. Documentation in the form of a work order or an invoice that equipment needs/services have been arranged by the event organizer is required. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 345 of 358 Page 4 Att-1 Volunteer Event Staff Provide information of organization or group providing volunteer services. This information needs to include the main contact’s name, address and phone number, the number of volunteers expected to be at the event, and where they will be stationed. Documentation must be received no later than 2 weeks prior to the event. Note: Individuals providing traffic control/monitoring services must be over 18 years of age. Commissioned officers must be stationed at traffic signals. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Requirements The ADA requires that the City of Bothell and public accommodations to provide equitable access for people with disabilities. Applicants are expected to make every effort to follow ADA guidelines and provide and maintain access for people with disabilities. This may include providing a clear path of travel to and on sidewalks and maintaining designated parking and accessibility to restrooms for people with disabilities. More information: www.ada.gov. Indemnification The applicant shall agree to sign an indemnification agreement which shall require the applicant to indemnify, defend and hold the city harmless from any and all claims for bodily injury or property damage that may arise out of or in connection with the applicant’s permitted use; Insurance During all periods of use, sponsors of community events and persons using facilities by concession contract may be required to obtain and maintain public liability and property damage insurance acceptable to the city and/or other insurance necessary to protect the public and the city on premises to be used unless waived by the city manager. The limits of said insurance, if necessary, shall be established by the city manager. A certificate evidencing the insurance, or, upon written request of the city, a duplicate copy of the policy, shall be provided to the city as evidence of the insurance protection. This insurance shall not be canceled or reduced without prior written notice to the city at least 30 days in advance of the cancellation and shall name the city as a named or additional insured and shall be primary to any other insurance available to the city. Special Events Permit Display A copy of the approved special events permit shall be maintained at the location of the special event throughout the duration of the event Grounds for Permit Denial Reasons for denying a permit include: • The event, as presented, cannot function safely. • The City was not provided sufficient notice of the event. Special Event Permit Applications must be submitted 60 days prior to the event date. • The diversion of police and fire resources to support the event would deny reasonable fire and police protection to other parts of the city. • The event does not meet traffic control and/or parking management conditions. • The proposed event would unreasonably disrupt the orderly or safe circulation of traffic as would present an unreasonable risk of injury or damage to the public. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 346 of 358 Page 5 Att-1 • The applicant provides false or misleading information; the applicant fails to complete the application or to supply other required information or documents; or the applicant declares or shows an unwillingness or inability to comply with the reasonable terms or conditions contained in the proposed permit; • The proposed event would conflict with another proximate event, interfere with construction or maintenance work in the immediate vicinity, or unreasonably infringe upon the rights of abutting property. The City Manager or designee shall consult with the City Attorney before denying a permit, and the reason(s) for the denial shall be in writing. Exemptions Although not required to be issued a special event permit, an event organizer of an activity exempted from this chapter is required to comply with all local, state and federal laws and regulations governing public safety or health. The following activities are exempt from having to obtain a special event permit: • Parades, athletic events or other special events that are sponsored or conducted in full by the City of Bothell; • Funeral procession by a licensed mortuary; • Temporary sales conducted by businesses, such as holiday sales, grand opening sales, sidewalk sales, or anniversary sales; • Garage sales, rummage sales, lemonade stands and car washes; • Activities conducted by a governmental agency acting within the scope of its authority; • Lawful picketing on public sidewalks; • Block parties, which must be applied for through a separate City process; • Events that take place solely within a City of Bothell park that utilize the Park Reservation Request Form (BMC 8.60.040); and • Right-of-Way use approved through the Public Area Use Permit process (BMC 17.20). Revocation of Permit All permits issued pursuant to this chapter shall be temporary, shall vest no permanent right in the applicant and may be revoked upon the occurrence of any of the following: 1. Immediate revocation in the event of a violation of any of the terms and conditions of the permit; 2. Without notice in the event such use becomes, for any reason, dangerous or any structure or obstruction permitted becomes insecure or unsafe. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 347 of 358 Page 6 Att-1 APPLICATION CHECKLIST At time of submittal:  Completed application form  Application fee (nonrefundable)  Communications Plan  Traffic Control Plan  Parking Plan  Security and Crowd Control Plan  Toilet Facilities Plan  Garbage, Recycling and Event Cleanup Plan  Indemnification signature  Proof of insurance At least 2 weeks prior to event:  Proof of impact notification as determined by the City  Proof of agency notification  Volunteer details PLEASE KEEP PAGES 1-6 OF THIS DOCUMENT AND SUBMIT PAGES 7-10 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 348 of 358 Page 7 Att-1 Special Event Permit Application • Submit by mail to: Shelby Krogh, Bothell City Hall, 18415 101st Ave NE, Bothell, WA 98011 • Submit by email to: shelby.krogh@bothellwa.gov • Non-refundable application fee per 2019 Fee Schedule: $300.00 for Small events, $675.00 for Large events • Application due no later than 60 days prior to event. Allow 30 days for staff review. Applicant Information Applicant Name: Date: Company/Organization: Mailing Address: City: State Zip: Phone: Day: Evening Cell: FAX: Email: Nonprofit ID# Event Information Date of Event: Event Set-up Time: Event Take-down Time: Actual Event Start/End Times (what would be published): Name of Event: Describe the general nature of the event: Proposed Event Location: Facilities you plan to use (check all that apply)  Park  Street  Sidewalk  Trail  Other (describe) Is the event  Private OR  Public A private event is one in which you have a specific guest list and know who is going to attend. A public event is open to the general public through word -of- mouth, flyers, signs or media advertising. Will participants be charged a fee?  Yes  No If yes, please explain how much and the purpose for collecting the fee: Estimated total attendance: # of Staff: Registered # of participants (if applicable): # of Volunteers: FOR STAFF USE ONLY Date received: Recipient: Nonrefundable fee paid: cash check CC February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 349 of 358 Page 8 Att-1 Event Components Please mark all items that apply to your event and provide details in the box below:  Alcohol  Amplified Sound  Animals  Bicycling  Bleachers  Boats  Carnival Rides  Caterer  Company Picnic  Concert/Live Music  Cooking/Barbecue  Dance or Drama  Distribution/sales  Drawing or Raffle  Dunk Tank(s)  Electricity/Generator  Entertainers  Exhibits or Displays  Fencing/scaffolding  Festival  Filming-video  Filming – photos  Fireworks  Food  Helium Balloons  Inflatable toys (large)  Marching Bands  Parade Floats  P.A. System  Parking/Shuttle  Race (timed event)  Rally/Protest  Run (non-timed)  Satellite  Sporting Event  Stage  Tables/Chairs  Tents/Canopies  Theater  Vehicles  Vendors  Other Provide details for all checked event components and describe any “other” items not on the list: Special Events Requirements (see Application Packet for Details) Plans for notifying all affected residents, businesses and agencies (required 4 weeks in advance of event): Traffic Control: Please attach to this application • Event layout/route with directional arrows and street names. • Placement and collection of signage, traffic control devices, barricades. • Location of event staff, volunteers, traffic certified flaggers/monitor, and where police officers are needed for traffic route/intersection control. • Planned routes for emergency services. For assistance and expertise, please contact Bothell Police and Fire Departments. Summarize your parking and transportation plans (proof of notification of affected agencies due 2 weeks prior to event): Summarize your needs for security, crowd control and medical assistance: Describe the number and location of portable toilets to be provided for the event: Describe the arrangements to be made for garbage and recycling and post -event clean up: February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 350 of 358 Page 9 Att-1 Will food be distributed at the event?  Yes  No If yes, please explain plans for food. Please ensure that appropriate health permits are secured prior to the event. Has it been determined that a fire permit is required for the event? ☐ Yes ☐ No If you have not already contacted the Community Risk Reduction office, please call 425-806-6250 to determine if a fire permit is required. Will items or services be sold at the event?  Yes  No If yes, please explain what items and services will be sold. Please ensure that vendors have secured the appropriate business licenses prior to the event. Please explain what type of noise the event will generate: Will volunteers assist with the event?  Yes  No If yes, please describe the number of volunteers, the ratio of adults to youth, and their duties: Summarize how the event will be ADA compliant: By signing below, the applicant hereby agrees to indemnify, defend and hold harmless the City, its elected and appointed officials and employees while acting within the scope of their duties, from any and all claims, demands and causes of action of any kind or character, foreseen or unforeseen, for damages including but not limited to personal injury, death, or property damage as well as the cost of defense of any legal proceedings including defense costs, court costs, witness and attorney fees, arising out of the applicant’s use of the public area or other premises permitted by this permit, except for damages arising out of the City’s sole negligence. Applicant expressly waives his/her immunity under Title 51 of the Revised Code of Washington, the Industrial Insurance Act, for injuries to his/her employees and agrees that the obligation to indemnify, defend and hold harmless provided for in this paragraph extends to any claim brought by or on behalf of any employee of the applicant. Applicant’s Name: (print) Applicant’s Signature: Date: Proof of insurance, if required, as described in Bothell Municipal Code 5.06.05 is required prior to the event date (see also Special Events Application Packet). February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 351 of 358 Page 10 Att-1 Event Approvals (for City use only) Each department needs to review and submit all information pertaining to denial or approval Department Approved as Submitted Needs Modification Approval Denied Name of Reviewer and Comments Police Operations    Fire    Public Works Operations    Recreation    Transportation    Public Information    FINAL REVIEW Event  Approved  Denied Comments: Date applicant notified: Signature of Authorized City of Bothell Representative: February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 352 of 358 Att-2: 2019 Fees Associated with Special Event Permit Process Depending on the scope of a Special Event, the City may incur or charge for staffing and services to ensure public health and safety. Some or all of the following fees may be applicable to organizers planning an event in City of Bothell limits: Special Event Permit Fee (Required) • Small Event (100-199 people) - $300 • Large Event (200+ people) - $675 Park Rental Fee (Optional - dependent on event location) • Blyth Park Resident Non-Resident Half Day $250 $315 Full Day $600 $756 *Rental of a park facility only includes use of the shelters; not the entire park. Parks must remain open to the public for use during special events. • Park at Bothell Landing Resident Non-Resident Amphitheater $65/hr $82/hr Access to Electricity (Amphitheater only) $23/hr $23/hr Grass Lot (along SR 522) $42/hr $52/hr *Rental of a park facility only includes use of the facility; not the entire park. Parks must remain open to the public for use during special events. Concessions/Vendor Fee (Optional – dependent on event location and elements) • Fee: $30/day/vendor/booth Business License Fee (Dependent on event components) Anyone engaging in business in the City of Bothell must obtain and be the holder of a valid business license (BMC 5.04.010). “Business” means all activities for gain, such as the sale of goods or services (ex.: tickets to fun run or entrance to event). • License ranges from $72 to $4,700+ February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 353 of 358 Community Development Review Fees (Dependent on event location/components) • Building/Life Safety Plan Review - $152.27 to $165.92/hour • Technology Fee – 5% Fire Permit Fees (Dependent on event components) Commercial Non-Profit Tent/Temporary Membrane $277 $277 Carnival/Fair $366 $167 Technology Fee 5% 5% Inspections are conducted on all events that apply for a Fire Permit. Inspections scheduled to take place during operating hours (Mon-Fri, 8am- 5pm) do not incur addition inspection fees. Inspections scheduled to take place outside of working hours are subject to overtime fees (After-hours inspection fee = $160.24/hour with a 3 hr. min.) Operation (Public Works and Parks) Staffing Fees (Dependent on event components) • Staffing - $51.79-90.70/hour/staff person (2018 rates based on PW salaries) • Vehicles - $22.25-22.85/hour (2018 rates based on FEMA) Police/Security Fees (Dependent on event components) • Staffing - $25-100/hour/staff person (dependent on provider; private vendor, PSES, etc.) Fire/EMT Fees (Dependent on event components) • Firefighter/Emergency Medical Technicians/Aid Crew - $90.63/hr • Aid Unit/Vehicle - $50/hr Parking Lot Use Fees (Optional) • Gravel Lot at Park at Bothell Landing, Lot D, Lot EFG o Resident: $42/hr o Non-Resident: $52/hr ▪ Must be rented as an “add on” to another facility rental. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 354 of 358 Att-3: Example Event Expenses As Council and staff consider the impact of permit fees on special events, this document provides examples of the various fees that a particular type of event may incur through the review process. The estimates below include City of Bothell permit fees, facility use fees, and fees that may be associated with required security and medical personnel (depending on the scope of the event). These estimates do not include additional fees such as garbage/recycling contracts, portable toilet rentals, permits to serve alcohol and food, or equipment necessary to run the event. Example Event #1 • Event Type: Middle School Picnic • Event Day/Time: Wednesday from 11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. • Location: Blyth Park • Setup Time: 10:00 a.m. • Teardown Time: 2:00 p.m. • Expected attendance: 130 • Additional Details: A Bothell-based middle school plans to bring 130 students to Blyth Park to celebrate the end of the school year. The school is catering the lunch from a local sandwich shop, and they plan to dispose of their garbage in the dumpsters at the park. Required Permits/Fees Cost Special Event Permit – Small Event $300.00 Facility Rental – Blyth Park Large and Small Shelters $250.00 Total Fees Due $550.00 Example Event #2 • Event Type: Japanese Cultural Festival • Event Day/Time: Saturday from 12:00-4:00 p.m. • Location: Park at Bothell Landing/Grass Lawn along 522 • Setup Time: 10:00 a.m. • Teardown Time: 6:00 p.m. • Expected attendance: 2,000 • Additional Details: This annual event features activities, music, and food in celebration of the upcoming Cherry Blossom season. The event is organized by a small business owner who resides in Woodinville. To keep the event accessible, the organizer does not allow vendors to sell services or products on site (except for food trucks). That said, the organizer charges $10 for each vendor space to cover their costs. In addition to vendors, the event will feature two bouncy houses and three food trucks, all run by generators. February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 355 of 358 The City has recommended at least one off-duty officer be present given the expected attendance and additional foot traffic at Bothell Way NE/SR 522. Required Permits/Fees Cost Special Event Permit – Large Event $675.00 Facility Rental – Lawn along SR522 (non-resident) $336.00 Facility Rental – Park at Bothell Landing Gravel Lot (non-resident) $336.00 Concessions/Vendor Fee $90.00 Business License – (1 employee, out-of-city contractor) $72.00 Off-duty Officer Fees – One officer (5 hours) $480.00 Fire Permit – Carnival (Commercial) + After-hours Inspection Fee $865.02 Total Fees Due $2,854.02 Example Event #3 • Event Type: Half Marathon • Event Day/Time: Sunday from 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. • Location: Downtown Bothell Street and Sammamish River Trail • Setup Time: 6:00 a.m. • Teardown Time: 3:00 p.m. • Expected attendance: 4,000 • Additional Details: A national running company has decided to host their newest half marathon in the City of Bothell. This event is timed, and highly competitive, as many runners will be trying to qualify for the Chicago Marathon. The organizers will have a professional photographer at the end of the race, who will sit on a riser to catch the best shot as each runner crosses the finish line. Several pop-up tents and inflatables are expected along the course. Given the amount of paper cups expected at each of the water stations along the route, the City has agreed to provide one Public Works staff person to monitor downtown garbage cans for trash overflow. Additionally, the City has recommended at least five off-duty officers be present along the route to help with traffic control and security. Required Permits/Fees Cost Special Event Permit – Large Event $675.00 Facility Rental – N/A $0.00 Business License – (30 employees, out-of-city contractor) $400.00 Community Development Review – Riser Plan and Inspection (3 hours) $522.65 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 356 of 358 Fire Permit – Tent (Commercial) + After-hours Inspection Fee $771.57 Operation Staffing Fees – One staff person (3 hours) + 1 vehicle $222.12 Off-duty Officer Fees – Five officers (4 hours) $1920.00 Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) – 2 technicians and 1 unit (4 hours) 925.04 Total Fees Due $5,436.38 February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 357 of 358 (This page intentionally left blank) February 4, 2020 Agenda Packet - Page 358 of 358